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A Step by Step Video of the Entire Walk Of Route Napoleon, From SJPdP to Roncesvalles

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#1
I wanted to share the link to the YouTube site for John Sikora’s video series, “Camino de Santiago Day by Day….” which now has a new video added to John’s series which shows virtually every step while walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles as seen when one is walking the Napoleon route.


For those who have never viewed this series, they are basically GoPro videos showing each stage of the Camino Frances step by step from the perspective of the pilgrim walking the route. It is unique because it focuses on the walking, not on the PEOPLE who are walking the Camino; there is very little ‘social engagement’ among pilgrims shown. It also uses a time compression Hyperlapse to show every step at about 8x the normal speed. This allows each single stage of Brierley’s guidebook to be shown within a short and highly watchable time frame. Those who want to know what walking Camino Frances is like will come away from viewing the videos with a visual familiarity of each of the stages.

It is a sort of visual peek of the Pilgrim’s view of walking on Camino Frances.

In addition to the actual video footage, John has added the Brierley map to the side of the video picture with a marker showing the actual progress of where the pilgrim is located during the progress of the video. A profile of the terrain elevation, distances, and a Goggle Maps flyover appear at the beginning of each segment.

Up until a couple of weeks ago, John Sikora had only one of the two alternative Routes video recorded of Stage 1 from St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles over the Pyrenees: The route via Valcarlos. Recently, the Napoleon Route was added to John's Series.

Most of the video stages are 15 to 20 minutes in length, so they are very watchable, allowing the viewer to watch as many -- or as few -- of the videos as they want in one sitting. The new Napoleon Route video segment is about twice that length, which is based on how John decided to edit my footage. This series is a great accompaniment to watch as one is exercising by treadmill, or other home workout equipment.

Because I am enthusiastic about John Sikora’s Camino series, I contacted him earlier this year proposing that we team up to add video of the Napoleon Route to his series. My proposal was that during my pilgrimage, I would wear a GoPro camera, duplicating the same settings John has used for his videos, to capture video along the Napoleon route. I would send the video footage to John for his video editing and post production expertise and then he could add it to his existing series.

John was very gracious in accepting my proposal, and during the ensuing months until my departure to SJPdP in late September, I sent him practice footage from my new GoPro, asked tons of questions, investigated the best and lightest equipment to carry out the project, and spent a lot of time on my workout hikes practicing with the GoPro.

On my own pilgrimage from St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago de Compostela, I walked the Napoleon route with a GoPro Hero 6 Black, an external Anker power pack, and several 250 GB micro SD cards. I also used the iPhone app “Walkmeter” to record a GPS track of each step, which allowed John to overlay the progress of the walk onto the Brierley map of Stage one.

The GoPro and Walkmeter app were turned on as soon as I walked out the door of Gite Makila, and was left ON to record every step of my 9 hours walk to Roncesvalles in 4K video (which John compressed into 1080p resolution during editing).

This new addition of Napoleon route also may help with the confusion which some have expressed as to the path to take when starting the descent into Roncesvalles from Col de Lepoeder. The new video shows the route using the road option down to Roncesvalles, which is less steep than using the trail/path. It will eventually clearly show where the decision point is, and what it looks like, when arriving at the spot where the choice needs to be made.

John Sikora’s work is a delight to watch, especially for a new and hopeful pilgrim-to-be who is hungry to know what the Camino Frances is really like for walking.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
#2
My goodness, Dave, you never fail to amaze! I can't wait to watch this series and since it is recommended by you, I know it will be outstanding!

I'm not sure if you are "back", but hope so! If not, I wish you a wonderful Christmas, and good health in the new year!

