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25 Habits of Successful and Happy People

RobertS26

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, (2013)
Camino Frances, (2014)
Camino Frances, (2015)
The Washington Post summarized a paper on the habits of successful and happy people that was recently published in Psychology magazine. I was struck by how many of these habits directly applied or related to a successful and happy Camino.

1. Savor the moment. Literally stop and smell the roses. When walking the Camino, stop and turn around to see the beautiful sunrise behind you or take off your boots and dip your feet into a cool stream.

2. Meditate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?

3. Don't hold grudges. Is there anything more liberating than leaving a small stone at the Cruz de Ferro to symbolize letting go of mistakes and regrets?

4. Spend money on others. One of my best memories on the Camino was walking into a bar filled with pilgrims just before Pedrouzo and telling the owner that everyone drank for free on me for the rest of the afternoon. Soon a guitar appeared and songs were being sang. And then a conga line formed. I don't remember much else after that . . . until my credit card bill arrived. Ouch. But it was worth it.

5. Be busy, but not rushed. Keep making progress during the day, but take time to take pictures or lay on the grass and watch the fluffy clouds slowly moving overhead.

6. Surround yourself with the right people. When choosing a Camino family, find people who like to wake up at the same time, walk the same distances, walk at the same pace, and take the same number of breaks.

7. Don't sweat the small stuff. For me, pilgrims who constantly worried about every little detail and fretted over the possibly of something going wrong were the ones I least wanted to be around.

8. Celebrate other people's success. On my second Camino there was a school teacher from Australia that walked slower than everyone. She usually didn't arrive at our destination until after 6 pm. The best part of the day was loudly celebrating her arrival.

9. Treat everyone with respect and kindness. In other words, do not flip on lights at 5 am and then rustle plastic bags.

10. Be optimistic. Just the thought that there might be a random bar around the next corner makes the next five minutes interesting.

11. Be proactive about relationships. In other words, invest in getting to know others. Be a constructive listener and not a conversation narcissist.

12. Get enough sleep. This of course assumes the bag rustlers and light flippers are proactive about relationships.

13. Spend time in nature. Rather than just walk, actually take in the nature around you. Look at the desert flowers blooming on the Meseta. Smell the corn growing in the fields. Smile at the dairy cattle in Galicia. Absorb your environment.

14. View problems as challenges. The only albergue in town is full? Cool! Check with the bartender down the street to see if there are any rooms to rent in town. Or stop in the church and ask the priest if a pew is available for the evening.

15. Reward yourself. Go ahead, have another dessert.

16. Express gratitude. Let the people of Spain know that you appreciate their hospitality with a gracias to anyone who even smiles in your direction.

17. Dream big. Is there any better way to fall asleep each night than dreaming about that moment of finally standing in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela?

18. Spend time alone. Sure, join a Camino family, but make sure there is an hour or two every day when you walk alone, to meditate, to think, to dream big . . .

19. Don't make excuses. If you are a 5 am plastic bag rustler, please don't say, "I didn't realize that it was that loud," when you get those well deserved dirty looks.

20. Have a growth mindset. Don't let arriving in Santiago de Compostela be the end of your Camino. Make it the beginning of your Camino through life.

21. Spend money on experiences, not material things. You've invested a lot of your time and money into walking the Camino. Don't waste it by spending time shopping or watching videos on your iPhone. Put your phone in your pack and invest time getting to know other pilgrims.

22. Have a morning ritual. Ah, yes . . . tortilla and a Pepsi every morning before hitting the road.

23. Take care of yourself. Routinely check those feet for hotspots before they become blisters.

24. Make use of your character strengths. I'm a criminal defense lawyer, so my character strength of being able to cross examine a witness until they yell, "Okay, I'm making the whole story up!" was not useful on the Camino.

25. Engage in deep, meaningful conversations. My best memories of the Camino are the conversations. I have walked with a record executive that had Bono's cell phone number, a man diagnosed with MS who wanted to take on one last physical challenge before his health began to deteriorate any further, a woman who walked with a pronounced limp to celebrate beating cancer and a stroke at the same time, a woman who walked because she wanted to regain her feeling of security after being assaulted by a stranger six months earlier, and a man who wanted to be a better husband so he walked from SJPP to Santiago to inventory his life. I could go on and on, but you get the point. It's the conversations that last with you.
 
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Anamya

Keeping it simple
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I'm a criminal defense lawyer, so my character strength of being able to cross examine a witness until they yell, "Okay, I'm making the whole story up!" was not useful on the Camino.

