Where past pilgrims share, and future pilgrims learn


A donation to the forum removes advertising!
  1. New here?
    We have accumulated over 10 years of Camino Questions and Answers.
    Please Sign Up and plan your camino with us. Buen Camino! Ivar
  2. Are you a lurker?
    Interested in getting a daily email with the latest forum post? Get it here.

Backpack too small?

Discussion in 'Equipment Questions' started by heatherrnw, Mar 22, 2011.

  1. heatherrnw

    heatherrnw New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Past: April 2012; Future: June 2014
    I went out last night and purchased my boots and pack for my Camino September 1st - Oct. 16th. My head swimming with all the suggestions that I had read through the day, I trekked into REI and made a decision based on what they had there.

    Boots: Merrell Moab mid gore-tx xcr
    Pack: Deuter 28 ACT trail SL

    I love the fit of the boots. At 1 size larger than my normal size, they are comfortable and can be tightened to not feel like they will fall off my feet.

    The pack was the best, I felt, they had in the store for this journey. It weighs in at 2 lbs 14 oz. I love all the pockets and easy entries into the pack. The chest and hip straps are comfortable and tighten and loosen easily. My only question is if it is too small. It is a 28 liter pack. It does have cushions to keep it off your back, but I saw some with a mesh vent system that would seem like it would work a little better. I considered the Golite jam pack at first, but cannot find it in a store here. I would have to order it online. Though the comments I have heard from some here are not positive towards it.

    I would love feedback on this! If it is too small, if there is something better. I like the idea of the Golite Jam because it is half the weight with almost double the room, coming in at 1 lb 7 oz and 50 liters. But is there something out there that is the quality of the Deuter with the lightness and room of the Golite Jam?
    [​IMG]

    A Donation to the forum removes advertising.
  2. mosesmew

    mosesmew New Member

    Joined:
    May 28, 2010
    Messages:
    19
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Yarmouth NS Canada
    Hi, Your pack looks like a nice sturdy one! After trying on lots of different ones,I got the "Osprey Talon33", it's weight is 1.3 lbs. Has lots of pockets etc. Onsale from $169.00 to $111.00 Plus here's a "code", for extra 15% off!(natur3). I found it on this website, http://www.lacordee.com Free shipping over $50.00. Best of Luck! Nancy :)
  3. lynnejohn

    lynnejohn Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Messages:
    1,276
    Likes Received:
    376
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
    Hi -

    The pack does look good - you're doing well! With discipline, it will be big enough. Try not to have everything super jammed into it, however. That makes it impossible to find anything without totally unpacking the whole thing. Also, you shouldn't count on hanging things off the outside of the pack - that can get very irritating and will throw you off balance if they're heavy or large enough.

    Tips on filling your backpack:
    http://www.mec.ca/Main/content_text.jsp ... 4302887281

    If you're interested in the mesh ventilation, I have a Gregory Jade 50, with the mesh flow-through. It has made a huge difference in "ventilation" and how hot I feel. And I love the room (I can throw my lunch and snacks into the top).

    http://www.gregorypacks.com/products/wo ... 87/jade-50

    Best of luck with the rest of your planning and packing, and buen camino1!

    lynne
  4. LTfit

    LTfit Moderator Staff Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2010
    Messages:
    1,030
    Likes Received:
    400
    Location:
    The Netherlands
    It looks like a nice pack but I am afraid that 28L will be too small for that time of year. Last summer I took the Osprey Atmos 35 and that was perfect. But I only had summer clothes (shorts and t-shirts), no sleeping bag and only 1 fleece. That left enough room for food.

    The pack is a bit over 1 kg. and total weight was 6 kg. without water.

    You might want to reconsider. Good luck!
  5. methodist.pilgrim.98

    methodist.pilgrim.98 R.I.P 2013

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    North West England
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
    There is only one to find out.

    Start packing now.

    Get everything you are expecting to carry and get it in the rucksack and see how you get on.

    I have used a Deuter 35L from SJPP to Finisterre and with all the pockets etc got away with it.

    It is amazing what you can tuck away if you keep moving stuff around till you find the perfect place for it to fit into.

    I had to carry my insulin and syringes etc. which you might not need, so if you are prepared to go without a second fleece, wear just one pair of trousers, etc you might do it. I only carried a sleeping bag liner as I was prepared to sleep in my clothes. I didn't have to do it that often but if that is a no=no then you will have to upgrade.

    I carried my Berghaus waterproof under the flap of the rucksack with no problem; it was one of the ways I cheated!

    In 2004 I was able to carry my collapsable walking stick onto the plane. Check with your airline if you can carry it outside of your rucksack because it probably won't fit inside.

    I used a 35L pack 2005, 06,07 and then upgraded to a 65L when my carrier got difficult about sticks in the cabin space and I moved on to an insulin pump which requires more equipment (very lightweight but bulky)

    Let us know how you get on.
  6. lynnejohn

    lynnejohn Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2006
    Messages:
    1,276
    Likes Received:
    376
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
    One more thing - and I know everyone tries on the pack to ensure it fits properly. However . .the thing with Gregory women's packs , is that they come in 3-4 different torso sizes. I am quite short and after trying on dozens of other packs I found the "small" perfect for me. The others were just too long and many were a fixed torso length. So if you're shorter or taller than average, it makes good sense to try packs that have more than one torso size.

    lynne
  7. +@^^

    +@^^ Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    packsize is personal
    depends on season and route and packing philosophy
    .
    i went with the "thou shalt not have stuff dangling from thine bag" approach
    and chose a slightly bigger bag (black diamond axiom 40 lt)
    and EVERYTHING went inside
    .
    i chortled at the sight of pilgrims with small bags and outside danglies - sleeping bags, mats, rain jackets, mugs, crocs, hat, water bottles, drying sox and undies, and a plastic bag of food
    all clanging and competing with the cow-bells for noize
    .
    dont get me wrong - i bought the Deuter 24 and 28 lt packs for my daughters - they are great bags
    just not for this event
    imho
  8. methodist.pilgrim.98

    methodist.pilgrim.98 R.I.P 2013

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    North West England
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
    That explains the sniggering I heard on the Camino then. :wink:
  9. heatherrnw

    heatherrnw New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Past: April 2012; Future: June 2014
    Thank you all so much for your insight and experiences! I have decided I need to take the pack back and get a bigger one.