P.S. It was so nice to see your little helicopter avatar again!
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#5
Thank you Dave, I had to abandon my Camino in 2014 due to chest pain but watched the video just now and saw the place where I had to turn back, Min 9.30, gate on the left just before the steep climb to Orrison. This was my first and only attempt (so far) at the Napoleon, maybe next time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
4/2011 VdlP,
4/2014 Rota Vincentina, Portugues.
4/2016 Aragones, Frances.
4/2019 Frances
#7
Thank you Dave and John for this great video. In 2016 I walked the Aragones and joined the Frances at Puente la Reina and I’m going to be walking the Frances again in April 2019 to fill in the stages that I missed and have been thinking maybe I would be okay to walk the napoleon but after watching the video I’ve finally been convinced that I definitely would not be able to walk the route due to unexplained breathing problems. I will decide on another starting point. The good thing is having watched the video I now know what the route is like and how beautiful it is.
Been Camino judy.
 

Hurry Krishna

Indian on the Way
Camino(s) past & future
2009 (from Sarria), 2014 from St Jean Pied de Port, 2016 from Porto, 2018 from Le Puy to Santiago.
#8
I wanted to share the link to the YouTube site for John Sikora’s video series, “Camino de Santiago Day by Day….” which now has a new video added to John’s series which shows virtually every step while walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles as seen when one is walking the Napoleon route.


For those who have never viewed this series, they are basically GoPro videos showing each stage of the Camino Frances step by step from the perspective of the pilgrim walking the route. It is unique because it focuses on the walking, not on the PEOPLE who are walking the Camino; there is very little ‘social engagement’ among pilgrims shown. It also uses a time compression Hyperlapse to show every step at about 8x the normal speed. This allows each single stage of Brierley’s guidebook to be shown within a short and highly watchable time frame. Those who want to know what walking Camino Frances is like will come away from viewing the videos with a visual familiarity of each of the stages.

It is a sort of visual peek of the Pilgrim’s view of walking on Camino Frances.

In addition to the actual video footage, John has added the Brierley map to the side of the video picture with a marker showing the actual progress of where the pilgrim is located during the progress of the video. A profile of the terrain elevation, distances, and a Goggle Maps flyover appear at the beginning of each segment.

Up until a couple of weeks ago, John Sikora had only one of the two alternative Routes video recorded of Stage 1 from St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles over the Pyrenees: The route via Valcarlos. Recently, the Napoleon Route was added to John's Series.

Most of the video stages are 15 to 20 minutes in length, so they are very watchable, allowing the viewer to watch as many -- or as few -- of the videos as they want in one sitting. The new Napoleon Route video segment is about twice that length, which is based on how John decided to edit my footage. This series is a great accompaniment to watch as one is exercising by treadmill, or other home workout equipment.

Because I am enthusiastic about John Sikora’s Camino series, I contacted him earlier this year proposing that we team up to add video of the Napoleon Route to his series. My proposal was that during my pilgrimage, I would wear a GoPro camera, duplicating the same settings John has used for his videos, to capture video along the Napoleon route. I would send the video footage to John for his video editing and post production expertise and then he could add it to his existing series.

John was very gracious in accepting my proposal, and during the ensuing months until my departure to SJPdP in late September, I sent him practice footage from my new GoPro, asked tons of questions, investigated the best and lightest equipment to carry out the project, and spent a lot of time on my workout hikes practicing with the GoPro.

On my own pilgrimage from St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago de Compostela, I walked the Napoleon route with a GoPro Hero 6 Black, an external Anker power pack, and several 250 GB micro SD cards. I also used the iPhone app “Walkmeter” to record a GPS track of each step, which allowed John to overlay the progress of the walk onto the Brierley map of Stage one.

The GoPro and Walkmeter app were turned on as soon as I walked out the door of Gite Makila, and was left ON to record every step of my 9 hours walk to Roncesvalles in 4K video (which John compressed into 1080p resolution during editing).

This new addition of Napoleon route also may help with the confusion which some have expressed as to the path to take when starting the descent into Roncesvalles from Col de Lepoeder. The new video shows the route using the road option down to Roncesvalles, which is less steep than using the trail/path. It will eventually clearly show where the decision point is, and what it looks like, when arriving at the spot where the choice needs to be made.

