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A Great Way to Carry a DSLR on the Camino

Camino(s) past & future
CF
It's not a new product but I've just found and bought one so thought I'd share for other photo junkies who haven't seen one yet and like me have struggled with how to bring my DSLR on the Camino.

It's a camera clip called Capture by Peak Design that very securely attaches your DSLR to your backpack shoulder strap, hip belt or pants belt with a quick release plate system. I bought this one in combination with a Joby Gorillapod Focus with Ballhead X as the quick release plate that comes with the clip works in both. I took this kit out for a 10k yesterday and was pleasantly surprised that having my DSLR hanging off one side didn't bother me at all perhaps partly because I carried a litre of water and the tripod on the opposite side to counterbalance. It was raining quite heavily yesterday so threw on my poncho and found the camera was still nice and dry as well as easily accessible.

Seems like the right combo to have the camera at hand and not miss shots because I just couldn't be bothered to stop and take off my bag to get the camera!
clip1.jpg
clip2.jpg focus1.jpg
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
It's not a new product but I've just found and bought one so thought I'd share for other photo junkies who haven't seen one yet and like me have struggled with how to bring my DSLR on the Camino.

It's a camera clip called Capture by Peak Design that very securely attaches your DSLR to your backpack shoulder strap, hip belt or pants belt with a quick release plate system. I bought this one in combination with a Joby Gorillapod Focus with Ballhead X as the quick release plate that comes with the clip works in both. I took this kit out for a 10k yesterday and was pleasantly surprised that having my DSLR hanging off one side didn't bother me at all perhaps partly because I carried a litre of water and the tripod on the opposite side to counterbalance. It was raining quite heavily yesterday so threw on my poncho and found the camera was still nice and dry as well as easily accessible.

Seems like the right combo to have the camera at hand and not miss shots because I just couldn't be bothered to stop and take off my bag to get the camera!
View attachment 36573
View attachment 36574 View attachment 36576
My sole observation is that with your DSLR camera so prominent and easily for all to see, you are a walking inducement to theft. This is particularly true in large cities.

Your carrying method looks fine. However, over five years, plus four volunteering for a month at the Pilgrim Office, most folks I see with these large & expensive cameras usually have a neck lanyard that secures the camera yet permits immediate access. The DSLR rides center on one's chest.

My advice to all persons carrying more than a pocket digital camera or smart phone for photography is to protect it in a plain and nondescript protective case, one that does not advertise "I HAVE AN EXPENSIVE CAMERA IN THIS BAG!"

Your carry method may be fine on the majority of the camino that is between towns or even in small towns and villages. But, once you hit the larger towns and cities, well, as with any urban environment, there is always a very small percentage of opportunist thieves looking for something that can be sold off easily.

I am NOT trying to put you off taking this camera, as the photos you take will provide a critical link to this life-affecting experience forever. However, what I am strongly suggesting is that you determine a suitable, less conspicuous carry method, one that does not isolate your for targeted theft. A simple, plain, black "fanny pack" or "bumbag" is all you need.

I hope this helps.
 

Edward Awad

El peregrino
Camino(s) past & future
(SJPP-Logrono June 2009), (Logrono-Santiago June 2015), (Irun-Finistere-Muxia April-May 2018)
This is awesome! Thanks for sharing :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF
My sole observation is that with your DSLR camera so prominent and easily for all to see, you are a walking inducement to theft. This is particularly true in large cities.

Your carrying method looks fine. However, over five years, plus four volunteering for a month at the Pilgrim Office, most folks I see with these large & expensive cameras usually have a neck lanyard that secures the camera yet permits immediate access. The DSLR rides center on one's chest.

My advice to all persons carrying more than a pocket digital camera or smart phone for photography is to protect it in a plain and nondescript protective case, one that does not advertise "I HAVE AN EXPENSIVE CAMERA IN THIS BAG!"

