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A shout out to el pimiento de Padrón

JustJack

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
CF: May/June 2023
VDLP: April/May 2024
I remember seeing this dish in a travel video a few years before I walked the CF. It looked delicious, and I finally started to find them at bars and restaurants a couple weeks into my walk.

Those specific peppers are difficult to find here in Vancouver (although I did find them once at a farmer's market), but another pepper which is very similar is easy to find - called shishito peppers, or sometimes twist peppers.

I can buy a fairly large bag of these peppers for a couple dollars here. They're extremely cheap for whatever reason. Which makes me wonder why this particular dish always seemed to be proportionately expensive in Spain. By that I mean a plate of these peppers usually cost 8 or 9 euros. I'm not complaining about the cost, but I find it puzzling why this one inexpensive vegetable seems to cost so much compared to other tapas or small dishes in Spain. Whatever the reason, I'm looking forward to ordering more when I'm back in a couple months :)
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I remember seeing this dish in a travel video a few years before I walked the CF. It looked delicious, and I finally started to find them at bars and restaurants a couple weeks into my walk.

Those specific peppers are difficult to find here in Vancouver (although I did find them once at a farmer's market), but another pepper which is very similar is easy to find - called shishito peppers, or sometimes twist peppers.

I can buy a fairly large bag of these peppers for a couple dollars here. They're extremely cheap for whatever reason. Which makes me wonder why this particular dish always seemed to be proportionately expensive in Spain. By that I mean a plate of these peppers usually cost 8 or 9 euros. I'm not complaining about the cost, but I find it puzzling why this one inexpensive vegetable seems to cost so much compared to other tapas or small dishes in Spain. Whatever the reason, I'm looking forward to ordering more when I'm back in a couple months :)
Wow, don't know where you are buying peppers! In some of the pulperias we stopped at this winter they were much less for a ration. In Santiago a couple of years ago they were brought to us free as a tapa with a beer! Could be the cost of cooking oil has skyrocketed since the war in Ukraine cut the supply of sunflower oil though.
 
Wow, don't know where you are buying peppers!
I bought them perhaps 4 or 5 times, in bars or cheap restaurants. Once in O Cebrerio I remember. I don't think they were ever less than 8 euros, and sometimes 9. This was for a larger plate than you'd get as a free tapas of course. It's enough for two to share, but I was on my own.
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
As a vegetarian, there was more than one time on my Camino that I made an entire meal out of a ración of pimientos de Padrón and a couple of pieces of bread with olive oil, especially when I was getting closer to and staying in Santiago. It was no hardship as they are one of my favorite foods anywhere and even the title of this thread made my mouth water when I saw it just now. I've seen them on a few menus here in the States but they've almost always been shishito peppers under a different (wrong) name — the two are similar, but alas not the same.


pimientos de padron.jpg


This photo was taken at a celebratory lunch (at A Fuego Lento, I believe) in Santiago after I picked up my Compostela. I'm glad this post gave me the excuse to find it on my camera roll again ... and a reminder of something else to look forward to on my next Camino this spring!
 
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Best thing I ever had in my life. I was in Portomarin and I loved them so much I had another plate of them. Worst decision I ever made in my life. Long walk the next day. :)
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I grow my own at home in Wales. Now on the third or fourth generation from seed kindly sent to me by a peregrina here on the forum. Won't be any this year as I have been exiled from my house by major building work. But looking forward to getting back in the swing next year. One of the homemade reminders of the Camino along with Welsh patxaran and membrillo!
IMG_20210701_173417_359.jpg
 
I grow my own at home in Wales. Now on the third or fourth generation from seed kindly sent to me by a peregrina here on the forum. Won't be any this year as I have been exiled from my house by major building work. But looking forward to getting back in the swing next year. One of the homemade reminders of the Camino along with Welsh patxaran and membrillo!
View attachment 165732
I just ordered seeds to plant this spring! I’ve been growing shishitos for a few years with great success. I’m going to grow both this year to compare.
If anyone else is interested in growing them, I ordered from The Incredible Seed Company in Canada. Johnny’s Seeds carry them in the States.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
As a vegetarian, there was more than one time on my Camino that I made an entire meal out of a ración of pimientos de Padrón and a couple of pieces of bread with olive oil, especially when I was getting closer to and staying in Santiago. It was no hardship as they are one of my favorite foods anywhere and even the title of this thread made my mouth water when I saw it just now. I've seen them on a few menus here in the States but they've almost always been shishito peppers under a different (wrong) name — the two are similar, but alas not the same.


View attachment 165707


This photo was taken at a celebratory lunch (at A Fuego Lento, I believe) in Santiago after I picked up my Compostela. I'm glad this post gave me the excuse to find it on my camera roll again ... and a reminder of something else to look forward to on my next Camino this spring!
surprisingly how simple but tasty they are and yes I'll be looking forward to them again this spring.
 
Pimiento de padrón is usually a large dish and very very tasty that is probably why they are the price they are
But hey you stick to your shitshitos lol
Joke in bad taste
Apologies
 
My introduction to them was in Santiago after the camino at Cafe Bar Stella. My word, where I have I been! I consumed plates of them everyday after that for the 5 days I was there. I like the mystery element to them, as well. They are supposed to be mild but every now and then one of them surprises with a burst of capsaicin that lights up the taste buds. The pulpo is also exquisite.