Wow, then you met some seasoned story tellers! :p

Loved the list, thanks for posting it. Your comments are also a lot of fun!
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
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I loved this list and agree with all your personal comments and observations...except my morning tortilla is always brought to me with a grande cup of cafe con leche. ;) And I live near many cornfields but didn't know they have a definate smell of thier own. I guess I only smell the roses. Lol.
Well done, Robert!
 
Last edited:

Bad Pilgrim

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
The Washington Post summarized a paper on the habits of successful and happy people that was recently published in Psychology magazine. I was struck by how many of these habits directly applied or related to a successful and happy Camino.

1. Savor the moment. Literally stop and smell the roses. When walking the Camino, stop and turn around to see the beautiful sunrise behind you or take off your boots and dip your feet into a cool stream.

2. Mediate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?

3. Don't hold grudges. Is there anything more liberating than leaving a small stone at the Cruz de Ferro to symbolize letting go of mistakes and regrets?

4. Spend money on others. One of my best memories on the Camino was walking into a bar filled with pilgrims just before Pedrouzo and telling the owner that everyone drank for free on me for the rest of the afternoon. Soon a guitar appeared and songs were being sang. And then a conga line formed. I don't remember much else after that . . . until my credit card bill arrived. Ouch. But it was worth it.

5. Be busy, but not rushed. Keep making progress during the day, but take time to take pictures or lay on the grass and watch the fluffy clouds slowly moving overhead.

6. Surround yourself with the right people. When choosing a Camino family, find people who like to wake up at the same time, walk the same distances, walk at the same pace, and take the same number of breaks.

7. Don't sweat the small stuff. For me, pilgrims who constantly worried about every little detail and fretted over the possibly of something going wrong were the ones I least wanted to be around.

8. Celebrate other people's success. On my second Camino there was a school teacher from Australia that walked slower than everyone. She usually didn't arrive at our destination until after 6 pm. The best part of the day was loudly celebrating her arrival.

9. Treat everyone with respect and kindness. In other words, do not flip on lights at 5 am and then rustle plastic bags.

10. Be optimistic. Just the thought that there might be a random bar around the next corner makes the next five minutes interesting.

11. Be proactive about relationships. In other words, invest in getting to know others. Be a constructive listener and not a conversation narcissist.

12. Get enough sleep. This of course assumes the bag rustlers and light flippers are proactive about relationships.

13. Spend time in nature. Rather than just walk, actually take in the nature around you. Look at the desert flowers blooming on the Meseta. Smell the corn growing in the fields. Smile at the dairy cattle in Galicia. Absorb your environment.

14. View problems as challenges. The only albergue in town is full? Cool! Check with the bartender down the street to see if there are any rooms to rent in town. Or stop in the church and ask the priest if a pew is available for the evening.

15. Reward yourself. Go ahead, have another dessert.

16. Express gratitude. Let the people of Spain know that you appreciate their hospitality with a gracias to anyone who even smiles in your direction.

17. Dream big. Is there any better way to fall asleep each night than dreaming about that moment of finally standing in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela?

18. Spend time alone. Sure, join a Camino family, but make sure there is an hour or two every day when you walk alone, to mediate, to think, to dream big . . .

19. Don't make excuses. If you are a 5 am plastic bag rustler, please don't say, "I didn't realize that it was that loud," when you get those well deserved dirty looks.

20. Have a growth mindset. Don't let arriving in Santiago de Compostela be the end of your Camino. Make it the beginning of your Camino through life.

21. Spend money on experiences, not material things. You've invested a lot of your time and money into walking the Camino. Don't waste it by spending time shopping or watching videos on your iPhone. Put your phone in your pack and invest time getting to know other pilgrims.

22. Have a morning ritual. Ah, yes . . . tortilla and a Pepsi every morning before hitting the road.

23. Take care of yourself. Routinely check those feet for hotspots before they become blisters.

24. Make use of your character strengths. I'm a criminal defense lawyer, so my character strength of being able to cross examine a witness until they yell, "Okay, I'm making the whole story up!" was not useful on the Camino.

25. Engage in deep, meaningful conversations. My best memories of the Camino are the conversations. I have walked with a record executive that had Bono's cell phone number, a man diagnosed with MS who wanted to take on one last physical challenge before his health began to deteriorate any further, a woman who walked with a pronounced limp to celebrate beating cancer and a stroke at the same time, a woman who walked because she wanted to regain her feeling of security after being assaulted by a stranger six months earlier, and a man who wanted to be a better husband so he walked from SJPP to Santiago to inventory his life. I could go on and on, but you get the point. It's the conversations that last with you.