Your carry method may be fine on the majority of the camino that is between towns or even in small towns and villages. But, once you hit the larger towns and cities, well, as with any urban environment, there is always a very small percentage of opportunist thieves looking for something that can be sold off easily.

I am NOT trying to put you off taking this camera, as the photos you take will provide a critical link to this life-affecting experience forever. However, what I am strongly suggesting is that you determine a suitable, less conspicuous carry method, one that does not isolate your for targeted theft. A simple, plain, black "fanny pack" or "bumbag" is all you need.

I hope this helps.
Thanks for your thoughts.

Just to address a couple of them for others considering a similar device, this clip is a locking clip, meaning you must twist a small knob that sits between the camera and your chest. It would take a truly extraordinary thief to put the hand against someones chest, twist the knob, push the release knob a second time and then lift the camera up and out of the clip. It could be done but it wouldn't be without my knowing ;).

One of the others compelling reasons I purchased this one was that when in place and locked it has over 200lbs of holding strength which in my mind means no one will run past me and do a grab-n-go and because there isn't a strap they cannot perform a slash-n-go that was so prevalent in some of the developing countries I worked in. Yes, they could take my whole pack if they slashed a shoulder strap but I believe the chances are somewhat slim on that one in Spain.

Regarding the neck strap, that is a great tool for short around town walks but with 3-4lbs of total body/lens weight hanging directly on my neck I'd be stopping for a massage or chiropractor in every town! :D For those days I use a Black Rapid shoulder sling (think old western movies ammunition belts worn across the chest) that removes the strain from the neck and gives it to the shoulder.

I do agree it is a noticeable camera so when I'm doing travel photography I have a 'smaller' lens and I use gaffers tape to conceal the cameras make and model and generally gives a less pristine look to the equipment. After 14 years of traveling around 6 continents for work it has been a good combination for me so far but I will also be the first to say there have been times where things didn't feel right and the gear went into my pack and it was worn on my front. Thankfully not too many times I've had to do that.

Thanks for your comments, though. I do appreciate them and found them very constructive.
 

NicMen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arriving in Lourdes for my first Camino 29th Aug 16 and starting to walk 31st.
Mmm...that looks really uncomfortable to me... For a small camera, maybe... but with a typical dslr and lens weighing around 2kgs or more, all that weight hanging from a clip off one side strap and bouncing on your chest with every step for 6 hours or so.... I think I would hate it within 5 metres...
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF
Mmm...that looks really uncomfortable to me... For a small camera, maybe... but with a typical dslr and lens weighing around 2kgs or more, all that weight hanging from a clip off one side strap and bouncing on your chest with every step for 6 hours or so.... I think I would hate it within 5 metres...
Fair enough comment. I thought that might be the case too but I didn't experience that in the two 10km walks I've taken with it so far. Because your shoulder strap is 'snug' to your chest there isn't any play in it so the camera really doesn't bounce at all (at least for me and my stride. Perhaps others who have a long/more aggressive stride may get a different result?). My biggest concern was the weight pulling down on my left shoulder strap too. I tried to balance it out by putting my tripod and water bottle in the left outside pockets and made sure the weight of the entire pack was properly on my hips and I really did not find it significantly noticeable. I feel like I'm gushing about this product so am also feeling need to disclose I have zero commercial interests in this, just a very avid photographer that has found a product that is very secure and keeps my camera in a position where I can access it immediately and not miss shots! I should also mention I've decided to take my 50mm 1.4 lens so that has reduced my weight significantly. The 100-400mm won't be making the trip to Spain :D
 

NicMen

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arriving in Lourdes for my first Camino 29th Aug 16 and starting to walk 31st.
I took my 17-40 f4 attached to my 6d and wouldn't have lasted too long. And my 70-200 f 2.8 was never a sensible option, regardless of how I carried it!
I cosidered taking my 50mm f1.8 because of small size and light weight, as well as the large aperture benefits, but I opted for the wide angle for the landscapes, shooting facades in narrow streets and inside churches.
My camera bag was hanging low from both straps at hip level using carabiners. This arrangement worked fine for me for almost 1000 kms.
I wish you Buen Camino and great photos! Just remain in the moment though. Sometimes our photography passion takes us away from where we are and see everything through the viewfinder...
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Thanks for your thoughts.

