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A favorite albergue on CF?

Zordmot

3rd CF in May 2022
Past OR future Camino
April-May 2022
Hi everyone! I’m looking forward to my third Camino in April. I’m trying to intentionally not have this one be a replay of previous experiences but to totally be something new. To that end I’m planning on staying in different albergues as much as possible. I’m asking if you have one albergue or BnB or inn on the CF that you’d recommend and a brief explanation of why. My preference are albergues that are unique and comfortable of course and the staff helpful. Beyond that, I like those that offer some kind of interaction such as communal meals, sharing, rituals, blessings, etc. (Municipal albergues tend to be my least favorite) Thanks! Looking forward to your suggestions and stories!
 
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La Morena in Ledigos. The dorm and washrooms are airy, new, well-lit, not crowded. There are private rooms as well (appeared very nice). The interior courtyard is lovely, and they had a proper chef on staff for the dining room clients. Ledigos is *very* quiet, and only about 5-6 K after Calzadilla de la Cazuela, so if you are departing out of Carrion, you could have a leisurely breakfast in Carrion before heading out on a relatively short day.
 

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SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
Do consider to stay at least in one municipal albergue.So much depends on the hospitalera /o in charge.
A perfect example of generous hospitality and human warmth is to be found at the muni in Mansilla de las Mulas where Laura runs a tight ship and is a gem in treating blisters!


In my top five of albergues on the CF ( together with private Liberanos Domine in Rabe de las Calzadas, private San Saturnino in Ventosa and the donativos of Grañon and Tosantos ).
 
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SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
Unfortunately, the Gronze has it as closed and Google Maps as temporarily closed. 😢


Yes, as are most munis during these Covidtimes.My interpretation is that staff at munis are paid regardless ( seeing they are civil servants ) and I guess that local politicians prefer the private albergues stay open and generate some income because in the long haul this benefits the town in its entity! If local restaurants and private albergues don't attract customers this will be not good for the local economy.
 

SabineP

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some and then more. see my signature.
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1340
There are several, but Casa Susi in Trabadelo was outstanding for its friendliness. The warm couple, Susi and Firmin, host this albergue, cooking up a happy communal vegetarian meal, which seemed also to be attended by pilgrims staying elsewhere for the night.
One especially endearing feature is the lack of two-tier bunks. There are only single beds in the spacious sleeping area. I left my original booking to stay there, and next day started climbing, refreshed and ready.

All the best,
Paul
 

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Past OR future Camino
First one in 1977 by train. Many since then by foot. Next one ASAP.

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RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
And Cacabelos..same concept as Azofra.
I did not make pictures of Azofra but this link has some.

I stayed there on a cold night in late October 2018. Not too many pilgrims there and I had a small room to myself. I got there late in the afternoon and I remember the bathroom facilities were a semi-outdoor shower set up. The water was nice and hot but when I finished and was drying off I had steam coming off me lol. Reminded me of being in the army again. Went to mass that night, there were some locals and a few of us pilgrims attending.
It was an interesting and unique albergue to stay in. Sad to see it closed up and barren.
 

jsalt

Jill
Past OR future Camino
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
Casa Ibarrola in Pamplona.
Affordable, friendly, pod beds (own light, cell phone socket and curtain), no curfew (key code to the door), and a simple breakfast included before you hit the road in the morning.
 
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puttster

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Pamplona, Jun 2022
.I like those that offer some kind of interaction such as communal meals, sharing, rituals, blessings, etc. (Municipal albergues tend to be my least favorite)
I'll be walking my first camino this year, so I don't have an albergue contribution. However, I am puzzled over the opinion that the municipals have the least communal interactions, since I am very much looking forward to sitting around, meeting folks. Why is that, and if not the munis, where?
 

SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
I'll be walking my first camino this year, so I don't have an albergue contribution. However, I am puzzled over the opinion that the municipals have the least communal interactions, since I am very much looking forward to sitting around, meeting folks. Why is that, and if not the munis, where?


Like I wrote : I had wonderful encounters in munis and I remember a specific stay in a donativo where most pilgrims very much kept to themselves even if the hospi was a warm a gentle guy.
So lots of elements play a part in making an albergue a special one.
I still remember the nice talk I had with my two fellow male roommates in Mansilla de la Mulas. One a cyclist from the Netherlands whom I only spoke that one day but we still are in contact with each other after eleven years.
 

Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF2019, CP2022?
There are some:

Best experience:
San Juan Bautista, Grañon (Donativo, very special experience)
San Miguel, Hospital de Órbigo (very artsy, superfriendly Hospitalero)
Unamuno, León (Dorm for scholars of the University with some rooms for Pilgrims, 24h access with key)

Nice to use:
San Antón Abad, Villafranca Montes de Oca (very nice Hotel with Albergue, choose the Pilgrims Menue)
Hornillos Meeting Point, Hornillos (very friendly Hospitaleros, nice rooms, comfy beds, garden)
Espíritu Santo, Carrión de los Condes (Albergue in an Monastry)
The Stone Boat, Rabanal del Camino (met some Pilgrims lodging there at my Dinner in Nuestra Señora del Pilar)
Albergue Compostela, Molinaseca (friendly, nice rooms)
Albergue Leo, Villafranca del Bierzo (superfriendly Hospitalera, really old winding house)

Hope you are inspired by my list.

If you have further questions, just pm me.

BC
Roland
 
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Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
2012
I'll be walking my first camino this year, so I don't have an albergue contribution. However, I am puzzled over the opinion that the municipals have the least communal interactions, since I am very much looking forward to sitting around, meeting folks. Why is that, and if not the munis, where?
@puttster its complicated (ain’t it always) the “Munis”, the municipal Albergues are just what it says on the tin. Owned and operated by the local town council or regional government. Usually managed by at least one local employee whose job it is to check in the pilgrims, collect the fees and clean up the mess left behind the next morning. They have no requirement, inclination or incentive to provide a pilgrim “experience”. Just sweep, mop and restock the “borrowed” toilet rolls.
The parochial and donativo Albergues usually run by committed locals and volunteers: the “houses of welcome” and quite a few of the “scarcely for profit, mostly out of love” private Albergues are where you are most likely to encounter what you are anticipating.
Buen Camino
 
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DoughnutANZ

I would rather be fishing
Past OR future Camino
2023
I'll be walking my first camino this year, so I don't have an albergue contribution. However, I am puzzled over the opinion that the municipals have the least communal interactions, since I am very much looking forward to sitting around, meeting folks. Why is that, and if not the munis, where?
Your ability to meet and interact with others will depend on you. Some people are shy and need to be nudged into interacting by formal structures like shared meals that are managed by the accommodation hosts. Others are more outgoing and instigate their own interactions including sharing a meal.