John Sikora’s work is a delight to watch, especially for a new and hopeful pilgrim-to-be who is hungry to know what the Camino Frances is really like for walking.
I wanted to share the link to the YouTube site for John Sikora’s video series, “Camino de Santiago Day by Day….” which now has a new video added to John’s series which shows virtually every step while walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles as seen when one is walking the Napoleon route.


For those who have never viewed this series, they are basically GoPro videos showing each stage of the Camino Frances step by step from the perspective of the pilgrim walking the route. It is unique because it focuses on the walking, not on the PEOPLE who are walking the Camino; there is very little ‘social engagement’ among pilgrims shown. It also uses a time compression Hyperlapse to show every step at about 8x the normal speed. This allows each single stage of Brierley’s guidebook to be shown within a short and highly watchable time frame. Those who want to know what walking Camino Frances is like will come away from viewing the videos with a visual familiarity of each of the stages.

It is a sort of visual peek of the Pilgrim’s view of walking on Camino Frances.

In addition to the actual video footage, John has added the Brierley map to the side of the video picture with a marker showing the actual progress of where the pilgrim is located during the progress of the video. A profile of the terrain elevation, distances, and a Goggle Maps flyover appear at the beginning of each segment.

Up until a couple of weeks ago, John Sikora had only one of the two alternative Routes video recorded of Stage 1 from St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles over the Pyrenees: The route via Valcarlos. Recently, the Napoleon Route was added to John's Series.

Most of the video stages are 15 to 20 minutes in length, so they are very watchable, allowing the viewer to watch as many -- or as few -- of the videos as they want in one sitting. The new Napoleon Route video segment is about twice that length, which is based on how John decided to edit my footage. This series is a great accompaniment to watch as one is exercising by treadmill, or other home workout equipment.

Because I am enthusiastic about John Sikora’s Camino series, I contacted him earlier this year proposing that we team up to add video of the Napoleon Route to his series. My proposal was that during my pilgrimage, I would wear a GoPro camera, duplicating the same settings John has used for his videos, to capture video along the Napoleon route. I would send the video footage to John for his video editing and post production expertise and then he could add it to his existing series.

John was very gracious in accepting my proposal, and during the ensuing months until my departure to SJPdP in late September, I sent him practice footage from my new GoPro, asked tons of questions, investigated the best and lightest equipment to carry out the project, and spent a lot of time on my workout hikes practicing with the GoPro.

On my own pilgrimage from St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago de Compostela, I walked the Napoleon route with a GoPro Hero 6 Black, an external Anker power pack, and several 250 GB micro SD cards. I also used the iPhone app “Walkmeter” to record a GPS track of each step, which allowed John to overlay the progress of the walk onto the Brierley map of Stage one.

The GoPro and Walkmeter app were turned on as soon as I walked out the door of Gite Makila, and was left ON to record every step of my 9 hours walk to Roncesvalles in 4K video (which John compressed into 1080p resolution during editing).

This new addition of Napoleon route also may help with the confusion which some have expressed as to the path to take when starting the descent into Roncesvalles from Col de Lepoeder. The new video shows the route using the road option down to Roncesvalles, which is less steep than using the trail/path. It will eventually clearly show where the decision point is, and what it looks like, when arriving at the spot where the choice needs to be made.

John Sikora’s work is a delight to watch, especially for a new and hopeful pilgrim-to-be who is hungry to know what the Camino Frances is really like for walking.
Looks wonderful and brings back vivid memories. Didn’t know about the series. But am definitely going to watch it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#10
WOW! That was outstanding. I note that there is a version 1A depicting the same route, albeit via the Valcarlos Route. It is available on You Tube. Search on John Sikora...

I will eagerly look forward to each successive stage of this marvelous video series...'
THANK YOU DaveBugg and John Sikora!

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
#11
Thanks for the comments related to the videos. BTW if you have suggestions how to make the videos better, I'm all ears. Dave sent me some great comments on the one I just posted so I'll be making a few tweaks over the next week or so.

