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A few questions about starting from Malaga

caminograce

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Last camino CF, March 2020
Next camino CF May 2023
Hi all, I'm debating walking the Mozarabe from Malaga this September (It's between this route and the coastal Portuguese). I'll have about 2 weeks, I don't really mind where I end up making it to, as long as I can get back to Malaga easily enough to fly back home to the UK.
I've been searching this forum and found some really useful information about this route (including this Gronze guide https://www.gronze.com/camino-mozarabe#localidad-1968) but I still have a few questions.

1. Albergues. I'm a bit confused how it works. Can you just turn up without contacting first, or is it best to try and make reservations in advance? I have seen people mention that in some cases keys must be collected from the local police. If this is the case, do I need to contact them ahead of time and tell them the date and time I plan to arrive in each town? Also, are there albergues in most towns, or will it be necessary to stay in hotels/pensiones etc along the way? My budget is tight, so this is my main concern for taking this route.

2. Guides. I've used Brierley's fantastic guidebooks for previous caminos (Frances, Portuguese) and love having something physical I can follow without having to rely on my phone. Does anyone know of any physical guidebook or a downloadable and printable guide that might be helpful? Failing that, any apps or other online guides?

3.Other pilgrims. I know this is a very quiet route compared with the likes of the Frances and Portuguese. But how quiet are we talking? I'm all for solitude but I'd prefer to bump into fellow pilgrims from time to time too, rather than being completely on my own.

4. Waymarkers. Am I likely to get lost? Or is the route fairly easy to follow?

If anyone has any other considerations for a solo female walker on this route I'm open to any tips or advice anyone might be able to offer. Thank you very much in advance!
 
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Hi all, I'm debating walking the Mozarabe from Malaga this September (It's between this route and the coastal Portuguese). I'll have about 2 weeks, I don't really mind where I end up making it to, as long as I can get back to Malaga easily enough to fly back home to the UK.
I've been searching this forum and found some really useful information about this route (including this Gronze guide https://www.gronze.com/camino-mozarabe#localidad-1968) but I still have a few questions.

1. Albergues. I'm a bit confused how it works. Can you just turn up without contacting first, or is it best to try and make reservations in advance? I have seen people mention that in some cases keys must be collected from the local police. If this is the case, do I need to contact them ahead of time and tell them the date and time I plan to arrive in each town? Also, are there albergues in most towns, or will it be necessary to stay in hotels/pensiones etc along the way? My budget is tight, so this is my main concern for taking this route.

2. Guides. I've used Brierley's fantastic guidebooks for previous caminos (Frances, Portuguese) and love having something physical I can follow without having to rely on my phone. Does anyone know of any physical guidebook or a downloadable and printable guide that might be helpful? Failing that, any apps or other online guides?

3.Other pilgrims. I know this is a very quiet route compared with the likes of the Frances and Portuguese. But how quiet are we talking? I'm all for solitude but I'd prefer to bump into fellow pilgrims from time to time too, rather than being completely on my own.

4. Waymarkers. Am I likely to get lost? Or is the route fairly easy to follow?

If anyone has any other considerations for a solo female walker on this route I'm open to any tips or advice anyone might be able to offer. Thank you very much in advance!
I just did this route in April/May, Malaga to Merida, which took me 21 walking days, with a rest day in Cordoba...so here are my thoughts.
Albergues - you can just show up if it's a municipal albergue - you may have to get the keys from the local police/city hall. I stayed in three municipal albergues, and that is what I had to do - though it seems most towns have a municipal albergue, though I chose to stay elsewhere. Note that depending on the albergue you may need to arrive by a certain time to make it easier to get the keys. It may also be more difficult if you're arriving on a Saturday or Sunday, so be aware of that.
Guides - nothing much that I am aware of. I used Gronze as best I could and also these links to the local Camino Associations - https://caminomozarabedemalaga.com/ , http://badajozjacobea.org/
Other pilgrims - It was super quite for me. I saw a total of 7 other pilgrims over the 21 days. The times I stayed in a municipal albergue I was the only one there. FWIW, the route from Almeria, through Granada, is somewhat busier.
Waymarkers - I thought that it was extremely well marked. Of the 9 caminos I have walked, this was marked as well, or better, than any of the others. I would recommend you consider using GPS routes on your phone. I used Wise Pilgrim and Gronze also has routes available.
Other thoughts - If you're concerned about the lack of other pilgrims, or really want to have some social life in the evenings, I would point you toward the Portuguese Coastal (which I have done). One of the 'challenges' of the Mozarabe is that on many of the stages there is not any intermediate services, such as a bar/restaurant to take a rest at. I stayed at the municipal albergues in Almogia, Villanueva de Algaidas and Encinas Reales - these were all good, except that Algaidas did not have hot water.

If there are any other questions that I might be able to help you with, please feel free to contact me, or post a question on this 'blog' and I will try to respond.
 
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I walked a few days of the Mozerabe out of Málaga last November, I loved the simplicity of it, a pared down, back to basics camino. But be prepared for your own company, and making a dailly plan.

Otherwise, go with the Portuguese coastal, where you will have lots of choices of everything.

There is a night and day difference between the two. Decide what it is you want from your camino..
 