    I went on a 4 mile walk today and packed it full of clothes. I wish I had everything ready to pack it up right now, but I don't. So I stuffed it full of clothes and a water bottle and it got to about 15 pds. I LOVE how this pack sits on my form. My shoulders didn't ache at all and there was ventilation from time to time. I think that may have been from the huge wind blasts we are having today, lol. But I feel it is just too small. I might be able to fit the necessities in it when I go, but there will be no room for anything else. So I will be checking into some of the recommends on this thread. Thanks so much!

    Heather
  10. SabineP

    SabineP Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2010
    Messages:
    657
    Likes Received:
    157
    Camino(s) past & future:
    CF ( 2011 ) Ruta del Ebro from Zaragoza to Logrono and then CF ( 2013 ) CI ( 2014 )
    Packsize indeed is so personal. My Gregory is a small one even ifvmy torso size requires a medium. I train with it fully loaded and it suits me fine. So it all comes down to trying and retrying and personal comfort. Ok maybe I will speak differently in six weeks after my Camino...
  11. viajero

    viajero New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2008
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    2
    I have used this backpack (mine was actually a previous model but is exactly the same) from REI: http://www.rei.com/product/778467 I am 5'8" and was told by the salesman that I might be a little tall for it but if I didn't carry a heavy load it would be fine. I usually carried about 14 pounds (including water and food). It is slightly bigger than yours at 30 liters. I walked in March so had to bring things for fairly cold weather as well as warm. It was a pretty tight fit to get everything in although I had a somewhat bulky (albeit lightweight) sleeping bag that took up quite a bit of space. At first I thought the pack was going to be too flimsy as the waist strap is not much to speak of. But the pack only weighs 1 lb. 8 oz. and as I carried little weight I never had any problems whatsoever. I think yours might be big enough depending on the size of your sleeping bag. I would try to lay out everything that you plan to bring and see how it fits in the bag. Unlike yours, mine was top loading so I had to pack accordingly...have things at the top if I was to use them during the day. I was really pleased with mine and have used it on the camino frances, del norte, and portugues as well as other hiking trips.
  12. falcon269

    falcon269 No commercial interests Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Messages:
    8,098
    Likes Received:
    1,538
    Location:
    USA
    First in-last out is not the best way to pack a pack, but since the sleeping bag probably goes on the bottom in that scenario, you will have a good start. Even with a light pack, read this link to REI. It gives an excellent overview of backpacking:

    http://www.rei.com/expertadvice/article ... kpack.html
  13. Rebekah Scott

    Rebekah Scott Well-Known Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2005
    Messages:
    2,018
    Likes Received:
    1,048
    Location:
    Moratinos, Palencia Spain
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Frances, Ingles, Invierno, San Salvador, Vadiniense, Portugal coast. Hospitalera, Federation hospi trainer, guide writer, waymarker, litter-picker.
    I routinely use a 28 liter pack, and it does me just fine. I just don´t take much of anything that is big. And yes, I do snap my shower-shoes onto the outside, despite the sniggering judgemental types. If nothing else I can be a comic relief for someone on the trail!
  14. renegadepilgrim

    renegadepilgrim Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    Portland, OR, USA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
    I'm a huge fan of the Osprey Aura, though I have been looking at the Talon as a possible pack for next time. REI has the newer models of the Aura and they changed the design a bit, which I think it needed. Also, look on Craigslist. Sometimes you can find these packs barely used for half the price. What kind of sleeping bag are you bringing? If you get a lightweight one that goes to 40F or so, you should be fine with a smaller pack like the Deuter.

    Good luck!
  15. Kitsambler

    Kitsambler Jakobsweg Junkie

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2008
    Messages:
    790
    Likes Received:
    92
    Location:
    Seattle WA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Le Puy (2010), Cahors (2011), Prague (2012), Nuremberg (2013), Einsiedeln (2014)
    The worst thing is to forget where you've stowed something, and have to completely unpack to find it. So start now -- right now -- to develop "a place for everything, everything in its place" system. Right pants pocket, left pants pocket, right hipbelt pocket, left hipbelt pocket, bladder pocket, top lid, top lid underside (if you have one), etc.

    Remember you'll be doing one thing consistently when you arrive at your lodgings, so make this a simple and repeatable process: boots off/shoes on, pack off/articles for the night removed, walking sticks and raingear hung by the door, sleep sack spread on the claimed bunk.

    Practicing the packing and unpacking every day as you do your training walks will help you set up your own personal "system".
  16. dougfitz

    dougfitz Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,198
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino France (Mar 2010), Camino Salvado (Sep 2011), St Olav's Way (Jun 2012), Camino Ingles, then Muxia/Fisterra (Apr 2014)
    Much depends on what you are going to carry. It would have been too small for me, but I started with an absolutely enormous pack, and have yet to decide what I will take on my next pilgrimage. When I got back home, I repacked what I had ended the Camino with into several smaller packs to see what would fit, etc.

    What I found was that everything fitted into a 40 li pack, but without room for a food bag. I have the 45+10 Deuter Guide, and I think this would have been a better option for me.

    If you are travelling in the warmer months, and don't need to carry a sleeping bag and thermals, you could clearly do so with something in the 30-35li range. You might make it with your current pack and a bit of external stowage.

    Remember that the camino is not what we in Oz would call scrub-bashing, and you are unlikely to have any problem hanging things off the outside of the pack. Like others, I prefer to have everything inside the pack, but I recognize that isn't as important as if you were trekking on narrow overgrown tracks or through the scrub.

