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10 day Camino de Madrid - Stages and reflections

Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Leon to Santiago (2015)
Camino Madrid/Salvador/Primitivo (2017)
#1
I just finished the Camino de Madrid yesterday and thought I'd share my stage info for anyone else who is looking at doing it in 10 days. The mileage and times below include bathroom breaks but NOT stops at cafes or sightseeing. My total travel time was 1-2 hours more than what is listed.

Day 1: Madrid to Colmenar Viejo - 35km, 7h30m
Day 2: Colmenar Viejo to Cercedilla - 34km, 8h07m
Day 3: Cercedilla to Segovia - 31km, 6h45m
Day 4: Segovia to Sta. Maria la Real de Nieva - 32km, 6h29m
Day 5: Sta. Maria la Real de Nieva to Coca - 22km, 4h55m
Day 6: Coca to Alcazaren - 26km, 5h06m
Day 7: Alcazaren to Puente Duero - 25km, 4h36m
Day 8: Puente Duero to Castromonte - 36km, 8h08m
Day 9: Castromonte to Villalon de Campos - 44km, 8h54m
Day 10: Villalon de Campos to Grajal de Campos - 31km, 6h19 min

NOTE: I did the 6km from Grajal de Campos to Sahagun on Day 11, as I was worried that there would be no room in the albergue there due to the traffic on the Frances. It took me approximately 1 hour to cover this distance in the morning. Had I not been worried about getting a bed, this distance could have easily been tacked on to Day 10.

A few other notes:
* I did this as a single woman and, while I only met a handful of pilgrims during my trip, I felt incredibly safe and looked after wherever I went.
* The albergues were well spaced, clean, and easy to access. I was often the only one there.
* This Camino is possible if you don't speak any Spanish, but you'll quickly learn simple phrases such as "cuanto cuesta" and "albergue llaves". More knowledge of Spanish would, however, have made it a more interesting experience.
* The path is incredibly well marked.
* Carry some food. On several occasions the bars were not open in towns, and I was happy to have some bread, nuts, cheese, etc.
* This is a very isolated Camino but, oddly enough, I feel much more isolated now that I'm on the Camino Frances. The lack of pilgrims on the Madrid makes running into someone else a special thing, and I also greatly enjoyed my interactions with the locals.

All in all, I feel like this particular Camino is a hidden gem. I look forward to returning next year as a hostelero.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2015)
Camino Frances (2016-2018)
A complicated Camino from Madrid (Aug/Sep 18)
#3
Thanks @kardisa - quite possibly/probably going to do this route in August. Helpful info. :)
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#4
Is water an issue? Do you have to carry water for the full day on most days?
 

pmjsmith

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,Portuguese coastal
#7
I just finished the Camino de Madrid yesterday and thought I'd share my stage info for anyone else who is looking at doing it in 10 days. The mileage and times below include bathroom breaks but NOT stops at cafes or sightseeing. My total travel time was 1-2 hours more than what is listed.

Day 1: Madrid to Colmenar Viejo - 35km, 7h30m
Day 2: Colmenar Viejo to Cercedilla - 34km, 8h07m
Day 3: Cercedilla to Segovia - 31km, 6h45m
Day 4: Segovia to Sta. Maria la Real de Nieva - 32km, 6h29m
Day 5: Sta. Maria la Real de Nieva to Coca - 22km, 4h55m
Day 6: Coca to Alcazaren - 26km, 5h06m
Day 7: Alcazaren to Puente Duero - 25km, 4h36m
Day 8: Puente Duero to Castromonte - 36km, 8h08m
Day 9: Castromonte to Villalon de Campos - 44km, 8h54m
Day 10: Villalon de Campos to Grajal de Campos - 31km, 6h19 min

NOTE: I did the 6km from Grajal de Campos to Sahagun on Day 11, as I was worried that there would be no room in the albergue there due to the traffic on the Frances. It took me approximately 1 hour to cover this distance in the morning. Had I not been worried about getting a bed, this distance could have easily been tacked on to Day 10.

A few other notes:
* I did this as a single woman and, while I only met a handful of pilgrims during my trip, I felt incredibly safe and looked after wherever I went.
* The albergues were well spaced, clean, and easy to access. I was often the only one there.
* This Camino is possible if you don't speak any Spanish, but you'll quickly learn simple phrases such as "cuanto cuesta" and "albergue llaves". More knowledge of Spanish would, however, have made it a more interesting experience.
* The path is incredibly well marked.
* Carry some food. On several occasions the bars were not open in towns, and I was happy to have some bread, nuts, cheese, etc.
* This is a very isolated Camino but, oddly enough, I feel much more isolated now that I'm on the Camino Frances. The lack of pilgrims on the Madrid makes running into someone else a special thing, and I also greatly enjoyed my interactions with the locals.

All in all, I feel like this particular Camino is a hidden gem. I look forward to returning next year as a hostelero.
I just finished the Camino de Madrid yesterday and thought I'd share my stage info for anyone else who is looking at doing it in 10 days. The mileage and times below include bathroom breaks but NOT stops at cafes or sightseeing. My total travel time was 1-2 hours more than what is listed.

