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60 and over on the Camino

Costas

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk in 2015
One immutable law of the camino is to never brag about how old you,and how far you have walked. Because right beside you will be someone who is considerably older, and who has walked much further.
Alan
Be brave. Life is joyous.
P.S. I am only 66.
Right you are Alan! Us young 60s and 70s don't need to brag any more. Nice part of the world you come from, Cowra. Cheers, Costas.
 

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Coleen Clark

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked August 2015, planning on walking August 2017
Hi,
My daughter say's that age is only a number and we are as old as we feel.
She has asked that the next woman I bring home be at least older than she (36).
Finished the Caminho Portugese two weeks ago at 66. The Camino Frances at 62.
Take your time, smell the roses and..,
Buen Camino,
Arn
Most people bring smaller souvenirs home than women. Perhaps you should start with bringing your daughter magnets or mugs and work your way up to a puppy before bringing any more women home. She will thank you. Believe me.
 

madcamino

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
Sixty is definitely not too old. We're trying to get throught the harder routes in our 60's so that we can do the easier ones in our 70's and 80's.

We don't stay in those refugios with all those kids much though....
are currently doing Camino Frances Neil is 77 and I am 58 - refugio are OK but we opt out for our own room every 4 or 5 nights. We are taking at our own pace and Neil at 77 is way ahead of me each day and we meet at night
 

Gerard Hazelebach

Gerard and Paulien
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPdP - Santiago) September "2014"
And preparing for "The Peace Walk) leaving Vienna August 20 2015
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.

Hi there, Last year, my wife (54) and I (turned 60 on the Camino) walked the French way in September. We had no problems what so ever. Important is that keep the weight of your packs as low as possible and that your shoes are well broken in. You realy don't need a lot of stuff. The most important htings on the Camino are your fee and a good spirit. We stayed in all the big cities along the route ( Pamplona, Burgos and Leon) an extra day or two to recuperate a little and to visit those wonderfull cities. I would advise you to walk the French Way and not hte Camino del Norte, because there is far more flexibility in your choice of stops along the way. On the Norte, several times you simply HAVE to walk a certain distance to get to the next albergue. We never did anything more then 25 - 28 KM's a day. Lots of days we simply walked no more then 20 - 22. I don't know how time you both can spend walking the Camino, but we had no set # of days, so were very flexible and we truly enjoyed that.
I hope this will give you some confidence.

BUEN CAMINO
 

Jacobus

Pilgrim since 2008
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2008 09 14
Del Norte 2011. Portuguese 2015, 2017Ingles 2015 Fisterre 2015.
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
Good morning.
I walked my first Camino shortly after I turned 56. I will be 63 this year as I commence my 5th Camino.
On my first I had doubts about my ability to complete the task. I faced the Pyrenees and was unsure of making Roncesvalles from SJPP in one go. In retrospect the fears were unfounded.
After that first day I felt I could conquer the world.
You will probably develope blisters no matter how good your shoes and socks and ointments and powders. Leg and foot pain despite miles of preparatory walks. Sore shoulders from carrying your back pack over great distances. Not to mention sun burn and the odd mosquito bite, thorn scratch and soaking in the rain.
But all of that is overcome by the entity that is "el Camino de Santiago".
Don't be surprised if the Camino bug bites more than once.
Buen Camino!
 

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Ricka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
Im 63 and went from Leon to Santiago
in 2 weeks and 2 days. I liked to start early and stop early. I walk slow anyway and I was extra slow. I wanted to take it all in. I would start to think about stopping when my shoulder straps started to dig in. I'm going again
soon. Maybe the Portuguese route.
Rick
 

TerryB

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte/Primitivo (April/May) 2009: Norte/Primitivo (parts) (April/May) 2010: Inglés (May) 2011: Primitivo (April/May) 2012: Norte / Camino de La Reina (April/May) 2013: Camino del Mar / Inglés (May/June) 2015
I would advise you to walk the French Way and not hte Camino del Norte, because there is far more flexibility in your choice of stops along the way. On the Norte, several times you simply HAVE to walk a certain distance to get to the next albergue. We never did anything more then 25 - 28 KM's a day. Lots of days we simply walked no more then 20 - 22. I don't know how time you both can spend walking the Camino, but we had no set # of days, so were very flexible and we truly enjoyed that.. . . . . .
There may be some advantages in walking the Camino Francés. However my first Camino, after my retirement at 65, was the Norte from Santander and onto the Primitivo. This was against much of the advice that I was given at the time but I never regretted my choice. Walking on my own, my stops for the night were easy to find. If there was no albergue I simply asked in the first bar in the town or village if they knew of someone who had "habitaciones". As I remember I never got a negative answer! My advice would be, decide what you want from your camino and then look at all the options.
As an aside, I have walked the Camino Primitivo twice and the Camino Inglés twice. Although shorter, I have found the Inglés far harder physically because of the numerous ascents and descents.
(Edit:- Most days I walked about 15-20kms with one day of 32 kms because the walking was easy.)
Blessings on your planning
Tio Tel
 
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JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
I'm 63, as old as my tongue and older than any teeth I have left.
Last week I finished walking the Camino Primitivo.
With all due respect to every other post in this thread. I just have to say there were times when I felt every second of those 63 years
Buen (you're only as old as you feel) Camino
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
I'm with you John! Last December when arriving again in Santiago at 75 I was totally pooped. Everything ached. After sitting in the cathedral to literally catch my breath and, of course, gave thanks, all felt easier. Now in the peace of retrospection the way calls once again.
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
I'm with you John! Last December when arriving again in Santiago at 75 I was totally pooped. Everything ached. After sitting in the cathedral to literally catch my breath and, of course, gave thanks, all felt easier. Now in the peace of retrospection the way calls once again.
Then go my friend, go
 

Lachance

Me llamo Deb
Camino(s) past & future
Part Francese 2016
I'm 63, as old as my tongue and older than any teeth I have left.
Last week I finished walking the Camino Primitivo.
With all due respect to every other post in this thread. I just have to say there were times when I felt every second of those 63 years
Buen (you're only as old as you feel) Camino
Help, that's how I feel after only a bit over an hour of 'training' walk, no pack. Seems like a big stretch from that to 4+ hours pd burdened like a pack horse.
 

Cejanus

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJDP - Santiago April "2013"; European Peace Walk"2015"; VIa de la Plata "2016"
Help, that's how I feel after only a bit over an hour of 'training' walk, no pack. Seems like a big stretch from that to 4+ hours pd burdened like a pack horse.
Treat that "pack horse" well Lachance. Check the pack and chuck out some of the stuff. Make it as light as you can and I am sure that "pack horse" will be your friend. Buen camino
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
Help, that's how I feel after only a bit over an hour of 'training' walk, no pack. Seems like a big stretch from that to 4+ hours pd burdened like a pack horse.
Pack light my friend, slow down and walk the same distance in 5-6 hours that you would in 4 and my guess is you will be ok
Buen(slow walking)Camino
 

Ricka

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015
I'm 63, as old as my tongue and older than any teeth I have left.
Last week I finished walking the Camino Primitivo.
With all due respect to every other post in this thread. I just have to say there were times when I felt every second of those 63 years
Buen (you're only as old as you feel) Camino
Love those afternoon naps after checking in to an auberge and having a shower!
RicksRicks
 

docpam

Pam
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes, Aragonese May-June 2018
I have just finished the Primitivo. At the first albergue I was the youngest, at 67. Age is a state of mind!
With regard to blisters I walk my dogs every day wearing the same things I wore in Spain, and those are Nike Pegasus running shoes, pantyhose knee highs cut off at the ankle plus socks bought at the supermarket - I was the only person in the 'Camino family' who finished the Camino who never had a blister. Whether that is because my feet are 'used' to the 2 layers or because of the '2' layers.
 