Also, I just started work on the Portuguese from Lisbon to Santiago (although the weather did not cooperate so some sections will be missing). In May of 2019, I'm going to do the first half of the de La Plata from Seville to Salamanca as well. Hopefully 2020 brings the other half to Santiago.

As another BTW, if someone wants to walk the sections that are missing (either Frances or Portuguese) with a GoPro as Dave did, I'm more than happy to add those to the process.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#12
Thanks for the comments related to the videos. BTW if you have suggestions how to make the videos better, I'm all ears. Dave sent me some great comments on the one I just posted so I'll be making a few tweaks over the next week or so.

Also, I just started work on the Portuguese from Lisbon to Santiago (although the weather did not cooperate so some sections will be missing). In May of 2019, I'm going to do the first half of the de La Plata from Seville to Salamanca as well. Hopefully 2020 brings the other half to Santiago.

As another BTW, if someone wants to walk the sections that are missing (either Frances or Portuguese) with a GoPro as Dave did, I'm more than happy to add those to the process.
I am going to have to send the link as an email to myself so I don't forget all about it, and when I have time to browse through my mailbox, then I will be able to enjoy them. I have watched some of your work, and look forward to the others.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk around 2022
#13
I look forward to watching this series! Alas, I have not been on Camino yet, but this looks like a wonderful way to do it “virtually “. The closest I get at the moment is on my new treadmill, which has the (very cool!) ability to show on my monitor a constant flow of screenshots from anywhere in the world there is a Google Streetview, while simultaneously matching the elevation and declination of the terrain. In this way I’ve been able to “walk the Camino” while training for it which is fun, but this series also looks fabulous! Thank you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
#15
Thank you Dave, I had to abandon my Camino in 2014 due to chest pain but watched the video just now and saw the place where I had to turn back, Min 9.30, gate on the left just before the steep climb to Orrison. This was my first and only attempt (so far) at the Napoleon, maybe next time.
Hi Davebugg,
Like Tincanter, I watched this wonderful video with baited breath
I see that the video took the same route as we did last year....the last section.

I can almost visualise every step of this last section when Charlie was so unwell and we walked at a snails pace..my heart beats faster when I think of that day .... ..turned out he had developed a DVT and had multiple Pulmonary Embolism ....and the beginning ...and the end of our Camino

All is well since then and we completed the San Salvidor this year without any problem

We will walk it again ...but not from SJPPDP ..next time Pamploma I think....for me.... ..but I'll leave it up to him as to where we start.

Will you walk it again Tinkanter??
Best wishes
Annette
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2017
#16
Welcome back, Dave. We’ve never met but I’ve missed you on the forum. Hope you feel better soon and I’m looking forward to reading more of your posts! BuenCamino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Autumn 2018
#18
There's a Korean guy BK Lee, who has done something very similar and is posting at the moment on his YouTube channel. But his videos are shot in real time so you need a few spare hours to watch each one. And without the accompanying maps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2016 Camino Frances to Leon
Fall 2017 Camino Frances to Finisterre
May 2019 Portuguese
#21
Yeah! Nice to see you again! Thanks for posting the video and Merry Christmas to you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (León to Santiago) 2018
#22
Absolutely incredible footage! And what a glorious day you had crossing over the Pyrenees. I loved how you paused for a moment to enjoy the stunning scenery of the mountainscapes! WOW!! Great job and looking forward to every one of your films! I also subscribed to your Youtube channel as well. Buen Camino!!
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#23
Absolutely incredible footage! And what a glorious day you had crossing over the Pyrenees. I loved how you paused for a moment to enjoy the stunning scenery of the mountainscapes! WOW!! Great job and looking forward to every one of your films! I also subscribed to your Youtube channel as well. Buen Camino!!
Thank you for your kind words, Jeff. The only video footage that I did for John was the Napoleon route to Roncesvalles. All of the other videos in the series John took and then did the editing. You will definitely enjoy John's work. :)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#25
So that was why you needed that big-ass power block!

