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Luggage Transfer Correos

3 Weeks to go

0 Euro Camino Bank Note

David with new Kit!

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September (2019)
Three weeks to go, and as seems the tradition of newbies I’m going to share my thoughts and experiences so far as I feel I have benefited from the posts of others before me.

My preparation started almost 12 months ago when I started buying books and reading the forums. My first revelation is that my treasured walking gear was no good for what was before me. No technical clothing at all – It was even more galling when my wife announced she was already aware of, and buying the correct gear.

That smug feeling lasted only until she bought her first pair of “proper” Merrell trekking shoes from a standard shoe shop last December, from a busy assistant who knew nothing about trekking shoes. Fast forward 3 months when we had to go to a proper outdoor specialist shop to get measured (with walking socks) for new shoes and we discovered her shoes were a ½ size too small. No wonder they didn’t feel right - An expensive mistake, always get professionally measured for your shoes or boots.

Clothing. I won’t list my choices but suffice to say I have taken the advice of others on this forum. I will be taking the clothes I travel in and 2 other changes. Today I will be getting measured for my own trekking shoes (maybe boots) as my comfy boots are starting to chaff around the ankles, so they must go.

We started walking our local hills around a year ago, but very irregularly, now of course we are doing it every week. Its quite a challenging hilly route of around 13 miles for the round trip so we are reasonably confident we are fit enough for the challenge. (The Malvern hill range in England)

Rucksack. We got professionally fitted, both with Osprey, mine is 33 litres my wife got 31 litres and both are the correct size for our kit. We have only been wearing them on our walks for the last 2 weeks, so more to do before setting off. Having not had a rucksack before I had no idea what size I needed as capacities meant nothing to me. So, I put all my kit into a dry pack and took it with me to the same specialist shop, and that’s how I discovered what capacity works for me. So, if you are taking similar kit to me, 31 litres for ladies and 33 litres for gents is ample. For the plane in Europe don't expect to get it on-board as hand luggage, its too hit and miss as dimension, weight and shape various between carriers. Ours is travelling in the hold. I have decided its safest to put it in a large lightweight 40 litre dry bag to keep it safe while on the conveyor belts, not to mention the bright colour making it easy to find again!

We both bought 1.5 litre water bladders (Osprey) and feel it’s the right balance of weight and water capacity for us. Taking the advice from others we will also take a 0.5 litre water bottle for those “quick” fills at fountains where it would be a pain refilling a water bladder.

One item that has proven very useful is a small set of scales. My “lightweight” trekking trousers turned out not to be as lightweight as I thought and are now my winter trousers. Same with one of my outer layers, that’s been relegated to winter too.
My rucksack weighs in at 7kg with the 1.5 litres of water included and I’ll try to refine that further before we go. Who knows, we might be brave enough to ditch the 3rd set of clothes. I need to think how I can pitch that one to “she who must be obeyed”!!

Its taken a long time for us to choose and refine our kit, starting off early and learning before we go has been very useful.
We are fortunate that we live in the UK and its relatively east to travel around Europe and we will start at SJPP and have a slow walk to Logrono before getting the train up to Bilbao for our return flight to exit Spain. Assuming we enjoy the trip (why would we not!) we will return in 2020 to complete it after I retire.

Having no fixed return date sounds very good to me.

I must go and get my feet measured now………..

Oh, one last thing, my wife benefits from reading similar posts from ladies to get their perspective, so get typing ladies.
 

Davie Blisters

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
It is eternity now, it always has been and it always will be. We are in the midst of it.
You may want to save yourselves a few quid by taking your backpacks as carry-on. I have a 32L and never put it in the hold. If you have walking-poles, carriers such as Easyjet will allow you to put them in the hold free of charge. Buen Camino
 

David with new Kit!

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September (2019)
Thanks Davie - I travel quite a bit in Europe and randomly they have either decided my bag or my wife's bag was to be subjected to the dreaded " if it fits it can come on" test and not always accepted. I agree with you though as I have seen others doing it. But, as its my first trip with a rucksack I have already "bit the bullet" and paid.

Hopefully on my return visit to finish the Camino I will be a bit braver!!
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF2012,Le Puy/CF 2015 Portugues 2017 Norte 2018, CF 2019
It is always better to take your backpack on the plane. In my 4 camino I have flown from United States or Mexico and then have always had to take short hope flights from either, Paris, London, Madrid, Barcelona and Santiago and have never had a problem taking my pack which is 43 liters. There aren't too many bigger bummers than arriving at baggage claim and your backpack is lost. If you are bringing poles you can put them in a small box and check it. If those get lost you can always get another pair pretty easily.
 