Hi all, I'm debating walking the Mozarabe from Malaga this September (It's between this route and the coastal Portuguese). I'll have about 2 weeks, I don't really mind where I end up making it to, as long as I can get back to Malaga easily enough to fly back home to the UK.
I've been searching this forum and found some really useful information about this route (including this Gronze guide https://www.gronze.com/camino-mozarabe#localidad-1968) but I still have a few questions.

1. Albergues. I'm a bit confused how it works. Can you just turn up without contacting first, or is it best to try and make reservations in advance? I have seen people mention that in some cases keys must be collected from the local police. If this is the case, do I need to contact them ahead of time and tell them the date and time I plan to arrive in each town? Also, are there albergues in most towns, or will it be necessary to stay in hotels/pensiones etc along the way? My budget is tight, so this is my main concern for taking this route.

2. Guides. I've used Brierley's fantastic guidebooks for previous caminos (Frances, Portuguese) and love having something physical I can follow without having to rely on my phone. Does anyone know of any physical guidebook or a downloadable and printable guide that might be helpful? Failing that, any apps or other online guides?

3.Other pilgrims. I know this is a very quiet route compared with the likes of the Frances and Portuguese. But how quiet are we talking? I'm all for solitude but I'd prefer to bump into fellow pilgrims from time to time too, rather than being completely on my own.

4. Waymarkers. Am I likely to get lost? Or is the route fairly easy to follow?

If anyone has any other considerations for a solo female walker on this route I'm open to any tips or advice anyone might be able to offer. Thank you very much in advance!
@Jeff B answered your questions, the same way as I would have answered them.
1. I'll reiterate that if you're going to stay in an albergue on a Saturday or Sunday night, get in touch with the local police or ayuntamiento early!
2. I emailed the Asociación Jacobea de Málaga and they emailed me a guide. asociacion@caminomozarabedemalaga.com
3. You might indeed bump into fellow pilgrims.
4. Excellent way markings.

The Asociación Jacobea de Málaga meets every Tuesday at 7pm at Calle República Argentina, 09, in the Centro Cultural. You'll be able to get a credenciale, and they have a pamphlet with all the accommodation options.

It's a very nice Camino. Our highlight was El Torcal and Antequera.
 
I just did this route in April/May, Malaga to Merida, which took me 21 walking days, with a rest day in Cordoba...so here are my thoughts.
Albergues - you can just show up if it's a municipal albergue - you may have to get the keys from the local police/city hall. I stayed in three municipal albergues, and that is what I had to do - though it seems most towns have a municipal albergue, though I chose to stay elsewhere. Note that depending on the albergue you may need to arrive by a certain time to make it easier to get the keys. It may also be more difficult if you're arriving on a Saturday or Sunday, so be aware of that.
Guides - nothing much that I am aware of. I used Gronze as best I could and also these links to the local Camino Associations - https://caminomozarabedemalaga.com/ , http://badajozjacobea.org/
Other pilgrims - It was super quite for me. I saw a total of 7 other pilgrims over the 21 days. The times I stayed in a municipal albergue I was the only one there. FWIW, the route from Almeria, through Granada, is somewhat busier.
Waymarkers - I thought that it was extremely well marked. Of the 9 caminos I have walked, this was marked as well, or better, than any of the others. I would recommend you consider using GPS routes on your phone. I used Wise Pilgrim and Gronze also has routes available.
Other thoughts - If you're concerned about the lack of other pilgrims, or really want to have some social life in the evenings, I would point you toward the Portuguese Coastal (which I have done). One of the 'challenges' of the Mozarabe is that on many of the stages there is not any intermediate services, such as a bar/restaurant to take a rest at. I stayed at the municipal albergues in Almogia, Villanueva de Algaidas and Encinas Reales - these were all good, except that Algaidas did not have hot water.

If there are any other questions that I might be able to help you with, please feel free to contact me, or post a question on this 'blog' and I will try to respond.
As I am researching and contemplating doing this Camino in March 2025, I thank you for all your information
 
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I am hoping to walk this Camino as well sometime in September. This information has been very useful. Thank you to all for the great input
 
My daughter and I walked Malaga to Cordoba this past March. Like the Mozarabe from Almeria, it is well marked. (The two are VERY different.) The Confraternity of St. James, UK, publishes a guidebook: The Camino Mozarabe, Malaga to Meridia, 2022, by Tim Stapenhurst. It is excellent. So is the Malaga Mozarabe associations website. Both municipal albergues and private accommodations were great. If you need to get a key from the police, call them in the morning and let them know about when you will arrive. Yes, between towns there is not much for food or water. This could be a real challenge in September. Carry a UV umbrella. Mostly a very good walking trail but carry at least one trekking pole for one very magnificent descent. Very few other pilgrims but the local people are very friendly. Buen Camino
 
Wow, thank you everyone who has taken the time to share such valuable information, especially @Jeff B, @AJGuillaume and @JerryStroebele. I feel I've got a MUCH better idea about what to expect from this camino now, so thank you for taking the time.
In all honesty, in light of what I've learnt, I'm now leaning towards sticking to the Portuguese coastal this year. I'm not sure if I'm quite prepared for this kind of challenge just yet, and with the September heat, relative lack of amenities and fellow pilgrims, and extra considerations for accommodations, I think I might need to leave the Mozarabe until next year or the year after. It does sound truly wonderful, in quite a different way to previous caminos I've been on, and I fully intend to do this in the not too distant future. I'll save this thread and will use it when the time comes. Thank you again everyone :)
 
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