Manu

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked from Ponferrada to Santiago April/May 2015. Will go next year to do the Camino Frances from Roncesvalles to Leon (2016)
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
Labtails, I'm 65. I walked last April/May 2015 from Ponferrada to Santiago. I did it in eight days for a 25km walk per day average. I started with a backpack of no more than 14 pounds. It is not too heavy but you´ll find your back soaked with transpiration fairly often. At my first stop in Villafranca the albergue owner advised me to use JacoTrans which is a service that carrries your backpack or lugage to your next destination. From thereon I walked lightly and doubly enjoyed my Camino. If you can afford about 4 euros per tranche you will find that not carrying weight is wonderful. I´ve been many times to the Andes mountains for difficult treks and employing donkeys to carry stuff, including backpacks, is standard procedure to keep your strength for the real thing. Buen Camino and enjoy the experience. It´s fantastic!!
 

EvelynT

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April 2015
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
I'm 66 and walked the Camino Frances from SJPP this spring, alone, overweight and with little preparation. Took 40 days with little trouble. Things that worked for me: really wide shoes larger than my normal size, a really light pack and a pretty low estimate of my capability. Most people I saw who either had to abandon or were in pain had tried to do too much. Start slow. On the Frances, the worst segment is SJPP to Roncevalle. Stop in Orisson (you need a reservation in advance), get a delivery service for your pack if available (I didn't but wish I had). Maybe even hire a guide or pick up service to split the Orisson to Roncevalles segment. Everything else is doable if you go slow but steady ( I also have arthritic knees and an ACL replacement). Don't know about the Norte but have heard it is more demanding.
 

wesojourn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September (2015)
I'm 66 and walked the Camino Frances from SJPP this spring, alone, overweight and with little preparation. Took 40 days with little trouble. Things that worked for me: really wide shoes larger than my normal size, a really light pack and a pretty low estimate of my capability. Most people I saw who either had to abandon or were in pain had tried to do too much. Start slow. On the Frances, the worst segment is SJPP to Roncevalle. Stop in Orisson (you need a reservation in advance), get a delivery service for your pack if available (I didn't but wish I had). Maybe even hire a guide or pick up service to split the Orisson to Roncevalles segment. Everything else is doable if you go slow but steady ( I also have arthritic knees and an ACL replacement). Don't know about the Norte but have heard it is more demanding.
Thanks EvelynT! I am beginning my first Camino on 2 September and have prepared/trained for 3 months. Even so, at 68 I have made a reservation to pause at Orisson. Your post confirmed my decision to book this. I have been reconsidering this, not so cheap, perhaps not so pilgrim place.
 

jsalt

Jill
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
Thanks EvelynT! I am beginning my first Camino on 2 September and have prepared/trained for 3 months. Even so, at 68 I have made a reservation to pause at Orisson. Your post confirmed my decision to book this. I have been reconsidering this, not so cheap, perhaps not so pilgrim place.
Hi, Orisson is a great place to stay for the first overnight stop. There are only pilgrims staying there, all just starting out, just like you. It’s expensive because it is in France (not Spain), so the hostel rates are the normal French (not Spanish) dinner, bed and breakfast rate. Buen camino! Jill
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
After reading all of this, I can't wait to write for the 80+ folks on the Camino. I'm trying to time my first walk from Sept 25, to arrive at the Santiago de Compostela Cathedral on my 'ochenta compleano' Nov 2. Granted, my 4-year old forum photo will likely look different next year….
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugese Route, Finstere (round trip), French route
HiUOTE="Labtails, post: 79132, member: 8656"]I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.[/QUOTE]
HI I am almost 61 and have walked a few times- I would suggest that you do some walking in prep for the camino, as this will tell you alot- my thoughts on distance are that almost anyone can 10 k a day, and if you can do 10 (6 mile), you can probably do more- I find 20 kilometers is a very reasonable goal- this usually lets me finish by 1 or 2 pm with time to rest, wash up, eat, etc- I have done 30+ k a day for three days in a row, and thta does tend to wear one downQ re foing with a tour: I don't care for that myself, but it is easy to arrange transport for your main bag and just hike with a day pack- makes things a lot easier- it might also be good to not think of the Camino in its entirety, rather one day at a time (600 miles vs. 12 a day, one seems a lot more,doable than the other
Buenos camino
 

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
I'm 63.
I suggest you give yourself plenty of extra days total time, then just walk each day as much as you want.
You don't need to plan ahead - and unless you WANT a support van, you don't need one.
If you feel a stage is too long, you can call a taxi first thing and have it take you a portion of the daily stage and drop you off within the limit you're able to walk.
I haven't walked the Norte in a while, but I doubt you'll have the issue of full albergues that people who walk the Camino Francis have.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
I'm 63.
I suggest you give yourself plenty of extra days total time, then just walk each day as much as you want.
You don't need to plan ahead - and unless you WANT a support van, you don't need one.
If you feel a stage is too long, you can call a taxi first thing and have it take you a portion of the daily stage and drop you off within the limit you're able to walk.
I haven't walked the Norte in a while, but I doubt you'll have the issue of full albergues that people who walk the Camino Francis have.
Annie, you're still a kid:>)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés.
After reading all of this, I can't wait to write for the 80+ folks on the Camino. I'm trying to time my first walk from Sept 25, to arrive at the Santiago de Compostela Cathedral on my 'ochenta compleano' Nov 2. Granted, my 4-year old forum photo will likely look different next year….
movingmaggie, You don't look you are in or close to your 80's! Your photo shows a lady around her late 50's or early 60's. I am 30 years old with 30 years of experience in being 30! And you look almost at my age or even younger.
After, almost 800kms of walking, on your "Cumpleaños" you will even look younger, for sure.

Any way, Salud y Buen Camino.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
movingmaggie, You don't look you are in or close to your 80's! Your photo shows a lady around her late 50's or early 60's. I am 30 years old with 30 years of experience in being 30! And you look almost at my age or even younger.
After, almost 800kms of walking, on your "Cumpleaños" you will even look younger, for sure.

Any way, Salud y Buen Camino.
Pepin, aren't you nice. I'm usually taken for early 60s. Good genes, good wine and blessed many times over Now…as for walking the 800 kms and looking younger, I doubt it. I may in fact look 80:>) and that wouldn't bother me in the least. Thanks for your note.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future: June July 2016 Frances from St Jean
I am 68 today. I have walked the C.Frances from Roncesvalles to Santiago over three years. and most of Pamplona to Santiago last year. I was hoping to do part of Camino del Norte next spring. but have just read that the bit from Irun to Bilbao is harder than anything on the Frances. so maybe it is not for me.

I would love to start in St.Jean and go over the Pyreenees. Can anyone give me a bit of encouragement.???

