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'Addiction'- an appropriate word for wanting to walk the Camino again (& again)?

2020 Camino Guides

SEB2

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2015), CP (2016), part of Vasco (2019)
It is with hesitation that I write on a topic that has been bothering me over many years of forum membership, and that is the equating of the desire to walk the Way again with addiction. I live in a country that, in rural areas, as well as major cities is bedevilled by the social and personal ills of opiate and other addictions. At present the UK is fighting a battle against the recruitment of very young children to act as couriers for drugs - known as county lines. Please pilgrims, do we really feel that walking the Camino is comparable to the numbing of mind and body that opiates provide for those poor souls whose lives have led them to their present dire circumstances. When drugs come into a community families are ruined, crime rockets and the threat of violence is always present, as this is a trade controlled by vicious people without a moral compass.

Please can we explore a wider vocabulary to express what motivates some of us to repeat the experience of walking to Santiago de Compostela that doesn't pathologise the activity? This means trying to move beyond describing it as a compulsion to which we must submit. After all there are lots of things we might wish to repeat ad infinitum that are not always good for us, but we are able to discern the difference between compulsion and choice, and surely a pilgrimage is more meaningful than the sating of any particular appetite. I understand that some members when using the word 'addiction' in relation to their wish to walk again (& again), did so with humorous intent.
It's a beautiful sunny morning here is Scotland after days of gales and torrential rain so it is not grumpiness that prompted the post, rather that I always shudder slightly when the word 'addiction' is used in relation to something I consider to be an experience filled with joy, offering opportunities for reflection and reaffirming what is good about humanity.
As an addendum, I am familiar with the history (not the experience) of the use of psychotropic drugs such as peyote in spiritual practices aimed at expanding the consciousness of those who believe but that is a separate matter and not in any way associated with addiction.
 

Turga

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
You are of course entitled to your opinion, but I think that perhaps you are being a little oversensitive. I don’t think any pilgrim on this forum using the word ‘addiction’ has ever had any conscious thought about the association of that word to the global drug problem. It is just a ‘convenient term’ to use instead of having to try to explain the complex feelings and motives that makes you want to go back to the Camino – and I believe that anyone on this forum reading that word in a Camino context will not associate it with anything else than the well known feeling of ‘Camino-longing’.

Taking the issue a step further, we’d also then have to be careful about using words like “snow”, “grass” and “horse” because in certain environments these words are also associated with various kinds of drugs. I mean, the world is complicated enough as it is… :)
 

Molly Cassidy

Travelling light
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to start the Camino Frances from St Jean at the end of May (2020).
It is with hesitation that I write on a topic that has been bothering me over many years of forum membership, and that is the equating of the desire to walk the Way again with addiction. I live in a country that, in rural areas, as well as major cities is bedevilled by the social and personal ills of opiate and other addictions. At present the UK is fighting a battle against the recruitment of very young children to act as couriers for drugs - known as county lines. Please pilgrims, do we really feel that walking the Camino is comparable to the numbing of mind and body that opiates provide for those poor souls whose lives have led them to their present dire circumstances. When drugs come into a community families are ruined, crime rockets and the threat of violence is always present, as this is a trade controlled by vicious people without a moral compass.

Please can we explore a wider vocabulary to express what motivates some of us to repeat the experience of walking to Santiago de Compostela that doesn't pathologise the activity? This means trying to move beyond describing it as a compulsion to which we must submit. After all there are lots of things we might wish to repeat ad infinitum that are not always good for us, but we are able to discern the difference between compulsion and choice, and surely a pilgrimage is more meaningful than the sating of any particular appetite. I understand that some members when using the word 'addiction' in relation to their wish to walk again (& again), did so with humorous intent.
It's a beautiful sunny morning here is Scotland after days of gales and torrential rain so it is not grumpiness that prompted the post, rather that I always shudder slightly when the word 'addiction' is used in relation to something I consider to be an experience filled with joy, offering opportunities for reflection and reaffirming what is good about humanity.
As an addendum, I am familiar with the history (not the experience) of the use of psychotropic drugs such as peyote in spiritual practices aimed at expanding the consciousness of those who believe but that is a separate matter and not in any way associated with addiction.
I think this is part of a general trend of misuse of the word addiction, and agree that people could think more carefully about their use of language.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I understand the OP's voice on the subject and yes, a very sensitive and serious view.
I agree with Turga though. When I read of our love and desire to walk caminos again, I see no harm in the use of the word. I have a brother addicted to opiods for over ten years and love him, yet the word addiction used in context of a pilgrim does not bother me at all.
 