Just to address a couple of them for others considering a similar device, this clip is a locking clip, meaning you must twist a small knob that sits between the camera and your chest. It would take a truly extraordinary thief to put the hand against someones chest, twist the knob, push the release knob a second time and then lift the camera up and out of the clip. It could be done but it wouldn't be without my knowing ;).

One of the others compelling reasons I purchased this one was that when in place and locked it has over 200lbs of holding strength which in my mind means no one will run past me and do a grab-n-go and because there isn't a strap they cannot perform a slash-n-go that was so prevalent in some of the developing countries I worked in. Yes, they could take my whole pack if they slashed a shoulder strap but I believe the chances are somewhat slim on that one in Spain.

Regarding the neck strap, that is a great tool for short around town walks but with 3-4lbs of total body/lens weight hanging directly on my neck I'd be stopping for a massage or chiropractor in every town! :D For those days I use a Black Rapid shoulder sling (think old western movies ammunition belts worn across the chest) that removes the strain from the neck and gives it to the shoulder.

I do agree it is a noticeable camera so when I'm doing travel photography I have a 'smaller' lens and I use gaffers tape to conceal the cameras make and model and generally gives a less pristine look to the equipment. After 14 years of traveling around 6 continents for work it has been a good combination for me so far but I will also be the first to say there have been times where things didn't feel right and the gear went into my pack and it was worn on my front. Thankfully not too many times I've had to do that.

Thanks for your comments, though. I do appreciate them and found them very constructive.

I read and I actually understand and concur with your rationale for the attachment system you have. BUT, a thief will not know how well YOU are attached to your camera.

DO YOU WANT to be in close contact with a thief, who must wrestle you to the ground to figure out how to take your camera? Or, do you prefer to deal with a knife pointed threateningly in your direction until you give it up? I know I would not. In Spain and most of Europe, guns are rarely used in property thefts. Knives are often used... I suppose that is what rigid "gun control" accomplishes...but I digress...

That is why my advice is intended to reduce the chance that you will even stand out as a potential "mark."

As regards not being a victim, being part of the background, "wallpaper," or not being distinctive is the best passive defense. The more "bling" you sport, the greater the inducement for any wannabe criminal...just sayin...

I am just trying to be helpful. I do dislike reading accounts of thievery, assault, and worse on this forum or in the local newspapers in Spain.

I hope this helps someone.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF
DO YOU WANT to be in close contact with a thief, who must wrestle you to the ground to figure out how to take your camera? Or, do you prefer to deal with a knife pointed threateningly in your direction until you give it up? I know I would not. In Spain and most of Europe, guns are rarely used in property thefts. Knives are often used... I suppose that is what rigid "gun control" accomplishes...but I digress...
I think we view the world a little differently but appreciate your input as I'm sure it will give others an alternate way to see the situation.
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
It's not a new product but I've just found and bought one so thought I'd share for other photo junkies who haven't seen one yet and like me have struggled with how to bring my DSLR on the Camino.

It's a camera clip called Capture by Peak Design that very securely attaches your DSLR to your backpack shoulder strap, hip belt or pants belt with a quick release plate system. I bought this one in combination with a Joby Gorillapod Focus with Ballhead X as the quick release plate that comes with the clip works in both. I took this kit out for a 10k yesterday and was pleasantly surprised that having my DSLR hanging off one side didn't bother me at all perhaps partly because I carried a litre of water and the tripod on the opposite side to counterbalance. It was raining quite heavily yesterday so threw on my poncho and found the camera was still nice and dry as well as easily accessible.