Wow! I hope I never meet anyone that does all of this at the same time... He/she must be hovering three inches above the ground (a real saint)!! X0D Sorry, I didn't mean to be sarcastic! I just think this would be a very difficult person to get along with... At least for me!! :0D

Just joking ;0D !!

BP
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
The Washington Post summarized a paper on the habits of successful and happy people that was recently published in Psychology magazine. I was struck by how many of these habits directly applied or related to a successful and happy Camino.

1. Savor the moment. Literally stop and smell the roses. When walking the Camino, stop and turn around to see the beautiful sunrise behind you or take off your boots and dip your feet into a cool stream.

2. Mediate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?

3. Don't hold grudges. Is there anything more liberating than leaving a small stone at the Cruz de Ferro to symbolize letting go of mistakes and regrets?

4. Spend money on others. One of my best memories on the Camino was walking into a bar filled with pilgrims just before Pedrouzo and telling the owner that everyone drank for free on me for the rest of the afternoon. Soon a guitar appeared and songs were being sang. And then a conga line formed. I don't remember much else after that . . . until my credit card bill arrived. Ouch. But it was worth it.

5. Be busy, but not rushed. Keep making progress during the day, but take time to take pictures or lay on the grass and watch the fluffy clouds slowly moving overhead.

6. Surround yourself with the right people. When choosing a Camino family, find people who like to wake up at the same time, walk the same distances, walk at the same pace, and take the same number of breaks.

7. Don't sweat the small stuff. For me, pilgrims who constantly worried about every little detail and fretted over the possibly of something going wrong were the ones I least wanted to be around.

8. Celebrate other people's success. On my second Camino there was a school teacher from Australia that walked slower than everyone. She usually didn't arrive at our destination until after 6 pm. The best part of the day was loudly celebrating her arrival.

9. Treat everyone with respect and kindness. In other words, do not flip on lights at 5 am and then rustle plastic bags.

10. Be optimistic. Just the thought that there might be a random bar around the next corner makes the next five minutes interesting.

11. Be proactive about relationships. In other words, invest in getting to know others. Be a constructive listener and not a conversation narcissist.

12. Get enough sleep. This of course assumes the bag rustlers and light flippers are proactive about relationships.

13. Spend time in nature. Rather than just walk, actually take in the nature around you. Look at the desert flowers blooming on the Meseta. Smell the corn growing in the fields. Smile at the dairy cattle in Galicia. Absorb your environment.

14. View problems as challenges. The only albergue in town is full? Cool! Check with the bartender down the street to see if there are any rooms to rent in town. Or stop in the church and ask the priest if a pew is available for the evening.

15. Reward yourself. Go ahead, have another dessert.

16. Express gratitude. Let the people of Spain know that you appreciate their hospitality with a gracias to anyone who even smiles in your direction.

17. Dream big. Is there any better way to fall asleep each night than dreaming about that moment of finally standing in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela?

18. Spend time alone. Sure, join a Camino family, but make sure there is an hour or two every day when you walk alone, to mediate, to think, to dream big . . .

19. Don't make excuses. If you are a 5 am plastic bag rustler, please don't say, "I didn't realize that it was that loud," when you get those well deserved dirty looks.

20. Have a growth mindset. Don't let arriving in Santiago de Compostela be the end of your Camino. Make it the beginning of your Camino through life.

21. Spend money on experiences, not material things. You've invested a lot of your time and money into walking the Camino. Don't waste it by spending time shopping or watching videos on your iPhone. Put your phone in your pack and invest time getting to know other pilgrims.

22. Have a morning ritual. Ah, yes . . . tortilla and a Pepsi every morning before hitting the road.

23. Take care of yourself. Routinely check those feet for hotspots before they become blisters.

24. Make use of your character strengths. I'm a criminal defense lawyer, so my character strength of being able to cross examine a witness until they yell, "Okay, I'm making the whole story up!" was not useful on the Camino.