Flights from Dublin to Bilbao in May are just €9.99 at present. It seems a pity to waste such good value.
I want to book and know what I am going to do. I know I can book and keep options open. bus to San Sebastian or Pamplona or Biaritz ??
Please encourage me somebody. The family here think me a bit cracked!!
Hi Lydia. I'll be 66 soon and I plan to do the full Frances from St Jean. There is some good advice in this 60 plus discussion. I am taking notes of the good advice, like, start off slow. I am a runner but all my joints are on their way out so!.... I am going to do the Camino while I can! You've done quite some walking already. Don't regret in years to come that you didn't go on the walk you are thinking about now. How's that for encouragement?!
 

wesojourn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September (2015)
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
Having completed my 'pilgrimage' from Saint Jean to Santiago on October 7, 2015, I have sensed a difference between 'trekkers' and 'pilgrims'. For the former, it may be an exercise in physicality. For the pilgrim, it may be a metaphor for life.
I live in a hilly area and thought was in shape after three months of training. I got up to 20 miles with a 20 lb. packback. The Pyrenees are not hills. In other words, your preparedness should include building endurance.
 

Devon Mike

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2014, 2015, 2016 & 2018), Primitivo & Ingles (2017)
Did my first Camino in 2014 at age 66. SJPP to Santiago, Finisterre and Muxia. 912kms/570 miles in 34 days with a 9kg pack.

My second Camino this year at age 67 was SJPP to Santiago, Finisterre and Muxia and then the walk back to Santiago. 1,006kms/629 miles in 49 days. After last year's experience, my pack weight was reduced to 5kg.

Next year's plan for my third Camino at age 68 is SJPP to Santiago, Muxia and Finisterre in 41 days.
 
Camino(s) past & future
walked Camino Frances 2012, future June 26 2016
Did my first Camino in 2014 at age 66. SJPP to Santiago, Finisterre and Muxia. 912kms/570 miles in 34 days with a 9kg pack.

My second Camino this year at age 67 was SJPP to Santiago, Finisterre and Muxia and then the walk back to Santiago. 1,006kms/629 miles in 49 days. After last year's experience, my pack weight was reduced to 5kg.

Next year's plan for my third Camino at age 68 is SJPP to Santiago, Muxia and Finisterre in 41 days.
Did my first camino frances aged 57 reaching santiago in 31 days thought I was doing alright till I met an American gent aged 72 what an example ,though a bit heavier and not as fit I have from now till to late June 2016 to prepare . Buen Camino.
 

Georgina77

Vancouver Island in December
Camino(s) past & future
Future July 2015 hopefully......... did it awesome :)
Hi I am reading about you people with the long legs and the speed of supper man and am a bit jealous as you sound like you could walk faster back wards and on one leg faster than I can forward on two but that being said I do hope your are taking time to not just walk as you can do that any where but to enjoy the walk the surroundings the people and culture that is all around you not to mention the history it is over whelming as is the art ... I can't think of when I enjoyed anything as much as I did seeing the old buildings and seeing as much as I could that brought such a joy to my spirit I cant tell you how wonderfully it effected me spiritually and physically and mentally yup I may have to go back a time or two to do all of the Camino but after my first Camino I did come home a changed woman Not younger in years maybe but a lot younger in my spirit and attitude I wish you all a buen Camino
 

Lydia Gillen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007/8/9 2011 (C.F 2015)
Hi Robert V. I am now 72. I have booked flights to and from Madrid in late April in order to walk from Burgos to Leon. This is continuing a Camino I started from St. Jean in 2012. I want to get to Santiago with this "French credential".

However last night I read that Pope Francis has said that next year is to be a year of Mercy and the Holy door is to be open. As the next holy year in Santiago is 2021 I think that I am exploring the idea of maybe going all the way to Santiago. Problem is I am expecting my sister home from abroad for the first time in many many years and she arriving 21st May. I would need to arrive home 24 hours before her!!!.

I hate not having time to go to Santo Domingo de Silos for 3 nights before I start walking and maybe not having a few days in Santiago to do the tour of the Portico de Gloria again.

Buen Camino
 

Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Infinito
Member of the over 60 gang here. In reference to next year is to be a year of Mercy and the Holy door is to be open. Full disclosure: I was not familiar with the term, so I did a google search for Holy Door (please don't tell my Catholic Nun cousin that I didn't know). Now that I know the religious meaning, will the Holy Door be open from January 1st to December 31st of next year? If not, then when? Thanks in advance and que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
 

Botaivica

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May - July 2016
SJPP - Santiago - Finisterra
May 2017
Caminho do Tejo
June 2017
Fatima - Santiago
Member of the over 60 gang here. In reference to next year is to be a year of Mercy and the Holy door is to be open. Full disclosure: I was not familiar with the term, so I did a google search for Holy Door (please don't tell my Catholic Nun cousin that I didn't know). Now that I know the religious meaning, will the Holy Door be open from January 1st to December 31st of next year? If not, then when? Thanks in advance and que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
Hi Sailor :)

Check here

Bota

http://internationalcaminoassociation.com/holy-door-of-santiagos-cathedral-to-be-open-in-2016/

 
Camino(s) past & future
Future: June July 2016 Frances from St Jean
Hi Robert V. I am now 72. I have booked flights to and from Madrid in late April in order to walk from Burgos to Leon. This is continuing a Camino I started from St. Jean in 2012. I want to get to Santiago with this "French credential".
However last night I read that Pope Francis has said that next year is to be a year of Mercy and the Holy door is to be open. As the next holy year in Santiago is 2021 I think that I am exploring the idea of maybe going all the way to Santiago. Problem is I am expecting my sister home from abroad for the first time in many many years and she arriving 21st May. I would need to arrive home 24 hours before her!!!.
I hate not having time to go to Santo Domingo de Silos for 3 nights before I start walking and maybe not having a few days in Santiago to do the tour of the Portico de Gloria again.
Buen Camino
Hi Lydia. Good on you, great to hear of your plans. You should be proud of yourself. Thank you for letting me know the great news about the Year of Mercy and about the Holy Door being opened. I just read the Pope's letter about it, exciting stuff and it is a huge insight into the mind of Pope Francis. There are big Indulgences involved in the Year of Mercy and the Holy Door (which is not only the four Papal Basilicas in Rome but is extended to every cathedral and some designated churches - so quite a few along the Camino). Did you read the part about the doorways of prison cells for believing prisoners? There are the usual thoughtful conditions to the Indulgences of course. What a time to be on the Camino in 2016.
Terrific that you will see your sister. I hope you can work out something to suit both of you. I'll send up a few prayers. Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future: June July 2016 Frances from St Jean
Did my first Camino in 2014 at age 66. SJPP to Santiago, Finisterre and Muxia. 912kms/570 miles in 34 days with a 9kg pack.

My second Camino this year at age 67 was SJPP to Santiago, Finisterre and Muxia and then the walk back to Santiago. 1,006kms/629 miles in 49 days. After last year's experience, my pack weight was reduced to 5kg.

Next year's plan for my third Camino at age 68 is SJPP to Santiago, Muxia and Finisterre in 41 days.
Hi Mike, What did you have in your 9kg and 5kg packs? I need some encouragement to keep my pack light. Well done for those walks and now plans for a third That's good encouragement for us that are over 60. I've been very impressed at all those in this thread who have written about their Camino experiences.
 