Nice work and hey, good to see you back man.
Yup, that was why it was needed. But it did provide solid power for the whole time I was continuously recording and still had about 1/3 of its power left when I got to Roncesvalle. :)
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#26
I thought the trotting cow was even funnier...NEVER saw a cow move that fast...maybe a bull, but NEVER a cow...
That was hilarious. I was laughing myself silly and thought for sure the cow would lead the way to the Chapel. :D
 
Camino(s) past & future
2019- will it be my year for the Camino- I certainly hope so!
#28
Wow! thank you so much- these are going to be so helpful. Anyone anxious about where the way leads them need no longer be! thank you!
 

lissie45

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk Frances 2019
#29
In NZ you always walk a road facing on coming traffic, you seem to be, but many aren’t! Poor drivers! Where does the rd go from Orrison? My partner has heart issues, I doubt he could walk it, but it could be a fun drive on a clear day
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
#30
Where does the rd go from Orrison?
On the Valcarlos route after Arneguy you cross a river back into France and walk along a road. Eventually you take a right turn off of it for a short distance to recross the river for a short ascent to the albergue in Varcarlos, Spain. Anyway, that road you were on continues up the mountain to meet the Route Napoleon.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#31
In NZ you always walk a road facing on coming traffic, you seem to be, but many aren’t! Poor drivers! Where does the rd go from Orrison? My partner has heart issues, I doubt he could walk it, but it could be a fun drive on a clear day
Your observation is spot on. There are certain types of curves of the roadway where it is better for driver visibility of pedestrians for said pedestrians to walk IN the direction of travel for a short period, and then cross back to face oncoming traffic. However, I was appalled at the rather large number of walkers who not only did the opposite of safe walking, but would actually walk, in numbers, out on the road and making vehicles slow down to avoid hitting them. Those walkers acted as if they owned the roadway, rather than behaving as guests and safe pedestrians.

The road from Orrison continues past the Pic D'Orrison Statue of The Virgin Mary (the halfway point between St Jean and Roncesvalles. You can drive to the Col Loepeder (where one begins the descent into Roncesvalles). There is also the intersection after Pic D'Orisson where a roadway leads down to Valcarlos, which is on the other route between SJPdP and Roncesvalles. The intersection road is a connection between the two different routes.

There is a shuttle service and taxis which drive up the Napoleon route to Orrison and beyond from St Jean. In fact, one can arrange to walk to a point on the Napoleon like the Virgin, and then have a taxi or shuttle pick you up and take you back to St Jean for the night. The next morning, take transportation back to where you were picked up the afternoon prior, and continue the walk into Roncesvalles. For those who wish to break up the walk to Roncesvalles into two days of walking rather than a single day, this is a very good option if you can't get reservations to stay at Orrison, or wish to walk to the halfway point -- which given the amount of daylight hours that still remain when one arrives at Orisson, makes for a walk that is still leisurely, yet shortens the next day's walk into Roncesvalles.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sept./Oct. 2017
#32
I wanted to share the link to the YouTube site for John Sikora’s video series, “Camino de Santiago Day by Day….” which now has a new video added to John’s series which shows virtually every step while walking from St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles as seen when one is walking the Napoleon route.


For those who have never viewed this series, they are basically GoPro videos showing each stage of the Camino Frances step by step from the perspective of the pilgrim walking the route. It is unique because it focuses on the walking, not on the PEOPLE who are walking the Camino; there is very little ‘social engagement’ among pilgrims shown. It also uses a time compression Hyperlapse to show every step at about 8x the normal speed. This allows each single stage of Brierley’s guidebook to be shown within a short and highly watchable time frame. Those who want to know what walking Camino Frances is like will come away from viewing the videos with a visual familiarity of each of the stages.

It is a sort of visual peek of the Pilgrim’s view of walking on Camino Frances.

In addition to the actual video footage, John has added the Brierley map to the side of the video picture with a marker showing the actual progress of where the pilgrim is located during the progress of the video. A profile of the terrain elevation, distances, and a Goggle Maps flyover appear at the beginning of each segment.