25. Engage in deep, meaningful conversations. My best memories of the Camino are the conversations. I have walked with a record executive that had Bono's cell phone number, a man diagnosed with MS who wanted to take on one last physical challenge before his health began to deteriorate any further, a woman who walked with a pronounced limp to celebrate beating cancer and a stroke at the same time, a woman who walked because she wanted to regain her feeling of security after being assaulted by a stranger six months earlier, and a man who wanted to be a better husband so he walked from SJPP to Santiago to inventory his life. I could go on and on, but you get the point. It's the conversations that last with you.
A great list, although I assume that #2 is "Meditate daily" instead of "Mediate daily". Unless there tends to be a lot of arguments in your Camino family and you are the one sorting them out.
 

Bala

Veteran member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances: SJPdP-Burgos, (2015); Burgos-Sarria (2018); Sarria-Santiago (2018).
Frances (2020)
...except my morning tortilla is always brought to me with a grande cup of cafe con leche. ;)
BTW, if I ever need an attorney, I'd love to hire you! Well done, Robert!

I'm firmly in the "tortilla y cafe con leche, grande por favor!!" camp. :D And I agree about the attorney. Although I hope I'm never involved in a criminal trial, Robert!
 
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Denmars girl

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
I plan to walk the Camino May/June 2019. It will be my first time! :-)
This goes well with another list I like. 5 habits of people who live long and healthy lives:
They
1. Drink 1 - 2 coffees a day
2. Drink 1 -2 drinks a day
3. Are slightly over weight
4. Are slightly hypertensive
5. Have a good social network
Is the latter list true? I hope so!
 
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Via Francigena (2018); Via Podiensis (4-6, 2020)
Great list! As a former defense attorney, I can relate to #24. I also paid for an evening of bar drinks and had a jolly good time until I saw the bill later, haha!
 

Jodyon the Road

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Ingles A Coruna to Santiago
This goes well with another list I like. 5 habits of people who live long and healthy lives:
They
1. Drink 1 - 2 coffees a day
2. Drink 1 -2 drinks a day
3. Are slightly over weight
4. Are slightly hypertensive
5. Have a good social network
I think your list with Robert's list make for a well rounded traveler!
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2018
The Washington Post summarized a paper on the habits of successful and happy people that was recently published in Psychology magazine. I was struck by how many of these habits directly applied or related to a successful and happy Camino.

1. Savor the moment. Literally stop and smell the roses. When walking the Camino, stop and turn around to see the beautiful sunrise behind you or take off your boots and dip your feet into a cool stream.

2. Meditate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?

3. Don't hold grudges. Is there anything more liberating than leaving a small stone at the Cruz de Ferro to symbolize letting go of mistakes and regrets?

4. Spend money on others. One of my best memories on the Camino was walking into a bar filled with pilgrims just before Pedrouzo and telling the owner that everyone drank for free on me for the rest of the afternoon. Soon a guitar appeared and songs were being sang. And then a conga line formed. I don't remember much else after that . . . until my credit card bill arrived. Ouch. But it was worth it.

5. Be busy, but not rushed. Keep making progress during the day, but take time to take pictures or lay on the grass and watch the fluffy clouds slowly moving overhead.

6. Surround yourself with the right people. When choosing a Camino family, find people who like to wake up at the same time, walk the same distances, walk at the same pace, and take the same number of breaks.

7. Don't sweat the small stuff. For me, pilgrims who constantly worried about every little detail and fretted over the possibly of something going wrong were the ones I least wanted to be around.

8. Celebrate other people's success. On my second Camino there was a school teacher from Australia that walked slower than everyone. She usually didn't arrive at our destination until after 6 pm. The best part of the day was loudly celebrating her arrival.

9. Treat everyone with respect and kindness. In other words, do not flip on lights at 5 am and then rustle plastic bags.

10. Be optimistic. Just the thought that there might be a random bar around the next corner makes the next five minutes interesting.

11. Be proactive about relationships. In other words, invest in getting to know others. Be a constructive listener and not a conversation narcissist.

12. Get enough sleep. This of course assumes the bag rustlers and light flippers are proactive about relationships.

13. Spend time in nature. Rather than just walk, actually take in the nature around you. Look at the desert flowers blooming on the Meseta. Smell the corn growing in the fields. Smile at the dairy cattle in Galicia. Absorb your environment.

14. View problems as challenges. The only albergue in town is full? Cool! Check with the bartender down the street to see if there are any rooms to rent in town. Or stop in the church and ask the priest if a pew is available for the evening.

15. Reward yourself. Go ahead, have another dessert.

16. Express gratitude. Let the people of Spain know that you appreciate their hospitality with a gracias to anyone who even smiles in your direction.