David with new Kit!

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September (2019)
I'm beginning to see the light, I hadn't spotted many posts on actually travelling with rucksacks on flights, most post were to do with sizes of rucksacks and how to wear them. Looks like I could have done with spotting more posts on options for flights with rucksacks!!

Hopefully others will learn from this feedback and have confidence to take it as hand luggage. I reckon that is what I will do next time.

Thank you both for the travel tips with poles too.
 

Dennis D

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés - 2014
Francés - 2015
Francés - 2016
Francés - 2017
Francés - 2018
Francés - 2019
(2020 - ?)
There are a lot of opinions about water bladders already posted on this forum. But, If it was me, I would leave it at home. I carry one 1/2 liter water bottle in the pocket of my jacket or hanging from the front strap on my backpack if the weather is too warm for a jacket. Ninety percent of the time, you are no more than an hour's walk between villages or towns (water sources). I refill my bottle at every opportunity. The other ten percent, take a second water bottle along. That should be plenty of water for September.

There should be no problem taking your back pack on the plane. I don't hassle with trying to bring walking sticks, I buy an affordable pair in Spain and when I finish my walk, I donate them at the Pilgrim office in Santiago.

I only brought one change of clothes except for underwear. I bring two extra pair. (At my age, you never know :rolleyes:)

Buen Camino,

P.S. If you feet can make it, the rest of you will follow
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2019)
Apologies in advance for the lengthy, rambling post.
My husband and I, like Dave with New Kit, are counting the days to start our first Camino. We start walking the Camino Frances on Tuesday, September 10 and are planning on 40-45 days. We both just retired and have no time constraints. I have also been watching and reading the forum, talking with friends who have walked the Camino Frances and over the year we've been buying our "gear" piece by piece. This forum has been so helpful. We hope to carry on our backpacks (38L) but I think it's a 50-50 chance. We're flying SAS to Europe and actually went to the airport to see if the packs would fit. It was tight, but did fit. As a backup in case we can't carry on, we are bringing a medium sized duffel bag that will serve as carry on for the items we want to make sure are with us. That serves two purposes since we are staying in Europe for a while before returning and will carry some of our "after pilgrim" clothing and will send ahead to Santiago.

The hardest thing for me was to find a pack that fit properly. I've tried three (thank you REI) and finally settling on the Osprey Jade.

Carrying our fears: I think about the saying that we "carry our fears" - and I know that's what I'm doing. In my preliminary packing I have cold medicine, benedryl, immodium, tums, tylenol, cortisone and a few other items. I've had the unfortunate experience when traveling in the past of getting food poisoning (twice) and colds. I know there are pharmacies along the way.......

My preliminary weight is 17 lbs (not including water) I want to get that down to 15 lbs or less.

I am taking three changes of clothing. Based on a recommendation from a previous female pilgrim. I purchased a Macabi skirt - also taking one pair of shorts and one pair of long pants, two short sleeve and one long sleeve shirt. Too much?

I've looked at experienced pilgrims' packing list - and need to do that again - and take a deep breath and "let go".
 

K Turner

One step at a time
Camino(s) past & future
14 August 2019 (SJPdP 16 August)
Three weeks to go, and as seems the tradition of newbies I’m going to share my thoughts and experiences so far as I feel I have benefited from the posts of others before me.

My preparation started almost 12 months ago when I started buying books and reading the forums. My first revelation is that my treasured walking gear was no good for what was before me. No technical clothing at all – It was even more galling when my wife announced she was already aware of, and buying the correct gear.

That smug feeling lasted only until she bought her first pair of “proper” Merrell trekking shoes from a standard shoe shop last December, from a busy assistant who knew nothing about trekking shoes. Fast forward 3 months when we had to go to a proper outdoor specialist shop to get measured (with walking socks) for new shoes and we discovered her shoes were a ½ size too small. No wonder they didn’t feel right - An expensive mistake, always get professionally measured for your shoes or boots.

Clothing. I won’t list my choices but suffice to say I have taken the advice of others on this forum. I will be taking the clothes I travel in and 2 other changes. Today I will be getting measured for my own trekking shoes (maybe boots) as my comfy boots are starting to chaff around the ankles, so they must go.