Some people are overwhelmed by large numbers of pilgrims while others see this as an opportunity to interact with many.

All municipal albergues are different but generally they are large, cheap (resulting in lots of pilgrims) and are managed by a local who is paid to do the job. Sometimes this means that the host is disinterested in pilgrims (e.g. O Cebreiro) and so if you are not outgoing then these places can seem off-putting.

Don't confuse municipal albergues with Donativo albergues. Donativos are usually hosted by volunteers who have been pilgrims themselves and this usually makes for a more welcoming atmosphere.

Some municipal albergues can seem a bit sterile because they don't organise stuff for pilgrims but have great facilities and so an outgoing pilgrim can really enjoy these places. The Azofra municipal is a good example of this.

It is your pilgrimage and you will ultimately control your own perception of it through your own actions.
 
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trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
I have many "winners", but one of the standouts for me was the private albergue "San Saturnino" in Ventosa. With its charming and rather "posh" interior, it felt like I was staying in an upscale establishment for the night.
It's funny, although I stayed there - mostly based on recommendations from the forum, I don't remember much about it at all.

One of those albergues that might not be the most posh, but rises above others was Albergue Estrella Guía in Puente la Reina. The pictures on Gronze look different than I remember - perhaps the location has changed, but what made it special was hospitalera Natalia, a former peregrina. Her albergue is a labor of love.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
I'll be walking my first camino this year, so I don't have an albergue contribution. However, I am puzzled over the opinion that the municipals have the least communal interactions, since I am very much looking forward to sitting around, meeting folks. Why is that, and if not the munis, where?
In all likelihood you'll meet most people while walking. Quite often the albergues are almost empty late in the day as people are out getting something to eat, drink or at the market after cleaning up and washing clothes. Exploring the town or city as well. Early evening getting dinner and at 10 pm it's pretty much lights out and no more chat in the sleeping area.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
Re Cacabelos: When I passed by it in September it was not only closed, but looked downright derelict.
That makes me sad and gets me to wonder if the Camino will ever be as it once was pre pandemic. I guess I should just be thankful for the opportunities I had to walk it before.
 

RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
I'll make it simple , One albergue/refugio out of the hundreds that I have stayed at instead of listing 20?
2003 , Manjarín with Tómas the Templar. No toilets or showers , a foot of snow , a small wood burning stove , a full bean stew meal with vino and 4 extra blankets to sleep with. Coffee , biscuits and jam for breakfast. Not for the faint hearted or those that wish to plug in hairdryers.
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
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Tony Maguire

Member
Past OR future Camino
20th August 2014
Hi everyone! I’m looking forward to my third Camino in April. I’m trying to intentionally not have this one be a replay of previous experiences but to totally be something new. To that end I’m planning on staying in different albergues as much as possible. I’m asking if you have one albergue or BnB or inn on the CF that you’d recommend and a brief explanation of why. My preference are albergues that are unique and comfortable of course and the staff helpful. Beyond that, I like those that offer some kind of interaction such as communal meals, sharing, rituals, blessings, etc. (Municipal albergues tend to be my least favorite) Thanks! Looking forward to your suggestions and stories!
Has to be the church in Granon
 

PhxRiles

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (Leon to Santiago) 2019
I'll second what @Paul McAmino said...Casa Susi in Trabadelo. I'd heard about an Australian-run albergue in Trabadelo (I've got a soft spot for the Aussies) so had to stay there. Fortunately they had a bed...I called in advance and Susi more or less held one for me if I'd make it by the time they opened at 1pm. Wonderful communal meal, lots of fun and camaraderie. Even had a small stream in back to soak my tender feet.
 

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Larry E

New Member
Past OR future Camino
September-October (2020)
My absolute #1 night on the Frances (September 2021) was Albergue Hostel Acá y Allá, Urdániz, Navarra. Why: Typical smaller bunkbed room, but/with adjacent but separate, comfortable "living room" with sofas, easy chairs, a TV, and a washing machine (the host also washed a load of mine, for free). Two full bathrooms. A nice, sunny dining area, with a (very tasty) optional dinner and an early (6:00am for me) breakfast option as well. And a private swimming pool right next to the dining area. Finally, the hosts could not be nicer, they live right above the hostel, and they are available and helpful, at any time, for any problem or issue.
 

Adelina

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
I have to name two: Las Aguedas in Murias de Rechivaldo, the very first Albergue I stayed at. Clean, beautiful, relaxing and delicious food - it set a high bar. I also stayed at a donativo "San Francisco" (& I am from SF) in Tosantos. Both were above and beyond experiences I had hoped to have on the Camino! Of course, there were many others...the muni in Santo Domingo de la Calzada, the ....I could go on and on!
 
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Phoenix

Generic member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I'll go with the first one that came to mind: Albergue Monte Irago in Foncebadón.

It wasn't the building or beds, rather the vibe of the place. Some might even call it a "hippy vibe." It was staffed by young people from all over who wanted very much to give an authentic communal experience, including sitting near a roaring fire at old tables eating a delicious meal and drinking vino and/or beer with a rowdy bunch of pilgrims sharing stories from their Camino so far.

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Past OR future Camino
Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
My absolute #1 night on the Frances (September 2021) was Albergue Hostel Acá y Allá, Urdániz, Navarra. Why: Typical smaller bunkbed room, but/with adjacent but separate, comfortable "living room" with sofas, easy chairs, a TV, and a washing machine (the host also washed a load of mine, for free). Two full bathrooms. A nice, sunny dining area, with a (very tasty) optional dinner and an early (6:00am for me) breakfast option as well. And a private swimming pool right next to the dining area. Finally, the hosts could not be nicer, they live right above the hostel, and they are available and helpful, at any time, for any problem or issue.
Oh yes, I stayed here too, in mid April 2017. It was a wonderful experience and the communal meal was one of the best! Unfortunately it was too chilly to take advantage of their lovely swimming pool. It's located only slightly off trail after Zubiri, which I noticed was totally full as a bus was loading up pilgrims. I was glad we had reserved this hostel ahead of time.
 