Gilberto

Gilberto del Camino
Camino(s) past & future
Camino's 7000 Km +
People using the word "addiction" in this context gives it a humoristic twist, a bit over the top to think otherwise. I personally use the word "virus" for my camino longing, futher I "suffer" since 2001. There are many words in the english language which can have a different meaning depending on the context you use them in. But real drugs are far from peoples mind.
 

edandjoan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
St. Gallen to Muxia
2012-2018
I appreciate the OP's comments and at times have been bother from the use of the word addiction on the forum . As a recovering addict (of over 25 years), I walk my journey and cherish my recovery. I would hope that there must be a more meaningful reason for walking the camino other than addiction: perhaps introspection, peace, joy, etc.
 

Turga

Camino tortuga
Camino(s) past & future
CF (Aug/Sep 2017)
CF (Aug/Sep 2018)
and agree that people could think more carefully about their use of language.
Oh, I agree! – in principle. The question is just how far one should go. I think it would take a bit of the ‘fun and spontaneity’ out of the forum if we had to analyze carefully which possible interpretations whoever could make of certain words and phrases (with the exception, of course, of the obviously inappropriate cases).

The issue has been touched upon in another thread about people having to express themselves on this forum in a language (English) that is foreign to them. I received some friendly and humorous reactions when once in some post I used the term ‘trafficated’ about roads with heavy traffic 😁 . I think it’s all about allowing each other some ‘slack’ and not assuming the worst….
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
When the time is right
For me the word « addiction » when talking about the Camino makes me cringe but most likely because addiction has been a personal experience with myself, my son and other family members. This word gives off a negative vibe for me. Having said that the use of the word is not for me to judge. My personal experiences are not those of other people in this forum and I need to understand and let go of those feelings.
 

SEB2

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2015), CP (2016), part of Vasco (2019)
You are of course entitled to your opinion, but I think that perhaps you are being a little oversensitive. I don’t think any pilgrim on this forum using the word ‘addiction’ has ever had any conscious thought about the association of that word to the global drug problem. It is just a ‘convenient term’ to use instead of having to try to explain the complex feelings and motives that makes you want to go back to the Camino – and I believe that anyone on this forum reading that word in a Camino context will not associate it with anything else than the well known feeling of ‘Camino-longing’.

Taking the issue a step further, we’d also then have to be careful about using words like “snow”, “grass” and “horse” because in certain environments these words are also associated with various kinds of drugs. I mean, the world is complicated enough as it is… :)
Thank you for your thoughtful response @Turga and your introduction of the term 'camino-longing'. This is just perfect and what I was hoping for, I am sure that others can be similarly creative in providing alternatives to 'addiction'. On the other hand, I don't think that I am being oversensitive but would rather veer in that direction than to be accused of insensitivity. There are those who have taken issue with what they consider a greater weight given to 'changing the word@ rather than 'changing the world', but in my years on this planet I have seen the previously accepted vocabularly regarding ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability and faith undergo great changes, and, in my opinion, these shifts in words have lifted the material status for, and respect accorded to groups previously marginalised by language that had normalised perjorative attitudes towards them. Prejudice was not necessarily intended, even if it was received as such, result, it was just how people spoke at that time. I agree with you that the world is complicated, so lets try to make it less complicated by taking the time to find words that speak more accurately and creatively of our place within it. Nevertheless you make a valid point which I shall in future take into account @Turga that English is not the first language of all forum members.
 

