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Differences in where to stay

Discussion in 'Frequently Asked Questions' started by nancyk, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. nancyk

    nancyk New Member

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    I did the Camino from O'Cebreiro last Sept and would love to walk the whole Camino someday before I'm too old. I'm 65. What really confuses me though is the difference between an albergue, hostel, pension and pensions. Can someone enlighten me please. By the way, I love this site and learn so much from you folks..........thank you.

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  2. sillydoll

    sillydoll Active Member

    Joined:
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    Location:
    ZA
    Camino(s) past & future:
    2002: 2004: 2006 VF: 2007: 2009: 2011 X 2: 2013 May:
    Paradores
    High class, luxury hotels in castles, monasteries, palaces and other historic buildings.
    Hotels
    1 to 5 star hotels - most with dining facilities.
    Hostales
    A little down scale from Hotels – these are graded according to a three star system - only a few have dining rooms
    Pensiones
    Marked with a “P” on a sign; there are many more pensiones than Fondas and they are generally offer more up-market accommodation than the Fondas.
    Fondas
    Marked with a white “F” on a blue sign the fondas are small inns, most do not have en suite bathrooms or any luxuries.
    Hostels
    Spain has about 200 youth hostels, most of which are members of the Red Española de Albergues Juveniles (REAJ).
    Casa Rural
    These include country houses, B&Bs, cottages and apartments. Accommodation ranges from simple and homely to upmarket luxury.
    Albergue del Peregrino
    Also known as refugios, refuges, pilgrim shelters, albergues - are places for pilgrims (not tourists) to sleep overnight whilst on their pilgrimage
  3. Anniesantiago

    Anniesantiago Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    Location:
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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Walked 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014
    Hey Nancy! You have a good 20 years or so before you are "too old" to walk the Camino! I can't tell you how many pilgrims I met who were in or approaching their 80's! :lol:
  4. skilsaw

    skilsaw Member

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    Nancy, if you've walked O'Cebreiro to Santiago, then you should have a pretty good understanding of what the Camino is about. If you did it as part of an organized tour and did a combination of busing and walking, then you are in for a great enriched experience.

    Don't wait. Plan to do it, God willing, next year in either May, June or Sept, Oct. You want to miss the crowding that occurs in July and August.

    Best wishes for whatever you decide.
    David
  5. nancyk

    nancyk New Member

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    Thanks everyone - this was helpful. And I appreciate your encouragement to walk the whole Camino next year and that age shouldn't be a barrier.
    Nancy
  6. camino-david

    camino-david Member Donating Member

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    Location:
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    Camino(s) past & future:
    Caminos Frances and Finisterre 2010: Caminos Aragones and Frances 2011: Via de la Plata, Camino Frances and Camino Portugues 2013
    Hi,
    I am walking the Camino right now, with two days to go to Burgos. DO NOT WORRY ABOUT YOUR AGE. There are plenty of retirees of your age walking, also I am 79 (admittedly the oldest I have seen). The two most important things in my opinion for older people - have good fitting boots that are a snug fit (I have no foot problems, not even blisters, but at least 50% of walkers do), and take it slowly at first and don´t try to do the stages that John Brierley writes in his book. Start with 10km or so and work up to 20 - 25km. Good luck with your planning. David
  7. nancyk

    nancyk New Member

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    David - thanks for the encouragement. I did walk 120 miles to Santiago last Sept without any blisters. I slathered Vaseline on my feet everyday. Gotta admit though walking the whole way is scary but.........................it keeps calling to me.
    Nancy
  8. CaroleH

    CaroleH Member

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    Location:
    Illawarra, Australia
    Camino(s) past & future:
    VdlP 2006, Portugues 2007;Madrid 2009, Finisterre 2009; Sur and VdlP 2011,2013
    David . .. hi, great to hear you are going so well. So pleased for you and look forward to hearing more. Totally agree with you about the boots . . . must fit well. When trying and buying, wear the exact socks you will wear on camino, and imho don't just buy boots that are one or two sizes bigger as is sometimes recommended here.

    Your second point about starting slowly we also agree with whole heartedly. We usually try to make our first day's stage/etapa about 14 km or less, and find the feelings of achievement and 'elation' at surviving that are a great boost for the following days. I will always remember how elated I felt at the end of the first day of our first camino, the vdlp. It was such a 'high', and it blew away the doubts, well most of them, and we knew this 'thing' was achieveable. :D

    Nancy . . . you can do it . . . . go for it!
    Buen camino. Carole
  9. Smith123

    Smith123 New Member

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    Hi guys,

    Whenever we do a pilgrimage, we always like to have a place on the journey where we stay in a nice hotel (I know some people will think that it's cheating, but everyone has their own style)! On the Camino de Santiago we stopped off in Logroño at a nice hotel to experience the amazing Rioja wine and pinchos on Calle Laurel. I can't quite remember where we used to book the hotel, I think it was something like http://www.logrono-hotels.com or something similar, because it had a lot of special offers. Anyway, it was a very good price, considering the quality of the hotel we stayed at. What a great time we had there, especially as it was during the festival of San Mateo so there were parades in the streets and everybody had such a great time. Sorry to ramble on, just thought if my advice could help somebody, I should share it. Leon is also a really great place on the route. We're thinking about doing it again sometime.
  10. crackmrmac

    crackmrmac Member

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    Ireland
    Hi Nancy, I hope one is never too old for this lark. I like to think I could manage 40 days of long distance walking sometime in the future.
    No matter the route, you can sleep under the stars or in a 5 star hotel.
    Let us know how you get on.

    Buen Camino.

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