Ignacio

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hi everyone! I’m looking forward to my third Camino in April. I’m trying to intentionally not have this one be a replay of previous experiences but to totally be something new. To that end I’m planning on staying in different albergues as much as possible. I’m asking if you have one albergue or BnB or inn on the CF that you’d recommend and a brief explanation of why. My preference are albergues that are unique and comfortable of course and the staff helpful. Beyond that, I like those that offer some kind of interaction such as communal meals, sharing, rituals, blessings, etc. (Municipal albergues tend to be my least favorite) Thanks! Looking forward to your suggestions and stories!
Hello Zordmot,

I walked Camino Frances in 2016, during a part of it I developed some nasty blisters, they were so bad that I decided to take 3-4 days off. Luckily, for me, I was in Carrion De Los Condes, there I found my personal favorite place to stay:

Hotel Real Monasterio de San Zoilo

That was the best and most relaxing stay I experienced in Spain that year. Check it out, it is such a beautiful place to spend some time. I don't have enough space here to do it justice. So if you googled it I am sure you'll find plenty of references. Take care of yourself and BUEN CAMINO!
 

ColoradoGirl

New Member
Past OR future Camino
September-October (2019)
There are several, but Casa Susi in Trabadelo was outstanding for its friendliness. The warm couple, Susi and Firmin, host this albergue, cooking up a happy communal vegetarian meal, which seemed also to be attended by pilgrims staying elsewhere for the night.
One especially endearing feature is the lack of two-tier bunks. There are only single beds in the spacious sleeping area. I left my original booking to stay there, and next day started climbing, refreshed and ready.

All the best,
Paul
I agree! One of best along the way.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
I'll make it simple , One albergue/refugio out of the hundreds that I have stayed at instead of listing 20?
2003 , Manjarín with Tómas the Templar. No toilets or showers , a foot of snow , a small wood burning stove , a full bean stew meal with vino and 4 extra blankets to sleep with. Coffee , biscuits and jam for breakfast. Not for the faint hearted or those that wish to plug in hairdryers.
I started to stay there on one Frances but was a bit concerned about fleas or bugs in the bedding and I pretty much had my fill of crapping in a hole when I was in the army :D
 
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Robi Diaz De Vivar

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2016), Norte (2017), Portuges (2018), Mozarabe (2019), Primitivo (2019), Via de La Plata (2
Hi everyone! I’m looking forward to my third Camino in April. I’m trying to intentionally not have this one be a replay of previous experiences but to totally be something new. To that end I’m planning on staying in different albergues as much as possible. I’m asking if you have one albergue or BnB or inn on the CF that you’d recommend and a brief explanation of why. My preference are albergues that are unique and comfortable of course and the staff helpful. Beyond that, I like those that offer some kind of interaction such as communal meals, sharing, rituals, blessings, etc. (Municipal albergues tend to be my least favorite) Thanks! Looking forward to your suggestions and stories!
I have 3 standouts. The albergue de la Parochia de San Miguel in Estella. It fails the comfort test, being extraordinarily basic, but the care and attention of the Hosteleros make it unforgettable. (The last time I looked this Albergue was shut - another casualty of Covid but I am sure from the ardour of the locals that I spoke to while there (especially el Cura) that as soon as they can re-open they will) .Everyone sems to stay in Torres del Rio but seriously staying in the Albergue Sansol 1km earlier makes so much more sense. Comfortable, the hosteleros are so friendly, the pilgrim dinner at 6 euros is great value and there seems to be a lot more wine than might be expected sloshing around. Also in the village there is a tiny bar selling the local rioja (gob-smacking) at 50 centimos a generous glass. Thirdly Burgos - you say that you have no love for municipal albergues but as the Carlsberg adverts used to say - if Carlsberg did albergues then they would have done this one - just fantastic.
 

Damienw

Mr
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francais 2018

Camino VDP / San Arbres 2019
Hi everyone! I’m looking forward to my third Camino in April. I’m trying to intentionally not have this one be a replay of previous experiences but to totally be something new. To that end I’m planning on staying in different albergues as much as possible. I’m asking if you have one albergue or BnB or inn on the CF that you’d recommend and a brief explanation of why. My preference are albergues that are unique and comfortable of course and the staff helpful. Beyond that, I like those that offer some kind of interaction such as communal meals, sharing, rituals, blessings, etc. (Municipal albergues tend to be my least favorite) Thanks! Looking forward to your suggestions and stories!
St. John’s in Granon !
 

Kev&Kath

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - Oct/Dec 2021
VdlP - Apr/Jun 2023
There are several, but Casa Susi in Trabadelo was outstanding for its friendliness. The warm couple, Susi and Firmin, host this albergue, cooking up a happy communal vegetarian meal, which seemed also to be attended by pilgrims staying elsewhere for the night.
One especially endearing feature is the lack of two-tier bunks. There are only single beds in the spacious sleeping area. I left my original booking to stay there, and next day started climbing, refreshed and ready.

All the best,
Paul
My wife and I think Casa Susi is pretty special as well. When next we do the Frances....it's a 'must do' stop for the night!!
 

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Frances ('10), Portugues ('11), Promitivo ('13), VdlP ('14), Ingles ('16), Torres ('17), Litoral '19
Hi everyone! I’m looking forward to my third Camino in April. I’m trying to intentionally not have this one be a replay of previous experiences but to totally be something new. To that end I’m planning on staying in different albergues as much as possible. I’m asking if you have one albergue or BnB or inn on the CF that you’d recommend and a brief explanation of why. My preference are albergues that are unique and comfortable of course and the staff helpful. Beyond that, I like those that offer some kind of interaction such as communal meals, sharing, rituals, blessings, etc. (Municipal albergues tend to be my least favorite) Thanks! Looking forward to your suggestions and stories!
The one that sticks in my mind is San Bol, but that was back in 2010. It still didn't have electricity but it was possible to have a hot shower (gas cylinders), Donativo and communal meal.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Albergue de peregrinos Parroquial de Zabaldika: Run by nuns, communal dinner, retreat in the adjoining church.