We started walking our local hills around a year ago, but very irregularly, now of course we are doing it every week. Its quite a challenging hilly route of around 13 miles for the round trip so we are reasonably confident we are fit enough for the challenge. (The Malvern hill range in England)

Rucksack. We got professionally fitted, both with Osprey, mine is 33 litres my wife got 31 litres and both are the correct size for our kit. We have only been wearing them on our walks for the last 2 weeks, so more to do before setting off. Having not had a rucksack before I had no idea what size I needed as capacities meant nothing to me. So, I put all my kit into a dry pack and took it with me to the same specialist shop, and that’s how I discovered what capacity works for me. So, if you are taking similar kit to me, 31 litres for ladies and 33 litres for gents is ample. For the plane in Europe don't expect to get it on-board as hand luggage, its too hit and miss as dimension, weight and shape various between carriers. Ours is travelling in the hold. I have decided its safest to put it in a large lightweight 40 litre dry bag to keep it safe while on the conveyor belts, not to mention the bright colour making it easy to find again!

We both bought 1.5 litre water bladders (Osprey) and feel it’s the right balance of weight and water capacity for us. Taking the advice from others we will also take a 0.5 litre water bottle for those “quick” fills at fountains where it would be a pain refilling a water bladder.

One item that has proven very useful is a small set of scales. My “lightweight” trekking trousers turned out not to be as lightweight as I thought and are now my winter trousers. Same with one of my outer layers, that’s been relegated to winter too.
My rucksack weighs in at 7kg with the 1.5 litres of water included and I’ll try to refine that further before we go. Who knows, we might be brave enough to ditch the 3rd set of clothes. I need to think how I can pitch that one to “she who must be obeyed”!!

Its taken a long time for us to choose and refine our kit, starting off early and learning before we go has been very useful.
We are fortunate that we live in the UK and its relatively east to travel around Europe and we will start at SJPP and have a slow walk to Logrono before getting the train up to Bilbao for our return flight to exit Spain. Assuming we enjoy the trip (why would we not!) we will return in 2020 to complete it after I retire.

Having no fixed return date sounds very good to me.

I must go and get my feet measured now………..

Oh, one last thing, my wife benefits from reading similar posts from ladies to get their perspective, so get typing ladies.
Greetings to both of you! My husband and I are leaving in three days and I definitely understand the growing excitement.

Buen Camino!
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
Three weeks to go, and as seems the tradition of newbies I’m going to share my thoughts and experiences so far as I feel I have benefited from the posts of others before me.

My preparation started almost 12 months ago when I started buying books and reading the forums. My first revelation is that my treasured walking gear was no good for what was before me. No technical clothing at all – It was even more galling when my wife announced she was already aware of, and buying the correct gear.

That smug feeling lasted only until she bought her first pair of “proper” Merrell trekking shoes from a standard shoe shop last December, from a busy assistant who knew nothing about trekking shoes. Fast forward 3 months when we had to go to a proper outdoor specialist shop to get measured (with walking socks) for new shoes and we discovered her shoes were a ½ size too small. No wonder they didn’t feel right - An expensive mistake, always get professionally measured for your shoes or boots.

Clothing. I won’t list my choices but suffice to say I have taken the advice of others on this forum. I will be taking the clothes I travel in and 2 other changes. Today I will be getting measured for my own trekking shoes (maybe boots) as my comfy boots are starting to chaff around the ankles, so they must go.

We started walking our local hills around a year ago, but very irregularly, now of course we are doing it every week. Its quite a challenging hilly route of around 13 miles for the round trip so we are reasonably confident we are fit enough for the challenge. (The Malvern hill range in England)

Rucksack. We got professionally fitted, both with Osprey, mine is 33 litres my wife got 31 litres and both are the correct size for our kit. We have only been wearing them on our walks for the last 2 weeks, so more to do before setting off. Having not had a rucksack before I had no idea what size I needed as capacities meant nothing to me. So, I put all my kit into a dry pack and took it with me to the same specialist shop, and that’s how I discovered what capacity works for me. So, if you are taking similar kit to me, 31 litres for ladies and 33 litres for gents is ample. For the plane in Europe don't expect to get it on-board as hand luggage, its too hit and miss as dimension, weight and shape various between carriers. Ours is travelling in the hold. I have decided its safest to put it in a large lightweight 40 litre dry bag to keep it safe while on the conveyor belts, not to mention the bright colour making it easy to find again!