Seems like the right combo to have the camera at hand and not miss shots because I just couldn't be bothered to stop and take off my bag to get the camera!
View attachment 36573
View attachment 36574 View attachment 36576
Saw a guy using something similar last year. Looks like a great idea but I will stick to a compact in the pocket of my rucksack hip belt. Too heavy for my liking
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF
Saw a guy using something similar last year. Looks like a great idea but I will stick to a compact in the pocket of my rucksack hip belt. Too heavy for my liking
The day may come when I can sell all my heavy Canon kit and get into a much lighter mirrorless system, maybe even a medium format. But for now the heavier gear is what I've got to capture the type of images I like so heavier gear it is!
 

DLJ

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(4/2012) St.Jean to Santiago; (9/2013) Geneva to Le Puy-en-Velay and beyond
I am a professional photographer using a Canon w/lens (18-300), but for the Camino, first, I am not walking the Camino for commercial photo reasons; secondly, while I do want to take photos, I am committed to making my load as light as possible; and while thievery, robbery, or other is not among my major Camino considerations, I opt for a small (7 oz.) camera (that shoots in RAW) in a belt case. Unobtrusive, instantly available, and Light, Light, Light. It has survived many of Europe's major cities without incident, and has provided great memories.
 

FRR

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
On the steep descent to Molinaseca I tripped and fell facedown on the rocks. Imagine if I had this. Broken rib cage right there.
 

Anthony18

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
I am a professional photographer using a Canon w/lens (18-300), but for the Camino, first, I am not walking the Camino for commercial photo reasons; secondly, while I do want to take photos, I am committed to making my load as light as possible; and while thievery, robbery, or other is not among my major Camino considerations, I opt for a small (7 oz.) camera (that shoots in RAW) in a belt case. Unobtrusive, instantly available, and Light, Light, Light. It has survived many of Europe's major cities without incident, and has provided great memories.
Same here. I'll be taking either a Canon G7X or a Panasonic Lumix DC-ZS70. Both are lightweight and take great shots.
 

Earthkeeper

Have teapot; will travel
Camino(s) past & future
Salvador Sept (2017) Primitivo Sept (2017) Portuguese (2018) Cami St Jaume Catalunya (May 2019)
It's not a new product but I've just found and bought one so thought I'd share for other photo junkies who haven't seen one yet and like me have struggled with how to bring my DSLR on the Camino.

It's a camera clip called Capture by Peak Design that very securely attaches your DSLR to your backpack shoulder strap, hip belt or pants belt with a quick release plate system. I bought this one in combination with a Joby Gorillapod Focus with Ballhead X as the quick release plate that comes with the clip works in both. I took this kit out for a 10k yesterday and was pleasantly surprised that having my DSLR hanging off one side didn't bother me at all perhaps partly because I carried a litre of water and the tripod on the opposite side to counterbalance. It was raining quite heavily yesterday so threw on my poncho and found the camera was still nice and dry as well as easily accessible.

Seems like the right combo to have the camera at hand and not miss shots because I just couldn't be bothered to stop and take off my bag to get the camera!
View attachment 36573
View attachment 36574View attachment 36576
I have been using this Peak Designs mount for years for my D6 and up to a 200mm lens. It works really really well. I walked Camino Portuguese, Primitivo, San Salvador with it. I regularly swop it from one to other side's shoulder strap and to hip belt. And sometimes Camera goes in the pack, when the light is flat and uninteresting. Beware one thing that has happened to me : the mount plate on the camera can twist itself undone, with the many movements and repeated attach and disattachment, especially when used on hip mount, and suddenly you can find your camera falling to the ground. Now I keep a close check that the plate is always tightly attached.
Buen camino!
 