Albergue de peregrinos Ultreia, Castrojeriz: Communal dinner with a huge old wine press at the table and dinner followed by a tour of tunnels for wine and safety.

Albergue refugio de peregrinos Los Templarios, Manjarín: Roughest place to stay on the Francés, communal lunch and dinner, canine companionship. See Renshaw and RJM above about roughness. Let's call it a medieval albergue and an experience.

Albergue Molino de Marzán: Just beyond Sarria at km 104.5, old mill and pond on sizable lot away from everything, tranquil, lodging in mill, modern outbuilding with kitchen/communal area, bring food or buy from a small selection there.
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2021
There are several, but Casa Susi in Trabadelo was outstanding for its friendliness. The warm couple, Susi and Firmin, host this albergue, cooking up a happy communal vegetarian meal, which seemed also to be attended by pilgrims staying elsewhere for the night.
One especially endearing feature is the lack of two-tier bunks. There are only single beds in the spacious sleeping area. I left my original booking to stay there, and next day started climbing, refreshed and ready.

All the best,
Paul
If Casa Susi in unavailable and if you are so inclined (pun intended) make your way up the hill to Pradela ( Bierzo) Albergue Lamas. An intimate and exquisite family experience.
 
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Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
Albergue de peregrinos Ultreia, Castrojeriz: Communal dinner with a huge old wine press at the table and dinner followed by a tour of tunnels for wine and safety.
We stayed here too, in May 2017. A very nice albergue and after getting settled in, we walked up to the castle on the hill with such great views.
 
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RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
I started to stay there on one Frances but was a bit concerned about fleas or bugs in the bedding and I pretty much had my fill of crapping in a hole when I was in the army :D
Well , after my 12 years of interrupted military service , I never did look upon this as an exercise , rather an experience of a lifetime. I think because it was cold very near to the end of October , that There were no bugs. There was certainly no hole in the ground , that would have been luxury on its own?
I think you missed out whereas that true refugio was top of my list?
 

jumada

Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, Finisterre, Muxia 2018
Such a wonderful post and an opportunity to reminisce! No one has mentioned Beilari in St. Jean. Joseph and his family provide such a wonderful beginning with the communal dinner and the location is conveniently located across from the Pilgrims Office.
Along the route I'd have to say that the two donativos of Granon and Tosantos were my favourite if you're looking for an overall experience of communal dinners, pilgrim blessings with an opportunity to participate, and don't mind sleeping on mats. Similar to this but bunks in a dormitory style room is Santa Maria in Carrion. The singing nuns are lovely and the sound of their voices during the pilgrims mass in the church next door will always be memorable.
Needless to say, I could name more, but I agree with many of the favourites from the previous posts. Buen camino in April!
 
I've stayed at some great albergues over the years but the one that still stands above is the Albergue de Lorca on the Camino Frances, with the very kind, welcoming host José Ramón. He saw how exhausted and sun weary I was when I arrived and immediately picked up my pack, carried it up to the room and insisted I rest before taking care of the business of credential / payment. He did the laundry, ran the bar and prepared a delicious dinner, shared by all at a communal table. Despite what must have been long, hard working days for him, Jose brought a very relaxed gentle vibe to his place - soft music in the bar and time for conversation. Lorca is a lovely small village to spend an evening.

I stayed there in September 2012, and this earlier thread is from 2014, but friends who have stayed there since report that the albergue and José are as wonderful as always.

 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances; Aragones; VdlP; Madrid-Invierno; Levante
I have volunteered as a hopitalera twice in the municipal in Najera, most recently, in Nov., 2021. It is owned by the municipality, but otherwise everything that is said above about municipals does not apply. It is, and previously was, staffed by volunteers. It is a donativo, and was also in the past, when I volunteered there. And for those who remember it from the past, it has recently undergone major renovations and is currently temporarily closed for further improvements. Do yourselves a favour and look in when next you are passing through. You will like what you see.
 

RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
I've stayed at some great albergues over the years but the one that still stands above is the Albergue de Lorca on the Camino Frances, with the very kind, welcoming host José Ramón. He saw how exhausted and sun weary I was when I arrived and immediately picked up my pack, carried it up to the room and insisted I rest before taking care of the business of credential / payment. He did the laundry, ran the bar and prepared a delicious dinner, shared by all at a communal table. Despite what must have been long, hard working days for him, Jose brought a very relaxed gentle vibe to his place - soft music in the bar and time for conversation. Lorca is a lovely small village to spend an evening.

I stayed there in September 2012, and this earlier thread is from 2014, but friends who have stayed there since report that the albergue and José are as wonderful as always.

I am so pleased Jóse has survived - I will support him again , if I do get a next time?
 
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Aloha From Kauai

A Lifetime of Journeys
Past OR future Camino
April 3rd - June 3rd, 2022
Albergue La Finca in Población de Campos. Each bunk is like a tiny room. The upper bunks are accessed via mini staircases instead of ladders. There is an optional communal dinner, and they let you use the washing machine for free.

View attachment 116843 View attachment 116844
Definitely a winner, just noted. Do you need reservations I wonder?
 

pjacobi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
San Nicolas de Puente Fitero: Extremely basic accommodations. The mass, foot washing and communal meal is an unforgettable experience!