We both bought 1.5 litre water bladders (Osprey) and feel it’s the right balance of weight and water capacity for us. Taking the advice from others we will also take a 0.5 litre water bottle for those “quick” fills at fountains where it would be a pain refilling a water bladder.

One item that has proven very useful is a small set of scales. My “lightweight” trekking trousers turned out not to be as lightweight as I thought and are now my winter trousers. Same with one of my outer layers, that’s been relegated to winter too.
My rucksack weighs in at 7kg with the 1.5 litres of water included and I’ll try to refine that further before we go. Who knows, we might be brave enough to ditch the 3rd set of clothes. I need to think how I can pitch that one to “she who must be obeyed”!!

Its taken a long time for us to choose and refine our kit, starting off early and learning before we go has been very useful.
We are fortunate that we live in the UK and its relatively east to travel around Europe and we will start at SJPP and have a slow walk to Logrono before getting the train up to Bilbao for our return flight to exit Spain. Assuming we enjoy the trip (why would we not!) we will return in 2020 to complete it after I retire.

Having no fixed return date sounds very good to me.

I must go and get my feet measured now………..

Oh, one last thing, my wife benefits from reading similar posts from ladies to get their perspective, so get typing ladies.
Nice post! I'm a 63 year-old woman and this will be my first Camino. I'm taking 2 sets of clothing but 5 pairs of socks (3 long, 2 short) and 2 pairs of Injinji liners. I'm using water bottles with a CamelBak hose instead of a bladder because the water gets too warm in the bladder (I sweat a lot).
I have been fitted for 3 backpacks and 6 pairs of shoes, and I finally decided on my shoes today. They're lightweight Solomon mid-rise boots. I leave on September 4th so I don't have a lot of time to break them in.
I'm carrying an Osprey 36L Sirrus onboard with me. I've previously carried a 44L onboard to and from the US with no problems. Some countries and carriers won't let you bring poles onboard so I'm buying them in SJPDP. I know I can't bring them on board flying out of Santiago.
Most of the weight I'm carrying is in my first aid kit and my toiletries, despite the fact that I have cut them down to my personal minimum. I'm not taking one soap bar for everything because my hair can't take it. I'll take a small amount of shampoo, some shower soap, and a small laundry bar.
Please have your wife post or reply here if she has any questions!
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature
Thanks Davie - I travel quite a bit in Europe and randomly they have either decided my bag or my wife's bag was to be subjected to the dreaded " if it fits it can come on" test and not always accepted. I agree with you though as I have seen others doing it. But, as its my first trip with a rucksack I have already "bit the bullet" and paid.

Hopefully on my return visit to finish the Camino I will be a bit braver!!
Hi David with new Kit! I also fly from the UK and have always put my rucksack in the hold ... (I probably wouldn’t if I was changing planes....)
If you fly from Gatwick, take it to the ‘oversize’ luggage place after checking it in. They seem to take good care of it.
Buen camino!
 

Meggins

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - One complete St.J.P.P to Santiago plus twice more for 500km each time.
Nice post! I'm a 63 year-old woman and this will be my first Camino. I'm taking 2 sets of clothing but 5 pairs of socks (3 long, 2 short) and 2 pairs of Injinji liners. I'm using water bottles with a CamelBak hose instead of a bladder because the water gets too warm in the bladder (I sweat a lot).
I have been fitted for 3 backpacks and 6 pairs of shoes, and I finally decided on my shoes today. They're lightweight Solomon mid-rise boots. I leave on September 4th so I don't have a lot of time to break them in.
I'm carrying an Osprey 36L Sirrus onboard with me. I've previously carried a 44L onboard to and from the US with no problems. Some countries and carriers won't let you bring poles onboard so I'm buying them in SJPDP. I know I can't bring them on board flying out of Santiago.
Most of the weight I'm carrying is in my first aid kit and my toiletries, despite the fact that I have cut them down to my personal minimum. I'm not taking one soap bar for everything because my hair can't take it. I'll take a small amount of shampoo, some shower soap, and a small laundry bar.
Please have your wife post or reply here if she has any questions!
I bring a bottle of either Johnsons or Aveeno Baby body & hairwash - in the bigger towns you can get similar. I use it for body , hair and laundry. I will be also heading out in early September - maybe see you along The Way!! Buen Camino
 