DLJ

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(4/2012) St.Jean to Santiago; (9/2013) Geneva to Le Puy-en-Velay and beyond
I have been using this Peak Designs mount for years for my D6 and up to a 200mm lens. It works really really well. I walked Camino Portuguese, Primitivo, San Salvador with it. I regularly swop it from one to other side's shoulder strap and to hip belt. And sometimes Camera goes in the pack, when the light is flat and uninteresting. Beware one thing that has happened to me : the mount plate on the camera can twist itself undone, with the many movements and repeated attach and disattachment, especially when used on hip mount, and suddenly you can find your camera falling to the ground. Now I keep a close check that the plate is always tightly attached.
Buen camino!
Thanks much for the info on Peak Designs mount, I'm now using Canon M50 (mirrorless) w/18-150, so small and light to begin with, and that mount should be ideal.
 

DLJ

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(4/2012) St.Jean to Santiago; (9/2013) Geneva to Le Puy-en-Velay and beyond
Same here. I'll be taking either a Canon G7X or a Panasonic Lumix DC-ZS70. Both are lightweight and take great shots.
Thanks for bringing me back to this subject. I now use Canon M50 (mirrorless) w/18-150mm, small & light, and I read the next entry
Same here. I'll be taking either a Canon G7X or a Panasonic Lumix DC-ZS70. Both are lightweight and take great shots.
Thanks for bringing me back to this site. I'm now using Canon M50 (mirrorless) w/18-150mm, small & light and reading Earthkeepers response just below yours, I have ordered a peak design holder for it.
 

lissie45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk Frances 2019
Thanks for this thread I'm waiting for my new Lumix GX85 to arrive - and I can see this working - probably on the waist belt for me. I do agree and always carry camera and electronics in a grubby beat up bag - but a camera in a bag does miss a lot of the action
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
Thanks for your thoughts.

Just to address a couple of them for others considering a similar device, this clip is a locking clip, meaning you must twist a small knob that sits between the camera and your chest. It would take a truly extraordinary thief to put the hand against someones chest, twist the knob, push the release knob a second time and then lift the camera up and out of the clip. It could be done but it wouldn't be without my knowing ;).

One of the others compelling reasons I purchased this one was that when in place and locked it has over 200lbs of holding strength which in my mind means no one will run past me and do a grab-n-go and because there isn't a strap they cannot perform a slash-n-go that was so prevalent in some of the developing countries I worked in. Yes, they could take my whole pack if they slashed a shoulder strap but I believe the chances are somewhat slim on that one in Spain.

Regarding the neck strap, that is a great tool for short around town walks but with 3-4lbs of total body/lens weight hanging directly on my neck I'd be stopping for a massage or chiropractor in every town! :D For those days I use a Black Rapid shoulder sling (think old western movies ammunition belts worn across the chest) that removes the strain from the neck and gives it to the shoulder.

I do agree it is a noticeable camera so when I'm doing travel photography I have a 'smaller' lens and I use gaffers tape to conceal the cameras make and model and generally gives a less pristine look to the equipment. After 14 years of traveling around 6 continents for work it has been a good combination for me so far but I will also be the first to say there have been times where things didn't feel right and the gear went into my pack and it was worn on my front. Thankfully not too many times I've had to do that.

Thanks for your comments, though. I do appreciate them and found them very constructive.
I use one of those clips from time to time. I still leave the neck strap on the camera so that if you drop the camera while taking it out of the clip it doesn't fall.
 

Mugatu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Finisterre, Muxia (2018)
Camino Frances or Norte (2019 , June 27-Aug 8)
Thanks for this thread I'm waiting for my new Lumix GX85 to arrive - and I can see this working - probably on the waist belt for me. I do agree and always carry camera and electronics in a grubby beat up bag - but a camera in a bag does miss a lot of the action
I use the same camera for travel, and use the capture clip V3 on my shoulder strap. I find the location to be highly intuitive and provide the best spacial awareness when hiking with respects to keeping the camera accessible and safe. I keep either a wrist strap or neck strap attached to my pack incase of any foreseeable drops. Enjoy your new camera ☺
 
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