    The advice to pack, trial, re-pack, experiment etc is sound. Remember to see how everything fits with the rain cover on, etc.

    Also think about what you might need while you are walking, and have those things close to an access point. Deuter packs always seem to be well provided with lid and side pockets, so that shouldn't be too difficult.

    DougF
  17. daesdaemar

    daesdaemar Camino-holic

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    California, USA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino Ingles - twice
    Remember that compression sacks will allow you to fit much more into your pack!
  18. Beverley

    Beverley Member

    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2011
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    10
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino Frances 2009, Camino Portuguese 2010, Del Norte 2011, Pamplona to Burgos and Santiago to Finnesterra 2012
    Well said!

  19. Portia1

    Portia1 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Messages:
    308
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    DC Metro - Maryland
    I carried an Osprey Exos 58 which worked just fine for me. I did pack everything inside (including my disassembled hiking poles for the flights). This was as important for the trip over/back (so I didn't have to check anything) as it was on the road. This pack does not have a lot of bells and whistle zippers and pockets and so it is lighter than many smaller packs. I was very disciplined about what I took so my total weight carried--with water and a little food--was less than 15#. I wanted the volume to give me some flexibility to put food and water in my pack--which I did.

    The discipline of "everything in its place" is excellent advice. First, for finding what you are looking for--especially when you need it right now. And second, in leaving the alberque--you have an ingrained process for loading and accounting for things. The worst thing is to get to the next alberque, unpack and discover that you've left something behind. I put my baggie with sleeping liner, ear plugs and sleep mask (those pesky pilgrims with headlights that always seem to shine right in my face as they are looking around) right on top under the lid. That way it is the last thing in and the first thing out on the bunk. I carried toothbrush and toothpaste in my lid so that I could brush and quickly be ready to leave.
  20. methodist.pilgrim.98

    methodist.pilgrim.98 R.I.P 2013

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    North West England
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
    I'm like Kitsamber, everything in it's place.

    Others just seem to like the "it's in my hand, I'll throw it in".

    You will soon find out which, deep down, you truly are.
  21. falcon269

    falcon269 No commercial interests Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Messages:
    8,098
    Likes Received:
    1,538
    Location:
    USA
    Each one weighs 3 or 4 ounces, so with three of them, you could have taken a larger pack and not squashed your daily bread!
  22. vjpulver

    vjpulver New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2008
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Santa Fe, NM (USA)
    Heather - the key word is neccessary items. That is all you need room for. Your pack is small, but at almost 3 pounds, it is quite heavy. In the photo I see that it has many long strings and plastic devises, etc. At the end of a day of walking you learn to respect your knees and feet...those extra ounces soon add up to pounds. I used a 30l pack which wieghed around 16oz and clipped off all the extraneous strings and zipper tabs, etc. (I also did this with my clothing and other items - eliminated tags, zipper pulls, strings...I was an obssessed Virgo!) I actually wieghed my "clippings" and found that I saved almost a pound that way... No need to obsess, but really the freedom of having a light pack is amazing - you feel more enegetic and can walk farther. As I walked my Camino (40 days/May 2009) I found myself lightening my load even more. I found that what I really needed had little to do with comforts, but with things of the spirit.
  23. heatherrnw

    heatherrnw New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Past: April 2012; Future: June 2014
    Yesterday I was so positive that the pack was a bit too small. Today I am unsure if I should just keep it and make it work or exchange it, lol. It seems so silly to worry over something that may turn out to be only a few liters less, lol. But I too am that picky, perfectionist virgo! LOL!

    I am headed into town today, taking the pack with me to another visit to REI, just to look and compare and decide. There is so much that I am pleased with about this pack, hence why I bought it. The size is the only thing that really concerns me. Though I have always been one to over pack. Taking 5 outfits for a 3 day trip...because you never know! So maybe this is my burden to address.

    I very much like the advice to pack and re-pack until I find the right spot for everything. I am working towards getting everything I need so that I can start doing that. I still need to get a sleeping bag, which I think is the last "major" thing I need. The rest I'm sure I can find around my house. I can't say how big the sleeping bag is since I don't have one as of yet. I have done a little research on them, but I'm not sure exactly what I will need to get for those nights in Sept-Oct.

    Again, thanks so much for all of the sage advice :)

    Heather
  24. dougfitz

    dougfitz Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,198
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino France (Mar 2010), Camino Salvado (Sep 2011), St Olav's Way (Jun 2012), Camino Ingles, then Muxia/Fisterra (Apr 2014)
    There is some debate about whether or not one needs to have a sleeping bag. I took one and a 'silk' liner. With a compression sack, this weighed just over 1kg. The bag was rated to +5dec C. Noting that I started at SJPDP in late Mar, when there was still snow on Route Napolean, I wouldn't have wanted to be without the bag.

    That said, there were several pilgrims, albeit much younger and hardier, who took what looked like a very thick liner, and relied on getting to albergues that provided blankets, and collecting extra blankets from those of us with sleeping bags to get through the really cold nights.

    DougF
  25. Tia Valeria

    Tia Valeria Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,987
    Likes Received:
    420
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Part Norte/part Primitivo 2010
    Camino Inglés 2011
    Camino Primitivo 2012
    Part Norte and Camino de la Reina 2013
    Camino del Mar - Camino Inglés (2015?)
    Hi Heather.
    If you are still wondering 'which pack?' can I suggest that you ask the shop to pack in various items from their store - eg sleeping bag or fleece type sack. You could take a bag of 'must have' clothes with you (eg one complete change of clothing including socks). It doesn't matter at this stage if they are the ones you finally take. Will they go in the 28lt pack and is it still comfy, or is a slightly bigger one better. You can add more in and check if you are happy with the weight etc. Then make your choice.

