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7 Month Old - stroller or carrier?

Which is best for tiny pilgrims?

  • Umbrella Stroller (small & collapsible)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    6

roaming

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2019 - itinerary undecided
I am considering walking a 10 day section of the Camino in the fall of 2019. My baby will be 7 months old, and my parents will be joining me (both experienced pilgrims).
  1. Is this selfish? How can I prepare to be a good pilgrim? Should I go somewhere else for a 10 day pilgrimage?
  2. Which pilgrim is the best for us?
  3. And most importantly should I use a front carrier? back carrier? light weight umbrella stroller? my heavy duty three-wheeled stroller? or a combination of these?
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
The umbrella stroller would be wasted weight in my opinion. If you take a stroller, take a "substantial" one! Babies in albergues can be disturbing for other pilgrims. There are enough of you that pensiones and hostales will be cheaper than four beds in an albergue. :)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
BOTH, IMHO. You will want to swap off at times, especially on steepish up and down sections, where any stroller is contraindicated. The stroller must be lightweight and collapsible.

If you can find one with a "sling seat" (as opposed to a hard, car seat thing, that converts to a front or backpack type carrier, that would help simplify matters.

Hope this helps.
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
I am considering walking a 10 day section of the Camino in the fall of 2019. My baby will be 7 months old, and my parents will be joining me (both experienced pilgrims).
  1. Is this selfish? How can I prepare to be a good pilgrim? Should I go somewhere else for a 10 day pilgrimage?
  2. Which pilgrim is the best for us?
  3. And most importantly should I use a front carrier? back carrier? light weight umbrella stroller? my heavy duty three-wheeled stroller? or a combination of these?
Taking a seven month old baby on a transatlantic flight is selfish.
If you feel like walking or hiking, do so at home.
 

roaming

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2019 - itinerary undecided
Taking a seven month old baby on a transatlantic flight is selfish.
If you feel like walking or hiking, do so at home.
We are going anyway to visit family in Europe and I am doing my research on how to minimize the trauma of this experience for everyone. But I am curious if taking a 7 month old on the long walk is selfish - unfair to baby, grandparents, other pilgrims. I appreciate this is a sacred walk, not just another thru hike.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Children "dragged" to the camino generally do poorly and ruin it for the whole family. At seven months, you can really ask the baby!! Do what feels comfortable to you. I think you will know the right answers.:)

I took a 4.5 year-old grandson who wanted to go, and he loved it. He talks about it all the time two years later.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Every child, and every parent is different. Only a parent can assess how “happy” or content their child will be when hot, cold, wet, in the hot sun, hungry, thirsty, or having a soiled diaper / nappy that has to wait a bit.

I do not think, IMHO, that any of us can make that call for them. Many of us have seen and walked with pilgrims toting a child.

The youngest I’ve yet encountered was a 7 week old infant. The mother had planned, saved, and sacrificed to do her Camino for several years and was not going to allow an uncalculated pregnancy stop or or her husband. She breastfed as needed. They walked from Sarria to Santiago and made it just fine. The infant rode in a soft chest carrier.

It can be done. As a non-parent, at least insofar as I am aware, at age 65...whew! I always defer to the parents, and provide information.

IMHO, and in the final analysis, the decision, and the consequences are theirs and theirs alone.

Hope this helps.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Taking a seven month old baby on a transatlantic flight is selfish.
I disagree with this conclusion and I hope a responsible parent would not be intimidated by it. A seven-month-old baby who is still being breastfed will certainly be easier than a 2 or 3 year old, or many adults. Everyone should be able to tolerate, with reasonably good humour, occasional inconveniences from other people - that is what the Camino is especially about.

I don't see why it would be considered selfish to take a baby on the Camino, if the familiy is staying in private non-communal accommodation. It is not something everyone would choose to do - the logistics are not easy - but I don't see why anyway else would be impacted. Having the extra adults along will be helpful.

It's been a long time since I carried babies around on a daily basis, and every baby-mother duo is different, but I suggest that a combination of stroller and a carrier would be needed. You will need to figure out the type of carrier by trial and error. Think about whether a walking stick is a help or a hindrance. Your balance needs to be solid, you want to be able to see ahead, you need to deal with potential rain.