taigirl

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
Nice post! I'm a 63 year-old woman and this will be my first Camino. I'm taking 2 sets of clothing but 5 pairs of socks (3 long, 2 short) and 2 pairs of Injinji liners. I'm using water bottles with a CamelBak hose instead of a bladder because the water gets too warm in the bladder (I sweat a lot).
I have been fitted for 3 backpacks and 6 pairs of shoes, and I finally decided on my shoes today. They're lightweight Solomon mid-rise boots. I leave on September 4th so I don't have a lot of time to break them in.
I'm carrying an Osprey 36L Sirrus onboard with me. I've previously carried a 44L onboard to and from the US with no problems. Some countries and carriers won't let you bring poles onboard so I'm buying them in SJPDP. I know I can't bring them on board flying out of Santiago.
Most of the weight I'm carrying is in my first aid kit and my toiletries, despite the fact that I have cut them down to my personal minimum. I'm not taking one soap bar for everything because my hair can't take it. I'll take a small amount of shampoo, some shower soap, and a small laundry bar.
Please have your wife post or reply here if she has any questions!
I am also mid sixties and walking first Camino in two weeks. It's the toiletries and first aid stuff that cause the most weight. I thought I had my packing sorted, one long hiking pants, one cotton three-quarters and one trackie pants for evening, three tops, a set of thin, light thermals and one Uniqlo down jacket. Looking at the weather, I am wondering if I am packing too warm. Aagh.
 

Evvie

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2019
I am also mid sixties and walking first Camino in two weeks. It's the toiletries and first aid stuff that cause the most weight. I thought I had my packing sorted, one long hiking pants, one cotton three-quarters and one trackie pants for evening, three tops, a set of thin, light thermals and one Uniqlo down jacket. Looking at the weather, I am wondering if I am packing too warm. Aagh.
I know! I've been reading suggestions, recommendations, and comments for months now. Every time I think I have things finalized I add or subtract something else. I know we're supposed to leave our fears behind us and that there's nothing you can't buy along the Camino and I'm trying really hard to keep that in mind! As for clothes, I'm taking two zip-off hiking pants, 2 long-sleeve shirts, and one base layer top/bottom. I'll have a pair of leggings for the evening. A lightweight puffy jacket and a rain jacket and that's it. Who can say if we're packing too warm? I've read that the weather is always unpredictable, from temperature to precipitation. In September/October it looks like the highs will be in the 60's and 70's, with 40's and 50's at night. Buen Camino!
 
Last edited:

Gerrard

New Member
We are 2nd timers. If u want to enjoy your pilgrimage suggest keep the weight to a minimum. Your feet are far and away the most important consideration. We use trail running shoes one size bigger that we normally wear. Double marino sox, very thin and vasiline on the feet every morning. We don't carry water as there is plenty of good drinking water on the trail. Buen Camino.
 

David with new Kit!

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September (2019)
2 weeks now!! and we are still refining our packing list, but it is definitely thinning out.
My wife particularly like this posting by Elle Bieling as its a ladies perspective on packing


I like the tip about Johnsons or Aveeno Baby body & hairwash above.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
We both bought 1.5 litre water bladders (Osprey) and feel it’s the right balance of weight and water capacity for us. Taking the advice from others we will also take a 0.5 litre water bottle for those “quick” fills at fountains where it would be a pain refilling a water bladder.
It is quite easy to refill a water bladder/reservoir when you add an inexpensive quick connect refill attachment to the reservoirs drinking tube. In fact, you don't even need to take off your backpack to do so. Quick and easy. If attached information I posted from an earlier thread below. Feel free to PM me if you have questions.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

For those interested in adding a quick disconnect adapter to your hydration reservoir/bladder, I've added a link below. With the quick disconnect added, I don't even need to remove my pack to do a quick and easy refill of the bladder.

The video shows the quick disconnect being used with a water filter as it might be used for wilderness backpacking. It is the way I have it set up when I am backpacking. However, on camino I left off the filter altogether. Instead of the filter being added to the refill cap on the flexible water bottle, skip the filter and screw the refill adapter cap -- sans filter -- to the bottle after it is filled with water.