Devon Mike

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Finisterre & Muxia (2014, 2015, 2016 & 2018), Primitivo & Ingles (2017)
Hi Mike, What did you have in your 9kg and 5kg packs? I need some encouragement to keep my pack light. Well done for those walks and now plans for a third That's good encouragement for us that are over 60. I've been very impressed at all those in this thread who have written about their Camino experiences.
Hi Robert,

In 2014 I took the usual stuff I would use in the UK in May/June, but found it was significantly warmer in Spain, so this year I took one set of spare clothing less and just a silk liner instead of my ultralight 3 season sleeping bag. That also meant I could use a lighter 35 litre pack instead of my 65 litre pack. These changes gave me the saving of 4Kgs.

I have attached the packing list I used this year. I lived out of this for 7 weeks walking just over 1,000kms and it worked well so I will use the same packing list next year too.

Buen Camino,
Mike
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Future: June July 2016 Frances from St Jean
Hi Mike,

I really appreciate your helpful post and the attached packing list. I'm sure I won't be the only one that will find your post and list useful. I do like specifics, so that list is great. I intend to walk around May/June also so I might get away with something like the silk liner too although I feel the cold more than most.

A reduction of 4kg is impressive. Keep up the good work,

Buen Camino,

Robert
 

Chito

Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to begin my second Camino April 15, 2017.
hi walked camino francis 2010 at 68 walking the ingles from 29 11 2011 then on to finisterre an muxia start training early good luck john 8)
I am 69 years old. This is my first Camino. I Am in fair to good shape. I ordered some ASO ankle stabilizers but do not at present have any trouble with my ankles. Wondering if I should bring stabilizers for my ankle and braces for my knees or if I should just purchase wraps if I need them along the way. I've read some things that using ankle stabilizers if not needed could be more harmful than helpful. Any thoughts about knee or ankle support would be appreciated. Thanks
 

Noritta

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am planning to go to Camino from London. I have only 2 weeks to do it.
Which city do you suggested to me to fly?
thank you !
Hello every one!
My name is Nora.
I would like to go to Camino from London. I have only 2 weeks to do it. Which city do you suggested to me to fly from London?
Thank you for your help ! :)
 

Sweetz

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
Hi, Newfydog:
Where do you stay, then? Have any suggestions for places to stay on the Camino Frances?
I'm going in late May 2012 and trying to figure the best way to get rest and have a little privacy.:)
Being in the "2nd half of my life," I'm thinking I'll need a bit more rebound time than those fabulous youngsters! :)

Thanks!
Boz
Dear Bossie......are you going again?
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Hello every one!
My name is Nora.
I would like to go to Camino from London. I have only 2 weeks to do it. Which city do you suggested to me to fly from London?
Thank you for your help ! :)
I see that you have not had an answer to your question. If you can fly into Santiago or Coruña from London you could walk the Camino Inglés from Ferrol. Stages suggest 5 days but you can take longer if that suits you, so long as you check out where there is accommodation.
 

Noritta

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am planning to go to Camino from London. I have only 2 weeks to do it.
Which city do you suggested to me to fly?
thank you !
Thank you very much for your answer Tia!
I booked my ticket,already. I could find out which way the best for me from London.
I honored your answer! :)
Have a good day
Nóra
:)
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x3), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham.
2018? CF, again :-)
Thank you very much for your answer Tia!
I booked my ticket,already. I could find out which way the best for me from London.
I honored your answer! :)
Have a good day
Nóra
:)
Buen camino Nóra :) Which way are you going?
 

Noritta

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am planning to go to Camino from London. I have only 2 weeks to do it.
Which city do you suggested to me to fly?
thank you !
Good evening Domigee!
I will fly from Lodon to Bilbao. I will cheat a little bit out of the way.
I will take a train form Bilbao to Pamplona. From Pamplona to Leon (train again) and from Leon , I will walk to Santiago. This is my plane :)
Lets see, how will be.
What do you think? :")
Thank you and have a good night! :)
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x3), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham.
2018? CF, again :-)
Sounds great and I wish you a buen Camino! :)
 

Noritta

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I am planning to go to Camino from London. I have only 2 weeks to do it.
Which city do you suggested to me to fly?
thank you !
Thank you very much!!! :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona - Burgos
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
Hi, I am 66 ner mounth and my husband is 67. We made daly walk around 10 km for a mounth or two before our walk. We started in Pamplona and got of after 200 km. I think the main point is to adjust to your own strenth. We walked ourself meeting lots of friend ly people.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Burgos to FinistereJahnstrase ROAD
Hello,
I think we are all a little apprehensive about starting alone, its not purely a female concern. Mine at 71 is centred mainly around health, safety and total lack of Spanish. I have often been told that the Camino will take care of us, but I am not 100% sure of this.
Peregrinos look after each other. Ultreia Keith.
I walked the Camino from Burgos to Finisterre when I was 71. The Camino will indeed take care of you if you have taken care of yourself before walking. Do train with walks and light conditioning. Good boots and a light pack are essential. I was always among friends though I arrived to walk alone. I walked in April and May. Good food. Wonderful auberges. Have no fear One foot in front of another is your goal. I look forward to my next Camino as I turn to 73.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2009, Camino Finisterre, 2009, Camino Portuguese, 2009, Via de La Plata, 2011. Pending: VdlP April-May 2014
I am 68 today. I have walked the C.Frances from Roncesvalles to Santiago over three years. and most of Pamplona to Santiago last year. I was hoping to do part of Camino del Norte next spring. but have just read that the bit from Irun to Bilbao is harder than anything on the Frances. so maybe it is not for me.

I would love to start in St.Jean and go over the Pyreenees. Can anyone give me a bit of encouragement.???

Flights from Dublin to Bilbao in May are just €9.99 at present. It seems a pity to waste such good value.
I want to book and know what I am going to do. I know I can book and keep options open. bus to San Sebastian or Pamplona or Biaritz ??
Please encourage me somebody. The family here think me a bit cracked!!
Ah...to be 68 again with all that vigour, innocence, and enthusiasm. I'm 81. Allow me to encourage you. I walked from SJPdP to SdC from September 21 to October 23 this year. I met many, MANY people in their 60s and 70s. Also met a 12-year-old. Just do it. Being "cracked" is an advantage not a handicap. Am seriously considering Le Puy to SJPdP for 2018.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2017
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
My wife 61 and 1 62 walked the Camino Frances this past summer (end of Aug to beginning of Oct 2017) We were not experienced trekkers, but finished the Camino in 34 days including one day of 37kms. We travelled with out set plans, three times we sent our packs ahead because of feetX2 and shoulder painX1. It was hard and very satisfying. If you are in reasonable health you can do it. When we got to Pamplona we mailed 25% of our packs contents home. Think lightweight and good shoes--you will know your feet very well by the end of the trip.
 