Bad Pilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Far too many...
Can I call myself a Camino repeat offender, or is it insensitive to people with a criminal past? :D Sorry, I had to go there 😉 Cause I've been using it a lot :eek:!!

By the way... I don't think "virus", as someone suggested above, is the appropriate substitute, given the the state of the world right now 😅 !!

/BP
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco(2017) Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(2019) CF
We live in a world where no matter what word you use for anything at any time will offend someone at some point.
I appreciate the OP point of view and understand it in some way, but if we continue to seek offense in everything heard or read, we'll find it. I would be offended by the world on a daily basis...I choose not to be.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
It is with hesitation that I write on a topic that has been bothering me over many years of forum membership, and that is the equating of the desire to walk the Way again with addiction. I live in a country that, in rural areas, as well as major cities is bedevilled by the social and personal ills of opiate and other addictions. At present the UK is fighting a battle against the recruitment of very young children to act as couriers for drugs - known as county lines. Please pilgrims, do we really feel that walking the Camino is comparable to the numbing of mind and body that opiates provide for those poor souls whose lives have led them to their present dire circumstances. When drugs come into a community families are ruined, crime rockets and the threat of violence is always present, as this is a trade controlled by vicious people without a moral compass.

Please can we explore a wider vocabulary to express what motivates some of us to repeat the experience of walking to Santiago de Compostela that doesn't pathologise the activity? This means trying to move beyond describing it as a compulsion to which we must submit. After all there are lots of things we might wish to repeat ad infinitum that are not always good for us, but we are able to discern the difference between compulsion and choice, and surely a pilgrimage is more meaningful than the sating of any particular appetite. I understand that some members when using the word 'addiction' in relation to their wish to walk again (& again), did so with humorous intent.
It's a beautiful sunny morning here is Scotland after days of gales and torrential rain so it is not grumpiness that prompted the post, rather that I always shudder slightly when the word 'addiction' is used in relation to something I consider to be an experience filled with joy, offering opportunities for reflection and reaffirming what is good about humanity.
As an addendum, I am familiar with the history (not the experience) of the use of psychotropic drugs such as peyote in spiritual practices aimed at expanding the consciousness of those who believe but that is a separate matter and not in any way associated with addiction.
As one who frequently uses that word to describe both my camino connection and my daily exercise routine, I decided to dig a little deeper. Turns out that this very same debate exists in the world of psychology. I read an interview with the author of the book that coined the term Positive Addiction and It totally resonates with me. It’s short and very readable, and I think many forum members will identify with what he says.

Of course, there are always two sides. There are some in the field of psychology who think the use of the word is inappropriate, much as @SEB2 posits in the initial post.

I try not to offend people gratuitously, but I think that the term very accurately describes some aspects of my life. And I agree with those who say that use of the term is in no way communicating any sort of disparagement or trivialization of those many negative addictions. It is perhaps just the shiny side of a very dark coin.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

KJFSophie

My Way, With Joy !
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014 & 2015 ),Via San Francesco(2017) Camino Portugese (2018 )Camino Ingles(2019) CF
Oh, I agree! – in principle. The question is just how far one should go. I think it would take a bit of the ‘fun and spontaneity’ out of the forum if we had to analyze carefully which possible interpretations whoever could make of certain words and phrases (with the exception, of course, of the obviously inappropriate cases).

The issue has been touched upon in another thread about people having to express themselves on this forum in a language (English) that is foreign to them. I received some friendly and humorous reactions when once in some post I used the term ‘trafficated’ about roads with heavy traffic 😁 . I think it’s all about allowing each other some ‘slack’ and not assuming the worst….
Well put @Turga ...and I agree. I generally take a step back and consider that the poster may not have english as a primary , or even secondary language. Translations often come across as blunt. In addition, humor is often lost. Good point.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I agree with both sides of this coin!
Unfortunately, unless we are able to speak in person to one another, sometimes our best intentions get lost in writing and can come across either too serious or too flippant even if not intended....when our personal opinions become debates in general, they are usually best left to face to face encounters. 🗣🗣
 

Island

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugués 2019
Pilgrims' Way 2020
Via Francigena 2020
Florida Trail
Appalachain Trail
I agree, @SEB2, that general use of the word "addiction" may desensitize some to the absolute destruction that drug and alcohol addiction do to individuals and communities. And I agree that pilgrims are not - in the literal sense - addicted to the Camino experience, otherwise they would never return home or would frequently sell all possessions to return to the Camino. So, addiction in its literal sense is not the correct term - to your point. I appreciate you raising my eyes to this topic.