 

kleckam

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances April '12, May '18
Hi everyone! I’m looking forward to my third Camino in April. I’m trying to intentionally not have this one be a replay of previous experiences but to totally be something new. To that end I’m planning on staying in different albergues as much as possible. I’m asking if you have one albergue or BnB or inn on the CF that you’d recommend and a brief explanation of why. My preference are albergues that are unique and comfortable of course and the staff helpful. Beyond that, I like those that offer some kind of interaction such as communal meals, sharing, rituals, blessings, etc. (Municipal albergues tend to be my least favorite) Thanks! Looking forward to your suggestions and stories!
Every place I have stayed has offered worthwhile experiences and/or opportunities to meet other interesting pilgrims. I have walked the Camino Frances twice, in '12 and '18. Each time I stayed at the Albergue de la Piedra in Villafranca del Bierzo (west of Ponferrada) ... http://alberguedelapiedra.com/ . The Hospitaleros, Livia and Unai, are a wonderful couple who made each of my visits extra special and memorable.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Past OR future Camino
Many, various, and continuing.
I echo what AlbertaGirl says above: the people who say Municipals are devoid of character are probably thinking of the Xunta-run municipals in Galicia, run by paid functionarios. Out in the great Camino pre-Galicia are many municipals staffed by an international troupe of dedicated volunteers, many of whom are great characters with years of hospitality experience and great tales to tell. There is SO much more to the camino than private pods and hotel-grade perks... it's these old-school (sometimes literally!) places where the Camino as we know it grew up and blossomed. Here is where you often can round up your friends and prepare a truly communal dinner; you wash your clothing in tub and hang it up in the sun; you meet and chat with people from every social strata, from every part of the world. Pilgrims out here take care of themselves and one another instead of paying someone to do it for them. (many parochial albergues have the same vibe, and similar volunteer staff.)
Stop at municipals or parochials in Estella, Najera, Tosantos, San Anton or San Esteban in Castrojeriz, San Nicolas de Puente Fitero, Granon, Calzadilla de la Cueza, Ages, Calzadilla de los Hermanillos, Sahagun, Calzada del Coto, Bercianos del Real Camino, Astorga, O Cebreiro ... and tons of scruffly old places on other caminos. The spirit of the Camino lives there.
 
Past OR future Camino
Latest: Rota Vicentina '19; Portuguese '19.
My first two Caminos were almost exclusively at larger type muni albergues as my son was on a limited budget. Everything you mention, @Rebekah Scott, was true for us; such a unique and interesting experience. I enjoyed washing and drying my clothes by hand, like stepping back in time. Also meeting and chatting with people from "everywhere" and hearing their stories was a first for me.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
The one albergue I have stayed in every time I walked the Frances was the San Esteban in Castrojeriz, mentioned on another comment in this thread. I'm not much of one for doing the old favorites routine but I guess if I were that one would be on the list. I always found it to have a great vibe and a cool hospitalero or hospitalera. Clean as well and near the town plaza. The first time I walked the Camino I had no albergue guide of any kind with me so I would just see an albergue and decide whether to stop there for the night. San Esteban was one of those and I made a good choice I think.
 

Tandem Graham

E ultreia e suseia, Deus adjuva nos
Past OR future Camino
Bike UK-SdC, Lana
Walk Le Puy-SdC
'22: VDLP
I echo a lot of the suggestions above, many of which I had heard about before I cycled in 2017, or walked in 2019. But sometimes, it's the one which you haven't planned for which wins the prize.
I got carried away with walking one afternoon but after 30km from Puente la Reina suddenly hit a wall of tiredness. I was outside La Perla Negra private Alberque in Azqueta, and I really fell on my feet. A lovely lady host, no bunks, just proper beds in spacious dorms, a fridge full of cold beer on a donativo basis, home-cooked copious veggie food for communal meal. Nice bunch of fellow pilgrims around the table too - 7 nationalities among 12 of us - we all learned a bit of Spanish, German, Portugese and Korean! Only downside was the queue for the single shower. But the hot water held out!
I hope the host and the culture she created in that place has survived the last two years.
 
Past OR future Camino
2022
My "favorite" does not have have anything fancy. Lots of old bunk beds, no meals, a vending machine with beer, really nothing going for it.

But . . .

When I first approached this place in 2013, run by a church, I was so exhausted I HAD to stay there, there was no choice. Also, Brierly said the Saint who founded this tiny alcove of hospitality for weary pilgrims in 1150, is buried there.

But it was soooo run down and desolate, as I discovered as I unpacked my few items and washed them in the sink. My heart ached for the Saint whose sarcophagus was in the adjoining Church and who had worked so tirelessly to build bridges and offer comfort for 1000 years of pilgrims. Crowded, noisy, unkept, sad.

Two years later, I was so glad to pass the same parish albergue, almost unchanged. Some renovations were in the works, a spartan meal was offered, prepared by locals and gratefully accepted. But I knew I couldn't bear to stay there again, it hurt my heart too much the last time. I stopped to say hi to my Saint and continued down the road.

A few meters on my way, though, there was a sudden and sharp pain in the bottom of my foot. Something had gotten into my boot just a few steps from the village. I painfully limped to the side of the road, took off my boot and sock, and found a very big, very sharp thorn - nettle - in the bottom of my boot.

How did it get in? There were no holes in my boot - it hadn't gone through the sole. I had not walked through anything even approaching grass. I certainly would have felt this thing making it's way down my sock to the bottom of my shoe. It just suddenly started right then and there.

I began to realize that this was a saintly nudge. I was supposed to stay there that night. I gave it up to the Saint, turned around and checked in - that's how I know they offered a supper! The albergue was a little better, a little more comfortable, a little more hopeful. I went in and admonished the Saint - he could have found a less painful way to ASK me to stay! Of course, as soon as I turned around to head back, all pain disappeared.

On the CF, walking that greenway up, up, up after Beldorado and Villafranca, after you pass the monument to victims of the Spanish Civil War, you will come to San Juan de Ortega. Stop and say "thank you" to San Juan for the bridge you will soon cross on your way to Burgos, and for other improvements he made for our journeys.

Oh, by the way, "Ortega," I've heard, is the Spanish word for "nettle."

😇
 
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Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
For me Beilari in SJPDP will always be a very special place. I am very shy and Joseph's first-night introductory games can be a bit of a trial. But I have more experience of them than most for reasons I'll explain here!

On a walk from my home in Wales to SJPDP I had a fall on my planned final day - only 20km short of my destination. The result was a prolapsed spinal disc and a taxi ride to SJPDP. It happened to be the week when both Huberta (the previous owner) and Joseph were running the place together as a handover. Although they were "full" they made a huge effort to move people around the building and give me a ground floor lower bunk for several days while I recovered. And then called a doctor to visit me. And collected my medications. And kept me company during some dark moments. Returning unannounced more than a year later I was immediately recognised and welcomed like family and found a place at the dinner table and a bed for the night. I will always be grateful to Joxelu, Jakline and my fellow pilgrims for their compassion and generosity in a very frightening time.
 