Maybee

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk Camino del Norte in May
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
I walked the Way of Le Puy in a month last year. Am well over 60 but fit and a regular walker. I carried my pack all the way but it weighed only 6.5kg and thoroughly recommend travelling light. I would also recommend good leather boots, well worn in, and merino socks.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Last full Camino (ie walked, no car) was when we were nearly 67 and 72. Now at nearing 70 and 75 we take the car and walk where we want on parts of the Camino and other paths, using B&B. This means no sleeping bags needed in our packs and the clothes stay in our room (or the car) when walking. age is no deterrent and we aim to keep walking as long as we can. We probably would use bag transport now if walking the Camino as pilgrims and just carry our trusty old packs with supplies for the day and our waterproofs..
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés.
Pepin, aren't you nice. I'm usually taken for early 60s. Good genes, good wine and blessed many times over Now…as for walking the 800 kms and looking younger, I doubt it. I may in fact look 80:>) and that wouldn't bother me in the least. Thanks for your note.
Congratulations movinmaggie !
Almost more than two years since our last note just before your first FC. Going for Primitivo this year!
I wish you all the best and a wonderful Camino.
Ps. My mention about one of the Camino Mysteries at the time....has worked for you , my God... you look much younger.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
October, 2014
September, "2017"
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
Perhaps my story will help you.
I turned 72, two weeks prior to leaving for SJPdP. I walked for 35 days, averaging 14.3 miles per day and took five days off: one day in Burgos to be a tourist and enjoy the cathedral and a meal along the river at an outdoor café; three days in Leon to recover from food poisoning (I lost 15 pounds and did not have it to lose), and the last day in Astorga to have a chipped molar repaired due to eating a very hard bocadillo. I arrived in Santiago in early November, found the pilgrim office to obtain my Compostela and since it was warm inside and the line was long, proceeded to pass out due to lack of water and food as I wanted to make the mid-day mass. I was carted to the hospital where I received an IV and a serious lecture about taking time to eat and drink.

The other part of my story started a few months earlier, in April of 2017. My fingers became numb while painting and after a week without improvement went to the ER where I was diagnosed with a bad disk in my neck that was creating inflammation. After another week of no improvement (my feet were then becoming numb and I was losing my balance), I was referred to a surgeon who wanted an MRI. Once he saw it, I was told that unless surgery occurred quickly I would be paralyzed and in a wheelchair as another disk was creating a crescent indentation in my spinal cord, shutting down the electrical impulses needed for the nerves to work. I could not hold a glass of water and had very limited feeling in both hands. I was also told no exercise. After surgery, and permission to exercise was granted, I was only able to walk less than a mile with a staff for support and had but ten weeks to train prior to leaving for Madrid. I covered 550 miles during those ten weeks and felt that I could make the trip with a walking staff to support me as my balance had not recovered.
I received much help along the way from very kind pilgrims and locals. I was blessed to be able to do this and I hope that you will try as I did. The Camino should be on everyone’s bucket list as it is an experience of a lifetime. Buen camino!
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Perhaps my story will help you.
I turned 72, two weeks prior to leaving for SJPdP. I walked for 35 days, averaging 14.3 miles per day and took five days off: one day in Burgos to be a tourist and enjoy the cathedral and a meal along the river at an outdoor café; three days in Leon to recover from food poisoning (I lost 15 pounds and did not have it to lose), and the last day in Astorga to have a chipped molar repaired due to eating a very hard bocadillo. I arrived in Santiago in early November, found the pilgrim office to obtain my Compostela and since it was warm inside and the line was long, proceeded to pass out due to lack of water and food as I wanted to make the mid-day mass. I was carted to the hospital where I received an IV and a serious lecture about taking time to eat and drink.

The other part of my story started a few months earlier, in April of 2017. My fingers became numb while painting and after a week without improvement went to the ER where I was diagnosed with a bad disk in my neck that was creating inflammation. After another week of no improvement (my feet were then becoming numb and I was losing my balance), I was referred to a surgeon who wanted an MRI. Once he saw it, I was told that unless surgery occurred quickly I would be paralyzed and in a wheelchair as another disk was creating a crescent indentation in my spinal cord, shutting down the electrical impulses needed for the nerves to work. I could not hold a glass of water and had very limited feeling in both hands. I was also told no exercise. After surgery, and permission to exercise was granted, I was only able to walk less than a mile with a staff for support and had but ten weeks to train prior to leaving for Madrid. I covered 550 miles during those ten weeks and felt that I could make the trip with a walking staff to support me as my balance had not recovered.
I received much help along the way from very kind pilgrims and locals. I was blessed to be able to do this and I hope that you will try as I did. The Camino should be on everyone’s bucket list as it is an experience of a lifetime. Buen camino!
You've been snagged by an old thread. The OP has long since completed his camino :)
 

Sailor

Donante Vitalicio
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Infinito
Perhaps my story will help you . . .
Old thread but your story of courage and determination will help others. Thank you. For me it was an honor to share a couple of days with you in our 2017 camino [I was just looking at the photos in my cell phone, one of them taken by you that wet morning in front of Puente de Magdalena as we entered Pamplona]. Thanks again, y que la luz de Dios alumbre su camino.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Some of us on this 'old thread' are still here..... just that now we probably mostly qualify for the next stage of 'over 70'
 

Georgina77

Vancouver Island in December
Camino(s) past & future
Future July 2015 hopefully......... did it awesome :)
Perhaps my story will help you.
I turned 72, two weeks prior to leaving for SJPdP. I walked for 35 days, averaging 14.3 miles per day and took five days off: one day in Burgos to be a tourist and enjoy the cathedral and a meal along the river at an outdoor café; three days in Leon to recover from food poisoning (I lost 15 pounds and did not have it to lose), and the last day in Astorga to have a chipped molar repaired due to eating a very hard bocadillo. I arrived in Santiago in early November, found the pilgrim office to obtain my Compostela and since it was warm inside and the line was long, proceeded to pass out due to lack of water and food as I wanted to make the mid-day mass. I was carted to the hospital where I received an IV and a serious lecture about taking time to eat and drink.

The other part of my story started a few months earlier, in April of 2017. My fingers became numb while painting and after a week without improvement went to the ER where I was diagnosed with a bad disk in my neck that was creating inflammation. After another week of no improvement (my feet were then becoming numb and I was losing my balance), I was referred to a surgeon who wanted an MRI. Once he saw it, I was told that unless surgery occurred quickly I would be paralyzed and in a wheelchair as another disk was creating a crescent indentation in my spinal cord, shutting down the electrical impulses needed for the nerves to work. I could not hold a glass of water and had very limited feeling in both hands. I was also told no exercise. After surgery, and permission to exercise was granted, I was only able to walk less than a mile with a staff for support and had but ten weeks to train prior to leaving for Madrid. I covered 550 miles during those ten weeks and felt that I could make the trip with a walking staff to support me as my balance had not recovered.
I received much help along the way from very kind pilgrims and locals. I was blessed to be able to do this and I hope that you will try as I did. The Camino should be on everyone’s bucket list as it is an experience of a lifetime. Buen camino!
Thank you for your post I am planning to walk next year in May and June I will be 72 this Dec. I too have disc issues and I have arthritis through out my body I did the Sarria to Santiago and then Fisterra to Muxia total 146 k two years ago with the help of my son this time how ever he will not becoming with me only a neighbor I am trying to make my pack as light as possible but having some issues with that I hope that I will be able to carry it I will be using poles I have to use them all the time any way or a walker so poles are a must At times I feel a bid discouraged and think maybe I am bitting off more than I can chew as we want to go from St. Jean Pied de Port to Santiago then to Fisterra and end in Muxia she will be 65 and is in fairly good shape but has never hiked before I am in poor shape and other than the hike my son and I did two years ago have never done any thing like this ... I know it seems like a big haul but because I don't know what tomorrow holds I just feel a need to do this but at times question my sanity ..hearing your story helps me to push forward ....Thanks for your story it gives me encouragement
 

Stephen Nicholls

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
I just feel a need to do this but at times question my sanity ..
I think we all feel like this, sometimes!
I'm thinking ... just thinking you understand ... about next April 2019. I would LOVE to walk the Portuguese Coastal route, but wonder about my arthritis and hips. I shall be 80. Oh, what the heck ... time to start planning!
Buen camino!
 