A more appropriate word for my relationship is: YEARNING.

Yearn (verb): have an intense feeling of longing for something, typically something that one has been separated from.

Going forward, I will try to use the word yearning to reflect my since of longing for and separation from the Camino.

All that said, I do not anticipate that many will adopt this verbiage and I have to recognize that others may not intend any offense / disrespect / disparagement by their word choice.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
It is with hesitation that I write on a topic that has been bothering me over many years of forum membership, and that is the equating of the desire to walk the Way again with addiction. I live in a country that, in rural areas, as well as major cities is bedevilled by the social and personal ills of opiate and other addictions. At present the UK is fighting a battle against the recruitment of very young children to act as couriers for drugs - known as county lines. Please pilgrims, do we really feel that walking the Camino is comparable to the numbing of mind and body that opiates provide for those poor souls whose lives have led them to their present dire circumstances. When drugs come into a community families are ruined, crime rockets and the threat of violence is always present, as this is a trade controlled by vicious people without a moral compass.

Please can we explore a wider vocabulary to express what motivates some of us to repeat the experience of walking to Santiago de Compostela that doesn't pathologise the activity? This means trying to move beyond describing it as a compulsion to which we must submit. After all there are lots of things we might wish to repeat ad infinitum that are not always good for us, but we are able to discern the difference between compulsion and choice, and surely a pilgrimage is more meaningful than the sating of any particular appetite. I understand that some members when using the word 'addiction' in relation to their wish to walk again (& again), did so with humorous intent.
It's a beautiful sunny morning here is Scotland after days of gales and torrential rain so it is not grumpiness that prompted the post, rather that I always shudder slightly when the word 'addiction' is used in relation to something I consider to be an experience filled with joy, offering opportunities for reflection and reaffirming what is good about humanity.
As an addendum, I am familiar with the history (not the experience) of the use of psychotropic drugs such as peyote in spiritual practices aimed at expanding the consciousness of those who believe but that is a separate matter and not in any way associated with addiction.
Passion!
 
D

Deleted member 59555

Guest
It is with hesitation that I write on a topic that has been bothering me over many years of forum membership, and that is the equating of the desire to walk the Way again with addiction. I live in a country that, in rural areas, as well as major cities is bedevilled by the social and personal ills of opiate and other addictions. At present the UK is fighting a battle against the recruitment of very young children to act as couriers for drugs - known as county lines. Please pilgrims, do we really feel that walking the Camino is comparable to the numbing of mind and body that opiates provide for those poor souls whose lives have led them to their present dire circumstances. When drugs come into a community families are ruined, crime rockets and the threat of violence is always present, as this is a trade controlled by vicious people without a moral compass.

Please can we explore a wider vocabulary to express what motivates some of us to repeat the experience of walking to Santiago de Compostela that doesn't pathologise the activity? This means trying to move beyond describing it as a compulsion to which we must submit. After all there are lots of things we might wish to repeat ad infinitum that are not always good for us, but we are able to discern the difference between compulsion and choice, and surely a pilgrimage is more meaningful than the sating of any particular appetite. I understand that some members when using the word 'addiction' in relation to their wish to walk again (& again), did so with humorous intent.
It's a beautiful sunny morning here is Scotland after days of gales and torrential rain so it is not grumpiness that prompted the post, rather that I always shudder slightly when the word 'addiction' is used in relation to something I consider to be an experience filled with joy, offering opportunities for reflection and reaffirming what is good about humanity.
As an addendum, I am familiar with the history (not the experience) of the use of psychotropic drugs such as peyote in spiritual practices aimed at expanding the consciousness of those who believe but that is a separate matter and not in any way associated with addiction.
It is with hesitation that I write on a topic that has been bothering me over many years of forum membership, and that is the equating of the desire to walk the Way again with addiction. I live in a country that, in rural areas, as well as major cities is bedevilled by the social and personal ills of opiate and other addictions. At present the UK is fighting a battle against the recruitment of very young children to act as couriers for drugs - known as county lines. Please pilgrims, do we really feel that walking the Camino is comparable to the numbing of mind and body that opiates provide for those poor souls whose lives have led them to their present dire circumstances. When drugs come into a community families are ruined, crime rockets and the threat of violence is always present, as this is a trade controlled by vicious people without a moral compass.

