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Luggage Transfer Correos

A Trail Mix and Snack Thread

2020 Camino Guides

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
I came across the information below, and thought it may be fun to share. . . and nutritious and energy replenishing as well :)

What is or is not healthy is a matter of preference with regard to trail foods to snack on. I want quick energy that gives me about 100-120 calories of intake every 25 to 35 minutes as I am distance walking. . . and most certainly when I am backpacking. I like a combination of cashews, Peanut M&Ms and raisins.. . . to which I sometimes add a bite or two of hard sausage or jerky or hard cheese.

Many of you will have some favorites of your own; others haven't even thought about this at all and may love some suggestions to try. A lot of us have our own strategies for fueling. For some, that eschews any notion of eating between meals, which is fine, too. None of us needs to follow what anyone else does for this kind of topic.

We could talk about MCT oils, and the role of caffeine and glycogen release, and the Krebs cycle and the physiology of body-activitiy interfaces. But that would be tediously boring to many of us and a real snooze fest.

So. . . if some kind of energy intake makes you feel better, keeps your energy levels going, and allows you to dance til 4:00 am, rest for an hour, and then get up at 5:00 am to walk a 26 mile stage. . . you've got the best secret recipe and you'd better share it. :) Street and medical pharmacological tips not included.

This thread really isn't a debate on what is best, or healthiest, or preferable. . . . it is just a fun and subjective throwing stuff into the bag of the Forum, shaking it around, and seeing what pours out :)

--------------------------------

7 Simple and Yummy DIY Trail Mix Recipes

Instructions: For each of the following recipes, simply collect all the ingredients into a Ziploc bag or a mason jar and shake until evenly mixed. You can then start munching straight away or store for approximately a month, depending on the ingredients

The Classic (GORP)
Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup peanuts
  • 3/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup granola
  • Optional: 1/4 cup M&M’s (or chocolate chips)
Why it works: A classic trail mix with just the right balance of salty sweetness, this steadfast combo of nuts, seeds, dried fruit, granola and dark chocolate will hit all the taste buds while packing a powerfully fueling punch.



Asian Zest
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup cashews
  • 3/4 cup sesame seeds
  • 3/4 cup dried mango
  • 1/4 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup kale chips
  • 1/4 cup Teriyaki beef jerky
  • 1/4 cup rice crackers
Why it works: With ingredients like mango, kale chips and even teriyaki beef jerky this trail mix might sound like it has a lot going on. Mainly because it does. But don’t knock it until you try it, sometimes the seemingly oddest food combinations have a way of creating delicious magic.



Peanut Butter Galore
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup peanuts
  • 1 cup banana chips
  • 1/2 cup flax seeds
  • 1/2 cup chocolate chips (dark)
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter chips
  • 1/2 cup pretzels
Why it works: What’s not to love about a mix that includes bananas, chocolate and peanut butter? Perfect for those with a bit of a sweet tooth, the dark chocolate chips and banana pieces are sure to satiate those sweets cravings, while the peanuts and peanut butter chips provide healthy fats that’ll keep your hunger satisfied.



Popcorn Delight
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup dried apricot
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries
  • 1/2 cup popcorn
  • 1/4 beef jerky
  • Cinnamon (to taste)
Why it works: Needing a little more fiber while out on the trail? This combo which includes popcorn — a very fiber-rich food — could do the trick. On top of your extra dose of fiber with this mix, you’ll also be loading your body with protein, good fats and antioxidant fruits and seeds.



Breakfast Bite
Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup pecans
  • 3/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup hemp seeds
  • 1/2 cup dried strawberries
  • 1/2 cup dried blueberries
  • 1/2 cup cheerios or Chex cereals
  • Cinnamon (to taste)
Why it works: Think of this breakfast bite mix as a souped-up version of a basic bowl of Chex cereal. Minus the milk. Loaded with nuts, seeds, berries, energizing carbs and a dash of cinnamon, this delightful recipe could easily become a morning staple both on and off the trail.