Georgina77

Vancouver Island in December
Camino(s) past & future
Future July 2015 hopefully......... did it awesome :)
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
we are planing to go about May 7th 2019 or there abouts from Canada and be there till almost the end of June We hope that will give us enough time to finish up in Santiago and go on to do Fisterra and Muxia as well We will be starting from St. Jean Pied De Port we maybe a bit over estimating our selves but that is the plan I am going to be 72 my neighbor is going to be 65 I am a slow walker I have arthritis and back issues but going to give it my best shot any way .... don't plan on a support van or on sending our packs on a head We are working to try to get into shape before we go; we are not supper women and need to work hard to pull this one off especially me with all my medical issues but God willing all will be fine ; we will most likely go from St. Jean through the Pyrenees on the lower Valcarlos route and not over the Pyrenees on the Napolian route to Ronscevalles once there we will hope fully continue on the French way across Spain ( if anyone wants to join with us they are welcome we will not be going fast or breaking any records just one step at a time
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
I suspect you won’t be able to walk the six to eight hours a day that younger walkers will be doing, so be mentally prepared to stop after the two to three hours you can do. If you find yourself behind “schedule,” there are buses, taxis, and trains. Don’t ruin your experience with false expectations and discouragement. There is no wrong way to do the pilgrimage.
 
Camino(s) past & future
October, 2014
September, "2017"
we are planing to go about May 7th 2019 or there abouts from Canada and be there till almost the end of June We hope that will give us enough time to finish up in Santiago and go on to do Fisterra and Muxia as well We will be starting from St. Jean Pied De Port we maybe a bit over estimating our selves but that is the plan I am going to be 72 my neighbor is going to be 65 I am a slow walker I have arthritis and back issues but going to give it my best shot any way .... don't plan on a support van or on sending our packs on a head We are working to try to get into shape before we go; we are not supper women and need to work hard to pull this one off especially me with all my medical issues but God willing all will be fine ; we will most likely go from St. Jean through the Pyrenees on the lower Valcarlos route and not over the Pyrenees on the Napolian route to Ronscevalles once there we will hope fully continue on the French way across Spain ( if anyone wants to join with us they are welcome we will not be going fast or breaking any records just one step at a time
I was 72 when I started from SJPdP on September 27, 2017. I spent the first night at Orisson and loved it. I averaged a little over 14 miles per day (35 days of walking) and if I had not experienced food poisoning, would have enjoyed it more. Folks are very kind and helpful. I trained in the mountains where I live in North Carolina walking aver 550 miles prior to the camino, but surgery during my training slowed me down somewhat. Take it easy and you will make it. Walk at your own pace and enjoy the experience.
 
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
I am 63, I have done the camino twice and hope to make 3 in May. I have dodgy knees and have Parkinsons disease. Now if I can do it, so can you! It is not a race, don't think you have to do so many km in a certain time,enjoy yourself, rest when you feel like and don't forget, a long distance walk is only a lot of short distance ones put together! Relax, listen to your body and have a great time, Buen Camino
 
I suspect you won’t be able to walk the six to eight hours a day that younger walkers will be doing, so be mentally prepared to stop after the two to three hours you can do. If you find yourself behind “schedule,” there are buses, taxis, and trains. Don’t ruin your experience with false expectations and discouragement. There is no wrong way to do the pilgrimage.
I am in my 60 s and found that I was going a lot more than a lot of younger pilgrims!!
 
Many thanks to all the comments posted.

I will be walking, trekking, crawling (?) through my first Camino beginning around May 8th starting in StJPP. I have not done much long distance walking in preparation. I have had two hip replacements (either side). I know that when I begin to walk the hip acts up. Nevertheless my cranky hips simmer down after thirty minutes of walking.

I will try to keep my backup weight under 12 - 15 kilos (no more than 35 lbs). Sadly I also suffer from a bad back which will necessitate my carrying a back brace.

After reading several books on the Camino, I know I will develop blisters. I intend to take vaseline, moleskin and a first aid kit.

I intend to walk the Camino Frances and hopefully reach Santiago by the 45th day with planned 2 day stops in Pamplona and Burgos. Am I being realistic?

I am a faithful reader of the comments through this blog. Any further suggestions for a sixty year YOUNG man traveling alone.

Utreia e sus eia Deus adjuva nos!

John in NJ.
It's been said before but do get your weight of back pack down to below 10km, a must!!!! last year I went 42 km in one day, because I was enjoying myself and lost track of time! Buen Camino
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
I am in my 60 s and found that I was going a lot more than a lot of younger pilgrims!!
I am going to be 72 my neighbor is going to be 65 I am a slow walker I have arthritis and back issues but going to give it my best shot any way .... don't plan on a support van or on sending our packs on a head We are working to try to get into shape before we go
Each pilgrim is unique. My comment is based on the statement of condition by the Poster. I am in my seventies, and just returned from nearly six weeks on caminos in France and Spain. It gets tougher each year because I do not maintain camino-conditioning at home. The first two weeks are now conditioning weeks, and it is not possible for me to do the "journeyman" days as when I was in my sixties! The hardest part these days is not being able to live up to my expectations. The "usta" syndrome adds a psychological dimension that I did not face fifteen years ago, and each year there are more "ustas." I usta walk dawn to dusk. There is a reason that there are not a lot of ninety year old pilgrims. A few unique individuals can do it, but the number decreases each year.

As the physical journey becomes more difficult with age, the psychological journey also changes. I think older pilgrims need to anticipate that. They CAN do it, but they will be battling "usta" in ways they have not experienced.:)
 

Gillis

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances in 2014
As part of that over-60 crowd for 7 caminos, I think you can do it. Press yourself just enough for the first part to be "conditioning." Avoid overdoing it. You aren't 20, and your recovery time will be longer than in your youth. Take care of your feet. Take breaks. Stop when you are tired. Do not follow the standard camino stages; if you are good for only 6 km, then walk only 6 km. Do not try to keep up with the interesting people you meet. It will only pull you off of your own pace. Expect to hurt. Expect most of the hurt to go away each night. Accept discomfort. Avoid misery. Everything about a camino is optional, so do not burden yourself with a lot of artificial rules or expectations, particularly the rules and expectations of others. There is no right way. There is no official route, just the path the local juntas set. Most of the traditional route of yore is under pavement. There is no such thing as cheating (except if you accept a Compostela when you did not meet the criteria).

One step at a time. Have no goal except that next step. Have fun! Buen camino.
Excellent advice!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
C. de Salvador/Primitivo (2018)
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
My personal opinion: I would emphatically dissuade you from joining a tour. If you are reasonably healthy, I'd say go for it. I walked it last year at the age of 63 and had a wonderful time. I saw many pilgrims experiencing health problems, whether blisters, knee pain or even respiratory illness that, in some cases, sent them home early, but many of them were quite a lot younger than 60.

