A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Østerdalen trail to Trondheim?

2020 Camino Guides

Agrizzlybear

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Camino Portugues 2017
Hey all, new user here looking to ask a question on the St Olav's trail. The official Norwegian site Pilgrimsleden.no mentions several paths to take. Gudbrandsdalen being by far the most popular. But it also mentions one called Østerdalen, which it describes as "pristine wilderness". That immediately caught the attention of my friend who is hiking with me. We realize it might be about 20 days of tent camping, but we're wondering if anyone's actually done this trail before. I can't find a single resource online besides that site. I speak some Norwegian, but I still couldn't find anything. Has anyone here ever tried it?

I'd really like to give it a try, but I want to make sure there's places to stock up on food and water. Of course I'd also like to know if pristine wilderness just means grey tundra the whole way. Should I just stick with Gudbrandsdal?
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
No tundra. It is a long wooden valley, with long distances between small places. Pristine... :D

Would recommend Gudbrandsdalen.
 

Agrizzlybear

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Camino Portugues 2017
Takk for hjelpen. Any reasons in particular you would recommend Gudbrandsdalen over Østerdalen?
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Takk for hjelpen. Any reasons in particular you would recommend Gudbrandsdalen over Østerdalen?
Better infrastructure. More options. Most likely more resting/overnight areas. Østerdalen is quite sparsely populated.
 

Agrizzlybear

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Camino Portugues 2017
Alright, I'm sold. I've been trying to learn Norwegian, and I realize that'll be pretty useless if I never see anybody to talk to.
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Hey all, new user here looking to ask a question on the St Olav's trail. The official Norwegian site Pilgrimsleden.no mentions several paths to take. Gudbrandsdalen being by far the most popular. But it also mentions one called Østerdalen, which it describes as "pristine wilderness". That immediately caught the attention of my friend who is hiking with me. We realize it might be about 20 days of tent camping, but we're wondering if anyone's actually done this trail before. I can't find a single resource online besides that site. I speak some Norwegian, but I still couldn't find anything. Has anyone here ever tried it?

I'd really like to give it a try, but I want to make sure there's places to stock up on food and water. Of course I'd also like to know if pristine wilderness just means grey tundra the whole way. Should I just stick with Gudbrandsdal?
Hi there @Agrizzlybear

I have just finished hiking the Østerdalen trail and also the Valldalsleden to Dovre. I will get back to you in a few weeks time with details. Just to say...

The Østerdalen trail is a splendid nature trail. The first 8 days from Rena to Øvre Rendal are a well marked leisurely stroll. After this the trail demands stamina, it becomes quite a challenge. In the fjells, from Fonnas fjellet onwards (days 9 - 23), one is up against the elements. It is easy to lose the way in mist, the rain or poor light.

The trail does not involve climbing or scrambling over rocks, it is mostly on springy turf, through mires, along forest trails, long grassy seters and dirt roads. There are many streams to cross - some every day. (I wore Brookes Cascadia 13 trail runners. These were excellent as water waders.)

The signing after Tynset to Trondheim is sparse, somewhat neglected and often obscured by mist, low sunlight and shade. I found many St Olaf tags in the undergrowth the wire connectors rusted through. One needs good long distance eyesight to spot cairns, odd shaped rocks, red markers on stones and old wooden batons. ( i walked without GPS, mobile or camera relying on observation skills and pdf maps printed from the pilegrim website. I don,t recommend this. Some might find this alarming...The maps lacked detail.)

One can sleep most nights in a mountain cabin with wood burning stove, candle light and water collected from nearby streams or lakes. In August blue berries and cloud berries were thick on the ground....

I was alone for the entire hike from Rena to Trondheim. I met no other pilegrims or hikers just the occassional shop keeper and host/hostess. Stages between cabins became long. The experience was awesome, sweet....

Food supplies must be carried 3 to 5 days at a time.

ps Lia Gard organised for a pilegrim helper to meet me at the railway station in Rena...more details later. There is an up to date pdf for accommodation, shops etc. I,ll post a link later.

pps I am still out there hiking pilgrim trails. I,ll get back to you in a few weeks time.

Cheers
Lovingkindness
I
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Hi there @Agrizzlybear

I have just finished hiking the Østerdalen trail and also the Valldalsleden to Dovre. I will get back to you in a few weeks time with details. Just to say...

The Østerdalen trail is a splendid nature trail. The first 8 days from Rena to Øvre Rendal are a well marked leisurely stroll. After this the trail demands stamina, it becomes quite a challenge. In the fjells one is up against the elements. It is easy to lose the way in mist, the rain or poor light.

The trail does not involve climbing or scrambling over rocks, it is mostly on springy tundra, through mires, along forest trails and occasionally on dirt roads. There are many streams to cross - some every day. (I wore Brookes Cascadia 13 trail runners. These were excellent as water waders.)

The signing after Tynset to Trondheim is sparse, somewhat neglected and often obscured by mist, low sunlight and shade. I found many St Olaf tags in the undergrowth the wire connectors rusted through. One needs good long distance eyesight to spot cairns, odd shaped rocks, red markers on stones and old wooden batons. ( i walked without GPS, mobile or camera relying on observation skills and pdf maps printed from the pilegrim website. I don,t recommend this. Some might find this alarming...The maps lacked detail.)

One can sleep most nights in a mountain cabin with wood burning stove, candle light and water collected from nearby streams or lakes. In August blue berries and cloud berries were thick on the ground....