This is what the kit looks like. it can be ordered from Osprey or Amazon or it is easy to find in backpacking shops (at least in the US)
For refill bottles.... I use extremely lightweight collapsible bottles that can hold up to 2 liters. Empty, they roll down to a small bundle that are easily stashed in an outside pocket. Many times, I will carry 1/2 liter in the bottle as a quick backup if the weather or the distance between water refills dictates. The refill container in the video is just one option. The refill adapter can also fit on a variety of bottled water containers, if so desired.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000J2KEGY/?tag=casaivar02-20

Hopefully this will help those who favor using a water reservoir/bladder extend the ease of its usability. It takes me about 30 seconds or so to add a fresh 1 liter of water to my reservoir. Less for 1/2 liter.
 

Mycroft

Member
You may want to save yourselves a few quid by taking your backpacks as carry-on. I have a 32L and never put it in the hold. If you have walking-poles, carriers such as Easyjet will allow you to put them in the hold free of charge. Buen Camino
Davie, is it really true that easyjet doesn't charge for walking sticks?! I thought all those cheapo airlines filled their coffers by 'nickel-and-diming' their passengers! Does easyjet have that written somewhere that they won't charge???
 

Mycroft

Member
We are 2nd timers. If u want to enjoy your pilgrimage suggest keep the weight to a minimum. Your feet are far and away the most important consideration. We use trail running shoes one size bigger that we normally wear. Double marino sox, very thin and vasiline on the feet every morning. We don't carry water as there is plenty of good drinking water on the trail. Buen Camino.
Not every Camino 'trail' has easy access to water. Are you referring to the Camino Frances?
Not being a fan of putting petroleum products on my body, I settle for a homemade lanolin/shea butter combo for my feet.
 

Mycroft

Member
Nice post! I'm a 63 year-old woman and this will be my first Camino. I'm taking 2 sets of clothing but 5 pairs of socks (3 long, 2 short) and 2 pairs of Injinji liners. I'm using water bottles with a CamelBak hose instead of a bladder because the water gets too warm in the bladder (I sweat a lot).
I have been fitted for 3 backpacks and 6 pairs of shoes, and I finally decided on my shoes today. They're lightweight Solomon mid-rise boots. I leave on September 4th so I don't have a lot of time to break them in.
I'm carrying an Osprey 36L Sirrus onboard with me. I've previously carried a 44L onboard to and from the US with no problems. Some countries and carriers won't let you bring poles onboard so I'm buying them in SJPDP. I know I can't bring them on board flying out of Santiago.
Most of the weight I'm carrying is in my first aid kit and my toiletries, despite the fact that I have cut them down to my personal minimum. I'm not taking one soap bar for everything because my hair can't take it. I'll take a small amount of shampoo, some shower soap, and a small laundry bar.
Please have your wife post or reply here if she has any questions!
Wondering if you've tried LUSH shampoo bar? And deodorant?
 

David with new Kit!

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September (2019)
2 weeks now!! and we are still refining our packing list, but it is definitely thinning out.
My wife particularly like this posting by Elle Bieling as its a ladies perspective on packing


I like the tip about Johnsons or Aveeno Baby body & hairwash above.
Update - We just bought the Aveeno Baby body & hairwash :cool:
 

David with new Kit!

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September (2019)
It's arrived!!

We just arrived in Roncesvalles after around 9hrs which included Orisson coffee stop and the van just before the border (yes, he was there)

We met lots of wonderfull people from many countries. You are never short of a friend on the Camino and everyone walks at their own pace and you see the same people several times over the day due to different paces and different stopping points.

Coming out of SJPP on the Napoleon route you meet your first hill within 2 minutes. Get used to it as it continues all the way to Orisson. Have a good stop as it's relentless for the next 6hrs afterwards too. The walking is mostly good.

But, pick a sensible pace and it's not too bad. Trecking shoes are fine for this leg and boots work too if you need ankle support.


It was around 20c but the humidity was very high, like walking in a sauna.

Wonderful views.

Must get to bed, Zubiri tomorrow.

Weather was meant to be wet but held off until Roncesvalles.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, Madrid (2019) Portuges (2020)
I'm beginning to see the light, I hadn't spotted many posts on actually travelling with rucksacks on flights, most post were to do with sizes of rucksacks and how to wear them. Looks like I could have done with spotting more posts on options for flights with rucksacks!!

Hopefully others will learn from this feedback and have confidence to take it as hand luggage. I reckon that is what I will do next time.