Bradypus

Migratory hermit
Past OR future Camino
Too many and too often!
On the CF, walking that greenway up, up, up after Beldorado and Villafranca, after you pass the monument to victims of the Spanish Civil War, you will come to San Juan de Ortega. Stop and say "thank you" to San Juan for the bridge you will soon cross on your way to Burgos, and for other
The outstanding experience of my first Camino in 1990 was probably at San Juan de Ortega. Like the Beilari story I posted above it was all bound up with generosity and compassion. So much more important than WiFi or USB charging points!
Post in thread 'Question about Albergue in San Juan de Ortega' https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...ergue-in-san-juan-de-ortega.58149/post-665185
 

Davybhoy

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019 Frances
08/22 CP from Lisbon via Fatima
San Nicolas de Puente Fitero: Extremely basic accommodations. The mass, foot washing and communal meal is an unforgettable experience!

This.
If I was to name my top 5 this would fill all 5 spots. Absolutely the best albergue experience we had.

6th would be Orisson
7th would be Casa Susi
:)
Anywhere smallish with a communal meal tends to generate the best experience we found.

We also stayed at La Perla Negra a vegetarian albergue in Azqueta. It was very quiet the night we were there, just one other pilgrim, but we spent a long time talking to the owner Helena(?) Who was absolutely wonderful. She couldn't do enough for us. And the meals were superb
 

Davybhoy

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019 Frances
08/22 CP from Lisbon via Fatima
I echo a lot of the suggestions above, many of which I had heard about before I cycled in 2017, or walked in 2019. But sometimes, it's the one which you haven't planned for which wins the prize.
I got carried away with walking one afternoon but after 30km from Puente la Reina suddenly hit a wall of tiredness. I was outside La Perla Negra private Alberque in Azqueta, and I really fell on my feet. A lovely lady host, no bunks, just proper beds in spacious dorms, a fridge full of cold beer on a donativo basis, home-cooked copious veggie food for communal meal. Nice bunch of fellow pilgrims around the table too - 7 nationalities among 12 of us - we all learned a bit of Spanish, German, Portugese and Korean! Only downside was the queue for the single shower. But the hot water held out!
I hope the host and the culture she created in that place has survived the last two years.
Ha!! I have just seen this!! 100% agree (see my previous post) we were there in August 2019
 

trevorcc

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPD to Santiago 2013,2014, Camino de Levante Sept. 2016, Frances March 2018, planning 2020
Albergue La Finca in Población de Campos. Each bunk is like a tiny room. The upper bunks are accessed via mini staircases instead of ladders. There is an optional communal dinner, and they let you use the washing machine for free.

View attachment 116843 View attachment 116844
Stayed there early 2018, rooms and bed great, but that night 5 pilgrims who have walked multiple Caminos all voted it the best pilgrims meal ever.
 
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trevorcc

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPD to Santiago 2013,2014, Camino de Levante Sept. 2016, Frances March 2018, planning 2020
My three favorites are San Nicolás (the one near Rio Pisuerga on Stage 15, San Anton, and Manjarin.
No electricity, no hot water, no running water at Manjarin, and lots of peace.
Never stayed at Majarin, but always stop there for a chat and reflect in 2013 when I was so ill Tomas would not let me walk out those mountains, when I walked it in 2014 he was so right. It is where I found myself and always shed a tear there.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022 CF
I'll make it simple , One albergue/refugio out of the hundreds that I have stayed at instead of listing 20?
2003 , Manjarín with Tómas the Templar. No toilets or showers , a foot of snow , a small wood burning stove , a full bean stew meal with vino and 4 extra blankets to sleep with. Coffee , biscuits and jam for breakfast. Not for the faint hearted or those that wish to plug in hairdryers.
What??? No hair dryers??? 😱 😉😉😉
 

OTH86

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 x 2, 2017, 2021
Albergue Parroquial de Zabaldika - it seems to be temporarily closed. What a warm welcome, wonderful, simple communal dinner, a trek up to the bell tower to ring the bell, and then a trek to another part near the bell tower for a shared, spiritual experience, not to be forgotten 🙏 and breakfast before you head for Pamplona... about 10 km after Larrasoaña, across the hiway and up a small hill... ❤️
Oops, I see that @Rick of Rick and Peg has mentioned it above...
 
Last edited:

OTH86

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 x 2, 2017, 2021
Another wonderful place, not an albergue, however. Casa Waslala in Belorado - a small, private place owned and cared for by Paul and Belmalyn for a number of years. Paul goes out of his way to help in any way he can.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances; Aragones; VdlP; Madrid-Invierno; Levante
I have been thinking that an albergue which is a favourite is always from a memory of a previous visit. Therefore it is impossible not to disappoint whoever is taking these posts seriously and making a list which will guarantee wonderful accommodation on their camino. The special places which I have visited have always been gifts to me, and I have had one or two really unpleasant experiences in some of the albergues named above. One of my very special memories is from my first night at Tosantos. I was helping to prepare the evening meal in the kitchen and an elderly local man was sitting on a chair patiently working his way through a large basket of tiny bruised apples, a gift of windfalls from a local orchard. He was rejoicing that he had apples to prepare so that there would be a postre for the pilgrims that night. I hope that God and the camino will have time on my future camino walks to make me more like that man. But he was not there, and I could not replicate that experience, on my next visit. All of my memorable albergue experiences have been one time gifts. Yes, it is true that some albergues seem to have a special spirit, but I cannot capture it for a future day or another pilgrim. If I go with my arms open to give and receive, I will be blessed. So will you. Buen camino.
 
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RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
My "favorite" does not have have anything fancy. Lots of old bunk beds, no meals, a vending machine with beer, really nothing going for it.

But . . .

When I first approached this place in 2013, run by a church, I was so exhausted I HAD to stay there, there was no choice. Also, Brierly said the Saint who founded this tiny alcove of hospitality for weary pilgrims in 1150, is buried there.

But it was soooo run down ...........



