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Equipment check-Cloths, gear, etc.

Discussion in 'Equipment Questions' started by migolito, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. migolito

    migolito New Member

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    Location:
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    It looks like I'll be starting my Camino the beginning of April at St.J. I'm expecting rain, cold, hot and dusty with maybe a little wind thrown in :)

    Cloths:
    My plan is to pack 3 sets of cloths (lite weight synthetic T-shirt, 2-lite weight synthetic zip-off pants,1-shorts, synthetic underwear, sock liner, socks). Additionally, I'll be taking a synthetic lite weight quarter zip shirt, a rain jacket, rain pants, wide brim hat, lite weight balaclava, and a wind/water resistant jacket, boots and sandals. The 3 sets of cloths allow me to wash cloths daily.

    This sounds like a lot of cloths, however, it will get me through almost anything nature has to throw at me. Please feel free to critique and make suggestions.

    Boots:
    My boots are Lowa Tempest which are excellent and well worn in, however, they are meant for dry climates. I'm not so sure a gaiter will help as the tung is not sewn at all and water will easily enter from the top. Suggestions.

    Sleeping:
    I'm bringing my 1.5 pound down sleeping bag and a .5 pound blow up pad. This will allow me to sleep on a bed or the ground. Earplugs.

    Backpack:
    Granite Gear Blaze. My empty pack weighs about 2 pounds and has a 1.5 liter water bladder. It is waterproof, however, everything inside my pack (cloths, sleeping bag, etc) will be in separate silnylon bags.

    Misc.
    Trekking poles, SPOT gps tracker, medical kit, shower/wash kit, Digital camera, guide,

    Please feel free to make suggestions.

    Mike

    ps. This is going to sound a little strange. While working on the How I 'm still working on the Why. I thought the Why would be the easiest part, however, the more I ask it the more I realize it is the most difficult of questions. I think Introspection is the heaviest thing I'll be packing.

  2. Kitsambler

    Kitsambler Jakobsweg Junkie

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    Three sets of clothes in the pack is too much (you have one set of clothes on your body in addition). One or at the very most two sets in the pack is plenty. You might take two sets, but three sets of socks.

    You can leave the sleeping pad at home also.

    The "why" often comes along the Way, as the Spirit of the Camino works on us.

  3. migolito

    migolito New Member

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    Yes I was thinking wearing one set, carrying two sets.

  4. falcon269

    falcon269 No commercial interests Donating Member

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    Convertible pants are also shorts, so it looks to me like you have three pairs of shorts. Do you need both a rain jacket and a windproof jacket? I confess to carrying a pair of shorts for sleep wear and as a backup to my convertible pants, and they don't weigh much since they are light nylon. Also, my lightweight, synthetic fleece jacket is about the same as your windproof jacket, and has kept me warm on many cool evenings. You have a good packing list in my opinion. I would bet a beer that you never use the sleeping mat... (If I were an American politician, I might bet you $10,000.)

  5. migolito

    migolito New Member

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    Yea, I've been rethinking my sleeping pad. Even though it is very lite weight, it does weigh something and takes up space. My thought was IF I need to sleep on the ground, but, I think I'm over thinking it :)

    My lite weight jacket is a North Face Apex jacket. It is water resistant, but, not waterproof. Ive read about some pretty good rain (in April) so I wanted to make sure I can stay dry...ish. I also have some North Face Venture rain pants that I'm bringing. I figure these are good for rain, wind and can be worn over shorts or whatever.

    I Also to my list is;

    Headlamp w/ultra low setting.

  6. Abbeydore

    Abbeydore Member

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    I've just spent a fortune on a thermorest matt, & you guys are saying leave it @ home :roll:
    Mind you have a new sleeping bag that weighs nothing & I'm sure will require a layer @ least :lol:

    Part of the thermal qualities of bag are rated with a mat, suppose a mattress is better!

  7. falcon269

    falcon269 No commercial interests Donating Member

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    If you don't get a bed, there will be 50 pilgrims willing to lend you their mat! After Astorga, you will find the most expensive sleeping mats in every donation box. I passed up a $100 Thermarest in Vega del Valcarce because I did not want to carry it home for camping!

    If you are going camping, on the other hand, take the mat because you will use it.

  8. Abbeydore

    Abbeydore Member

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    Wot a plonker I am; it will get used here soon :lol:

  9. renegadepilgrim

    renegadepilgrim Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler

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    You only need two sets of clothes...one to wear and one in your pack. I walked April/May 2010 and did not need shorts the entire time. It rained and snowed the last three weeks of walking. The first week and a half there was sun, enough to get a tan, but not warm enough for shorts! I would consider a pair of thermal bottoms too, for those days when it is chilly. Also, waterproof jacket is essential...or a poncho, your choice, but I got caught in some torrential downpours and I was so glad my jacket was waterproof. Otherwise, your list looks good. How do you like your GG pack? I have been eyeballing one of those for the WCT, but have decided to go Osprey Exos 58 instead.

    p.s. Leave the sleeping pad at home! Unless it's one of those fancy sub-lb Thermarest ones that is 4 inches thick when you blow it up.... :) Kidding...leave it at home!

  10. karennz2012

    karennz2012 New Member

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    Hi all

    appreciated your posts - timely advice for me on equipment - Ive just done my first test-pack. Came in at 10kg and feeling good about being able to prune that.
    My question though is about the sleeping mats. I have been listening to advice and not taking one by the way. but Ive read different stories about whether you can sleep on the floor.
    I was reassured by thinking if I couldnt get a bed, I could just sleep on the floor but have read about it not being allowed now.
    any up to date information on this would be most welcome. I would certainly feel a bit more secure if I thought that was an option.

    thanks
    karen

  11. renegadepilgrim

    renegadepilgrim Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler

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    When we had overflow nights in Santo Domingo de la Calzada in October, we had mattresses to put on the floor. Was it ideal? No. But pilgrims appreciated a place to sleep. You really don't need a sleeping pad, but you might get put on a mattress on the floor if there is overflow space. Me personally, I wouldn't want to sleep on the floor....too easy for the bedbugs to get to you! :)

  12. Nicholas Moody

    Nicholas Moody New Member

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    I carried a sleeping mat but never used it myself. The only time it was used was when a large party of pilgrims came into an albergue and there was one too many for the bed space available, so I lent one of them the mat. I believe that there should only be the same amount of pilgrims in a hostel as the number of bed spaces, but I suppose common sense prevailed on this occasion. It was only a small, out of the way, hostel.
    As to clothing, I agree about only taking two sets of gear as long as you are confident that a set will dry overnight. However I took three sets of walking socks just in case. I also used merino wool T shirts as a base layer to help soak up the sweat. They were great, and not too hot as you might think with wool.
    I walked in April/May 2011 and it was scorching in France/Spain all the way bar the odd day, so shorts (zip offs) were vital for me.

  13. migolito

    migolito New Member

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    Ok, the sleeping pad is out. And, I think I'm going to do 2 pairs of pants-one on, one in the pack. However, I'm sticking w/3 shirts (under armor) and 3 sets underwear.

    My Granite Gear BP. Is easily the best BP Ive ever had. I own The North Face, Gregory, Acrteryx, Badlands, etc. This pack IS geared for ultra-lite packing and will carry up to about 30 lbs. However, on the Camino I'm planning on about 13lbs or less. It is very comfortable without excess padding and adjustable down to 30 liters or up to 60 liters.
    I got this pack for the 220 mile John Muir Trail which is a wilderness trail down the Sierra Nevada mountains in California. So, I needed the capability to carry more weight and have expandable volume.

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