    Our local store was very happy to do this and I finished up with a 25+5 Berghaus pack - 25lt main body and 2 zipped side pockets. It holds all I can carry (6kg). It might be on the small side in some ways but my spare fleece would tuck in under the 'lid' and be more accessible there anyway. I am just back from a 15.6km practice walk and I think my Berghaus is brilliant for me.
    Fit and weight are the most important things and that you are happy.
    Buen camino
    Tia Valeria
  26. heatherrnw

    heatherrnw New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2011
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Austin, TX
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Past: April 2012; Future: June 2014
    So after a long day of stuffing packs with 10 lb pillows and trying them on over and over again, I was still undecided. I went to REI, then Whole Earth Provisions, then back to REI and home with nothing. The packs I found I liked all seemed to be too small liter wise. I almost settled on an Osprey 36 liter, loving everything it had except the size. At REI (the 2nd time) I thought maybe the Deuter 42 was good. It had everything I am looking for except no little convenient pouches on the waist belt or shoulder straps. So I came back home to look them over online once more. I finally settled on the Deuter Futura Pro 42 Pack. I think this should be a great pack for me, only I would love to have those little pouches. I found online that it appears last years model of this pack DID have the pouches. Not sure why they took them off, but it will have to work. I looked at ones that were suggested, like the Osprey 50 and liked most of what it had to offer, feeling like it was missing only a couple things I want in a pack.

    I've come to fully understand now that pack truly IS a personal choice. So taking your time in deciding and trying on many packs is best before deciding.

    Heather
  27. methodist.pilgrim.98

    methodist.pilgrim.98 R.I.P 2013

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    North West England
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
    Glad you are sorted.

    Now all you have to do is decide what goes where. Once you have that done you will feel ready to hit the road.

    You'll not regret the extra space though do remember you don't have to fill it if you don't need to.
  28. gittiharre

    gittiharre Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2008
    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    Auckland
    Heather, not sure if you have had this advice yet, finalize your packing list, put everyting into a bag, go to the store and pack a couple of packs with your gear and see which one fulfills your criteria best, I did this and it helped me decide. I can get away with quite a small pack which totals 32 litres, my sandals do hang on the outside, everyting else is taken care of inside the pack including a down sleeping bag and lunch. I use the Aarn Liquid Agility with compact front pockets, have used Deuter 34 ltr in the past and Civetta 32 ltr by Vaude. All were big enough, Aarn is more comfortable and functional though, as I have easy access to the water bottles in the outer mesh of my front pockets.Cheers, Gitti
  29. Sojourner47

    Sojourner47 Guest

    Well, I've said it before, ("Another backpack recommendation request"), but will - boringly - repeat it here.
    I know you guys are coming from the other side of the world, and need stuff for a longer period travelling, but what on earth are you filling these huge packs with?
    Large packs = more weight, plus more stuff to fill them = more weight.
    As previously stated, my daysac is 13 litres, with room for all my stuff, including a down sleeping bag, and weighs 3.5 kilos, including a litre of water, and nothing dangling off the outside...
    With that low weight I don't need a framed (more weight) rucsac - my daysac weighs 345grm, and there are lighter ones I could use, but not so sturdy, and this one is an old friend of many miles.

    You will regret having to carry all this stuff every step of the way!!
    Remember the golden rule: take half the clothes and twice the money.
  30. dougfitz

    dougfitz Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,198
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino France (Mar 2010), Camino Salvado (Sep 2011), St Olav's Way (Jun 2012), Camino Ingles, then Muxia/Fisterra (Apr 2014)
    Your packing list reminds me of the Canadian I met at Atapuerca, who was similarly travelling very light. He arrived, showered and washed his clothing, and crept into his sleeping bag for the rest of the afternoon while his clothing dried so he could go out. By the time he did, it was dark and he came back with some tinned food and chocolate, and ate that.

    I couldn't have walked like that, and didn't.

    Everyone walks their own Camino, and not everyone desires to be as spartan in their options as you appear to be.

    DougF
  31. falcon269

    falcon269 No commercial interests Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Messages:
    8,098
    Likes Received:
    1,538
    Location:
    USA
    Here is what Earl Shaffer recommended for hiking the 2,000+ mile Appalachian Trail:

    He was hiking, cooking, and camping. In later years, he abandoned the cook kit for an aluminum bowl. I see some equipment you don't need on the Camino! How little is enough?
  32. daesdaemar

    daesdaemar Camino-holic

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2010
    Messages:
    264
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    California, USA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino Ingles - twice
    I use compression sacks that weigh less than an ounce each. They are available at specialty camping and outdoors retailers. They allow me to put more more into my backpack. I use two compression sacks that add less than 1.5 ounces to my weight.
  33. falcon269

    falcon269 No commercial interests Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Messages:
    8,098
    Likes Received:
    1,538
    Location:
    USA
    The lightest compression sacks I have found are by Granite Gear, and save weight using light nylon fabric and cord instead of nylon straps for the compression mechanism. They weigh, from S to XL (10 l to 25 l): 2.8/2.9/3.4/3.8 ounces. (Latest versions: http://www.granitegearstore.com/eVent-S ... 42C52.aspx )

    Granite Gear compression sacks with mesh straps start at about 4 ounces. Use four of them, and you have added a pound.

    For those who are willing to add the extra weight, external pockets can be mounted on the various accessory ladders on the outside of a pack. That gives the flexibility of having a small pack, but expanding it as necessary. You would loose the sleek exterior of a pack with everything inside.

    Can you reveal the brand that is lighter, daesdaemar?
  34. Sojourner47

    Sojourner47 Guest

    My packing list does include a change of clothes - I have no wish to spend afternoons hiding in my sleeping bag...
    Of course, this is entirely my choice, as everyone has their own idea about how much they wish to carry, and far be it for me to dictate what anyone else should do - after all, it's you who's carrying it!! I merely offer my own observations, from my own experience. :mrgreen:
    The one thing, after ill-fitting shoes, which will give you blisters is too much weight carried. And believe me, I speak from bitter experience.
  35. WolverineDG

    WolverineDG Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2006
    Messages:
    1,147
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Texas
    I hope you find a pack that works for you. :) I've used both an Osprey & an Aarn & liked them both. Somehow, though I always seem to stuff all kinds of junk in my pack that seldom, if ever, get used (like extra toiletries & sundries mostly). It's worth it, I've decided, to bite the bullet & buy replacements for toothpaste, soap, shampoo while on the road instead of hauling them along with you.

