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10 things you NEED to bring on the Camino de Santiago!

Camino(s) past & future
Piémont, Frances, Littoral, Norte, Ingles (completed) Baztan, St. Jaume, Portuguese (planned!)
#1
Hola peregrinos! I made this short video about the 10 things you NEED (or I think you need) to bring on the Camino. After two journeys and a third in the works, I've had a lot of time to think about this topic. :)

I hope you enjoy! Buen Camino!

UPDATE: This video is only a suggestion - by no means does this list work for everyone! Please feel free to pick and choose what works for you.


-Sam
 
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davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#2
Hola peregrinos! I made this short video about the 10 things you NEED (or I think you need) to bring on the Camino. After two journeys and a third in the works, I've had a lot of time to think about this topic. :)

I hope you enjoy! Buen Camino!

-Sam
Interesting presentation and it is terrific that you have the sincere desire to help others along the Way. I would gently disagree with two things mentioned:

1. Needle and thread in blister treatment. The risk of allowing bacterial infections to occur by leaving thread in the blister wound is present. Bacteria wick up the thread, into the wound, which is a dark, moist and closed environment. It matters not that the thread was 'disinfected' prior to insertion, as the disinfection is time sensitive once exposed to, and in contact with, the environment. I've seen it happen -- not on Camino -- but in other backpacking and military venues. This is an old method that really needs to go away.

The theory is that keeping the blister roof from resealing and refilling with fluid will aid healing. That is correct. Using a thread left in place can do it, but there is a much better method. Incise the side of the blister roof, close to the base nearest the sole of the foot, with either a pair of small scissors, or a disposable scalpel blade. The incision will not reseal itself and will not allow a fluid buildup. It will also keep the ability for bacterial intrusion to a minimum.

2. Nalgene bottles. Those bottles will work just fine, but they are heavy. Other lightweight alternatives exist.

I appreciate your posting, and I sincerely hope you don't take my comments as a negative about you as a contributor. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#3
Interesting presentation and it is terrific that you have the sincere desire to help others along the Way. I would gently disagree with two things mentioned:

1. Needle and thread in blister treatment. The risk of allowing bacterial infections to occur by leaving thread in the blister wound is present. Bacteria wick up the thread, into the wound, which is a dark, moist and closed environment. It matters not that the thread was 'disinfected' prior to insertion, as the disinfection is time sensitive once exposed to, and in contact with, the environment. I've seen it happen -- not on Camino -- but in other backpacking and military venues. This is an old method that really needs to go away.

The theory is that keeping the blister roof from resealing and refilling with fluid will aid healing. That is correct. Using a thread left in place can do it, but there is a much better method. Incise the side of the blister roof, close to the base nearest the sole of the foot, with either a pair of small scissors, or a disposable scalpel blade. The incision will not reseal itself and will not allow a fluid buildup. It will also keep the ability for bacterial intrusion to a minimum.

2. Nalgene bottles. Those bottles will work just fine, but they are heavy. Other lightweight alternatives exist.

I appreciate your posting, and I sincerely hope you don't take my comments as a negative about you as a contributor. :)
I completely agree on both counts. The scissors method for opening up a blister works great for me. Rather than Nalgene I use the Vapur collapsible water bottles. Much lighter and take up much less room when empty.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#4
Hola peregrinos! I made this short video about the 10 things you NEED (or I think you need) to bring on the Camino. After two journeys and a third in the works, I've had a lot of time to think about this topic. :)

I hope you enjoy! Buen Camino!

Link:

-Sam
Sam, thank you for your little video. Already you have responses that show differences of opinion. This will not be the first time you have found that, I am sure! Being honest, already I forget the ten things, but if I concentrate then the pictures will remind me: buff, sandals, guide book, Swiss knife, bottles, needle and thread. Voltaren, camera. Now I am stuck! As I watched, I filtered out what I disagree with, but I see that you are simply sharing what you found helpful, and that is kind of you, especially for first time pilgrims.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#6
Hi @Camino2014 ! I think a better title would be ‘10 things I need.......’ ;)
Or, better... 10 things I was happy to have on my camino. I normally take 5 of that list, and only 1 (some sort of light footwear for evenings) would I consider rather necessary.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#7
I second @davebugg views on needles and thread. These are meant to patch clothes and sew buttons back on.