Just have a plan B, in case it turns out to be too difficult. Your choice of route might depend on that, in part. The Camino Frances has the most infrastructure - accommodation, transport, stores, etc. - and would be easiest for making adjustments to your plan. Maybe you would carefully pick some shorter sections that can be easily navigated by stroller, and in some cases wait for your parents at the towns. (I think that is what I would recommend to my own kids and grandkids.)
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
A couple of years ago there was an extended family group on the Camino with a toddler and a baby. They used a jogging type stroller made for trails, and the adults took turns pushing it. Everyone seemed pretty happy as far as I could tell.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
I am considering walking a 10 day section of the Camino in the fall of 2019. My baby will be 7 months old, and my parents will be joining me (both experienced pilgrims).
  1. Is this selfish? How can I prepare to be a good pilgrim? Should I go somewhere else for a 10 day pilgrimage?
  2. Which pilgrim is the best for us?
  3. And most importantly should I use a front carrier? back carrier? light weight umbrella stroller? my heavy duty three-wheeled stroller? or a combination of these?
Walk near the end "after" the steep climb out of Ruitelan
All other sections could be dangerous or too long in duration.
Stay in private accommodation away from other pilgrims .
Many start early @ 5 .30 - 6am unfortunately and most go to bed @ 10pm or later , so don't even think of albergues.
A child that age requires 11-15 hours sleep per day , mostly at night and ""uninterrupted """.........i myself can't see it happening.
 

Geodoc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (crossed Pyrenees then Sarria to SdC) 2018, Frances & Ingles Summer, 2019.
We walked with a Canadian couple whom had a 4-year-old and an infant (don't recall how many months, but under a year). They had both, a stroller (substantial, with good all-terrain tires) and a front carrier. They wound up mostly carrying the infant because he didn't want to ride in the stroller, and wound up using the stroller to carry their packs in.

They also spent most of their nights in private rooms in alburgues or casa rurales.

And, to reiterate what others have said, it is not selfish to want to keep your baby with you while you participate in life.
 

Casserole

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 - Solo, SJPdP to Finisterre
2018 - Daughter (2) and Hubby, Sarria to SdC
I would say a front or back carrier. I used a back for my 2.5 year old.

Also, it is NOT selfish. We took our babe everywhere, planes (both in country and out of country), trains, roadtrips, when she was an infant. They are always taking in new information and it is my belief that this is the reason my daughter is such a great traveler. The breaking of routine, different sounds and smells.

My only other word of advise, if you have the money (or they happen to have an extra seat), putting the babe in a car seat on the plane. Doing this changed travel for me. And on the Camino, we just sent the car seat to our end destination.

And we stayed in albergues, but got a private room. One night we had to stay in a group room and it wasn't our kid disrupting everyone, it was the grown ass adults that kept us up.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
A child that age requires 11-15 hours sleep per day , mostly at night and ""uninterrupted """.........i myself can't see it happening.
Haha! Never happened with my 3 babies. (But I agree that albergues are not so suitable.)
 
Last edited:

tomishy

Member
Camino(s) past & future
April/May 2019
Taking a seven month old baby on a transatlantic flight is selfish.
If you feel like walking or hiking, do so at home.
I disagree - I have been travelling the world from Australia with my daughter since she was months old. They are happy and settled wherever mum is. If you think you can do it then go as I am learning that life is too short to put our dreams off.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
I am considering walking a 10 day section of the Camino in the fall of 2019. My baby will be 7 months old, and my parents will be joining me (both experienced pilgrims).
  1. Is this selfish? How can I prepare to be a good pilgrim? Should I go somewhere else for a 10 day pilgrimage?
  2. Which pilgrim is the best for us?
  3. And most importantly should I use a front carrier? back carrier? light weight umbrella stroller? my heavy duty three-wheeled stroller? or a combination of these?
Dear op, let me say: if you wish to be a pilgrim, with your baby, and your parents: go ahead, I have seen buggies, followed by parents,. I have seen bicycles, with parents and trailers and four or five children. Your camino is your camino, I wish you every camino blessing,
 

roaming

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2019 - itinerary undecided
BOTH, IMHO. You will want to swap off at times, especially on steepish up and down sections, where any stroller is contraindicated. The stroller must be lightweight and collapsible.