17. Dream big. Is there any better way to fall asleep each night than dreaming about that moment of finally standing in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela?

18. Spend time alone. Sure, join a Camino family, but make sure there is an hour or two every day when you walk alone, to meditate, to think, to dream big . . .

19. Don't make excuses. If you are a 5 am plastic bag rustler, please don't say, "I didn't realize that it was that loud," when you get those well deserved dirty looks.

20. Have a growth mindset. Don't let arriving in Santiago de Compostela be the end of your Camino. Make it the beginning of your Camino through life.

21. Spend money on experiences, not material things. You've invested a lot of your time and money into walking the Camino. Don't waste it by spending time shopping or watching videos on your iPhone. Put your phone in your pack and invest time getting to know other pilgrims.

22. Have a morning ritual. Ah, yes . . . tortilla and a Pepsi every morning before hitting the road.

23. Take care of yourself. Routinely check those feet for hotspots before they become blisters.

24. Make use of your character strengths. I'm a criminal defense lawyer, so my character strength of being able to cross examine a witness until they yell, "Okay, I'm making the whole story up!" was not useful on the Camino.

25. Engage in deep, meaningful conversations. My best memories of the Camino are the conversations. I have walked with a record executive that had Bono's cell phone number, a man diagnosed with MS who wanted to take on one last physical challenge before his health began to deteriorate any further, a woman who walked with a pronounced limp to celebrate beating cancer and a stroke at the same time, a woman who walked because she wanted to regain her feeling of security after being assaulted by a stranger six months earlier, and a man who wanted to be a better husband so he walked from SJPP to Santiago to inventory his life. I could go on and on, but you get the point. It's the conversations that last with you.
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco(2017) Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(2019) CF
"2. Meditate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?"

No. Nothing is more hypnotic. I cringe when I hear people telling others to skip the Meseta ! To me, it was one of the few places where I felt so much at peace, not having to fret over every step and where to place your feet, avoiding muck, slugs, holes....Just walking, no stress. Mindless, mindful walking.

Very much enjoyed your thoughts, thank you.
 
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Baba John

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015 Frances, 2017 Frances, 2019 Frances
"2. Meditate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?"

No. Nothing is more hypnotic. I cringe when I hear people telling others to skip the Meseta ! To me, it was one of the few places where I felt so much at peace, not having to fret over every step and where to place your feet, avoiding muck, slugs, holes....Just walking, no stress. Mindless, mindful walking.

Very much enjoyed your thoughts, thank you.


I whole heartedly agree.

The Mesata is the 'crockpot' of the Camino. You sink to the bottom and become part of the stew. The long soaking in the silence and the small villages that feed you are a balm to the heart and, gentle fuel for the spirit.
If the CF has a repository for its soul, it's in the Mesata. The opportunity for transendence is given a ripe opportunity to develop and express itself as one wanders the seemingly endless gravel path on the way to Santiago.

Peace be with you.

Buen Camino.
 
Last edited:

Craglin

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
-Did St Jean Pied de Port to Pamplona July 2017. Planning Pamplona to Burgos 2018
Finish rest later
The Washington Post summarized a paper on the habits of successful and happy people that was recently published in Psychology magazine. I was struck by how many of these habits directly applied or related to a successful and happy Camino.

1. Savor the moment. Literally stop and smell the roses. When walking the Camino, stop and turn around to see the beautiful sunrise behind you or take off your boots and dip your feet into a cool stream.

2. Meditate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?

3. Don't hold grudges. Is there anything more liberating than leaving a small stone at the Cruz de Ferro to symbolize letting go of mistakes and regrets?

4. Spend money on others. One of my best memories on the Camino was walking into a bar filled with pilgrims just before Pedrouzo and telling the owner that everyone drank for free on me for the rest of the afternoon. Soon a guitar appeared and songs were being sang. And then a conga line formed. I don't remember much else after that . . . until my credit card bill arrived. Ouch. But it was worth it.

5. Be busy, but not rushed. Keep making progress during the day, but take time to take pictures or lay on the grass and watch the fluffy clouds slowly moving overhead.

6. Surround yourself with the right people. When choosing a Camino family, find people who like to wake up at the same time, walk the same distances, walk at the same pace, and take the same number of breaks.

7. Don't sweat the small stuff. For me, pilgrims who constantly worried about every little detail and fretted over the possibly of something going wrong were the ones I least wanted to be around.