You hear a lot about sterilising the needle prior to impaling yourself but how about that manky spool of cotton that has been rolling around in your pack since goodness knows when? Ever wondered why field dressings are sealed and never opened before use?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances = past Via De La Plata = Future
#9
Hola peregrinos! I made this short video about the 10 things you NEED (or I think you need) to bring on the Camino. After two journeys and a third in the works, I've had a lot of time to think about this topic. :)

I hope you enjoy! Buen Camino!

Link:

-Sam
Very good basic stuff. There is a good blog out there by Annies Simple life that also gives great advice. I would also take tablets to purify water, (Aussey bushmen use Condease Crystals). I drink a lot so those fountains that were a bit dodgy i was able to use.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#10
6 Caminos over 17 years and never had a problem with the water from fuentes. If it says NON POTABLE don't use it. I've seen people in big, expensive Audis and MBs stop to fill up multiple jerrycans with fuente water.

In fact, one time at Boadilla, we helped an old lady fill up her water containers (it's the one with the big wheel you have to turn) and a Chilean girl asked if she has no piped water in her house. Oh yes she said but you wouldn't want to drink THAT. That water was for washing clothes and bathing. Why would you drink THAT when you could have clean, fresh water from the fuente?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#11
There are two things I have NOT needed to cope with either en route (more than 2000 km so far) or in training (nearly 4000 km to date)... blisters...bedbugs...
What am I doing wrong?
Hi - I assume your question is purely rhetorical, but it has a hint of incredulity about blister and bedbug problems. There are many things I have not had to cope with either - plantar fasciitis and personal assaults, for example. I attribute that to a large amount of luck, combined with some basic preparation/precautions to reduce (but not eliminate) the risks.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Piémont, Frances, Littoral, Norte, Ingles (completed) Baztan, St. Jaume, Portuguese (planned!)
#12
Hi @Camino2014 ! I think a better title would be ‘10 things I need.......’ ;)
I posted this in the hopes it would help new pilgrims get a clear idea of what their packing list should look like. I do not claim to be a Camino expert, only someone who is trying to help others by posting a video. If these things don't work for you, feel free to disregard my suggestions. Buen camino :)
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Piémont, Frances, Littoral, Norte, Ingles (completed) Baztan, St. Jaume, Portuguese (planned!)
#13
Interesting presentation and it is terrific that you have the sincere desire to help others along the Way. I would gently disagree with two things mentioned:

1. Needle and thread in blister treatment. The risk of allowing bacterial infections to occur by leaving thread in the blister wound is present. Bacteria wick up the thread, into the wound, which is a dark, moist and closed environment. It matters not that the thread was 'disinfected' prior to insertion, as the disinfection is time sensitive once exposed to, and in contact with, the environment. I've seen it happen -- not on Camino -- but in other backpacking and military venues. This is an old method that really needs to go away.

The theory is that keeping the blister roof from resealing and refilling with fluid will aid healing. That is correct. Using a thread left in place can do it, but there is a much better method. Incise the side of the blister roof, close to the base nearest the sole of the foot, with either a pair of small scissors, or a disposable scalpel blade. The incision will not reseal itself and will not allow a fluid buildup. It will also keep the ability for bacterial intrusion to a minimum.