    Kelly
  36. methodist.pilgrim.98

    methodist.pilgrim.98 R.I.P 2013

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    North West England
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
    In 2004 I ran out of soap, shampoo and clothes wash all at the same time.

    I bought one bottle of glycerine liquid soap which was the lightest option (supermarkets in Spain tend not to stock small containers of shampoo) and used only that.

    OK I smelt a bit of glycerine but it is a clean smell and no one objected, including my very forthright travelling companion. I arrived at Santiago clean and with a lighter rucksack. What more could one want? :lol:
  37. kuannner

    kuannner New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    seattle, wa
    oh dear. i already own a pretty heavy duty pack that's complete overkill for what i'll need on the camino, so i've been looking online for other alternatives (there are no outdoor stores near my school, and i don't have a car here to get to one). during winter break i went to REI almost daily to stress over boots and packs and other equipment, so i am somewhat familiar with my specific needs. i had just settled on the deuter act 28 sl for several reasons, and then i saw this thread. at 5'3" and weighing 105 pounds i'm a pretty petite chick and need a pack specifically for women (children even). i figured that i could get away with a smaller pack because, well, most everything i need to pack is smaller (much like myself). however i'm also much like a mom in that i pack for the "in case" and am also still frivolous enough as a 20 year old to somewhat care what i look like, even though i am traveling the camino as a spiritual pilgrimage of discernment and enlightenment. this doesn't mean hair straightener and coordinated outfits, but it does mean contacts, shampoo, conditioner, etc, and perhaps an unnecessary clothing choice for when i don't feel like wearing cargo shorts and technical tees. the smaller pack would be to encourage me to not pack superfluously and stick to the "essentials," whatever i decide those to be.

    i have read all (most) of the responses here and i know that pack choice is extremely personal, but what do you think? can i get away with it? not looking to have a ton of danglies, though i am a packing mastermind so i don't see this as a problem.

    bottom line: i am little. shouldn't my pack be too?

    oh, i'm also on a ridiculously tight budget, and rei has a 20% off deal that i was going to take advantage of, but those "ultra light ultra awesome" packs that are a billion dollars, those won't cut it.
  38. WolverineDG

    WolverineDG Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2006
    Messages:
    1,147
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Texas
    Karyn, take it from me, leave the junk behind. That's what killed me each time. I cut myself down to the most basics of clothes: 3 shirts, 3 bras, 3 undies, 3 pr hiking socks, 3 pr woolen socks**, 2 capri-length exercise pants & 1 full length (black), plus a hoodie & rain poncho. All that weighed nothing compared to all my little bottles of shampoo, conditioner, body wash, toothpaste, contact lens solution, etc. There were days when all I wanted to do was just chuck the junk in the nearest bin & only have my clothes & towel in my pack. So instead of taking all that junk for "just in case," take extra cash.

    You can always restock your shampoo, toothpaste, contact lens solution as you need it. And after a while on the road, your inner beauty comes out, so no need for make-up, mouse, gel, blow dryers, etc. ;) Besides, there are times when it's almost too much of a chore to keep up with just showering & laundering, without having to add on all the time to do your face & hair. Look at it as a lesson in letting go of your security blankets. I used to almost never leave the house without my full warpaint on; now I think it's a PITA to do so! :lol:

    **on edit,that should be 3 pairs of LINER socks. No sense in having 6 pairs of the same kind of sock. lol
  39. kuannner

    kuannner New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    seattle, wa
    haha i don't even use that stuff back home. thanks for the advice, though. most of the "extras" that i would be bringing along would be clothing related. on that note, in your clothes list you said you brought capri length exercise pants. is there any reason i can't just bring some exercise shorts like the nike's i'm wearing right now? less fabric less weight... but perhaps too short for the modesty of the camino? [sigh] there aren't any threads for young adults that don't know how to dress properly.
  40. methodist.pilgrim.98

    methodist.pilgrim.98 R.I.P 2013

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    North West England
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
    Karyn your shorts are completely decent for the Camino, I've seen both older and younger women walking round the refugio in their undies and they caused no comment nor attracted any trouble. Some of the girls leave their bras at home. Pack what you are comfortable with.

    If you want to lose weight pack only your walking socks, three pairs, and don't worry about any others. I personally would take two quick drying shirts, one of which needs long sleeves, and a T shirt. If you find you need another one there are shops on the Camino but you'll be surprised at how 2+1 is enough.

    I'm still not sure if you can get away with a 28L pack, but if funds are low then you may have to do so.

    You might try contacting your national Confraternity (Company of Little Pilgrims?) and see if they know of any friendly pilgrim in Seattle who would lend you a larger pack? Say 35L.

    In the end you must take a pack you feel comfortable with. Don't forget the nail sissors.
  41. camino-david

    camino-david Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    232
    Likes Received:
    50
    Location:
    Sydney, Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Caminos Frances and Finisterre 2010: Caminos Aragones and Frances 2011: Via de la Plata, Camino Frances and Camino Portugues 2013
    Hi,
    I think an important consideration is whether your proposed pack has a frame. I have yet to see a 26l pack like the one you are thinking about that has an internal frame. Don't forget you will need some room for at least lunch food, and water which is 1.3 lbs per pint (I think because it is many years since I used pounds and pints). I agree with everyone else about only taking your essentials. If you take makeup, shampoo, conditioner etc you will be a standout glamour girl Buen Camino. David
  42. renegadepilgrim

    renegadepilgrim Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    725
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    Portland, OR, USA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
    Karyn, there is an active group of pilgrims in Seattle that you can find via the American Pilgrims on the Camino website. I'm not sure where you are going to school in Seattle but the public transportation is good enough you should be able to get to the main REI just off Denny without too much difficulty. If there's anything I can do to help, please PM me. I am planning a trip to Seattle in April.
  43. falcon269

    falcon269 No commercial interests Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2008
    Messages:
    8,098
    Likes Received:
    1,538
    Location:
    USA
    "A pint is a pound the world around."