Wasabi Mix
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup cashews
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup wasabi peas
Why it works: Cranberries and wasabi peas might sound like an unlikely combination, however, when eaten together their pleasant blend is really something everybody should try at least once. The dried cranberries alongside the cashews complement the slight kick of the wasabi peas, which just so happen to be an excellent source of protein.



Cajun Mama
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup peanuts
  • 1/2 cup walnuts
  • 1 cup pumpkin seeds
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup sesame sticks
  • 1/4 cup green peas
  • 1/2 tsp chili
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
Why it works: If spice is your thing, then the Cajun Mama trail mix is the one for you. Created with flavors like chili powder, cayenne pepper and cumin, this spicy and bold mix is one way to ensure you get that extra little pep in your step.


Tips for Creating Trail Mix Recipes

1. Experiment: the perfect trail mix is the trail mix that'll work best for you. That's why you want to experiment with your own recipes and flavor combinations. Sometimes it'll be a winner, other times a stinker. But eventually, you'll be able to come up with 3-4 recipes that are on point.

Here are a few things to experiment with:

  • Flavor: test unusual flavor combinations and see if you can come up with anything remotely pleasant. For example, who could have guessed that topping vanilla ice cream with a dash of soy sauce would taste so darn good?
  • Texture: beyond flavor, each ingredient has its own texture. Do you like your trail mix crunchy, crispy or smooth? Do you enjoy it more when it's dry or a little bit moist? Notice what happens to the overall texture of your snack when you add in more nuts, more fruits or more seeds.
  • Energy levels: when it comes to physical performance, not all trail mix is created equal. Pay attention to your energy levels after snacking and make sure that your trail mix is actually energizing you. A trail mix loaded with artificial sugars may provide you with a short-lived boost of energy, but chances are it'll be followed by an abrupt crash, headaches, and possibly heartburn. If that happens, reconsider your "cheat" ingredients and try to rebalance your mix.

2. Do It Yourself: Tempted to grab that ready-to-eat trail mix pouch from your supermarket? Don't. A quick glance at the back of the packaging will likely reveal a collection of products you should stay away from - refined sugars and oils, additives, and flavor enhancers. Instead, choose to make your own trail mix at home. It takes seconds to prepare and the health benefits of doing so are undeniable. Take it a step further by roasting your own nuts (10 minutes at 350°F) and dehydrating your own fruits and vegetables.


3. Keep Perishability in Mind: When experimenting with ingredients, keep in mind that some will spoil quicker than others. Use a website like StillTasty.com to know how long your ingredients will be good for and plan accordingly. Commercially-popped popcorn, for example, will go bad after 1 to 2 weeks of being opened. Not ideal if you're prepping for a month-long thru-hike.

A Brief History of Trail Mix (maybe)

A delicious and nutritious mixture of fruits, dried nuts, grains, seeds, chocolate chips, or really anything you want, trail mix is a lightweight on-the-go snack stocked full of nourishing carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

History’s a bit unclear in determining who first created trail mix, but there’s record of it dating all the way back to European countries during the 17th century. Another theory, however, is that Jack Kerouac first officially dreamed up the stuff when in his 1958 novel, The Dharma Burns, his main characters mentioned trail mix while planning meals for their upcoming hiking trip. A more popular theory, on the other hand, is that two California surfers invented it back in 1968 when they threw together a mix of peanuts and raisins in search of a quick, energizing snack.

Although we may never know who the original trail mix founder was, we can rest assured knowing the hundreds of trail mix variations that have developed since ensure there’s at least one version to appease every taste bud, specialty diet, or macro counting individual out there.
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
I came across the information below, and thought it may be fun to share. . . and nutritious and energy replenishing as well :)

What is or is not healthy is a matter of preference with regard to trail foods to snack on. I want quick energy that gives me about 100-120 calories of intake every 25 to 35 minutes as I am distance walking. . . and most certainly when I am backpacking. I like a combination of cashews, Peanut M&Ms and raisins.. . . to which I sometimes add a bite or two of hard sausage or jerky or hard cheese.