The Camino is forgiving and adaptable. Some people had a company carry their packs ahead to their next destination (it appeared to be pretty easy to do). Others took buses across segments they didn't want to walk. I haven't done the Camino del Norte, but on the Frances, you usually aren't committed to a very long walk each day... there are usually accommodations available within about 20 K. You don't have to be very ambitious. I say go for it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(Le Puy- St Jean Pied a Port (September 2018 )

St. Jean Pied a Port - Finisterre 2008
I walked the Camino Frances at 59, doing no special training, carrying a 30 year old backpack (6kg) and starting out with crappy Indian sandals someone had given me. First night out, in Roncesvalles, there was a big long table of discarded items. I selected a well broken in pair of trainers that fit fine, and they carried me all the way to the sea. ( Wasn't even tempted by the discarded pair of glittery high heels- what was she* thinking?!)
Now I am planning to set off on the Via Podiensis for my 70th birthday. Have a new pair of 2nd hand tennis shoes from a flea market in Tunis. Again no special training, except that I live a life with no car, no hot running water, many steep hills at 2,000m, and a lifetime of few mod cons. Much of it is in the mind, the rest is going slow.
*or he
 

pelerine

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, Primitivo, Plata, Salvador Torres
Hi falcon269!
The “usta” problem does not present itself if you walk your first camino when you are 70 because “usta” does not have time to establish itself. For my 70th birthday I treated myself to a walk all the way from my home on the north coast of Brittany, around Brittany and down the coast of the Atlantic and then the Norte to Santiago and to cabo de Finisterre. At the speed I managed (average 22km/day) it took me 5 months. Down to Irun I carried my tent as there are no albergues on the coast of France and then sent it bacl home. Since then I have walked several caminos and continue to plan as I am approaching my 80s.

Look at Stephen Nicholls’ post - he plans to do the Portuguese at 80 next year! I am planning to do the Olvidado at 79 next year - IF I find there are enough possibilities of accommodation to make fairly short stages.

Buen Camino to everyone whatever your age - do not let a consideration of age stop you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
Lol. I am going to be 59 this year. I am currently walking the CF, starting SJPDP. At my age & fitness, and at Stage 19, I find I can do up to 22 km per day with an 8 kg pack. I know it is 1 kg heavier than I wanted.
Sore feet love foot cream. I and other Peregrinos have been searching for foot balm/cream. Pain subsides overnight. I slow down if my legs, knees or feet are hurting. I am grateful that God and my Mammuts have brought me this far.
Time to rub my feet.
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug-Sept(2016) SJPDP-Finisterre, July-Aug(2017) SJPDP-Muxia-Finisterre, July-Aug(2018) El Norte
I walked my first Camino at 57. I’ll turn 61 on my second next year. I feel amazingly alive when walking. I hope to walk ‘til I drop.
I feel the same way. I just wish that I had discovered the Camino and my talent for long distance walking earlier in life.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May-June (2017)
Ingles-Finisterre (2018)
I walked last year at 60, one of my friends was 65. I met an 82 year old German man doing it for the fourth time...I’m in good shape and he made me look like the rookie Pilgrim that I was. If you’re in decent shape, age is a small factor, pacing yourself becomes more important I think. Walk, a lot in your boots and work up to wearing your pack, I got some great looks as I walked around Dallas. Find some hills to walk and learn your pace on them. I added a treadmill into my routine on the hill climb mode. Enjoy, Buen Camino!
 

camino-david

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
I walked my first Camino from St Jean to Finistere in 39 days at the age of 79, and honestly I found it easy. I carried my pack all the way and stayed in albergues because I enjoyed meeting people of all ages from all over the world. But I was very fit because I had done a decent walk of 20kms or so carrying my pack about twice a week, and most of the other days walked locally for about 2 hours. Since then I have walked the Frances 3 more times and several other Caminos. Never had feet problem. Never had a blister. I think the secret is fitness.
 

WalkonBy

Walk' Wounded
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Fall 2015
Upcoming, Portuguese Comino summer (2018)
Three weeks Theresa and I are leaving for loir valley wedding and then onward to Coimbra Portugal to walk the Portuguese Camino. I've only had 3 weeks to train and now I'm 31 lbs. heavier...yikes
 

tomnorth

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
Three weeks Theresa and I are leaving for loir valley wedding and then onward to Coimbra Portugal to walk the Portuguese Camino. I've only had 3 weeks to train and now I'm 31 lbs. heavier...yikes
Hey Rick, great to hear from you. I hope you and Therese have a wonderful Camino. I’m walking the Frances again next Mar/Apr. I look forward to living vicariously through your posts.
 

jkberry

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
1st 9/18
I am 60 and walking for the first time starting mid September. Will stay at Orisson and am open to anything along the way, not in a hurry. I have done very long walks for a week, but never for this long. Starting a new chapter in my life and this seems the perfect way to do it. I will be walking solo.

Have some questions: I was gifted a 45 Liter Deuter pack and a "safety yellow" separate rain cover. It this too large a pack (it fits well, I am tall) The next size down is less than one pound lighter. The safety yellow is alarmingly bright. Returning them would bit a bit of a thing since they were gifts but doable for sure. Any thoughts? I am packing light and reading all these suggestions but there are so many
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I am 60 and walking for the first time starting mid September. Will stay at Orisson and am open to anything along the way, not in a hurry. I have done very long walks for a week, but never for this long. Starting a new chapter in my life and this seems the perfect way to do it. I will be walking solo.

Have some questions: I was gifted a 45 Liter Deuter pack and a "safety yellow" separate rain cover. It this too large a pack (it fits well, I am tall) The next size down is less than one pound lighter. The safety yellow is alarmingly bright. Returning them would bit a bit of a thing since they were gifts but doable for sure. Any thoughts? I am packing light and reading all these suggestions but there are so many
I am 60 and walking for the first time starting mid September. Will stay at Orisson and am open to anything along the way, not in a hurry. I have done very long walks for a week, but never for this long. Starting a new chapter in my life and this seems the perfect way to do it. I will be walking solo.

Have some questions: I was gifted a 45 Liter Deuter pack and a "safety yellow" separate rain cover. It this too large a pack (it fits well, I am tall) The next size down is less than one pound lighter. The safety yellow is alarmingly bright. Returning them would bit a bit of a thing since they were gifts but doable for sure. Any thoughts? I am packing light and reading all these suggestions but there are so many
Size in a backpack is not based on the "volume" that the pack can carry, it is based on the "length" of the frame. When you say you were gifted, was the pack just handed to you as a present, or did you have yourself measured to determine the proper fit of the frame and other adjustments and someone it was paid for by gift certificate or such?

If the former, then the bigger concern over color is whether or not it is the proper sized pack. It is not a matter of how much 'volume' a pack can hold, it is a matter of the 'length' of the frame, along with the size of the shoulder harness and waist belt. It is also about whether the shoulder harness feels good, because the actual shape of the shoulder straps determine if they will be comfortable with your body shape.

Some manufacturers offer choices of an "S" strap shape or a "J" shape. The names reflect the actual shape of the strap. The "J" strap is the traditional shape. As women became a bigger part of the backpacking market, one of the most common complaints was that the "J" strap would rub and press against the bosom, which is not a problem for most men. The "S" shape helps eliminate, or at least markedly reduces, that issue. When fitting and trying out a pack, you can see how this might be an important thing to pay attention to. Not too surprising, there are men who prefer the "S" shape as well because of having a larger chest size. Some manufacturers have combined and modified the two shapes into a sort of 'hybrid'.

If your plan was to try and keep that specific 'model' of Deuter pack, you cannot simply go to a smaller volume bag in that same model. You get whatever volume of bag which comes with the frame size you need. In order to go to a smaller volume of pack, then you would likely need to choose a different model of Deuter.