At home in Washington State, I was pleasantly surprised to see Shazam Shishito peppers in Costco (one pound bag for US $7.45). They come fairly close to Pimientos de Padrón, but not quite (the original in situ always the best). Still, they are a joy to prepare and, in my case, scarf them down with some chilled white wine. Oh, the joy!

Thank you, JustJack, for starting this thread. BTW, the Shishitos are available just across the border at the Bellingham Costco.
IMG_3489.JPG
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
I have never liked peppers... Not the sweat kind, and not the spicy kind... Some chilli could work as spice, but not as a vegetable. Never. That has been my big disappointment - not liking peppers, they are colorful, they are full of vitamin C, in so many dishes. The list goes on. But I just can't stand the taste in any shape or form.

That is until... I got myself some pimiento peppers in Padron. How is it possible. For the first time in my life, not only could I tolerate peppers, but I loved them. I mean LOVED. I might just have to try and grow some for myself!
 
Does anyone have a recipe on how to cook them? I am trying to grow some and not having very good luck. Love them, too!
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Does anyone have a recipe on how to cook them? I am trying to grow some and not having very good luck. Love them, too!
You just quickly fry them and put sea salt on them, and a dash of good olive oil...
They're easy to growhere in the uk, don't know about where you are...
 
I am trying to grow some and not having very good luck. Love them, too!
They aren’t hard to grow, but all peppers are heat loving. They are going to want warm soil and full sun, and they have a fairly long growing season. If you’re in NH, they might be more of a greenhouse plant or at least need a head start by seeding them indoors and planting out into a cold frame.

I’ve grown them and they did well here in the high desert of central Washington.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I have never liked peppers... Not the sweat kind, and not the spicy kind... Some chilli could work as spice, but not as a vegetable. Never. That has been my big disappointment - not liking peppers, they are colorful, they are full of vitamin C, in so many dishes. The list goes on. But I just can't stand the taste in any shape or form.

That is until... I got myself some pimiento peppers in Padron. How is it possible. For the first time in my life, not only could I tolerate peppers, but I loved them. I mean LOVED. I might just have to try and grow some for myself!
A forum member who is currently offline would surely send this reply to your post: 😍
I occasionally treat myself to them from a local supermarket...
 
I just ordered seeds to plant this spring! I’ve been growing shishitos for a few years with great success. I’m going to grow both this year to compare.
If anyone else is interested in growing them, I ordered from The Incredible Seed Company in Canada. Johnny’s Seeds carry them in the States.
Johnny Appleseed? Why did this name jump into my mind?
 
You just quickly fry them and put sea salt on them, and a dash of good olive oil...
They're easy to growhere in the uk, don't know about where you are...
Thanks! I have my fingers crossed and hope the blooms will eventually be peppers!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Does anyone have a recipe on how to cook them? I am trying to grow some and not having very good luck. Love them, too!
Fry them in olive oil until they blister. As with so many Spanish/Italian dishes, the quality of the olive oil you use is important. And for this dish the quality of the salt is as well. Don't simply use regular table salt. As you can see in the photos, there should be larger pieces of salt. I prefer flaked Mediterranean sea salt.
 
Does anyone have a recipe on how to cook them? I am trying to grow some and not having very good luck. Love them, too!
No recipe needed- heat EVOO just before smoking- add the peppers- saute and turn almost constantly until blistered. Pour on to a plate with all the oil, add a large flaky salt. Hold by the stems and eat the peppers, wipe up all the oil with a good bread. My year old supply of seeds still do germinate so if anyone here in the US would like some I would be glad to send. My new plants were started about a month ago indoors since they are so slow growing!
 
I looked up EVOO, thinking it was an acronym for a variety of cooking stoves...
By the way, here is a screenshot of the character I referred to above. He featured in my early education about other parts of the world!
IMG_5465.jpeg
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Does anyone have a recipe on how to cook them? I am trying to grow some and not having very good luck. Love them, too!
Padron.jpg
If you are having trouble growing the peppers try first placing the seeds on a wet paper towel that you have folded over. Place into a zippered plastic bag. When you see "tails" start to grow then plant the seeds. Take care not to damage the tails when planting. Since the growing season is short here in WV I start my seeds on New Years Day. The plants in the photo have already been transplanted to larger pots. I no longer plant in a garden, but use planters and pots instead. Although they like heat in the height of summer I do shade them for the hottest part of the day. Hope this helps get yours started.
 
I remember seeing this dish in a travel video a few years before I walked the CF. It looked delicious, and I finally started to find them at bars and restaurants a couple weeks into my walk.

Those specific peppers are difficult to find here in Vancouver (although I did find them once at a farmer's market), but another pepper which is very similar is easy to find - called shishito peppers, or sometimes twist peppers.

I can buy a fairly large bag of these peppers for a couple dollars here. They're extremely cheap for whatever reason. Which makes me wonder why this particular dish always seemed to be proportionately expensive in Spain. By that I mean a plate of these peppers usually cost 8 or 9 euros. I'm not complaining about the cost, but I find it puzzling why this one inexpensive vegetable seems to cost so much compared to other tapas or small dishes in Spain. Whatever the reason, I'm looking forward to ordering more when I'm back in a couple months :)
In Andalucía we call them “pimiento frito” or fried peppers. They are my favorite too! In the States you can now find them pretty easily in most grocery stores and Costco. They come in a bag. You can cook them in an air fryer super easy and they taste nearly identical! Just spray them with some olive oil and sprinkle with sea salt when done.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!

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