Many of you will have some favorites of your own; others haven't even thought about this at all and may love some suggestions to try. A lot of us have our own strategies for fueling. For some, that eschews any notion of eating between meals, which is fine, too. None of us needs to follow what anyone else does for this kind of topic.

We could talk about MCT oils, and the role of caffeine and glycogen release, and the Krebs cycle and the physiology of body-activitiy interfaces. But that would be tediously boring to many of us and a real snooze fest.

So. . . if some kind of energy intake makes you feel better, keeps your energy levels going, and allows you to dance til 4:00 am, rest for an hour, and then get up at 5:00 am to walk a 26 mile stage. . . you've got the best secret recipe and you'd better share it. :) Street and medical pharmacological tips not included.

This thread really isn't a debate on what is best, or healthiest, or preferable. . . . it is just a fun and subjective throwing stuff into the bag of the Forum, shaking it around, and seeing what pours out :)

--------------------------------

7 Simple and Yummy DIY Trail Mix Recipes

Instructions: For each of the following recipes, simply collect all the ingredients into a Ziploc bag or a mason jar and shake until evenly mixed. You can then start munching straight away or store for approximately a month, depending on the ingredients

The Classic (GORP)
Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup peanuts
  • 3/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup granola
  • Optional: 1/4 cup M&M’s (or chocolate chips)
Why it works: A classic trail mix with just the right balance of salty sweetness, this steadfast combo of nuts, seeds, dried fruit, granola and dark chocolate will hit all the taste buds while packing a powerfully fueling punch.



Asian Zest
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup cashews
  • 3/4 cup sesame seeds
  • 3/4 cup dried mango
  • 1/4 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup kale chips
  • 1/4 cup Teriyaki beef jerky
  • 1/4 cup rice crackers
Why it works: With ingredients like mango, kale chips and even teriyaki beef jerky this trail mix might sound like it has a lot going on. Mainly because it does. But don’t knock it until you try it, sometimes the seemingly oddest food combinations have a way of creating delicious magic.



Peanut Butter Galore
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup peanuts
  • 1 cup banana chips
  • 1/2 cup flax seeds
  • 1/2 cup chocolate chips (dark)
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter chips
  • 1/2 cup pretzels
Why it works: What’s not to love about a mix that includes bananas, chocolate and peanut butter? Perfect for those with a bit of a sweet tooth, the dark chocolate chips and banana pieces are sure to satiate those sweets cravings, while the peanuts and peanut butter chips provide healthy fats that’ll keep your hunger satisfied.



Popcorn Delight
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup dried apricot
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries
  • 1/2 cup popcorn
  • 1/4 beef jerky
  • Cinnamon (to taste)
Why it works: Needing a little more fiber while out on the trail? This combo which includes popcorn — a very fiber-rich food — could do the trick. On top of your extra dose of fiber with this mix, you’ll also be loading your body with protein, good fats and antioxidant fruits and seeds.



Breakfast Bite
Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup pecans
  • 3/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup hemp seeds
  • 1/2 cup dried strawberries
  • 1/2 cup dried blueberries
  • 1/2 cup cheerios or Chex cereals
  • Cinnamon (to taste)
Why it works: Think of this breakfast bite mix as a souped-up version of a basic bowl of Chex cereal. Minus the milk. Loaded with nuts, seeds, berries, energizing carbs and a dash of cinnamon, this delightful recipe could easily become a morning staple both on and off the trail.


Wasabi Mix
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup cashews
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup wasabi peas
Why it works: Cranberries and wasabi peas might sound like an unlikely combination, however, when eaten together their pleasant blend is really something everybody should try at least once. The dried cranberries alongside the cashews complement the slight kick of the wasabi peas, which just so happen to be an excellent source of protein.



Cajun Mama
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup peanuts
  • 1/2 cup walnuts
  • 1 cup pumpkin seeds
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup sesame sticks
  • 1/4 cup green peas
  • 1/2 tsp chili
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
Why it works: If spice is your thing, then the Cajun Mama trail mix is the one for you. Created with flavors like chili powder, cayenne pepper and cumin, this spicy and bold mix is one way to ensure you get that extra little pep in your step.