Please can we explore a wider vocabulary to express what motivates some of us to repeat the experience of walking to Santiago de Compostela that doesn't pathologise the activity? This means trying to move beyond describing it as a compulsion to which we must submit. After all there are lots of things we might wish to repeat ad infinitum that are not always good for us, but we are able to discern the difference between compulsion and choice, and surely a pilgrimage is more meaningful than the sating of any particular appetite. I understand that some members when using the word 'addiction' in relation to their wish to walk again (& again), did so with humorous intent.
It's a beautiful sunny morning here is Scotland after days of gales and torrential rain so it is not grumpiness that prompted the post, rather that I always shudder slightly when the word 'addiction' is used in relation to something I consider to be an experience filled with joy, offering opportunities for reflection and reaffirming what is good about humanity.
As an addendum, I am familiar with the history (not the experience) of the use of psychotropic drugs such as peyote in spiritual practices aimed at expanding the consciousness of those who believe but that is a separate matter and not in any way associated with addiction.
Hello all To many of you, this reply will seam like the actions of a cornered ferret.😁. Yes humor is a large part of my life. I am UN PC.!! Can we all guess where this may go. (Hard hats on every body).
I walked the Camino three times in the last two years. The first time for my granddaughter that had just died from Cystic Fibrosis at the age of seventeen. But I walked it more than that, because I had Issues to resolve apologies to make. to myself and others . I am Catholic I had some one, very high up to get things right with.. Just as well i'm so funny it's getting a bit heavy 😞. Dont even go near the nuke button called religion the Camino is Called the WAY OF ST JAMES. It does not have to be that way for everyone'. IT WAS FOR ME. Some thing wrong with my computer all these capitals keep coming up.
I have used some polarizing words to describe my experiences in the past. I have tried to break the mold for these words and give them a more positive meaning and demonstrate how the Camino completely changed my life.
Answers to questions.
I am 71, I grew up in the flower power times.Have I ever done drugs? No ( Do like a beer though)
Am I a PC person? Sorry no.
After walking the Camino ,do I now love myself and me fellow pilgrims and MY God? Yes
You people still don't know why I am acting like a cornered Ferret do you?
Go to my icon and click on it and go to resources all will be revealed.
Good luck with that and God bless.😇
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Please can we explore a wider vocabulary to express what motivates some of us to repeat the experience of walking to Santiago de Compostela that doesn't pathologise the activity?
we are able to discern the difference between compulsion and choice
I tend to agree with the OP. I don't mind the occasional use of the word "addiction" in the camino context - among friends who are familiar with the yearning. However, I would never use the word to describe my own desire to continuing walking caminos. I think "obsession" or "compulsion" would be better words to describe the severe cases. In my case, I choose to walk the camino, and can say "no" if there are good reasons not to go. I have several times deferred a walk. In fact, I want my family to know that my caminos are optional, and only take place after consideration of their needs and wants. I am not addicted!

On one camino I was walking with a couple, in which the man was clearly more serious about repeat caminos than the wife. She was fully participating but it was clear that he was more committed to walking many routes once or twice per year. One time she broached the subject with me, commenting that some people said it was an addiction; she seemed uncomfortable and a little concerned. We talked a bit about it and I tried to reassure her that walking caminos is a positive thing to do. Happily, they are still walking, several years later!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I agree with all sides of this particular discussion. On the one hand, I certainly agree that words matter. I don't proudly claim to be "not PC". In my experience, being "politically correct" is generally just a matter of being considerate and respectful of others, generally people of less power and privilege than myself. I don't see that as a bad thing.