😇
There was a very well known Padré who ran that albergue , he served garlic soup. When I last stopped there he had just passed and the albergue was closed. I have been to the BAR next door quite a few times - they always seem to have attitude towards pilgrims who actually are almost their sole source of income? The last time I went there , all the staff were as miserable as hell itself , even the dogs next to the open fire were miserable. My walking companion and I continued to Ages , a far happier place with a choice of at least three albergues. I would not stop at Ortega again , even if there is a 6 inch nail going through my boot.
 

maruska89

Mary C.
Past OR future Camino
Porto to SdC-Sept 2017
Camino Frances-Apr/May 2019
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2017), Primitivo (2019)
It's funny, although I stayed there - mostly based on recommendations from the forum, I don't remember much about it at all.

One of those albergues that might not be the most posh, but rises above others was Albergue Estrella Guía in Puente la Reina. The pictures on Gronze look different than I remember - perhaps the location has changed, but what made it special was hospitalera Natalia, a former peregrina. Her albergue is a labor of love.
She is a real star! I was staying elsewhere and was directed to her place to do laundry. We ended up having a really nice conversation, while she insisted on helping me fold the laundry. Just a ray of sunshine and I would absolutely stay at Estella Guia next time
 

RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
Just a thought , as this thread seems to go a little deeper than the normal 'best Albergues' , I would not be surprised that the Church have closed their albergues to allow the private albergues to survive on what must be a far smaller pie?
 
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Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances; Aragones; VdlP; Madrid-Invierno; Levante
Just a thought , as this thread seems to go a little deeper than the normal 'best Albergues' , I would not be surprised that the Church have closed their albergues to allow the private albergues to survive on what must be a far smaller pie?
When the albergue Emaus at Burgos was closed early on in the pandemic the explanation given was that the parish had many seniors who were vulnerable to covid and the pilgrims passing through were a threat to their health. As pilgrims were staying in the albergue in the church building and invited to attend the evening mass, this was reasonable. Also, there are several other albergues in Burgos and Emaus is one of the smallest, so pilgrim accommodation was available elsewhere.
 
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CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Casa Ibarrola in Pamplona.
Affordable, friendly, pod beds (own light, cell phone socket and curtain), no curfew (key code to the door), and a simple breakfast included before you hit the road in the morning.
Yes, I love this little place.
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I have many "winners", but one of the standouts for me was the private albergue "San Saturnino" in Ventosa. With its charming and rather "posh" interior, it felt like I was staying in an upscale establishment for the night.
I also love this place. I stayed in the old San Saturnino on my first Camino and was very impressed with the hospitalera, who consoled a crying perigrina who had arrived exhausted to find the albergue "completo." She allowed her a shower, to use the kitchen, then directed her to the Church courtyard for a lovely night under the stars. I've also stayed in the new one, and you're right - it feels quite upscale! :)
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I'll make it simple , One albergue/refugio out of the hundreds that I have stayed at instead of listing 20?
2003 , Manjarín with Tómas the Templar. No toilets or showers , a foot of snow , a small wood burning stove , a full bean stew meal with vino and 4 extra blankets to sleep with. Coffee , biscuits and jam for breakfast. Not for the faint hearted or those that wish to plug in hairdryers.
Yes, among my favorites too. The first time I stayed there, during dinner a young man came walking down the path. He was dirty, barefoot, and did not speak. I seem to remember he wasn't carrying a pack, but I could be wrong. A new pilgrim, I was quite suspicious (and judgemental) and wondered who this homeless looking guy was!? Tomas, on the other hand, recognized him right away as a pilgrim who was walking without belongings, in silence. He gently led him to the table, fed him, and gave him a bed for the night. It was a learning experience for me in true hospitality.
 
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Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
San Nicolas de Puente Fitero: Extremely basic accommodations. The mass, foot washing and communal meal is an unforgettable experience!

Yes! Another favorite. We loved this place. That night we washed our clothes using hand pumped water, had a wonderful candlelight dinner with lots of music, and the foot washing ceremony. I don't think you have to pump your water there anymore - a place worth sitting and waiting for.
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Wow.. I'm posting too much! But my gosh, I have so many "favorite" albergues where I've stayed over the years. MOST are my favorites, but my favorites of favorite are the parochials, and the ones with the fewest comforts like San Anton or Manjarin. I'm loving this thread! I'm sorry to hear Emaus is closed. Will they open again? I also love Maralotx in Ciraqui, San Bol, Piedra in Villafranca, Casa de Abuela in Los Arcos, the parochial in Viana, and so many more. I could go on and on and on. On the other hand, I have less than a handful of "not" favorites. I think I just love the Camino, period!
 
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I could go on and on and on. On the other hand, I have less than a handful of "not" favorites. I think I just love the Camino, period!
I could go on and on too! I think we all just love conjuring up our great albergue memories that are such happy times.
I can only think of two or three truly bad experiences out of approximately 60+++ experiences...great odds!
 

Davybhoy

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019 Frances
08/22 CP from Lisbon via Fatima
I also love Maralotx in Ciraqui,
Yes! We stayed at maralotx. Had a fantastic afternoon and evening there......however the church across the square rang the bells every 15 minutes ALL night. We gave up and left at 5:30 the following morning!! However Ciraquai remains one of our favourite towns.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances; Aragones; VdlP; Madrid-Invierno; Levante
I'm sorry to hear Emaus is closed. Will they open again?
I heard from Marie Noelle at Emaus that the albergue is planning to reopen this spring. I did not mention this in my post, since I could not remember for certain the date which she had given. Also, so much is changing with the pandemic that I would not trust dates for re-opening until they have actually happened.
 
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Tandem Graham

E ultreia e suseia, Deus adjuva nos
Past OR future Camino
Bike UK-SdC, Lana
Walk Le Puy-SdC
'22: VDLP
the parochial in Viana,
At the time, I didn't appreciate it. Sorry this is a long story!