    Pockets, which are a man's "purse," are very useful when walking. Shorts are great (convertible pants that are shorts and long pants are better), but you will find them most useful if you can put passport, camera, knife, and money in a pocket. Many Nike-type shorts do not have pockets, so consider the ones that do have them.
  44. dougfitz

    dougfitz Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,198
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino France (Mar 2010), Camino Salvado (Sep 2011), St Olav's Way (Jun 2012), Camino Ingles, then Muxia/Fisterra (Apr 2014)
    Yes. Let me explain it this way. I carried about 15% of my ideal body weight (BMI<25) before food and water, which was about 12kg not counting the pack. Food and water added 2.5kg, a total of 14.5kg. On a rough rule of thumb, a kilo of weight needs 3li of pack capacity, so I would need a 45li pack. While I used a larger one, I know that I could get everything I had at the end of my Camino into that size pack.

    If you were to do the same, at about 47kg you would be carrying 7kg of gear, and with another 2.5kg for food and water, all up about 9.5kg and you would need a pack around 28li.

    Packs weigh somewhere between 30gm/li and 50gm/li, depending on construction and robustness. I have a Macpac adventure racing pack at the bottom end of the scale, and a hybrid touring pack at the top end of this scale. For my pack volume, this makes nearly 1kg of difference, and at some stages, I would have really liked to have been carrying a kilogram less!

    On the Camino, lightness is probably more important than robustness, but given you already have a 28li Deuter, a pretty robust pack, I wouldn't necessarily be thinking of changing it just yet.

    There is already plenty of good advice about check packing and re-packing, as well as what to take, what to think twice about, and what not to bring. If you follow this advice, and still think you need a bigger pack, then would be the time to make that decision, knowing better just how much more space you really need.

    Is the 15% right? Its a rule of thumb, and if you can get below that, it will make a difference. To get down to 10%, I would have needed to get rid of my camera, guidebooks, thermal inner layers for the Pyrenees at the end of Mar and possibly a bit more. I wouldn't have done that, but I met others who had. Sojourner47 has posted on this, and you might want to check out his approaches. I am sure there are others who have walked much lighter than I did as well.

    DougF
  45. methodist.pilgrim.98

    methodist.pilgrim.98 R.I.P 2013

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    North West England
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
    The Confraternity of St James, London recommends that no pilgrim should carry more than 8kg regardless of their size.

    That may be a bit too pendantic but aim for 10% of body weight as your maximum and less if you can achieve it.
  46. WolverineDG

    WolverineDG Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    May 18, 2006
    Messages:
    1,147
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Texas
    You can wear shorts on the Camino. :) I just wore capris because I walked when the weather was a bit cooler. Plus, I don't like to wear shorts. lol Just note that *some* churches (not all of them) expect more modest attire when you visit them.

    I've seen people wear all kinds of stuff on the camino, including a Scotsman in a kilt. I am glad, though, that I don't live in a time when people could be ordered to walk the Camino stark naked. :shock:

    Kelly
  47. Tia Valeria

    Tia Valeria Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,987
    Likes Received:
    420
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Part Norte/part Primitivo 2010
    Camino Inglés 2011
    Camino Primitivo 2012
    Part Norte and Camino de la Reina 2013
    Camino del Mar - Camino Inglés (2015?)
    A case for wearing woad? a blue body dye used by the Ancient Britains.
    Terry put this post up the other day on an equipment thread. The words to 'Woad' go to the tune 'Men of Harlech'.
    http://www.caminodesantiago.me/board/equipment-questions/topic10376.html?hilit=woad#p64896
    :lol:
  48. alipilgrim

    alipilgrim New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2007
    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    Palm Desert / Vancouver
    Camino(s) past & future:
    CF (2005/02), CF (2007/05), Madrid/CF (2011/05), VdP (2012/04)
    I do think the litre rating on packs must be subjective. I have an REI 30L daypack - took it hiking yesterday and with a pair of running shoes (in case my new boots caused blisters), a fleece and a very thin mid-layer it was FULL! Absolutely no way I could put in a sleeping bag too. The few extra ounces that a larger pack might weigh is well worth the extra space, IMHO. I don't like to have to squish everything in, nor have to compress my sleeping bag to the smallest possible configuration every morning, nor not have room for a nice bun or baguette. Buying a larger pack does NOT mean you have to fill it up at home - but will give you the option to buy that extra layer on the Camino if you find you need to.
  49. +@^^

    +@^^ Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    @alipilgrim - im with you
    theres no award for having the smallest pack
    and i dont understand the hysteria
    .
    for an extra plus/minus 250grams, you get to have another 15 litres + of space
    and this gives you OPTIONS
  50. dougfitz

    dougfitz Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,198
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino France (Mar 2010), Camino Salvado (Sep 2011), St Olav's Way (Jun 2012), Camino Ingles, then Muxia/Fisterra (Apr 2014)
    I couldn't find that advice, but I know that when I walked the Camino Frances in 2010, I generally followed the advice at http://www.csj.org.uk/planning.htm#take, which talks about 10-15% of body weight and suggests pack volumes of 35-45li for women and 60li for men.

    My experience is that the volume allowance is generous, and I have already posted a general approach to calculating the volume requirements of a pack.

    The other obsevation is that for those us carrying a little bit extra weight, one needs to start with something closer to one's healthy weight! I used the equivalent of BMI=27.5 as the baseline. My thinking was that was a better target for my overall pack weight than if I had used my current weight at the time. I would be even stricter on myself next time, and start with a weight target based on BMI=25 and put this in a much smaller pack (45li) than I carried in 2010.