2. Nalgene bottles. Those bottles will work just fine, but they are heavy. Other lightweight alternatives exist.

I appreciate your posting, and I sincerely hope you don't take my comments as a negative about you as a contributor. :)
I really appreciate your reply! No, I didn't take anything negatively :)

I can see why the needle and thread method can be unsanitary, and I suppose I was just lucky on my Caminos because it always did the trick for me. As an amendment to that statement, I think it is always good to sanitize and incise the blister (as you said) rather than let it swell up - In fact, when I'm NOT on the Camino and just dealing with blisters at home, I use the scissor sans thread and it always works.

Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Piémont, Frances, Littoral, Norte, Ingles (completed) Baztan, St. Jaume, Portuguese (planned!)
#14
Sam, thank you for your little video. Already you have responses that show differences of opinion. This will not be the first time you have found that, I am sure! Being honest, already I forget the ten things, but if I concentrate then the pictures will remind me: buff, sandals, guide book, Swiss knife, bottles, needle and thread. Voltaren, camera. Now I am stuck! As I watched, I filtered out what I disagree with, but I see that you are simply sharing what you found helpful, and that is kind of you, especially for first time pilgrims.
Glad you liked it! :) Yes, by all means, this is only a suggestion! Feel free to pick and choose what works for you - I'd be curious to hear the 10 things you/other pilgrims would pack? Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Casino del Norte 2015 in part, Camilo del Norte 2016 finish in 2017.
#15
Thank you Sam. This is almost my exact list - I used Max Freeze never hearing about Voltaren. I shall be on the lookout for it. Buen Camino. I hope to be on the Norte again in September.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#16
Glad you liked it! :) Yes, by all means, this is only a suggestion! Feel free to pick and choose what works for you - I'd be curious to hear the 10 things you/other pilgrims would pack? Buen Camino!
I will have a mental check... but straight off, I can hardly say I would pack, but certainly walk with a well matched walking companion, if available!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#17
I made this short video about the 10 things you NEED (or I think you need) to bring on the Camino.
Hi, interesting ideas, and thanks for your thoughts, but you don’t actually need any of them on the CF ;).

Certainly not a guide book – just follow the yellow arrows.

And I would never use a needle and thread on a blister.

I can’t bring a Swiss Army Knife as my pack goes in the aircraft cabin with me.

My smartphone is my camera (but even that is not essential on the CF).

Microfibre towels are like chamois leathers – good for cleaning cars.

My cheap plastic water bottle costs 30c in the supermercado, and is replaced when it starts going green inside.

I never use liquid soap, voltaren cream or a headband.

That leaves sandals in your list, which, again, are not essential, as you could walk the whole camino without them, but they are nice to have in the evenings :D:cool:.

I'd be curious to hear the 10 things you/other pilgrims would pack?
Since you ask :D:

1. a fleece/silk liner or lightweight sleeping bag; 2. a rain jacket or poncho; 3. moleskin or tape (so you don’t get blisters in the first place); 4. Pain killers/anti-inflammatories; 5. a few ziplock plastic bags; 6. earplugs; 7. a hat or sun visor that covers your face from the sun; 8. travel insurance; 9. nail clippers; 10. toilet paper (just in case . . .).
Jill
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#18
Hi, interesting ideas, and thanks for your thoughts, but you don’t actually need any of them on the CF ;).

Certainly not a guide book – just follow the yellow arrows.

And I would never use a needle and thread on a blister.

I can’t bring a Swiss Army Knife as my pack goes in the aircraft cabin with me.

My smartphone is my camera (but even that is not essential on the CF).

Microfibre towels are like chamois leathers – good for cleaning cars.

My cheap plastic water bottle costs 30c in the supermercado, and is replaced when it starts going green inside.

I never use liquid soap, voltaren cream or a headband.

That leaves sandals in your list, which, again, are not essential, as you could walk the whole camino without them, but they are nice to have in the evenings :D:cool:.