I have been to Viana three times, but only once, during my 2019 walk, to stay.
In 2014 during a car/camping holiday in north-eastern Spain, my partner Carol and I were locked into the churchyard as Viana had its bull-running, a much tamer affair than Pamplona, but nevertheless a privilege to witness.
In 2017, on our pilgrimage from home (UK) to Santiago on tandem bicycle, we stopped in the square for an ice cream and checked out the parish albergue, but carried on to Logrono instead.
In 2019, the nucleus of my pilgrim family had begun to form: on the edge of Los Arcos I had bumped into Louis, a NZ chap 30 years my junior, for the third time, and we walked and talked as we strode in stifling heat towards Viana. He was about to book into one of the private albergues, but I told him I fancied trying the parish albergue, which is attached to the the side of the church, at the first floor level. He liked the sound of it.
We had a fulsome warm welcome from the two hospitaleras, both called Maria. We were shown to the 'dorm', a room of maybe 100 sq ft, and invited to pull out a sleeping mat from the pile and place it on a chosen part of the floor. There were already 8 mats in place, with barely room to walk between them!
Two notable characters arrived after us: Jose, an ever-smiling pilgrim from Brazil, who had walked from Rome, and Wojciech, a large and somewhat unkempt Polish pilgrim, who had walked some 3000km from his home country!
After a plain but filling pilgrim meal, we were invited by the Parish Priest for a tour of the organ gallery and archive of the church and a brief but moving mass of thanksgiving. Wojciech translated for the Priest, into Portugese, English, Italian and German!
I had the worst night's sleep of any of my caminos. There was late night partying in the square below but to manage the heat, amplified by that generated by 12 pilgrims in a small room, the windows remained wide open. I was roughly 18 inches from the multi-lingual, sonorous voiced Wojciech who was definitely the soloist for the snoring concerto! My earplugs were overwhelmed and the sleeping mat was certainly a mat but offered insufficent padding for actual sleeping!
I arose at 5am, well before first light, and went outside to a stone bench beside the church, where Carol and I had devoured our ice creams two years earlier, and actually managed 40 minutes of sleep!
When I returned to the comedor for breakfast, Louis and Jose were trying to cheer up Lucy, an English pilgrim who the previous evening had seemed a calm and gentle young person but was now angrily declaring the end to her camino -"I have got to get some $%^^**:! sleep!"
One of the Marias set next to Lucy while bread, jam and coffee were shared. Lucy asked her how long she had volunteered for.
"Two weeks", said Maria.
Lucy: "How do you manage to sleep when it is so noisy here?"
Maria: "Oh I don't sleep here, I sleep in the (private) albergue (off the main square)!"
Lucy practically exploded: "Not even the £^"&8*** hospitaleras sleep here - how are we supposed to?!"
After breakfast I shared my guidebook with Lucy, pointing her to places with private rooms, so she could replenish her sleep and restore her calm. (I heard later that after two days of rest in a Casa Rurale she did complete her camino.)
Louis and I walked to Logrono together, joking about our questionable choice of accommodation. But the next time I am in Viana, I will stay in the parish albergue again!
 

RENSHAW

Official Camino Vino taster
Past OR future Camino
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks on the CF frequently.
Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
Yes! We stayed at maralotx. Had a fantastic afternoon and evening there......however the church across the square rang the bells every 15 minutes ALL night. We gave up and left at 5:30 the following morning!! However Ciraquai remains one of our favourite towns.
I sat with a camino friend on that balcony with a small brandy each gazing at the lit Church. Just wait until you get to Zubiri or Asqueta and the 'Big ben' chimes chime twice? I was caught out terribly in Zubiri where the bell rand at 5 , I must have dozed off immediately , then I heard it again and thought - yes , 6 but it was still 5 and I twiddled my thumbs for an hour waiting for my walking companion to wake??
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
I stayed in the parochial in Azofra (I've also stayed in the muni) - enjoyed both
Are you sure that the parochial albergue was in Azofra? I don't see it listed on Gronze. Maybe it's closed now. I know that when I was there the municipal filled up quickly because of a large school group, and they opened two overflow places, one of which was at the church.
 
Past OR future Camino
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Are you sure that the parochial albergue was in Azofra? I don't see it listed on Gronze. Maybe it's closed now. I know that when I was there the municipal filled up quickly because of a large school group, and they opened two overflow places, one of which was at the church.
Yup. It was in Azofra. We attended a very cool festival there.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
There was a very well known Padré who ran that albergue , he served garlic soup. When I last stopped there he had just passed and the albergue was closed. I have been to the BAR next door quite a few times - they always seem to have attitude towards pilgrims who actually are almost their sole source of income? The last time I went there , all the staff were as miserable as hell itself , even the dogs next to the open fire were miserable. My walking companion and I continued to Ages , a far happier place with a choice of at least three albergues. I would not stop at Ortega again , even if there is a 6 inch nail going through my boot.
I've stayed there twice at the albergue. A cold, rainy October day 2018 and a warm August day in 2019. Both times was quite full. Had cold beers at the bar both times of course. Don't remember the disposition of the staff there, but the beer was cold and life was good :D . I found the albergue to be interesting and adequate. Had the big communal meal both times. Food was basic, nothing as they say to write home about but when I'm walking the Camino I am quite hungry by dinner time and heartily devour anything put on a plate in front of me. One star or five star, all the same to me. The old saying of "hunger is the best sauce" applies lol :D . Went to mass. Checked out the old cathedral. Interesting. I remember the first time I passed through there about ten years ago they were in the process of cathedral renovation.
I've also stayed in Ages a couple of times. One of my favorite small villages on the Frances. Very friendly people there.
 
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RJM

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino's Frances, Fisterre, Portuges. Over 180 day
Casa Ibarrola in Pamplona.
Affordable, friendly, pod beds (own light, cell phone socket and curtain), no curfew (key code to the door), and a simple breakfast included before you hit the road in the morning.
Good albergue. Stayed there more than once. No curfew and has a pass code to get in. Cool hospitalero(s). Once when I stayed there I went out drinking and eating till 2:00 am with fellow pilgrims and the hospitalero let me sleep in a couple of more hours that morning and shower and have some of the breakfast they spread out before I left. Great having that little cubicle to sleep late in.
 

puttster

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Pamplona, Jun 2022
I want to get a notebook to enter all the albergue suggestions. I will try one page per town, beginning in Pamplona. Question: how many pages will I need?
 

SabineP

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
some and then more. see my signature.
Yup. It was in Azofra. We attended a very cool festival there.


Indeed. Albergue Herbert Simon.Years ago.


 
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