Day 1: Madrid to Colmenar Viejo - 35km, 7h30m
Day 2: Colmenar Viejo to Cercedilla - 34km, 8h07m
Day 3: Cercedilla to Segovia - 31km, 6h45m
Day 4: Segovia to Sta. Maria la Real de Nieva - 32km, 6h29m
Day 5: Sta. Maria la Real de Nieva to Coca - 22km, 4h55m
Day 6: Coca to Alcazaren - 26km, 5h06m
Day 7: Alcazaren to Puente Duero - 25km, 4h36m
Day 8: Puente Duero to Castromonte - 36km, 8h08m
Day 9: Castromonte to Villalon de Campos - 44km, 8h54m
Day 10: Villalon de Campos to Grajal de Campos - 31km, 6h19 min

NOTE: I did the 6km from Grajal de Campos to Sahagun on Day 11, as I was worried that there would be no room in the albergue there due to the traffic on the Frances. It took me approximately 1 hour to cover this distance in the morning. Had I not been worried about getting a bed, this distance could have easily been tacked on to Day 10.

A few other notes:
* I did this as a single woman and, while I only met a handful of pilgrims during my trip, I felt incredibly safe and looked after wherever I went.
* The albergues were well spaced, clean, and easy to access. I was often the only one there.
* This Camino is possible if you don't speak any Spanish, but you'll quickly learn simple phrases such as "cuanto cuesta" and "albergue llaves". More knowledge of Spanish would, however, have made it a more interesting experience.
* The path is incredibly well marked.
* Carry some food. On several occasions the bars were not open in towns, and I was happy to have some bread, nuts, cheese, etc.
* This is a very isolated Camino but, oddly enough, I feel much more isolated now that I'm on the Camino Frances. The lack of pilgrims on the Madrid makes running into someone else a special thing, and I also greatly enjoyed my interactions with the locals.

All in all, I feel like this particular Camino is a hidden gem. I look forward to returning next year as a hostelero.
I just finished the Camino de Madrid yesterday and thought I'd share my stage info for anyone else who is looking at doing it in 10 days. The mileage and times below include bathroom breaks but NOT stops at cafes or sightseeing. My total travel time was 1-2 hours more than what is listed.

Day 1: Madrid to Colmenar Viejo - 35km, 7h30m
Day 2: Colmenar Viejo to Cercedilla - 34km, 8h07m
Day 3: Cercedilla to Segovia - 31km, 6h45m
Day 4: Segovia to Sta. Maria la Real de Nieva - 32km, 6h29m
Day 5: Sta. Maria la Real de Nieva to Coca - 22km, 4h55m
Day 6: Coca to Alcazaren - 26km, 5h06m
Day 7: Alcazaren to Puente Duero - 25km, 4h36m
Day 8: Puente Duero to Castromonte - 36km, 8h08m
Day 9: Castromonte to Villalon de Campos - 44km, 8h54m
Day 10: Villalon de Campos to Grajal de Campos - 31km, 6h19 min

NOTE: I did the 6km from Grajal de Campos to Sahagun on Day 11, as I was worried that there would be no room in the albergue there due to the traffic on the Frances. It took me approximately 1 hour to cover this distance in the morning. Had I not been worried about getting a bed, this distance could have easily been tacked on to Day 10.

A few other notes:
* I did this as a single woman and, while I only met a handful of pilgrims during my trip, I felt incredibly safe and looked after wherever I went.
* The albergues were well spaced, clean, and easy to access. I was often the only one there.
* This Camino is possible if you don't speak any Spanish, but you'll quickly learn simple phrases such as "cuanto cuesta" and "albergue llaves". More knowledge of Spanish would, however, have made it a more interesting experience.
* The path is incredibly well marked.
* Carry some food. On several occasions the bars were not open in towns, and I was happy to have some bread, nuts, cheese, etc.
* This is a very isolated Camino but, oddly enough, I feel much more isolated now that I'm on the Camino Frances. The lack of pilgrims on the Madrid makes running into someone else a special thing, and I also greatly enjoyed my interactions with the locals.

All in all, I feel like this particular Camino is a hidden gem. I look forward to returning next year as a hostelero.
 

pmjsmith

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances,Portuguese coastal
#8
Those distances are a bit too long for me; are there other places to stay in between?
I'd love to try this Camino but not able to walk that far daily. Thank you.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#9
Those distances are a bit too long for me; are there other places to stay in between?
I'd love to try this Camino but not able to walk that far daily. Thank you.
Don't let @kardisa stages put you off this wonderful Camino. It was her stride and you have your own!

Many options to cut the stages short depending whether you want to stay at albergues or are willing to spend some more € on private acommodation. Take a look here:
http://www.mundicamino.com/los-caminos/40/camino-de-madrid/
and look under albergues & hospedajes and you'll get the picture of distances between accommodations. Mind you that albergues on CdM are very well equipped and nice. Also read some of the recent threads because at least 3 forum members that I can remember right now walked it this year and they all posted their impressions.