Since you ask :D:

1. a fleece/silk liner or lightweight sleeping bag; 2. a rain jacket or poncho; 3. moleskin or tape (so you don’t get blisters in the first place); 4. Pain killers/anti-inflammatories; 5. a few ziplock plastic bags; 6. earplugs; 7. a hat or sun visor that covers your face from the sun; 8. travel insurance; 9. nail clippers; 10. toilet paper (just in case . . .).
Jill
Looking into travel insurance, any suggestions from UK with no excess!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#19
Hi, interesting ideas, and thanks for your thoughts, but you don’t actually need any of them on the CF ;).

Certainly not a guide book – just follow the yellow arrows.

And I would never use a needle and thread on a blister.

I can’t bring a Swiss Army Knife as my pack goes in the aircraft cabin with me.

My smartphone is my camera (but even that is not essential on the CF).

Microfibre towels are like chamois leathers – good for cleaning cars.

My cheap plastic water bottle costs 30c in the supermercado, and is replaced when it starts going green inside.

I never use liquid soap, voltaren cream or a headband.

That leaves sandals in your list, which, again, are not essential, as you could walk the whole camino without them, but they are nice to have in the evenings :D:cool:.



Since you ask :D:

1. a fleece/silk liner or lightweight sleeping bag; 2. a rain jacket or poncho; 3. moleskin or tape (so you don’t get blisters in the first place); 4. Pain killers/anti-inflammatories; 5. a few ziplock plastic bags; 6. earplugs; 7. a hat or sun visor that covers your face from the sun; 8. travel insurance; 9. nail clippers; 10. toilet paper (just in case . . .).
Jill
Exactly. And Iodine (called Betadine in Spain) & pads for your eventual blisters, NOT Compeed; one of the Devil's inventions. And Voltaren tablets for inflammation. Buy them in Spain: They have the strong stuff. Actually, all you need can be bought in Spain; cheaper and better than at home.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#20
Looking into travel insurance, any suggestions from UK with no excess!
As with any insurance it depends on age, general condition and use!
Do you have any specific problems (that you're prepared to discuss)?
I generally take out a general travel package, disclosing mild hypertension, no excess on everything (the value of the goods I carry is minimal) and I opt for £10 million in health coverage (used to be £5 but things change).
My last longish Camino was the CF in 2016 when I was 65 and the cover was less than £50 through John Lewis.
Use any of the UK insurance comparison websites - I find them all pretty much the same: GoCompare/Compare the Market - Google is your friend!

Just make sure you declare all existing and recent conditions; for instance No 1 daughter has a brain tumor - it never seems to affect the cost but a friend had to abort a trip to see her son in Thailand on medical grounds and the company refused to pay out because she hadn't listed a visit to her doctors 18 months previously for a totally unconnected condition (which no longer affected her).
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#21
I completely disagree with over half of these recommendations/"requirements". Nice try, but you might want to frame this as your opinion instead of absolutes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#22
As with any insurance it depends on age, general condition and use!
Do you have any specific problems (that you're prepared to discuss)?
I generally take out a general travel package, disclosing mild hypertension, no excess on everything (the value of the goods I carry is minimal) and I opt for £10 million in health coverage (used to be £5 but things change).
My last longish Camino was the CF in 2016 when I was 65 and the cover was less than £50 through John Lewis.
Use any of the UK insurance comparison websites - I find them all pretty much the same: GoCompare/Compare the Market - Google is your friend!