If you can find one with a "sling seat" (as opposed to a hard, car seat thing, that converts to a front or backpack type carrier, that would help simplify matters.

Hope this helps.
Thanks for the idea - I have not yet found a stroller sling transformer - but I like the idea.
 

roaming

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2019 - itinerary undecided
I disagree - I have been travelling the world from Australia with my daughter since she was months old. They are happy and settled wherever mum is. If you think you can do it then go as I am learning that life is too short to put our dreams off.
Thanks! This is pretty inspiring. My baby is such an easy going baby and I’m keen to continue on living with her in tow.
 

roaming

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2019 - itinerary undecided
Dear op, let me say: if you wish to be a pilgrim, with your baby, and your parents: go ahead, I have seen buggies, followed by parents,. I have seen bicycles, with parents and trailers and four or five children. Your camino is your camino, I wish you every camino blessing,
Thanks! I’m going to save up every bit of encouragement to use on the long days. :)
 

roaming

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2019 - itinerary undecided
I would say a front or back carrier. I used a back for my 2.5 year old.

Also, it is NOT selfish. We took our babe everywhere, planes (both in country and out of country), trains, roadtrips, when she was an infant. They are always taking in new information and it is my belief that this is the reason my daughter is such a great traveler. The breaking of routine, different sounds and smells.

My only other word of advise, if you have the money (or they happen to have an extra seat), putting the babe in a car seat on the plane. Doing this changed travel for me. And on the Camino, we just sent the car seat to our end destination.

And we stayed in albergues, but got a private room. One night we had to stay in a group room and it wasn't our kid disrupting everyone, it was the grown ass adults that kept us up.
We’ve tried her on a few long hikes with the front carrier. She is a trooper and did 21km in a day, all in the mountains. I just notice she can do more in the stroller - such as play with toys or move her body more. But the stroller sounds like it could be a logistical challenge in European infrastructure. Our three wheel Chariot is definitely built for our local rugged outdoors.
 

roaming

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2019 - itinerary undecided
Haha! Never happened with my 3 babies. (But I agree that albergues are not so suitable.)
I would say a front or back carrier. I used a back for my 2.5 year old.

Also, it is NOT selfish. We took our babe everywhere, planes (both in country and out of country), trains, roadtrips, when she was an infant. They are always taking in new information and it is my belief that this is the reason my daughter is such a great traveler. The breaking of routine, different sounds and smells.

My only other word of advise, if you have the money (or they happen to have an extra seat), putting the babe in a car seat on the plane. Doing this changed travel for me. And on the Camino, we just sent the car seat to our end destination.

And we stayed in albergues, but got a private room. One night we had to stay in a group room and it wasn't our kid disrupting everyone, it was the grown ass adults that kept us up.
To use one’s carseat on the plane - do you simply just book another seat on the flight under her name? Do you use the car seat anywhere else in your travels (I.e. trains, taxis, etc) typically?

I’m favouring the front carrier presently (without stroller).
 

Casserole

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 - Solo, SJPdP to Finisterre
2018 - Daughter (2) and Hubby, Sarria to SdC
To use one’s carseat on the plane - do you simply just book another seat on the flight under her name? Do you use the car seat anywhere else in your travels (I.e. trains, taxis, etc) typically?

I’m favouring the front carrier presently (without stroller).
You do have to buy a seat under the child's name. Its not cheap, but if you have the means, then do it. If not, you can hope for some luck and an empty seat on your flight.

I bought a $30-40 car seat from a big box store. We used it on the plane, train, and in the car (we rented one for the rest of our trip). We found our babe was much happier in the car seat than in the plane/train seat.

We hiked from Sarria to SdC. When we got to Sarria, we had the car seat transported to a hostel in SdC. It only cost something like 8 Euro, and then the hostel charged a 3 Euro holding fee. Where every you stay that first day will probably have some system for sending your things.