Tips for Creating Trail Mix Recipes

1. Experiment: the perfect trail mix is the trail mix that'll work best for you. That's why you want to experiment with your own recipes and flavor combinations. Sometimes it'll be a winner, other times a stinker. But eventually, you'll be able to come up with 3-4 recipes that are on point.

Here are a few things to experiment with:

  • Flavor: test unusual flavor combinations and see if you can come up with anything remotely pleasant. For example, who could have guessed that topping vanilla ice cream with a dash of soy sauce would taste so darn good?
  • Texture: beyond flavor, each ingredient has its own texture. Do you like your trail mix crunchy, crispy or smooth? Do you enjoy it more when it's dry or a little bit moist? Notice what happens to the overall texture of your snack when you add in more nuts, more fruits or more seeds.
  • Energy levels: when it comes to physical performance, not all trail mix is created equal. Pay attention to your energy levels after snacking and make sure that your trail mix is actually energizing you. A trail mix loaded with artificial sugars may provide you with a short-lived boost of energy, but chances are it'll be followed by an abrupt crash, headaches, and possibly heartburn. If that happens, reconsider your "cheat" ingredients and try to rebalance your mix.

2. Do It Yourself: Tempted to grab that ready-to-eat trail mix pouch from your supermarket? Don't. A quick glance at the back of the packaging will likely reveal a collection of products you should stay away from - refined sugars and oils, additives, and flavor enhancers. Instead, choose to make your own trail mix at home. It takes seconds to prepare and the health benefits of doing so are undeniable. Take it a step further by roasting your own nuts (10 minutes at 350°F) and dehydrating your own fruits and vegetables.


3. Keep Perishability in Mind: When experimenting with ingredients, keep in mind that some will spoil quicker than others. Use a website like StillTasty.com to know how long your ingredients will be good for and plan accordingly. Commercially-popped popcorn, for example, will go bad after 1 to 2 weeks of being opened. Not ideal if you're prepping for a month-long thru-hike.

A Brief History of Trail Mix (maybe)

A delicious and nutritious mixture of fruits, dried nuts, grains, seeds, chocolate chips, or really anything you want, trail mix is a lightweight on-the-go snack stocked full of nourishing carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

History’s a bit unclear in determining who first created trail mix, but there’s record of it dating all the way back to European countries during the 17th century. Another theory, however, is that Jack Kerouac first officially dreamed up the stuff when in his 1958 novel, The Dharma Burns, his main characters mentioned trail mix while planning meals for their upcoming hiking trip. A more popular theory, on the other hand, is that two California surfers invented it back in 1968 when they threw together a mix of peanuts and raisins in search of a quick, energizing snack.

Although we may never know who the original trail mix founder was, we can rest assured knowing the hundreds of trail mix variations that have developed since ensure there’s at least one version to appease every taste bud, specialty diet, or macro counting individual out there.
Mmm...might just try these at home!
...One thing that surprised me is that I could not find peanutbutter anywhere on the Camino, I have an egg allergy so wanted a morning protein other than the tortilla espanola 😳
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
Mmm...might just try these at home!
...One thing that surprised me is that I could not find peanutbutter anywhere on the Camino, I have an egg allergy so wanted a morning protein other than the tortilla espanola 😳
Peanut Butter can be found pretty much in most Supermercados. A lot of time it will be with Nutella, which is epidemic. :)
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
Peanut Butter can be found pretty much in most Supermercados. A lot of time it will be with Nutella, which is epidemic. :)
I did see Nutella (loaded with sugar and is hazelnut not peanut) but was looking for just plain old peanut butter....I couldn’t find it in any supermarkets in either Spain nor France.....anyone from Spain on this forum who knows the secret?
I thought about bringing powdered peanutbutter (as cant bring a jar of PB in my carry on pack)....but I might just cut to the chase and bring protein powder, this I know I can get in Spain at least
 
Last edited:

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
I did see Nutella (loaded with sugar and is hazelnut not peanut) but was looking for just plain old peanut butter....I couldn’t find it in any supermarkets in either Spain nor France.....anyone from Spain on this forum who knows the secret?
I thought about bringing powdered peanutbutter (as cant bring a jar of PB in my carry on pack)....but I might just cut to the chase and bring protein powder, this I know I can get in Spain at least
Oops. . I meant that peanut butter and other nut butters are often found in the section that Nutella is in. The only time I've had finding some, are in smaller villages.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I did see Nutella (loaded with sugar and is hazelnut not peanut) but was looking for just plain old peanut butter....I couldn’t find it in any supermarkets in either Spain nor France.....anyone from Spain on this forum who knows the secret?
I thought about bringing powdered peanutbutter (as cant bring a jar of PB in my carry on pack)....but I might just cut to the chase and bring protein powder, this I know I can get in Spain at least
I always recommend having your backpack as a carry-on while traveling to the Camino on an airline. Most of the time though you are still allowed a check in bag/luggage. What I have done before is put an inexpensive set of trekking poles in a cardboard box, along with any liquids or such like antiperspirant, toothpaste etc, snack/protein bars...whatever. Things that I don't want to carry-on the flight or cannot. Tape up the box and check it onboard. Upon arrival I transfer it all to my pack and trash the box into a bin. If the box becomes lost luggage, no worries. Nothing expensive or irreplaceable in it.
Perhaps you could do the same with two small jars of peanut butter. They're consumable. Pack gets lighter everyday when you eat it, lol.
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
Oops. . I meant that peanut butter and other nut butters are often found in the section that Nutella is in. The only time I've had finding some, are in smaller villages.
Thanks I’ll look again this year 😉
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
@davebugg
It would help if you would clarify if the nuts and seeds in your recipes are salted or plain. I sometimes carry walnuts, or whatever other nuts I find in season along the trail, as I always walk in autumn. Generally, my snack for the day consists of an apple and sheep cheese. This often doubles as lunch, unless I stop for comida on a less busy trail where a noon main meal is the local norm. Flexibility is my key for being well nourished on camino.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
@davebugg
It would help if you would clarify if the nuts and seeds in your recipes are salted or plain. I sometimes carry walnuts, or whatever other nuts I find in season along the trail, as I always walk in autumn. Generally, my snack for the day consists of an apple and sheep cheese. This often doubles as lunch, unless I stop for comida on a less busy trail where a noon main meal is the local norm. Flexibility is my key for being well nourished on camino.
I actually found those recipes, but I would use which ever best suits one's taste.
 

hooiserpilgrim

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
camino frances Oct 2018
Thanks I’ll look again this year 😉
I brought several packets of the Justin's peanut butter. They are a tad more expensive than a jar, but they are small and easy to use/carry as you don't need a spoon or knife.
 

rabtacoma

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Leon to Santiago October 2019
I brought about 5 quart ziplock bags from home. When I bought nuts, dried fruit, misc i dumped than all in a ziplock to mix. This was handy as once you open the packages they tend to get messy. After I used the bag for about a week (refilling as necessary) I moved it on to a back pocket to use to pack out any “tissue”.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
I brought several packets of the Justin's peanut butter. They are a tad more expensive than a jar, but they are small and easy to use/carry as you don't need a spoon or knife.
I use my 1/2 ounce (14 grm) Opinel #4.

I prefer the stainless blade version, even though the carbon steel version is easier to sharpen. The SS version holds a great edge for quite a while, though. A great multi-tasker . . spreading peanut butter, cutting cheese and sausages, slicing bread, cutting cords, slicing off tape, etc. :)

 
Last edited:

Valarie Griep

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese (2016)
Mmm...might just try these at home!
...One thing that surprised me is that I could not find peanutbutter anywhere on the Camino, I have an egg allergy so wanted a morning protein other than the tortilla espanola 😳
I've purchased a product called PB2 in the US which is peanut butter powder. Simply mix a bit up with water and spread it. It tasted great and is obviously much lighter than a jar of peanut butter. I'm vegan so I like having a reasonable option for when I can't get a plant-based meal.
 

tomnorth

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015)
I fell in love with the golden manzana (apple) on my Camino. It became my absolute favorite trail snack, that and a yogurt.
 