I was alone for the entire hike from Rena to Trondheim. I met no other pilegrims or hikers just the occassional shop keeper and host/hostess. Stages between cabins became long. The experience was awesome, sweet....

Food supplies must be carried 3 to 5 days at a time.

ps Lia Gard organised for a pilegrim helper to meet me at the railway station in Rena...more details later. There is an up to date pdf for accommodation, shops etc. I,ll post a link later.

pps I am still out there hiking pilgrim trails. I,ll get back to you in a few weeks time.

Cheers
Lovingkindness
I
I just love you and your spirit so much!
You give me hope!
 

Agrizzlybear

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Camino Portugues 2017
Hi there @Agrizzlybear

I have just finished hiking the Østerdalen trail and also the Valldalsleden to Dovre. I will get back to you in a few weeks time with details. Just to say...

The Østerdalen trail is a splendid nature trail. The first 8 days from Rena to Øvre Rendal are a well marked leisurely stroll. After this the trail demands stamina, it becomes quite a challenge. In the fjells one is up against the elements. It is easy to lose the way in mist, the rain or poor light.

The trail does not involve climbing or scrambling over rocks, it is mostly on springy tundra, through mires, along forest trails and occasionally on dirt roads. There are many streams to cross - some every day. (I wore Brookes Cascadia 13 trail runners. These were excellent as water waders.)

The signing after Tynset to Trondheim is sparse, somewhat neglected and often obscured by mist, low sunlight and shade. I found many St Olaf tags in the undergrowth the wire connectors rusted through. One needs good long distance eyesight to spot cairns, odd shaped rocks, red markers on stones and old wooden batons. ( i walked without GPS, mobile or camera relying on observation skills and pdf maps printed from the pilegrim website. I don,t recommend this. Some might find this alarming...The maps lacked detail.)

One can sleep most nights in a mountain cabin with wood burning stove, candle light and water collected from nearby streams or lakes. In August blue berries and cloud berries were thick on the ground....

I was alone for the entire hike from Rena to Trondheim. I met no other pilegrims or hikers just the occassional shop keeper and host/hostess. Stages between cabins became long. The experience was awesome, sweet....

Food supplies must be carried 3 to 5 days at a time.

ps Lia Gard organised for a pilegrim helper to meet me at the railway station in Rena...more details later. There is an up to date pdf for accommodation, shops etc. I,ll post a link later.

pps I am still out there hiking pilgrim trails. I,ll get back to you in a few weeks time.

Cheers
Lovingkindness
I
Okay you've just made this sound like the most epic journey. Now I'm torn. I might stick with Gudbrandsdalen this time, but I really really want to hear more about this.
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Hi there,

Here is the link to the Østerdalen PDF (2019): Stages, accommodation, grocery, catering, cultural heritage and church...

...and other pfd's published on www.pilegrimsleden.no

* Other info : Rena to Tynset

* Maps : Rena to Tynset

(Åmot kommune has more detailed maps of the stretch from Rena. I was given a copy by the pilegrim helpers, Finn + Liv who met me at the Rena railway station. Later they made a surprise visit bearing gifts! Finn checked all the trail signs and streams in Åmot kommune a day or so ahead just to be sure that I got through. Tusen Takk! )

* Maps : Tynset to Trondheim

* Other info : Tynset to Trondheim

cheers
Lovingkindness
 
Last edited:

Agrizzlybear

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2014
Camino Portugues 2017
Hi there,

Here is the link to the Østerdalen PDF (2019): Stages, accommodation, grocery, catering, cultural heritage and church...

...and other pfd's published on www.pilegrimsleden.no

* Other info : Rena to Tynset

* Maps : Rena to Tynset

(Åmot kommune has more detailed maps of the stretch from Rena. I was given a copy by the pilegrim helpers, Finn + Liv who met me at the Rena railway station. Later they made a surprise visit bearing gifts! Finn checked all the trail signs and streams in Åmot kommune a day or so ahead just to be sure that I got through. Tusen Takk! )

* Maps : Tynset to Trondheim

cheers
Lovingkindness
Thanks a ton. Those are super helpful. I've decided on Gudbrandsdalen, at least for my first try. But I definitely want to come back and do this one. I especially liked the Åmot kommune with its detailed history.

Are there any more places/books people have found for St Olavsleden/specific areas?
 

lovingkindness

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
Thanks a ton….Are there any more places/books people have found for St Olavsleden/specific areas?
You're welcome!
You might consider contacting Aslaug Haugen, ( Smedberget Pilegrimstun, Øvre Rendal). She researches local pilegrim history and is responsible for updating the Østerdalen PDF mentioned above (contact details on PDF).

Aslaug told me that in mediaval times when pilegrims arrived in the Rendalen Valley they stayed for many days with local folk. The farmers forgot their work and threw away their equipment preferring to spend all day with the pilegrims and dance away the nights! The pilegrims came in large groups , hundreds and hundreds of people… Today in Tyldalen local pilegrim lore is re-enacted in an outdoor theatre. I think it occurs every three years...

More information about the Østerdalen trail and pilegrim events in Rendalen can be found here. I'll see what I can find for places further along the trail.

Cheers
LK
 
Last edited:

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)


Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 7 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 46 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 172 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 278 24.4%
  • June

    Votes: 85 7.5%
  • July

    Votes: 23 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 25 2.2%
  • September

    Votes: 325 28.5%
  • October

    Votes: 142 12.5%
  • November

    Votes: 15 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.5%
Top