    And finally, the issue of advertised versus actual pack volume is always going to be difficult. At one stage I collected enough packaging filler to test my theory that advertised volumes are not achieved in practice. It was not as bad as I thought, but there was a variation across the packs I own, and never on the plus side :cry:

    DougF
  51. kuannner

    kuannner New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    seattle, wa
    Wow. Thanks for all the advice! I am familiar with the Camino group in Seattle, and EXTREMELY familiar with the REI off Denny. This past summer I worked at a homeless shelter on Denny and would always want to hop down to just wander around or rock climb- I basically grew up on the Pinnacle. Problem is that I'm not in Seattle, nor will I be going back until after the Camino. I tried to get as much shopping done during spring break as I could, but they didn't make the funding decision until March so I didn't know for sure if it was even going to happen. Good news: I got great boots... the fourth pair I took home, but hey it's REI and that doesn't matter. Bad news: that's all I got. If I could waltz into REI and walk around with the different packs and put equipment in them I'd be peachy, but as I cannot I rely on my other sources (such as this forum).

    I'm going with another guy from my school and he's bringing a 50 ltr, not that I'm going to take advantage of his space very often but if need be I can stuff a baguette in there. He bought the larger pack expecting me to do so, anyway- wouldn't want to disappoint.

    Happy about the shorts, not about to prance around in my undies, and I know to bring some sort of long skirt like cover up for when I go in to churches (sarong, pareo, etc).

    I have not yet purchased the 28 ltr deuter and may have settled on this 2009 model of deuter futura pro 34 sl, or perhaps the newer model of the same as it has a rain cover and with the member discount there is only about a $10 difference. I am unfortunately still eying other packs, though, such as the REI Flash 50 because it's just so light, though it doesn't boast the airflow suspension system that many other packs such as the deuter do. I suppose the deuter act lite 45+10 would be pretty ideal, but it's pretty expensive even with the discount. Blegh. Decisions are not my strong suite.

    renegadepilgrim- enjoy your trip to Seattle! Although I see that you're from Portland so you're already up in the great PNW. I'm extremely jealous as I'll only get to be there a couple weeks this year because of school, global service trips, and some ridiculous pilgrimage i'm going on :wink:

    Thank you again for all your comments and help! Though I am annoyed that I cannot test and try everything on to make sure it's "perfect," I am thoroughly enjoying my Camino shopping (even if my budget isn't).
  52. methodist.pilgrim.98

    methodist.pilgrim.98 R.I.P 2013

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2010
    Messages:
    772
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    North West England
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
    DougF

    The CSJ website does indeed say that.

    However, in 2004 I bought their printed version of the CSJ guide to the Camino Francés. In the middle were yellow pages which contained the practical info on preparing for pilgrimage.

    "A rule of thumb is not more than 10% of body weight with a target maximum of not more than eight kilos. You will find it difficult to achieve this sort of figure. You simply have to be ruthless about what you actually take, even if you have chosen the lightest of everything. Another rule: unless the item comes under the heading absolutely essential do not take it. Pack and repack, each time discarding anything that "might be useful" until you are there - and then remember that you have to allow for the fact that on the camino you will be carrying provisions for the day and water, a heavy item in itself - and start again! It can be done, and you will be thankful that you made it when you see the suffering of fellow pilgrims with oversized, overloaded rucksacks." page 5. This is copyright to CSJ.

    In 2004 I heeded that advice, bought a 35L rucksack and strove to have only have drying clothes hanging from my rucksack. I didn't always succeed. My walking sandals fitted on the inside while my boots didn't. When I frequently walked in my sandals then the boots were on the outside. Damn. :roll:

    Since then I have been back every year and have seen no good reason not to aim for 8kg.

    In December 2010 I had to take supplies for my insulin pump. They cannot be crushed and they require space even though they are very light. This required a 60L pack.

    At the airport the scales said 8kg and my pack had two collapasible poles on the inside. I reckoned that they would weigh about what my food would so I was well pleased.

    The 8kg 10% of body weight rule has served me well and I have not thrown the "yellow pages" away as they remind me what I must strive to achieve.

    Sorry for the long explanation but you did ask. :)
  53. Seven

    Seven New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 7, 2010
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm also of the "you don't have to fill it" school of thought. Also consider the time of year you're travelling - you'll most likely need to pack some warm items.

    I think of the 10% rule and wonder why someone who weighs in at around 100 lbs would limit themselves. When you factor in the weight of the pack alone your gear list is going to be quite short.

    My choice? I'm torn - I already own an Arc'teryx Bora 50, (its nice, fits me great but comes in a bit heavy), but have my eye on a Deuter 50+10. I love the weight, built-in rain cover and hydration accessibility.

    I have three additional weeks of travelling around Spain after the Camino, so I have to either carry my "urban" clothes with me the entire way, or ship them ahead to Santiago to pick up when I get there. Either way I have to get them there from Canada.

    And a quick note on "danglies". Items swinging on your pack as you walk eat up energy. They make you work just a little bit harder. If you must attach something to the outside of your pack secure it to avoid the motion.
  54. Caminando

    Caminando New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2009
    Messages:
    684
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    EU
    Hi Heather

    I was surprised that in the responding posts that no-one mentioned that your shoulders shouldn't take the weight, the hip belt does. The hip/shoulder ratio is around 70% / 30%, perhaps 80/20. If the weight is on your shoulders then it's not fitting right. The supplier should have mentioned it too.

    Nor did anyone offer a word of caution about wearing boots/shoes one size too big. There is a lot of discussion on the forum about shoes/boots/blisters etc.