Example: we'll pretend that your model of Deuter fits you and is a medium size. That means that it is designed to fit a person whose spine length is at the middle of Deuters sizing chart for spines. In that frame size, the bag volume is set... you will not be able to get a smaller volume bag. If your spine was shorter or longer, than those frame sizes will have bags which also will be somewhat smaller in volume, or larger in volume simply because it takes a either a bigger or smaller volume bag to fit the appropriate sized frame.

To save weight in a Deuter pack, from what you now have, look at Deuter's other models; they will have a range of different backpacks to carry larger or smaller volumes. From day packs to expedition sized bags. So, if you plan to stick with Deuter, you would need to choose a whole different model to get a smaller volume pack.

REI carries Deuter, so my first thought was that the pack came from REI where you said you bought your shoes in a separate post. When you go back to return your shoes, take the pack with you and have one of their staff check the fit. Be picky about how the pack feels as you are being fitted and then carrying it loaded with weights (REI does that), adjusting straps and belts, and checking things like head space --- does the pack allow you to move your head up and down without getting terribly in the way.

After you have done that, and you like how the pack functions and feels, then and only then worry about color :) Don't like the color? Easy fix; get a rain cover with a color you like. People have also been known to have painted the fabric with fabric paint.

Also, keep in mind that Deuter packs are generally among the heavier packs. If you end up needing or wanting to exchange to a really lightweight pack, send a private message to me and I can make some recommendations for you to try. I do gear testing for a wide range of backpacking gear and clothing manufacturers and I'd be happy to help if I can. I don't write reviews for publications, I write reports to manufacturers quality control and design people.

Just keep in mind that anything that I suggest as to gear or clothing is never an endorsement, nor is it anything more than a place to start when you are trying out stuff. When someone says, "I have used this, that, or the other thing and have no problems, blister, or encounters with enraged marmots", that does not mean you would have the same experience. Fit and function of everything, like backpacks and shoes and baselayers, are to each of us as individual as snowflakes.
 

jkberry

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
1st 9/18
Made my trip to REI and thankfully the pack my knowledgeable friend bought is the right size and features for me. It is a fine color, it is the rain cover that is as bright as the sun standing next to it. Got the shoes sorted out I think, and now I am ready to try it all out together and get ready. Thank you Dave et all for all the good advice that for some reason was not intuitive for me. This is not new for me, just been a very long time. Jill
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
Made my trip to REI and thankfully the pack my knowledgeable friend bought is the right size and features for me. It is a fine color, it is the rain cover that is as bright as the sun standing next to it. Got the shoes sorted out I think, and now I am ready to try it all out together and get ready. Thank you Dave et all for all the good advice that for some reason was not intuitive for me. This is not new for me, just been a very long time. Jill
Jill,
I bought a new rain poncho yesterday, and I chose the brightest that I could find in the style that I chose. This was not because I favour bright colours, but rather because I want to be as visible as possible on the camino. My new poncho is red and white, with reflective stripes that will show up in a car's headlights. There have been many discussions on this forum about safety on the camino. One issue which seldom comes to the forefront is safety on the roads when walking at night or in dim light. I don't know the statistics, but I have seen reports on pilgrims who were injured or killed when crossing roads. A "bright as the sun" rain cover seems to me to be an excellent protection against the hazards of not being visible in the rain. Perhaps your friend had this in mind when purchasing it. Buen (and safe) camino.
 

davebugg

DustOff: "When I have your wounded."
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Made my trip to REI and thankfully the pack my knowledgeable friend bought is the right size and features for me. It is a fine color, it is the rain cover that is as bright as the sun standing next to it. Got the shoes sorted out I think, and now I am ready to try it all out together and get ready. Thank you Dave et all for all the good advice that for some reason was not intuitive for me. This is not new for me, just been a very long time. Jill
Heck, keep in mind that on a dreary, gray, and wet day, a bright spot of yellow in a rain cover might be a nice contrast :)
 

WalkonBy

Walk' Wounded
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Fall 2015
Upcoming, Portuguese Comino summer (2018)
I am 60 and walking for the first time starting mid September. Will stay at Orisson and am open to anything along the way, not in a hurry. I have done very long walks for a week, but never for this long. Starting a new chapter in my life and this seems the perfect way to do it. I will be walking solo.

Have some questions: I was gifted a 45 Liter Deuter pack and a "safety yellow" separate rain cover. It this too large a pack (it fits well, I am tall) The next size down is less than one pound lighter. The safety yellow is alarmingly bright. Returning them would bit a bit of a thing since they were gifts but doable for sure. Any thoughts? I am packing light and reading all these suggestions but


Your pack and raincover are fine as long as it fits, keep pack weight about 13 lbs. not including water. It is very important that walk the Camino by "start like an old women for a week or two and finish like a young girl". Go slow and walk short distances initially. Don't get caught up by other pilgrims asking you to walk further like 30-40 km. You can decline, thank them for the time you walked with them and go relax at the albergue. Walk your Camino. It will all be amazing.
 

movinmaggie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015) Scotland GGW (2017) Primitivo (2018) if all vital signs working
In your third paragraph, ' start like an old woman...I walked from StJPdP to Santiago for my 80th birthday, with my own 13 lb pack. So I guess you would put me in that category, BUT....I passed 20 & 30 year olds who had to stop walking because of shin splints and infected blisters, so maybe reconsider what some 'old women' are capable of.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May-June (2017)
Ingles-Finisterre (2018)
Don’t worry about the color of the rain cover, I hope you don’t need it. If you do, your new Camino friends can easily spot you in the distance. My friends always looked for my hat. Enjoy and Buen Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF March 15, 2015
I would love to hear from some senior trekkers about how they planned their Camino adventure. I am planning to walk next year in my 60th year with my 63 yr. old brother. We have concerns about being too ambitous about the distance we can reasonably walk in any given day. We are in good health, but not experienced long distance hikers. Should we join a tour with support van? We would like to try the Camino del Norte in September. We want to walk, but be realistic about it. Any advise would be appreciated.
I would suggest that you walk and go as far as you feel comfortable, use trekking poles which can take 20 % of pressure off your joints. I personally wouldn't hire a support van as when you are over there you can always use a bag transfer service if you feel the need or a bus or taxi if you need to get somewhere. My husband is plus sixty, hadn't walked more than 5 km a time and he had no problems. Do the pace you want, don't feel you have to keep up to or slow down to anyone else, enjoy your journey
 

ggtree

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis June 2018
I would suggest that you walk and go as far as you feel comfortable, use trekking poles which can take 20 % of pressure off your joints. I personally wouldn't hire a support van as when you are over there you can always use a bag transfer service if you feel the need or a bus or taxi if you need to get somewhere. My husband is plus sixty, hadn't walked more than 5 km a time and he had no problems. Do the pace you want, don't feel you have to keep up to or slow down to anyone else, enjoy your journey
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, May-June (2017)
Ingles-Finisterre (2018)
Last year, several of us walked the CF, all but one over 60 a couple 65. We're in good health and we did work on building stamina including walking distances in our boots and as we got closer with our packs loaded. Besides some funny looks and genuinely interested questions it was no problem. Towards the end, I did have some sore knees and I did send my full pack ahead on a couple days, the knees responded nicely. Get in shape, take your time, have fun.
 

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