Happy planning. It's half of the fun :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Leon to Santiago (2015)
Camino Madrid/Salvador/Primitivo (2017)
#11
Those distances are a bit too long for me; are there other places to stay in between?
I'd love to try this Camino but not able to walk that far daily. Thank you.
As KinkyOne said, you definitely do not have to do these distances. :) There are albergues every 5-20km, and you can easily find a schedule that suits you. However, the highlights of my trip were Segovia, Coca, Alcazaren, and Medina de Rioseco. My only regret is that I didn't stay in the latter city over night.

Edit: I mentioned in another post that I used the $5 CSJ kindle ebook. This provides excellent and accurate info on amenities and albergues in each town.
 

naturmenneske

naturmenneske
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Madrid mars 2017
Via de la Plata februar 2016
Camino France januar 2015
Camino Portoguese 2012
#13
Those distances are a bit too long for me; are there other places to stay in between?
I'd love to try this Camino but not able to walk that far daily. Thank you.
I walked The Madrid Camino in Marz and used 14 days and found places to stay where I had planed to be. Nice albergues many places on the camino. I just met two other pilegrims during the 14 days, and many nice local people.
1. Madrid - Colmenar Viejo
2. Colmenar Viejo - Mataelpino
3. Mataelpino - Cercedilla
4. Train from Cercedilla to Segovia because of snow
5. Segovia - Ané
6. Ané - Nava de la Asunción
7. Nava de la Asunción - Villeguillo
8. Villeguillo - Alcazarén
9. Alcazarén - Puente Duero
10. Puente Duero - Cigunuela
11. Cigunuela - Penaflor de Hornija
12. Penaflor de Hornija - Medína de Rioseco
13. Medína de Rioseco - Villalon de Campos
14. Villalon de Campos - Grajal de Campos
And then I continued on the French Camino
15. Grajal de Campos - Bercianos del real Camino
.....
The Madrid Camino is easy to walk, not much up and down, mostly nearly flat.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#15
I too would like to walk the Camino de Madrid. Mainly because mostly not on paved roads and relatively flat ( the dodgy knee). I took a look at the website of the amigos of the Camino de Madrid and am very impressed with their work.
Only difficult etapa in terms of kilometres would be the one before Segovia. Don't think I can handle 30 kilometres anymore.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#17
I too would like to walk the Camino de Madrid. Mainly because mostly not on paved roads and relatively flat ( the dodgy knee). I took a look at the website of the amigos of the Camino de Madrid and am very impressed with their work.
Only difficult etapa in terms of kilometres would be the one before Segovia. Don't think I can handle 30 kilometres anymore.
If the reason for not being able to walk 30k is dodgy knee I wouldn't worry. I have two dodgy knees :)
The ascent is "tough" but descend isn't that steep at all and surface is very soft, like in every forest. Also you can shorten this stage a bit firstly by staying in the last albergue in Cercedila and secondly by going to Valsain the first day. At least two pensiones are there. And the next day leg to Segovia would be shorter. Or you may even walk from Valsain to La Granja de San Ildefonso the first day and take the tour through Royal palace and gardens next morning. That way it would be shorter leg on the second day to Segovia where you can enjoy afternoon sightseeing. I think that even if you would walk all the way from Cercedilla to Segovia on official Camino you would want to take rest day there. So you have three options and don't worry about the knee :)
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#18
@KinkyOne : will look into the options. The Gronze and Amigos de Camino de Madrid don't give much explanation about detour to La Granja..will search a bit more...
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#19
@KinkyOne : will look into the options. The Gronze and Amigos de Camino de Madrid don't give much explanation about detour to La Granja..will search a bit more...
I think @pilgr went that way this spring and we talked a lot about that detour. Anyway there are GPS tracks in my daily journal in Madrid section.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Several and counting...
#21
I think @pilgr went that way this spring and we talked a lot about that detour. Anyway there are GPS tracks in my daily journal in Madrid section.
I stayed in La Granja. Beautiful pilgrim friendly albergue not specifically for Camino. I had it to myself. Very easy walk to Segovia next day. Fantastic Argentinian restaurant in Valsaín. Lots of eateries at all prices in La Granja. There's even a Parador I think!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2001 and 2006,Parts of Via de la Plata 2007 and 2010 Camino de Madrid 2012,Camino de Madrid 2013, Camino de Levante 2014, Camino de Madrid 2015
#22
I too would like to walk the Camino de Madrid. Mainly because mostly not on paved roads and relatively flat ( the dodgy knee). I took a look at the website of the amigos of the Camino de Madrid and am very impressed with their work.
Only difficult etapa in terms of kilometres would be the one before Segovia. Don't think I can handle 30 kilometres anymore.
You can take a detour to Valsain and the day after a short day Valsain to Segovia.
 

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