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Scattered comments on Santiago-Muxia-Fisterre

Discussion in 'Santiago to Finisterre and Muxia' started by peregrina2000, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. peregrina2000

    peregrina2000 Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    My 2012 camino is done, and one of the best parts was my walk from Santiago. Though there is some road walking, there's not a lot, and the marking is very good. Here are a few random observations.

    My stages were Santiago-Vilaserio - Dumbria - Muxia- Fisterra, and I really liked ending in Fisterra.

    Negreira -- I saw the private albergue right on the camino mentioned in another post, it's right on the main street in town.

    -- If you're looking for a nice bar with a place to sit outside and relax, there's a bar on the left right before you cross the river leaving town. Named Porto, I think. There's a nice terrace out back and it is shaded and looks over the river. Nice spot to rest up, especially if you're continuing on to Vilacerio as I did.

    Vilkacerio -- private albergue with basic platos for meals in the bar. Nice albergue. There's also a municipal albergue in town.

    New albergue in Santa Marinha, on highway next to bar, about 8 or 9 kms from Vilacerio.

    Olveiroa -- every time I walk through that town there is a new facility. New pension/albergue/cafe bar combination right as you come in to town. The family run place is in the process of adding a restaurant, I was told it might be an "all you can eat" buffet type place. Not sure what I think of that.

    3kms after Olveiroa, detour marked for a pension called A Pedra 981-72 76 02. No backtracking would be required, it's just a km on the highway from there up to the bar at Hospital, which is right next to the split for Muxia of Fisterra.

    Dumbria -- all alone in the huge albergue. Though the sign on the door says it only opens at 3, the guy who came down at 3 told me that if I had tried the door I would have seen it was open. The people in charge work at the polideportivo next door, where there is free internet and a cafe bar. Very nice people. They opened a can of pimientos for me. There are two food stores in town (it would be quite a stretch to call them supermercados) but one was closed when I was there.

    Quintans -- maybe about 10-12 kms from Dumbria, was the first place with a bar that I saw.

    San Martinho (about 2 kms beyond Quintans) -- saw a sign for a new private albergue coming soon.

    Moraime -- two stunning decorated doorways in the 12th century church. From there it's a stone's throw to Muxia.

    Muxia -- now has a private albergue. Pretty big, huge kitchen, some of the nicest bathrooms I've seen (with separate private dressing cubicle at the entrance to each shower stall). I stayed in the municipal albergue, but this private place is doing a great business. I think there are more than 40 beds. Bela Muxia, 981 742041, Rua de Encarnacion, 30, http://www.belamuxia.com Lots of peregrinos who took the bus out stayed here, as well as some who walked.

    Finisterre -- The road from Muxia to Finisterre is well marked, and there is only one place where there is confusion. You will be walking down towards the ocean on a road and you will see arrows pointing you to the left (the arrows are painted on the road). About 50 m continuing straight on, you can see a mojon that is taking you to the right. Ignore that mojon and follow the arrows.

    There is now a bridge off to the side of the submerged stones. This is no wooden footbridge, it's a big imposing concrete mama of a bridge. Way over the top, IMO, nearly wide enough for vehicles, and the approach is now a wide path of many stones and slabs.

    Right after the bar in Lires (or right before if you're coming from Fisterra), there is a marked detour to the Lires beach, where there is another bar. I didn't take it, but saw later that it must be a short detour that is well marked and involves no backtracking. There were two well-marked detours off the camino about a km apart. I would take it next time because it would get you to the beach!

    Fisterra has a few new albergues, but I stayed in the municipal one. We saw five women get out of a taxi and get in the albergue line. When the albergue opened, the hospitalera invited them to enter first, so they must have been friends of someone. A little annoying, but there is no shortage of places to stay in Fisterra/Finisterre.

    The 8:20 am bus back to Santiago takes a very different route than the route I've taken in the past. It hugs the coast almost all the way to Noia and then gets on a divided road for the last 25 kms into Santiago. It was nice to see all the coastal towns, and I thought Muros looked like a very nice place to spend a few days.

    I know the numbers of people walking this route are growing and it's nice to see how private initiative is kicking into gear to provide accommodations. Buen camino, Laurie

  2. sagalouts

    sagalouts Member

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    thanks Laurie for posting such an incisive overview of this great walk,I thought I knew it but your updates show I'm still learning,thanks again for sharing.
    Ian

  3. Kennedy1

    Kennedy1 New Member

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    Camino(s) past & future:
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    Camino Finisterre and Camino Muxia - June 2013
    Thanks Laurie for all your insightfully comments. I am planning on doing the same route when I reach Santiago in October. Your suggestions and observations will make my journey much easier.

    Kind regards, Kennedy

  4. Priscillian

    Priscillian Member

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    Agggghhh---Laurie so disappointed not to have met you, especially when you were so close....... Maybe next time...?

  5. Priscillian

    Priscillian Member

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    Looking at the dates, it´s not too late! DO come and join us at The Little Fox. I´ll happily pick you up... Tracy

  6. SandyBrown

    SandyBrown New Member

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    Nice to hear your voice, and great to see you in SdC again this year, my friend. Thanks for this great post on the Muxia route and I'm glad it went well for you.

    Stay cool during the blazing Illinois summer!

  7. peregrina2000

    peregrina2000 Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    Tracy, I am definitely going to visit your lovely retreat, hopefully next year. As I was walking from Dumbria to Muxia, I met a young man (maybe Scotish) who was on his way to your place. He seemed surprised that I knew where he was going. He told me he learned of it from a leaflet in an albergue. I saw your flyers in Dumbria, but none in Muxia. Muxia would be a great place to have them -- have you asked about leaving some in Bela Muxia, the new private albergue?