Sjp007

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 St James
2020 St James
I've purchased a product called PB2 in the US which is peanut butter powder. Simply mix a bit up with water and spread it. It tasted great and is obviously much lighter than a jar of peanut butter. I'm vegan so I like having a reasonable option for when I can't get a plant-based meal.
Great alternative thanks :)
 

Mike Blackard

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF -Sept.-Oct 2018 , CF Aug- Oct 2019
(CF or VdlP summer/fall 2020)
OK, not exactly a trail mix snack, but for me a new discovery for pick me back up and get me going every 3-4 hours at the next café/bar was a CLARA CON LIMON. schooner size glass half filled with tap beer and half filled with lemon soda. Low on alcohol, high on refreshing. Small places use tap beer and pour lemon soda on top from a big bottle. Bigger places (in cities) will have the combination pre mixed on tap, RADLER brand. That and a small plate of olives (or fresh anchovies) and this pelegrino is ready to go.
 

Friend from Barquinha

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
None yet; perhaps the Portugese (2021?)
OK, not exactly a trail mix snack, but for me a new discovery for pick me back up and get me going every 3-4 hours at the next café/bar was a CLARA CON LIMON. ...RADLER brand.
Radler is actually the German generic name for this drink--more or less a shandy, which is half lemonade, half beer. In Portugal, some brands call it "Radler" and others "'Panaché" which is the French name for the same thing. Very popular in the summer! Most cafés will have it. I believe Sagres, which is the most common beer brand you'll see, calls its version "Radler."
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
I've purchased a product called PB2 in the US which is peanut butter powder. Simply mix a bit up with water and spread it. It tasted great and is obviously much lighter than a jar of peanut butter. I'm vegan so I like having a reasonable option for when I can't get a plant-based meal.
I've used similar nut powders when backpacking, and they are a reasonable substitute. :)

On Camino, I never had a problem finding small jars of peanut butter, though, which would usually allow me to use up the contents. If I did have any peanut butter left over, I found willing takers for the leftovers so I never had to carry a jar.
 

Mycroft

Active Member
I came across the information below, and thought it may be fun to share. . . and nutritious and energy replenishing as well :)

What is or is not healthy is a matter of preference with regard to trail foods to snack on. I want quick energy that gives me about 100-120 calories of intake every 25 to 35 minutes as I am distance walking. . . and most certainly when I am backpacking. I like a combination of cashews, Peanut M&Ms and raisins.. . . to which I sometimes add a bite or two of hard sausage or jerky or hard cheese.

Many of you will have some favorites of your own; others haven't even thought about this at all and may love some suggestions to try. A lot of us have our own strategies for fueling. For some, that eschews any notion of eating between meals, which is fine, too. None of us needs to follow what anyone else does for this kind of topic.

We could talk about MCT oils, and the role of caffeine and glycogen release, and the Krebs cycle and the physiology of body-activitiy interfaces. But that would be tediously boring to many of us and a real snooze fest.

So. . . if some kind of energy intake makes you feel better, keeps your energy levels going, and allows you to dance til 4:00 am, rest for an hour, and then get up at 5:00 am to walk a 26 mile stage. . . you've got the best secret recipe and you'd better share it. :) Street and medical pharmacological tips not included.

This thread really isn't a debate on what is best, or healthiest, or preferable. . . . it is just a fun and subjective throwing stuff into the bag of the Forum, shaking it around, and seeing what pours out :)

--------------------------------

7 Simple and Yummy DIY Trail Mix Recipes

Instructions: For each of the following recipes, simply collect all the ingredients into a Ziploc bag or a mason jar and shake until evenly mixed. You can then start munching straight away or store for approximately a month, depending on the ingredients

The Classic (GORP)
Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup peanuts
  • 3/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup granola
  • Optional: 1/4 cup M&M’s (or chocolate chips)
Why it works: A classic trail mix with just the right balance of salty sweetness, this steadfast combo of nuts, seeds, dried fruit, granola and dark chocolate will hit all the taste buds while packing a powerfully fueling punch.