    Please put aside the comments on how nice your pack looks; this is pleasant but is it really helpful to you?
  55. dougfitz

    dougfitz Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2011
    Messages:
    1,198
    Likes Received:
    473
    Location:
    Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Camino France (Mar 2010), Camino Salvado (Sep 2011), St Olav's Way (Jun 2012), Camino Ingles, then Muxia/Fisterra (Apr 2014)
    I think these are both good points. On the matter of boots, it seems to me that some of the discussion comes at this from the wrong direction. If you get your boots from a good outfitter who takes the time to do the fitting properly, they will take into account things like the thicker socks you are likely to wear, the little extra room your toes need for steep downhill stretches, and the fact that your foot will lengthen and broaden slightly over the course of a day carrying a pack. When all this is considered, it would be unusual if your boot wasn't a size or more larger than your normal street shoes.

    Certainly if one were then to buy a boot a size larger again, that would be to invite problems.
  56. Sojourner47

    Sojourner47 Guest

    Might I suggest a different approach to choosing a pack?
    My working years were spent as a carpenter/joiner/cabinetmaker etc, and I often had to carry my tools out on site. So, I had a smallish tool box, then made the tools fit the box, rather than a box to fit the tools (I'd never have lifted it)
    Buy a small(ish) pack, then make your stuff fit it, rather than the other way round.....
    Just an idea :D
  57. johnnyman

    johnnyman New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Central Texas, U.S.
    I have a 36L pack, and it's absolutely crammed full. I'm glad I don't have a larger pack. It would be too tempting to fill it up with stuff ... :shock:
  58. +@^^

    +@^^ Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    Cape Town, South Africa
    if you were given 2 choices -
    a) i wish id bought a smaller bag - i had surplus free space
    b) i wish id taken a bigger bag - i squished my bocadillo
    .
    which would you choose
  59. johnnyman

    johnnyman New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2011
    Messages:
    124
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Central Texas, U.S.
    I wish you were gonna be there, brother :lol:
  60. wdbillingsley

    wdbillingsley New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2010
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    0
    I carried a Osprey Kestrel 38 L pack and had plenty of room even carrying my wife's sleeping bag. My wife carried an Osprey 24L pack. Most of the young people had 50L bags. There were a couple of German girls who had full bottles of shampoo, etc. and bags of food in their packs.
  61. rachelvi

    rachelvi New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2009
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    The thing about a larger pack is that you are tempted to fill it up with "extras". Extras equal more weight. More weight makes the walking harder. Harder walking means less energy for exploring. I used a 25 liter pack, because it was what I had. It was this one: http://www.campman.com/golite-mens-vo24 ... c1dafda05e

    I did have my sleeping back on the outside of the zippered section in the bungee cord and my crocs clpped onto the outside as well. I also strapped a baguette into the bungee as well one day. I'll have to see if I can find a picture of that.

    The wonderful thing about REI is that you can take anything back at any time for any reason. So as you refine your packing list, actually pack those things into your pack and see if you can make it work. If not, return it and go buy a new one.
  62. Irlan

    Irlan New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2009
    Messages:
    15
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Bordeaux (France)
    I have a Lowe Alpine 45L, and it's definitely too big for me (I think a good third is empty).
    But on the other hand, my 45 is not very heavy (1.75 kg), so I would not earn a lot of weight with a 35L (may be 200 gr. ?).
    And it's good to have some empty space for when I buy some bread :)
  63. sillydoll

    sillydoll Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2004
    Messages:
    6,461
    Likes Received:
    298
    Location:
    ZA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2002: 2004: 2006 VF: 2007: 2009: 2011 X 2: 2013 May:
  64. Tia Valeria

    Tia Valeria Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2009
    Messages:
    1,987
    Likes Received:
    420
    Camino(s) past & future:
    Part Norte/part Primitivo 2010
    Camino Inglés 2011
    Camino Primitivo 2012
    Part Norte and Camino de la Reina 2013
    Camino del Mar - Camino Inglés (2015?)
    We like a pack with an airflow system so we keep cool. The others make my back sweaty. Mine is a ladies fit Berghaus Freeflow and only just falls out of Sil's criteria at 1kg. 60gms. I could probaly get rid of that 60gms if I tried. :)
    For 'rest' days I have an ultra light Sil-sac (68gms) that folds up into nothing but holds plenty. (Also a recommendation from Sil). It doubles up as a shopping bag too.
    Weight is important to me too, a total of 6kg is comfy, 6kg 250 gm is OK and 6kg 500gms is verging on too much.
    Fit is also important, too short or too long and the pack won't fit right. If it fits and is lightweight but has a larger capacity just resist the temptation to fill it, at least until you reach Santiago. Also remember that you will need somewhere to put your Compostela. Most folk buy a tube from the Pilgrims' Office to put it in and it has to go in your pack. :)
  65. BrianForbesColgate

    BrianForbesColgate New Member

    Joined:
    May 3, 2012
    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    Woodstock, Ontario, Canada
  66. Al the optimist

    Al the optimist Active Member Donating Member

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2012
    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    726
    Location:
    Wolverhampton, England
    I recently did Ingles + Finisterra in September with temperatures in the high 20s and early 30s (Centigrade). Yes I know it's only 9 days, so maybe not a fair assessment of what would happen on a longer Camino. However there was a lot of up and down hilly bits (most of it it seemed). I wore a Talon 44 with the 3 Litre Hydration System. They weigh 100gms and 280gms respectively. My pack weight (Pack/System/Contents) before water/food was 5 kilos. I found the pack to always be comfortable and never felt "heavy" on my back. I prefer camel water method as I could sip whenever I wanted without stopping (I find it difficult to reach around to get a bottle out of the side pockets) and so kept continually hydrated. There was more room than I wanted/needed, but so what? Nothing was crushed and everything was easy to get at (I use different size/colour/labelled dry bags to make life easier).
    Travels as cabin baggage, even with RyanDare :)
    I know it is a matter of personal choice and this is only mine, but I hope the input helps someone.
    Buen Camino
    allan

Share This Page

This site is run by Ivar Rekve | Add your Camino to the Camino Calendar | Credentials (donativo) | Find us on Google+