On the other hand, I don't see the word being used disparagingly, as the examples of "words that need changing" tend to be. I also recognize that words do change their meanings naturally in English. Several decades ago, I remember when "addicted" had a very narrow, specifically defined meaning, which involved changes in the body in response to certain kinds of drugs that would case physical side effects ("withdrawal symptoms") if the drugs stopped being taken. The meaning was so narrow that if people were psychologically dependent on other drugs that didn't create those physical changes in the body, the word "addicted" was not used for their dependence. Instead, people talked about them being "habituated" to those drugs. Clearly, it has broadened since then. Now dictionaries also give a second meaning to the word: enthusiastically devoted to a particular thing or activity. "he's addicted to computers".

I am not sure I can fault people for using a word in a commonly accepted sense of the word that, itself, has no negative meanings. But I take to heart the concerns of my fellow pilgrims who find the word uncomfortable when they read it in this context and will try and avoid its use here in the future.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe, BR (01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT (09/2019)
Interesting comments and duly noted but in context I see nothing wrong with using the term for example having an addiction to an activity like walking, running, gym, watching TV or playing video games. Personally speaking sometimes the Camino has crossed over from addiction to an obsession and even this needs to be kept in check as although its a healthy obsession, balance and moderation should be exercised. 🤠
 

poogeyejr

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte, May 2011
Norte, Sept 2013
Frances, 1wk, Jan 2017
While I understand some people's sensitivity to the term addiction due to their life experiences Miriam Webster also defines addition as - a strong inclination to do, use, or indulge in something repeatedly.

This may be a common use definition, that has been added over the years, but it certainly explains why people use the word to explain their very insistent desire to repeat the Camino.

I appreciate the OP's comments and at times have been bother from the use of the word addiction on the forum . As a recovering addict (of over 25 years), I walk my journey and cherish my recovery. I would hope that there must be a more meaningful reason for walking the camino other than addiction: perhaps introspection, peace, joy, etc.
While it would be lovely for all the people to have more meaningful reasons to keep returning to the Camino for some of us, the feeling we got while walking is so amazing that we would do almost anything to get back to that feeling, including going into debt and leaving against our partner's wishes.

I love that we can debate kindly and thoughtfully, without malice.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Of course, the challenge with using terms like "obsession" or "compulsion" to describe our urge to return to the Camino is that people who have experience with real obsessive compulsive disorder, either in themselves or in people close to them, know that it is much, much more serious than it is lightly referred to when people joke "I am OCD about this", and use of these terms may be problematic for these people.

Not saying that I personally object to using the words, which I recognize have broader usages (as "addicted" does, as noted in previous posts). Just that the same premise of concern can be applied to some of the proposed substitutes.
 

Gerry O

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hoping to some of the Camino in either August or October this year
There Are so many people with so many experiences related to so many terms and words, it is ridiculous in my view to try to take all these into account when writing or speaking.
If you e been an recovered addict for twenty odd years and survived this long without using then you are pretty strong and would have dealt with the A word regularly over this time.
 

Silencio Por Favor

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ingles 2018
I wonder if a, lets say "obsession", with the Camino has had real life changing status for some people, for example loss of relationship due to partner not wanting to walk? Career sacrifice down to taking too much time away from the workplace?
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I wonder if a, lets say "obsession", with the Camino has had real life changing status for some people, for example loss of relationship due to partner not wanting to walk? Career sacrifice down to taking too much time away from the workplace?
It has certainly had life changing effects for some people: changing careers, moving to Spain, marrying people met on the Camino, etc.

Those aren't, however, the seriously life damaging effects we associate with addiction or obsession when the words are used in a medical context. I haven't heard of those, although they may certainly have happened. People who have had their life seriously damaged by the Camino are unlikely to want to hang out in these forums, it seems to me.
 

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