    Hey, caminoist, yes it was great to see you, I'm sorry I missed the semi-finals in the Plaza Roja. And one of these days I'm going to start a thread on Treksta shoes and hope you will give me lots of information, because I am sorely in need of new Camino footwear!

    Buen camino, Laurie

  8. Sansthing

    Sansthing Member

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    I was in Muxia for a couple of days in June. I couldn´t stay at the albergue Municipal because I had traveled from Finisterre by bus. I asked the Municipal hospitaleiro about alternative accommodation and he said there were only hotels, and gave me a leaflet for an expensive one! At another hotel I was told there were no private albergues and was offered a room for 40 euros...I managed to get a room in a private house eventually by speaking to someone in a bar. My point is...why is the private albergue not better known, especially by the hospitaleiro in the Municipal. I just wanted somewhere to chill after doing the VDLP.
    Sandra :arrow:

  9. Beverley

    Beverley Member

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    Laurie, thanks for posting this. I am going to walk from Santi to Fin this year after I do a week or so from Pamplona with friends. This will be my 4th Camino so I guess it is time to do the last leg.

    All the best
    Bev

  10. Priscillian

    Priscillian Member

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    The reason the new albergue in Muxia is not "better known" is that it has only been open for three weeks. The owner's name is Angel and it is lovely, spacious and central (behind the tourist office). They have shared accommodation and one private room. The website is http://www.belamuxia.com

    I have both received pilgrims here at The Little Fox who have stayed there, and sent some on. I've heard really good things.

    Probably the reason why there were no flyers in Muxia is because they are all gone! I've had a house full since the day I started welcoming pilgrims here in mid-May. And word gets around... Most don't want to leave!!!
    I have ordered some more brochures and will be putting them in Santiago (I am there from the 24th to the 26th if anybody wants to meet up), and the Camino to Finisterre and Muxia.
    Buen Camino Todos...
    Tracy

  11. falcon269

    falcon269 No commercial interests Donating Member

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    Price is not mentioned on the new albergue's website. Do you have any idea what it is, Priscillian?

  12. Priscillian

    Priscillian Member

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    Bunks are 12 euros, the double is (I think) 40, but I may be wrong. They have a kitchen.

  13. Dawntreader

    Dawntreader New Member

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    Laurie,

    Brand new here and still making the arrangements for next September for the Camino. I wish to walk to Muxia and Fisterre and will arrive there after mid October. Do you know if the hostels will be open?How would i find this out?

    Thanks,

    Jeni

  14. mspath

    mspath Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    Jeni,

    You can use the Eroski web site for albergues at this link http://caminodesantiago.consumer.es./albergues/. Scan down to the last section Epílogo a Fisterra y Muxía and all the albergues are listed by Etapa or Halt. Click on the name then Ver ficha completa del albergue to see all the details including Disponibilidad del albergue dates of opening.

    Hope this helps!

    Buen Camino,

    Margaret

  15. peregrina2000

    peregrina2000 Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    Margaret, thanks so much for that link. I had forgotten how up to date the Eroski site usually is. It shows the new albergues I saw on my walk in June, some of which had only been open for a few weeks, like the one in Muxia.

    When you combine this with mundicamino's site, which lists private accommodation also, you have a really complete picture of the options. I think Eroski just lists the albergues, be they public, religious, or private.

    Buen camino, Laurie

  16. Travel Diva

    Travel Diva New Member

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    Thanks for the details - I am going to take this with me as I am walking from Santiago to Muxia then to Finisterra, and so many posts about lost signs etc. So hopefully we'll get there without backtracking.
    Buen Camino.

    Siva

  17. peregrina2000

    peregrina2000 Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    Just back from another camino that ended with a walk to Muxia and then Finisterre and I have a couple of updates.

    The main thing is to say that I highly recommend the Lires beach option. It is well marked and involves no backtracking. If walking from Muxia to Finisterre, the way to the beach is clearly marked in the "center" of Lires. If walking from Finisterre to Muxia there is a clearly marked turnoff. image.jpg

    The reward is a coffee stop in the Bar Playa (open at 9:30 seven days a week from Holy Week through September)
    image.jpg

    And there are some stunning views on the way back to the Camino along the ocean.

    image.jpg

    image.jpg

    It may be a little longer but it is one of the few chances you get to walk along the coast on this stretch.

    The other thing is the bus back from Finisterre to Santiago. The tourist office only gives out the Monbus schedule, which is typically a three hour saunter along the coast through Muros and Noia. But there is another option on the Vazquez -Aucasa line which takes between two and two and a half hours. This involves a transfer in Baio, but the transfer is simple. At the Baio bus stop, get off the bus. About five minutes later, another bus comes up and you get on.

    When I have access to a scanner, I will scan the 2014 summer bus schedules, as well as the detailed list of accommodations, bars, etc that the tourist office gives out on the route.

    Buen camino, Laurie

  18. ebrandt

    ebrandt Member Donating Member

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    The pictures look beautiful! Thanks for the update. I am just 'chomping at the bit' to be back and walking! Liz

  19. peregrina2000

    peregrina2000 Well-Known Member Donating Member

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    I hope I am successful in attaching a scanned copy of the info given by the Galicia tourist office in Santiago. All accommodations, bars, restaurants, etc, on the route to Fisterra and Muxia, as of July 2014

    Buen camino, Laurie

    Attached Files:

    ebrandt likes this.

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