8. Celebrate other people's success. On my second Camino there was a school teacher from Australia that walked slower than everyone. She usually didn't arrive at our destination until after 6 pm. The best part of the day was loudly celebrating her arrival.

9. Treat everyone with respect and kindness. In other words, do not flip on lights at 5 am and then rustle plastic bags.

10. Be optimistic. Just the thought that there might be a random bar around the next corner makes the next five minutes interesting.

11. Be proactive about relationships. In other words, invest in getting to know others. Be a constructive listener and not a conversation narcissist.

12. Get enough sleep. This of course assumes the bag rustlers and light flippers are proactive about relationships.

13. Spend time in nature. Rather than just walk, actually take in the nature around you. Look at the desert flowers blooming on the Meseta. Smell the corn growing in the fields. Smile at the dairy cattle in Galicia. Absorb your environment.

14. View problems as challenges. The only albergue in town is full? Cool! Check with the bartender down the street to see if there are any rooms to rent in town. Or stop in the church and ask the priest if a pew is available for the evening.

15. Reward yourself. Go ahead, have another dessert.

16. Express gratitude. Let the people of Spain know that you appreciate their hospitality with a gracias to anyone who even smiles in your direction.

17. Dream big. Is there any better way to fall asleep each night than dreaming about that moment of finally standing in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela?

18. Spend time alone. Sure, join a Camino family, but make sure there is an hour or two every day when you walk alone, to meditate, to think, to dream big . . .

19. Don't make excuses. If you are a 5 am plastic bag rustler, please don't say, "I didn't realize that it was that loud," when you get those well deserved dirty looks.

20. Have a growth mindset. Don't let arriving in Santiago de Compostela be the end of your Camino. Make it the beginning of your Camino through life.

21. Spend money on experiences, not material things. You've invested a lot of your time and money into walking the Camino. Don't waste it by spending time shopping or watching videos on your iPhone. Put your phone in your pack and invest time getting to know other pilgrims.

22. Have a morning ritual. Ah, yes . . . tortilla and a Pepsi every morning before hitting the road.

23. Take care of yourself. Routinely check those feet for hotspots before they become blisters.

24. Make use of your character strengths. I'm a criminal defense lawyer, so my character strength of being able to cross examine a witness until they yell, "Okay, I'm making the whole story up!" was not useful on the Camino.

25. Engage in deep, meaningful conversations. My best memories of the Camino are the conversations. I have walked with a record executive that had Bono's cell phone number, a man diagnosed with MS who wanted to take on one last physical challenge before his health began to deteriorate any further, a woman who walked with a pronounced limp to celebrate beating cancer and a stroke at the same time, a woman who walked because she wanted to regain her feeling of security after being assaulted by a stranger six months earlier, and a man who wanted to be a better husband so he walked from SJPP to Santiago to inventory his life. I could go on and on, but you get the point. It's the conversations that last with you.
Great advice! Why else walk El Camino?
 

efdoucette

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2011 Camino Frances
Since 2011 - too many to list
"conversation narcissist" - haha love it. Yeah they are everywhere. You can be a friend, entertain, prod a conversation but it's not about "me", it's mostly about the people in our life (even if it's just for a moment on the trail).
 
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Unie

Irish in QLD Australia
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, May 2019
The Washington Post summarized a paper on the habits of successful and happy people that was recently published in Psychology magazine. I was struck by how many of these habits directly applied or related to a successful and happy Camino.

1. Savor the moment. Literally stop and smell the roses. When walking the Camino, stop and turn around to see the beautiful sunrise behind you or take off your boots and dip your feet into a cool stream.

2. Meditate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?

3. Don't hold grudges. Is there anything more liberating than leaving a small stone at the Cruz de Ferro to symbolize letting go of mistakes and regrets?

4. Spend money on others. One of my best memories on the Camino was walking into a bar filled with pilgrims just before Pedrouzo and telling the owner that everyone drank for free on me for the rest of the afternoon. Soon a guitar appeared and songs were being sang. And then a conga line formed. I don't remember much else after that . . . until my credit card bill arrived. Ouch. But it was worth it.

5. Be busy, but not rushed. Keep making progress during the day, but take time to take pictures or lay on the grass and watch the fluffy clouds slowly moving overhead.

6. Surround yourself with the right people. When choosing a Camino family, find people who like to wake up at the same time, walk the same distances, walk at the same pace, and take the same number of breaks.