Thank you both for the travel tips with poles too.
If I’m doing a single flight with no connections, I check my rucksack.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, Madrid (2019) Portuges (2020)
Apologies in advance for the lengthy, rambling post.
My husband and I, like Dave with New Kit, are counting the days to start our first Camino. We start walking the Camino Frances on Tuesday, September 10 and are planning on 40-45 days. We both just retired and have no time constraints. I have also been watching and reading the forum, talking with friends who have walked the Camino Frances and over the year we've been buying our "gear" piece by piece. This forum has been so helpful. We hope to carry on our backpacks (38L) but I think it's a 50-50 chance. We're flying SAS to Europe and actually went to the airport to see if the packs would fit. It was tight, but did fit. As a backup in case we can't carry on, we are bringing a medium sized duffel bag that will serve as carry on for the items we want to make sure are with us. That serves two purposes since we are staying in Europe for a while before returning and will carry some of our "after pilgrim" clothing and will send ahead to Santiago.

The hardest thing for me was to find a pack that fit properly. I've tried three (thank you REI) and finally settling on the Osprey Jade.

Carrying our fears: I think about the saying that we "carry our fears" - and I know that's what I'm doing. In my preliminary packing I have cold medicine, benedryl, immodium, tums, tylenol, cortisone and a few other items. I've had the unfortunate experience when traveling in the past of getting food poisoning (twice) and colds. I know there are pharmacies along the way.......

My preliminary weight is 17 lbs (not including water) I want to get that down to 15 lbs or less.

I am taking three changes of clothing. Based on a recommendation from a previous female pilgrim. I purchased a Macabi skirt - also taking one pair of shorts and one pair of long pants, two short sleeve and one long sleeve shirt. Too much?

I've looked at experienced pilgrims' packing list - and need to do that again - and take a deep breath and "let go".
Clothes - too many

Planning - excellent

Degree of trepidation - excessive

You'll love it.

After the first two days it’s a village to village (or town) walk through a developed civilised country with more English-speaking pharmacies than you would believe.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2017, 2018, 2019, Ingles 2018, Madrid (2019) Portuges (2020)
It's arrived!!

We just arrived in Roncesvalles after around 9hrs which included Orisson coffee stop and the van just before the border (yes, he was there)

We met lots of wonderfull people from many countries. You are never short of a friend on the Camino and everyone walks at their own pace and you see the same people several times over the day due to different paces and different stopping points.

Coming out of SJPP on the Napoleon route you meet your first hill within 2 minutes. Get used to it as it continues all the way to Orisson. Have a good stop as it's relentless for the next 6hrs afterwards too. The walking is mostly good.

But, pick a sensible pace and it's not too bad. Trecking shoes are fine for this leg and boots work too if you need ankle support.


It was around 20c but the humidity was very high, like walking in a sauna.

Wonderful views.

Must get to bed, Zubiri tomorrow.

Weather was meant to be wet but held off until Roncesvalles.
It’s all (relatively) downhill from there.

Pamplona soon: woo-hoo!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
It's arrived!!

We just arrived in Roncesvalles after around 9hrs which included Orisson coffee stop and the van just before the border (yes, he was there)

We met lots of wonderfull people from many countries. You are never short of a friend on the Camino and everyone walks at their own pace and you see the same people several times over the day due to different paces and different stopping points.

Coming out of SJPP on the Napoleon route you meet your first hill within 2 minutes. Get used to it as it continues all the way to Orisson. Have a good stop as it's relentless for the next 6hrs afterwards too. The walking is mostly good.

But, pick a sensible pace and it's not too bad. Trecking shoes are fine for this leg and boots work too if you need ankle support.


It was around 20c but the humidity was very high, like walking in a sauna.

Wonderful views.

Must get to bed, Zubiri tomorrow.

Weather was meant to be wet but held off until Roncesvalles.
Well done to you both. I peeked in to your post having misread kit for kilt! You had such a sensible approach, and you got great benefit from asking your questions. go easy, and enjoy it all.
 

David with new Kit!

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances September (2019)
Just an update.

We have just arrived in Logrono with very tired feet. Brierley got it right about the "gift" of the concrete path into Logrono.

When you pass the large sign advising you are in the Rioja region there is no longer any dirt path so feel free to exchange your boots/shoes for your comfy shoes.

We take the train to Bilbao tomorrow for our flight home the following day as we have now run out of time.

The biggest highlight for us both is the people we met along the way and looking forward already to my retirement next year when we will have the time to return to Logrono and finish the walk.

Buen Camino
 

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