As for the carrier, our babe was older than yours, but I was so much happier having my hands free and I felt more free with her on me. Not to mention, the carrier is MUCH lighter than any stroller you would be pushing. Every ounce counts. We did buy a stroller later on in our trip, but you could always bring one and have it sent ahead with the car seat (and any extra stuff - diapers, clothes. we sent those ahead too).

I'm happy to answer any questions you have and I'm sure there are plenty of people on this forum that have great advice too!
 

roaming

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2019 - itinerary undecided
You do have to buy a seat under the child's name. Its not cheap, but if you have the means, then do it. If not, you can hope for some luck and an empty seat on your flight.

I bought a $30-40 car seat from a big box store. We used it on the plane, train, and in the car (we rented one for the rest of our trip). We found our babe was much happier in the car seat than in the plane/train seat.

We hiked from Sarria to SdC. When we got to Sarria, we had the car seat transported to a hostel in SdC. It only cost something like 8 Euro, and then the hostel charged a 3 Euro holding fee. Where every you stay that first day will probably have some system for sending your things.

As for the carrier, our babe was older than yours, but I was so much happier having my hands free and I felt more free with her on me. Not to mention, the carrier is MUCH lighter than any stroller you would be pushing. Every ounce counts. We did buy a stroller later on in our trip, but you could always bring one and have it sent ahead with the car seat (and any extra stuff - diapers, clothes. we sent those ahead too).

I'm happy to answer any questions you have and I'm sure there are plenty of people on this forum that have great advice too!
Thank you! This has been extremely helpful. Diapers - were these hard to find along the way? Sun protection - what did you use? Cheers!
 

Casserole

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 - Solo, SJPdP to Finisterre
2018 - Daughter (2) and Hubby, Sarria to SdC
Thank you! This has been extremely helpful. Diapers - were these hard to find along the way? Sun protection - what did you use? Cheers!
Our carrier had a sunshade for an add on (Dueter Kid Comfort Air). To avoid using a ton of sunscreen (babyganics sunscreen) I got a 50 upf long sleeve shirt from Target (its a big box store here) for $10 and then had her wear leggings. Oh, and we got her a big billed hiking sun hat. We were there at the end of August, right after Spain's terrible heat wave, so it was hot, but not unbearable. But we still made sure to stop at all the spots with water so she could play and cool down.

Diapers were easier than I expected to find. Like I mentioned earlier, I packed extra and sent them ahead, but we never had an issue.

One thing to be prepared for, not matter the age, every person in Spain wants to give your kid a treat, especially on The Camino. They LOVE kids. Its like they carry treats just in case they run into a child. But besides the treats, everyone was willing and eager to help us out with anything (drinks and snacks). We even had an entire restaurant cheer for us as we walked into Arzua.

I had also downloaded the Buen Camino app. It was incredibly helpful. It shows distances to the next town, how many albergues are there, how to contact them/book them. We would have been up a creek a few times without it because the albergues book up quick and this allowed us to get the private rooms before they were gone.
 

JAMM

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Not enough
A few quick thoughts:
-I personally do not think you are being selfish at all if you have a good understanding what makes you and your baby happy and comfortable and are prepared to change your plans as you go. I would have attempted what you are considering if I had had calm babies (which unfortunately didn't happen).
-Galicia is a bit hilly so you might find the carrier easier than pushing the stroller up and down all day. If you choose a flatter section (e.g. the meseta), a stroller might work out better but ultimately there will probably be up and downsides to each system.
-Unless you need particular brands for whatever reason, you should be able to get everything you need baby-wise in most small towns. Most supermarkets as well as chemists (Farmacias) will sell nappies, wipes, ointments, suncream, etc. In my experience, restaurants are happy to accommodate requests off-menu (e.g. unseasoned cooked vegetables, chicken, etc) but supermarkets and Farmacias also sell baby food jars.
-Spain is very child-friendly but the Camino, particularly towards the end, is a very multinational context. In most of the albergues I stayed there was not a single Spanish person, apart from the hospitalero/a, so you might come across different takes on the charms of an infant if you opt for shared acommodation. Having said that, if your baby is a good sleeper, you (and other pilgrims) may find that he/she makes a better roommates than some adults.
Good luck with your plans and buen camino, whenever it happens.
 

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