Asian Zest
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup cashews
  • 3/4 cup sesame seeds
  • 3/4 cup dried mango
  • 1/4 cup shredded coconut
  • 1/4 cup kale chips
  • 1/4 cup Teriyaki beef jerky
  • 1/4 cup rice crackers
Why it works: With ingredients like mango, kale chips and even teriyaki beef jerky this trail mix might sound like it has a lot going on. Mainly because it does. But don’t knock it until you try it, sometimes the seemingly oddest food combinations have a way of creating delicious magic.



Peanut Butter Galore
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup peanuts
  • 1 cup banana chips
  • 1/2 cup flax seeds
  • 1/2 cup chocolate chips (dark)
  • 1/2 cup peanut butter chips
  • 1/2 cup pretzels
Why it works: What’s not to love about a mix that includes bananas, chocolate and peanut butter? Perfect for those with a bit of a sweet tooth, the dark chocolate chips and banana pieces are sure to satiate those sweets cravings, while the peanuts and peanut butter chips provide healthy fats that’ll keep your hunger satisfied.



Popcorn Delight
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1/2 cup dried apricot
  • 1/2 cup dried cherries
  • 1/2 cup popcorn
  • 1/4 beef jerky
  • Cinnamon (to taste)
Why it works: Needing a little more fiber while out on the trail? This combo which includes popcorn — a very fiber-rich food — could do the trick. On top of your extra dose of fiber with this mix, you’ll also be loading your body with protein, good fats and antioxidant fruits and seeds.



Breakfast Bite
Ingredients:

  • 3/4 cup pecans
  • 3/4 cup almonds
  • 1 cup hemp seeds
  • 1/2 cup dried strawberries
  • 1/2 cup dried blueberries
  • 1/2 cup cheerios or Chex cereals
  • Cinnamon (to taste)
Why it works: Think of this breakfast bite mix as a souped-up version of a basic bowl of Chex cereal. Minus the milk. Loaded with nuts, seeds, berries, energizing carbs and a dash of cinnamon, this delightful recipe could easily become a morning staple both on and off the trail.


Wasabi Mix
Ingredients:

  • 1 1/2 cup cashews
  • 1 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup dried cranberries
  • 1/2 cup wasabi peas
Why it works: Cranberries and wasabi peas might sound like an unlikely combination, however, when eaten together their pleasant blend is really something everybody should try at least once. The dried cranberries alongside the cashews complement the slight kick of the wasabi peas, which just so happen to be an excellent source of protein.



Cajun Mama
Ingredients:

  • 1 cup peanuts
  • 1/2 cup walnuts
  • 1 cup pumpkin seeds
  • 1 cup raisins
  • 1/4 cup sesame sticks
  • 1/4 cup green peas
  • 1/2 tsp chili
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/2 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
Why it works: If spice is your thing, then the Cajun Mama trail mix is the one for you. Created with flavors like chili powder, cayenne pepper and cumin, this spicy and bold mix is one way to ensure you get that extra little pep in your step.


Tips for Creating Trail Mix Recipes

1. Experiment: the perfect trail mix is the trail mix that'll work best for you. That's why you want to experiment with your own recipes and flavor combinations. Sometimes it'll be a winner, other times a stinker. But eventually, you'll be able to come up with 3-4 recipes that are on point.

Here are a few things to experiment with:

  • Flavor: test unusual flavor combinations and see if you can come up with anything remotely pleasant. For example, who could have guessed that topping vanilla ice cream with a dash of soy sauce would taste so darn good?
  • Texture: beyond flavor, each ingredient has its own texture. Do you like your trail mix crunchy, crispy or smooth? Do you enjoy it more when it's dry or a little bit moist? Notice what happens to the overall texture of your snack when you add in more nuts, more fruits or more seeds.
  • Energy levels: when it comes to physical performance, not all trail mix is created equal. Pay attention to your energy levels after snacking and make sure that your trail mix is actually energizing you. A trail mix loaded with artificial sugars may provide you with a short-lived boost of energy, but chances are it'll be followed by an abrupt crash, headaches, and possibly heartburn. If that happens, reconsider your "cheat" ingredients and try to rebalance your mix.