Just make sure you declare all existing and recent conditions; for instance No 1 daughter has a brain tumor - it never seems to affect the cost but a friend had to abort a trip to see her son in Thailand on medical grounds and the company refused to pay out because she hadn't listed a visit to her doctors 18 months previously for a totally unconnected condition (which no longer affected her).
Thanks Jeff, no specific problems, just falling apart slowly, and forgetting stuff, 56 years old,
Looking like I might be as cheap with an annual policy,
Nearly the only thing left on my to do list before I fly , that and ordering some more cetirizine,
Managed to check in both flights, and I fly back on the 5th September, had to pay for a front row seat, but more than happy to do that,
Bill
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#23
Glad you liked it! :) Yes, by all means, this is only a suggestion! Feel free to pick and choose what works for you - I'd be curious to hear the 10 things you/other pilgrims would pack? Buen Camino!
so, what would I pack/take?
Enough money to last, grit, phone with 112 and ICE numbers stored, charger, walking poles, tiny daysack, poncho, first aid kit, sleeping bag or liner, swimsuit. A few clothes of course, including hat and buff. Like you, these are what I would take, and not compulsory for anyone else.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#24
so, what would I pack/take?
Enough money to last, grit, phone with 112 and ICE numbers stored, charger, walking poles, tiny daysack, poncho, first aid kit, sleeping bag or liner, swimsuit. A few clothes of course, including hat and buff. Like you, these are what I would take, and not compulsory for anyone else.
Are there many places to swim ? or is it for the showers? (swimsuit)
Bill
 

natefaith

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria-Santiago (2009)
León-Ponferrada (2014)
Camino Inglés (2017)
#25
Are there many places to swim ? or is it for the showers? (swimsuit)
Bill
Depending on which route you take, there could be beaches and rivers along the way. On the Camino Frances not so much, but on the Camino del Norte, Camino Inglés, and Camino Portugués, there are places to stop.

Swimsuits are not necessary at all for the showers. Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#26
To all of those writing "These are just your opinions and you need to mark them as such in the subject line of your post and/or the title of your video", or words to that effect:

When have you ever seen a list of "X essential things to pack" that wasn't personal opinion? Surely, it goes without saying that any post of this type is personal opinion. It is not as if there will be someone waiting in Santiago de Composela to check the backpack and say "No Compostela for you! You walked without Voltaren. Didn't you know that you NEEDED to carry it?"

If someone goes to the effort to make a video like this to share what they learned from their experience, I would respect their contribution and not focus on the fact that they did not fill their subject line or video title with disclaimers that should be obvious to all. It is not quick and easy work to make a video like this.

I'm not saying that you have to agree with everything that was said. Of course, you should feel free to add the benefits of your experience and opinions to the mix. But to focus your responses on this type of criticism seems unduly harsh.

Of course, in case it wasn't obvious. All of this is just my opinion.
 
#27
To all of those writing "These are just your opinions and you need to mark them as such in the subject line of your post and/or the title of your video", or words to that effect:

When have you ever seen a list of "X essential things to pack" that wasn't personal opinion? Surely, it goes without saying that any post of this type is personal opinion. It is not as if there will be someone waiting in Santiago de Composela to check the backpack and say "No Compostela for you! You walked without Voltaren. Didn't you know that you NEEDED to carry it?"

If someone goes to the effort to make a video like this to share what they learned from their experience, I would respect their contribution and not focus on the fact that they did not fill their subject line or video title with disclaimers that should be obvious to all. It is not quick and easy work to make a video like this.

I'm not saying that you have to agree with everything that was said. Of course, you should feel free to add the benefits of your experience and opinions to the mix. But to focus your responses on this type of criticism seems unduly harsh.

Of course, in case it wasn't obvious. All of this is just my opinion.
Couldn't agree more, David, thanks for this very civil response. You have to have a thick skin to post your opinions on this forum sometimes, and I think your words offer some wisdom for many who are quick to criticize in an ungentle way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#28
Are there many places to swim ? or is it for the showers? (swimsuit)
Bill
Wherever there is a chance for a dip - clues are there if you see locals at rivers, (Irotz, about 10k before Pamplona) and sometimes there are pools as I remember so well in Nájera. We were given ginormous bocadillos prepared by local young people, and free tickets to the local pool! ‘En Nájera, todos Najerinos!’
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#29
Are there many places to swim ? or is it for the showers? (swimsuit)
Bill
Out of my head: Cizur Menor, Redecilla, Puente la Reina, Torres del Rio (but it is only a small ‘splashing’ pool), Boadilla, Hontanas (I think?) and of course if you go on to the coast (Muxía), the sea.... I think there are others but that’s all I remember right now.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#30
Out of my head: Cizur Menor, Redecilla, Puente la Reina, Torres del Rio (but it is only a small ‘splashing’ pool), Boadilla, Hontanas (I think?) and of course if you go on to the coast (Muxía), the sea.... I think there are others but that’s all I remember right now.
Hontanas yes, at down end of village. Belorado (albergue Quatro Cantones, inside the town. There is also an albergue with pool on the entrance to the town, but there is nothing else there...). My favorite is albergue En El Camino in Boadilla del Camino, a nice day's walk from Castrojeriz. Good food & cold beer served there:


https://www.cuatrocantones.com/en/
http://www.boadilladelcamino.com/albergue/
 
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
(2019: Planning to return!)
#31
The albergue with the other pool at Belorado is Albergue A Santiago, on the Camino as you approach the town. Didn't try it (too cold both times we visited plus no swimsuit!) but it looks like it would be well-used in summer. Nice place to stay too. Just a short walk into the town centre.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
#32
The albergue with the other pool at Belorado is Albergue A Santiago, on the Camino as you approach the town. Didn't try it (too cold both times we visited plus no swimsuit!) but it looks like it would be well-used in summer. Nice place to stay too. Just a short walk into the town centre.
I stayed there one year. I prefer Quatro Cantones in the centre of the town. Also ATM in the town.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#33
I posted this in the hopes it would help new pilgrims get a clear idea of what their packing list should look like. I do not claim to be a Camino expert, only someone who is trying to help others by posting a video. If these things don't work for you, feel free to disregard my suggestions. Buen camino :)
And my hopes are that new peregrinos use our responses to get a clear idea that their packing lists do not NEED to look like this. That the new smart phones take as good or better pictures and another camera is not necessary. That you can buy a local Opinel knife to cut baguettes. That there are lighter bottles than nalgene. That needle and thread are useful for repairs, but are generally not recommended for blister treatment. Etc.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#34
And my hopes are that new peregrine's use our responses to get a clear idea that their packing lists do not NEED to look like this. That the new smart phones take as good or better pictures and another camera is not necessary. That you can buy a local Opinel knife to cut baguettes. That there are lighter bottles than nalgene. That needle and thread are useful for repairs, but are generally not recommended for blister treatment. Etc.
I would take only my phone, but just before I leave I'm having phone issues, and battery has never lasted more than a day, so I am going to take my slightly older phone, and ten year old pentax camera with two spare batteries, hoping to have 42 days with no social media, !
Can it be done,?
Bill
 
Camino(s) past & future
Piémont, Frances, Littoral, Norte, Ingles (completed) Baztan, St. Jaume, Portuguese (planned!)
#35
And my hopes are that new peregrinos use our responses to get a clear idea that their packing lists do not NEED to look like this. That the new smart phones take as good or better pictures and another camera is not necessary. That you can buy a local Opinel knife to cut baguettes. That there are lighter bottles than nalgene. That needle and thread are useful for repairs, but are generally not recommended for blister treatment. Etc.
Thanks for your suggestions JillGat. I had never heard of Opinel knives until now, so I'll have to look into that.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Piémont, Frances, Littoral, Norte, Ingles (completed) Baztan, St. Jaume, Portuguese (planned!)
#36
I would take only my phone, but just before I leave I'm having phone issues, and battery has never lasted more than a day, so I am going to take my slightly older phone, and ten year old pentax camera with two spare batteries, hoping to have 42 days with no social media, !
Can it be done,?
Bill
I think its a commendable thing to do a Camino without social media! As for me, I had a daily blog to run and "fans" (family and friends) that were hooked on it, so I could not do that. But I hope to attempt it in the future.

Regarding a camera, I couldn't travel without it because I like having my Camino photos separate from my phone photos (I take a lot of photos). It helped that my camera had a built-in "transfer via WiFi" function - so helpful for blogging! Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Piémont, Frances, Littoral, Norte, Ingles (completed) Baztan, St. Jaume, Portuguese (planned!)
#37
Hi, interesting ideas, and thanks for your thoughts, but you don’t actually need any of them on the CF ;).