7. Don't sweat the small stuff. For me, pilgrims who constantly worried about every little detail and fretted over the possibly of something going wrong were the ones I least wanted to be around.

8. Celebrate other people's success. On my second Camino there was a school teacher from Australia that walked slower than everyone. She usually didn't arrive at our destination until after 6 pm. The best part of the day was loudly celebrating her arrival.

9. Treat everyone with respect and kindness. In other words, do not flip on lights at 5 am and then rustle plastic bags.

10. Be optimistic. Just the thought that there might be a random bar around the next corner makes the next five minutes interesting.

11. Be proactive about relationships. In other words, invest in getting to know others. Be a constructive listener and not a conversation narcissist.

12. Get enough sleep. This of course assumes the bag rustlers and light flippers are proactive about relationships.

13. Spend time in nature. Rather than just walk, actually take in the nature around you. Look at the desert flowers blooming on the Meseta. Smell the corn growing in the fields. Smile at the dairy cattle in Galicia. Absorb your environment.

14. View problems as challenges. The only albergue in town is full? Cool! Check with the bartender down the street to see if there are any rooms to rent in town. Or stop in the church and ask the priest if a pew is available for the evening.

15. Reward yourself. Go ahead, have another dessert.

16. Express gratitude. Let the people of Spain know that you appreciate their hospitality with a gracias to anyone who even smiles in your direction.

17. Dream big. Is there any better way to fall asleep each night than dreaming about that moment of finally standing in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela?

18. Spend time alone. Sure, join a Camino family, but make sure there is an hour or two every day when you walk alone, to meditate, to think, to dream big . . .

19. Don't make excuses. If you are a 5 am plastic bag rustler, please don't say, "I didn't realize that it was that loud," when you get those well deserved dirty looks.

20. Have a growth mindset. Don't let arriving in Santiago de Compostela be the end of your Camino. Make it the beginning of your Camino through life.

21. Spend money on experiences, not material things. You've invested a lot of your time and money into walking the Camino. Don't waste it by spending time shopping or watching videos on your iPhone. Put your phone in your pack and invest time getting to know other pilgrims.

22. Have a morning ritual. Ah, yes . . . tortilla and a Pepsi every morning before hitting the road.

23. Take care of yourself. Routinely check those feet for hotspots before they become blisters.

24. Make use of your character strengths. I'm a criminal defense lawyer, so my character strength of being able to cross examine a witness until they yell, "Okay, I'm making the whole story up!" was not useful on the Camino.

25. Engage in deep, meaningful conversations. My best memories of the Camino are the conversations. I have walked with a record executive that had Bono's cell phone number, a man diagnosed with MS who wanted to take on one last physical challenge before his health began to deteriorate any further, a woman who walked with a pronounced limp to celebrate beating cancer and a stroke at the same time, a woman who walked because she wanted to regain her feeling of security after being assaulted by a stranger six months earlier, and a man who wanted to be a better husband so he walked from SJPP to Santiago to inventory his life. I could go on and on, but you get the point. It's the conversations that last with you.
Loved this, thanks for sharing
 

Rhun Leeding

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Leon to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2015
Camino Ingles & Santiago to Finisterre & Muxia Sept/Oct 2016
#26 - ignore all of the points on the list that you don't like!

But really - a very good list. I'm not sure if my habit counts as a morning ritual, but always be the last out of bed, and skip the first couple of cafes! Maybe I'm weird, but unless there was a long stretch before the first cafe (10k+), I'd rather have a few miles in the legs before breakfast.
 

Jan_89

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francés: July/August 2014

Camino Francés: May/June 2017
Woow! So good! Thanks for sharing! 👍
Haha and the morning ritual.. 😄 For me it was: un café con leche, tortilla y zumo de naranja.. Every single day! 😍
 

Gerry McCulloch

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
23 May 2019
The Washington Post summarized a paper on the habits of successful and happy people that was recently published in Psychology magazine. I was struck by how many of these habits directly applied or related to a successful and happy Camino.

1. Savor the moment. Literally stop and smell the roses. When walking the Camino, stop and turn around to see the beautiful sunrise behind you or take off your boots and dip your feet into a cool stream.

2. Meditate daily. Is there anything more hypnotic than the rhythmic sound of gravel crunching beneath your boots on the Meseta?

3. Don't hold grudges. Is there anything more liberating than leaving a small stone at the Cruz de Ferro to symbolize letting go of mistakes and regrets?