2. Do It Yourself: Tempted to grab that ready-to-eat trail mix pouch from your supermarket? Don't. A quick glance at the back of the packaging will likely reveal a collection of products you should stay away from - refined sugars and oils, additives, and flavor enhancers. Instead, choose to make your own trail mix at home. It takes seconds to prepare and the health benefits of doing so are undeniable. Take it a step further by roasting your own nuts (10 minutes at 350°F) and dehydrating your own fruits and vegetables.


3. Keep Perishability in Mind: When experimenting with ingredients, keep in mind that some will spoil quicker than others. Use a website like StillTasty.com to know how long your ingredients will be good for and plan accordingly. Commercially-popped popcorn, for example, will go bad after 1 to 2 weeks of being opened. Not ideal if you're prepping for a month-long thru-hike.

A Brief History of Trail Mix (maybe)

A delicious and nutritious mixture of fruits, dried nuts, grains, seeds, chocolate chips, or really anything you want, trail mix is a lightweight on-the-go snack stocked full of nourishing carbohydrates, proteins and fats.

History’s a bit unclear in determining who first created trail mix, but there’s record of it dating all the way back to European countries during the 17th century. Another theory, however, is that Jack Kerouac first officially dreamed up the stuff when in his 1958 novel, The Dharma Burns, his main characters mentioned trail mix while planning meals for their upcoming hiking trip. A more popular theory, on the other hand, is that two California surfers invented it back in 1968 when they threw together a mix of peanuts and raisins in search of a quick, energizing snack.

Although we may never know who the original trail mix founder was, we can rest assured knowing the hundreds of trail mix variations that have developed since ensure there’s at least one version to appease every taste bud, specialty diet, or macro counting individual out there.
Take care of how many flax seeds you eat in a day! They are great for relieving constipation. In the seed form, one does not get the omega3 but ground flax is a different story.
 
Last edited:

Mycroft

Active Member
Mmm...might just try these at home!
...One thing that surprised me is that I could not find peanutbutter anywhere on the Camino, I have an egg allergy so wanted a morning protein other than the tortilla espanola 😳
I know that Justin's makes nut butters in small packs--maybe there are other companies that do the same. The almond butter is tasty!
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
I’m surprised no one mentioned the quintessential and easy to find snacks bananas and dates.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2017)
Frances(2018)
Ingles(2019)
Aragones(2020)
Portuguese(2020)
Take care of how many flax seeds you in a day! They are great for relieving constipation. In the seed form, one does not get the omega3 but ground flax is a different story.
:) I don't eat flaxseed myself, so fair warning to those who do.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
Take care of how many flax seeds you eat in a day! They are great for relieving constipation. In the seed form, one does not get the omega3 but ground flax is a different story.

When eaten sprouted, dried and ground, you not only get the omega 3, but you get the ..err ... ‘bulking‘ effect, too 😉
And they take a devil of a lot of liquid to mix into eg youghurt!

(an aside: they are supposed to be very helpful for IBS symptoms 🙂)
 

Mary Doll

Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sarria to Santiago (2018)
Camino Francés SJPDP to Finisterre planned for June 2020
OK, not exactly a trail mix snack, but for me a new discovery for pick me back up and get me going every 3-4 hours at the next café/bar was a CLARA CON LIMON. schooner size glass half filled with tap beer and half filled with lemon soda. Low on alcohol, high on refreshing. Small places use tap beer and pour lemon soda on top from a big bottle. Bigger places (in cities) will have the combination pre mixed on tap, RADLER brand. That and a small plate of olives (or fresh anchovies) and this pelegrino is ready to go.
I’m a big of a shandy. I find it really refreshing. I assume clara is another word for beer. I always asked for cerveza con limon. I really need to start working on my Spanish every day. 🍺
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
Barobins Food and drink on the Camino de Santiago 53
S Food and drink on the Camino de Santiago 46

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