Up until a couple of weeks ago, John Sikora had only one of the two alternative Routes video recorded of Stage 1 from St Jean Pied de Port to Roncesvalles over the Pyrenees: The route via Valcarlos. Recently, the Napoleon Route was added to John's Series.

Most of the video stages are 15 to 20 minutes in length, so they are very watchable, allowing the viewer to watch as many -- or as few -- of the videos as they want in one sitting. The new Napoleon Route video segment is about twice that length, which is based on how John decided to edit my footage. This series is a great accompaniment to watch as one is exercising by treadmill, or other home workout equipment.

Because I am enthusiastic about John Sikora’s Camino series, I contacted him earlier this year proposing that we team up to add video of the Napoleon Route to his series. My proposal was that during my pilgrimage, I would wear a GoPro camera, duplicating the same settings John has used for his videos, to capture video along the Napoleon route. I would send the video footage to John for his video editing and post production expertise and then he could add it to his existing series.

John was very gracious in accepting my proposal, and during the ensuing months until my departure to SJPdP in late September, I sent him practice footage from my new GoPro, asked tons of questions, investigated the best and lightest equipment to carry out the project, and spent a lot of time on my workout hikes practicing with the GoPro.

On my own pilgrimage from St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago de Compostela, I walked the Napoleon route with a GoPro Hero 6 Black, an external Anker power pack, and several 250 GB micro SD cards. I also used the iPhone app “Walkmeter” to record a GPS track of each step, which allowed John to overlay the progress of the walk onto the Brierley map of Stage one.

The GoPro and Walkmeter app were turned on as soon as I walked out the door of Gite Makila, and was left ON to record every step of my 9 hours walk to Roncesvalles in 4K video (which John compressed into 1080p resolution during editing).

This new addition of Napoleon route also may help with the confusion which some have expressed as to the path to take when starting the descent into Roncesvalles from Col de Lepoeder. The new video shows the route using the road option down to Roncesvalles, which is less steep than using the trail/path. It will eventually clearly show where the decision point is, and what it looks like, when arriving at the spot where the choice needs to be made.

John Sikora’s work is a delight to watch, especially for a new and hopeful pilgrim-to-be who is hungry to know what the Camino Frances is really like for walking.
Thanks for all your hard work on the YouTube video. Is there any chance thay you and Mr. Sikora might do the Way of St. Francis in Italy from Florence to Asissi and on to Rome? A guy Cicerone did a guided book but your kind of video would be great.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
#33
Thank you, Graham for your kind words. John seems to be letting little dust accumulate between one hike or pilgrim walk to the next. On YouTube, the videos on his playlist of various walks are impressive. So I wouldn't be surprised if that route is on his "to do" list. :)

My collaboration with John on walking the Napoleon route was a one off team effort. I haven't been involved with any of his other GoPro productions and there are no plans at another project. If I go back on camino Frances, I have a short list of where John would love to capture footage that he missed due to heavy rains. He has also invited those who are willing to capture GoPro footage while walking Camino Frances to contact him to get a list of those areas on Frances that he wants to get into the series.

Believe me, I loved working with John; he was generous with his time in helping me get up to speed on gear, technique using my new GoPro, and looking at my test videos to help me assess areas of improvement. Hopefully, I will have a chance to catch up with him and meet him face-to-face. :)

The only thing I regret with my video footage is that there was a bit of flub up with a third party app that I was using on my iPhone -- via Bluetooth link from my GoPro -- to get better contrast and exposure control; that is why there is a wide contrast between sunlight and shadow in some sections of the video. The Bluetooth handshake kept getting lost. I finally just turned off the app, and used the controls on the GoPro itself, which required more handling of the camera for adjustments than I would've liked. Which slowed my walk a bit. It is due to John Sikora's post production magic that the footage turned out as well as it did.

I would also mention that if the video is viewed at a higher resolution than HD (1080p), it looks better.
 

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