4. Spend money on others. One of my best memories on the Camino was walking into a bar filled with pilgrims just before Pedrouzo and telling the owner that everyone drank for free on me for the rest of the afternoon. Soon a guitar appeared and songs were being sang. And then a conga line formed. I don't remember much else after that . . . until my credit card bill arrived. Ouch. But it was worth it.

5. Be busy, but not rushed. Keep making progress during the day, but take time to take pictures or lay on the grass and watch the fluffy clouds slowly moving overhead.

6. Surround yourself with the right people. When choosing a Camino family, find people who like to wake up at the same time, walk the same distances, walk at the same pace, and take the same number of breaks.

7. Don't sweat the small stuff. For me, pilgrims who constantly worried about every little detail and fretted over the possibly of something going wrong were the ones I least wanted to be around.

8. Celebrate other people's success. On my second Camino there was a school teacher from Australia that walked slower than everyone. She usually didn't arrive at our destination until after 6 pm. The best part of the day was loudly celebrating her arrival.

9. Treat everyone with respect and kindness. In other words, do not flip on lights at 5 am and then rustle plastic bags.

10. Be optimistic. Just the thought that there might be a random bar around the next corner makes the next five minutes interesting.

11. Be proactive about relationships. In other words, invest in getting to know others. Be a constructive listener and not a conversation narcissist.

12. Get enough sleep. This of course assumes the bag rustlers and light flippers are proactive about relationships.

13. Spend time in nature. Rather than just walk, actually take in the nature around you. Look at the desert flowers blooming on the Meseta. Smell the corn growing in the fields. Smile at the dairy cattle in Galicia. Absorb your environment.

14. View problems as challenges. The only albergue in town is full? Cool! Check with the bartender down the street to see if there are any rooms to rent in town. Or stop in the church and ask the priest if a pew is available for the evening.

15. Reward yourself. Go ahead, have another dessert.

16. Express gratitude. Let the people of Spain know that you appreciate their hospitality with a gracias to anyone who even smiles in your direction.

17. Dream big. Is there any better way to fall asleep each night than dreaming about that moment of finally standing in front of the Cathedral in Santiago de Compostela?

18. Spend time alone. Sure, join a Camino family, but make sure there is an hour or two every day when you walk alone, to meditate, to think, to dream big . . .

19. Don't make excuses. If you are a 5 am plastic bag rustler, please don't say, "I didn't realize that it was that loud," when you get those well deserved dirty looks.

20. Have a growth mindset. Don't let arriving in Santiago de Compostela be the end of your Camino. Make it the beginning of your Camino through life.

21. Spend money on experiences, not material things. You've invested a lot of your time and money into walking the Camino. Don't waste it by spending time shopping or watching videos on your iPhone. Put your phone in your pack and invest time getting to know other pilgrims.

22. Have a morning ritual. Ah, yes . . . tortilla and a Pepsi every morning before hitting the road.

23. Take care of yourself. Routinely check those feet for hotspots before they become blisters.

24. Make use of your character strengths. I'm a criminal defense lawyer, so my character strength of being able to cross examine a witness until they yell, "Okay, I'm making the whole story up!" was not useful on the Camino.

25. Engage in deep, meaningful conversations. My best memories of the Camino are the conversations. I have walked with a record executive that had Bono's cell phone number, a man diagnosed with MS who wanted to take on one last physical challenge before his health began to deteriorate any further, a woman who walked with a pronounced limp to celebrate beating cancer and a stroke at the same time, a woman who walked because she wanted to regain her feeling of security after being assaulted by a stranger six months earlier, and a man who wanted to be a better husband so he walked from SJPP to Santiago to inventory his life. I could go on and on, but you get the point. It's the conversations that last with you.
Brilliant post 👏👏🎩
 
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Finisterre

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
though I'm not massively outwardly successful
I have to agree.
I do all those things.
And I'm happy with my lot.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
A great "old post" to have been resurrected! Especially now as we are more "alone" to ponder many things.
 

Delphinoula

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
C. PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C.Franconia 2019 C.Algeciras Sevillia 2019
Swabian C. (2020)
Great post
me coming from a country of thinkers and poets, now of planners and horders, I get that list thing.
God gave us 10 things to do or not,
Jesus one , and modern psychology 25.
It sound like a long to do list with the catchy phrase of successful ( whatever this is) and happy.
If life was only a cook book.
If you are blessed by the time your hair turns grey you will have found out what is good for you and you are of quality to act on it. On the Camino that’s called life.
 
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