Certainly not a guide book – just follow the yellow arrows.

And I would never use a needle and thread on a blister.

I can’t bring a Swiss Army Knife as my pack goes in the aircraft cabin with me.

My smartphone is my camera (but even that is not essential on the CF).

Microfibre towels are like chamois leathers – good for cleaning cars.

My cheap plastic water bottle costs 30c in the supermercado, and is replaced when it starts going green inside.

I never use liquid soap, voltaren cream or a headband.

That leaves sandals in your list, which, again, are not essential, as you could walk the whole camino without them, but they are nice to have in the evenings :D:cool:.



Since you ask :D:

1. a fleece/silk liner or lightweight sleeping bag; 2. a rain jacket or poncho; 3. moleskin or tape (so you don’t get blisters in the first place); 4. Pain killers/anti-inflammatories; 5. a few ziplock plastic bags; 6. earplugs; 7. a hat or sun visor that covers your face from the sun; 8. travel insurance; 9. nail clippers; 10. toilet paper (just in case . . .).
Jill
I like your essentials list and surely have never done a Camino without those things! One thing: I do love following the arrows and forgetting the guidebook exists, but on the Norte, the arrows often betray you. The provincial governments compete, individuals compete, and arrows get painted all over the place! I often found myself going every which way! If not a guidebook, I found the Buen Camino apps to be very helpful and filled with updated re-routings (entirely in Spanish).
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#38
I think its a commendable thing to do a Camino without social media! As for me, I had a daily blog to run and "fans" (family and friends) that were hooked on it, so I could not do that. But I hope to attempt it in the future.

Regarding a camera, I couldn't travel without it because I like having my Camino photos separate from my phone photos (I take a lot of photos). It helped that my camera had a built-in "transfer via WiFi" function - so helpful for blogging! Buen Camino
Hope my camera lasts, bought before cameras had sharing capability, have had two weeks in Morocco without wifi, it was great, so many folk , including me are addicted to their phones, so I am going to try and get off social media,
Bill
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#39
Just wanted to reiterate, Camino2014, that the issue here with your video is not really about the items you found to be essential on your Caminos. We all have our own priorities. The issue is in your title; telling others what they NEED to bring. You should expect others to bristle at that. You might want to reframe your "suggestions" as a list of what you found YOU needed on your Camino and why.
 

Unie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, April 2019
#40
Hola peregrinos! I made this short video about the 10 things you NEED (or I think you need) to bring on the Camino. After two journeys and a third in the works, I've had a lot of time to think about this topic. :)

I hope you enjoy! Buen Camino!

UPDATE: This video is only a suggestion - by no means does this list work for everyone! Please feel free to pick and choose what works for you.


-Sam
Thanks for taking the time and effort Sam, you obviously have a caring heart. I imagine folk can take what suits them and toddle on their merry way if it’s not for them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
#41
Just wanted to reiterate, Camino2014, that the issue here with your video is not really about the items you found to be essential on your Caminos. We all have our own priorities. The issue is in your title; telling others what they NEED to bring. You should expect others to bristle at that. You might want to reframe your "suggestions" as a list of what you found YOU needed on your Camino and why.
As opposed to all of the other lists of essentials which weren't just opinions but were objectively essential?
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#42
I like your essentials list and surely have never done a Camino without those things! One thing: I do love following the arrows and forgetting the guidebook exists, but on the Norte, the arrows often betray you. The provincial governments compete, individuals compete, and arrows get painted all over the place! I often found myself going every which way! If not a guidebook, I found the Buen Camino apps to be very helpful and filled with updated re-routings (entirely in Spanish).
I'm using the Buen Camino app and loving it, but mine is in English, though obviously translated (pretty well) from Spanish. It's kept me, and other pilgrims, on track
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Via de La Plata (spring, 2019)
#43
As opposed to all of the other lists of essentials which weren't just opinions but were objectively essential?
This goes for all packing lists. Post em all and pilgrims can peruse them to get an idea of what they might want to carry on the Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
VdLP-Sanabres-Fisterra (Summer 2015); Future? Levante-VDLP-Invierno (Feb/Mar 2019);
#44
Just make sure you declare all existing and recent conditions; for instance No 1 daughter has a brain tumor - it never seems to affect the cost but a friend had to abort a trip to see her son in Thailand on medical grounds and the company refused to pay out because she hadn't listed a visit to her doctors 18 months previously for a totally unconnected condition (which no longer affected her).
Please read the fine print very carefully. Many conditions are not automatically covered including some common ones.
https://www.choice.com.au/travel/money/travel-insurance/review-and-compare/travel-insurance is a very interesting article. Turns out my usual insurer who tends to be the one the travel agents use does not cover a lot. If you have a mental health history you are particularly likely to be discriminated against. If you are older, some common conditions such as asthma, may cost more.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#45
...

1. Needle and thread in blister treatment. The risk of allowing bacterial infections to occur by leaving thread in the blister wound is present. Bacteria wick up the thread, into the wound, which is a dark, moist and closed environment. It matters not that the thread was 'disinfected' prior to insertion, as the disinfection is time sensitive once exposed to, and in contact with, the environment. I've seen it happen -- not on Camino -- but in other backpacking and military venues. This is an old method that really needs to go away. ...

...
Yes, please, let's make the "thread treatment" go away! I have seen so many really bad infections because of this! BC SY
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#46
Yes, please, let's make the "thread treatment" go away! I have seen so many really bad infections because of this! BC SY
Such a bad practice. A somebody who blanches when giving blood the thought of sticking a needle and thread in my foot . . . :eek:
I had much joy in watching a doctor friend berate a Spanish army doctor who was merrily going around the refugio in Burgos offering to lance people's blisters. One of her choicer phrases was "why don't you just bring down a dirty syringe and infect them all?"
Irish doctor 1, Spanish army 0
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#47
I don't think I have used most of those 10 things. In particular I have no idea why people bring swiss army knives. I have never needed to get a stone out of a horse's hoof, open a can or bottle, use a corkscrew, ream a hole in leather, saw wood, strip wire, tweeze bones or get a hook out of a fish, or skin a rabbit on camino. I just tear my bread and cheese, and bite bits off. Shopkeepers will open wine and beer for you.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#48
I don't think I have used most of those 10 things. In particular I have no idea why people bring swiss army knives. I have never needed to get a stone out of a horse's hoof, open a can or bottle, use a corkscrew, ream a hole in leather, saw wood, strip wire, tweeze bones or get a hook out of a fish, or skin a rabbit on camino. I just tear my bread and cheese, and bite bits off. Shopkeepers will open wine and beer for you.
That reads like the top half of my bucket list ;)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#50
Me too. I did all of those things, and that was just on the first morning between SJPP and Orisson...
The trouble with the SAK is it doesn't come with instructions.
I remember watching a young pilgrim trying to open a can and going the wrong way - if you've never used a SAK can opener you move the blade away from you. Trying to cut towards you leads to a messy, jagged rim*.
I started to say "If you try . . . " and got snapped at: "I know what I'm doing!"
Later they saw me open a can and, in fairness, came up and apologised.

One thing I've never found a use for is the little hook - supposed to be a "parcel carrier" for those of you whose favourite things include brown paper packages tied up with string - suggestions?

* There is one tool that is supposed to be a screwdriver/bottle opener/can opener that is meant to be used toward you. Guess what? It makes a real mess of the tin lid - Victorinox should be ashamed of producing it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
#51
I only need a simple knife to peel kiwi fruit to prevent constipation (by the way, this word is a false friend of Spanish constipado).
 

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