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Advise sought on Olvidado

Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
We are planning to walk Olvidado in April 2019. Any advise? How easy was it to get water? Was it necessary to carry food for the day or was it available within a 10K walk? Is there typically snow on the route this time of year? How much of this is path, vs pavement? We plan to follow others Wikilocs tracks. Anything different we should take besides what we carried on Del Norte at same time last year? Have printed out both guides posted on this site, thanks for sharing. Has anyone walked this that broke it down into 15-20K segments (at least in the beginning or really mountainous parts)? Thanks and Buen Camino!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Jeri,
I walked the Olvidado about four years ago from Bilbao and hope to start this year in Aguilar de Campoo, which skips the first week of the Olvidado.

If the guide written by me and Susanna is one of the ones you are talking about, it is now several years old and out of date in some respects. But I did just last week get an email from someone who used it in the fall of 2018 and found it very helpful. If you have scrolled the threads, you can see that Caminka, alansykes, and Sheffield James, and maybe a few others have walked recently. There's lots of good info in those threads.

There is a lot of pavement, especially in the first part out of Bilbao. Much of it is on "bidegoris", which I think is basque for bicycle path, so it isn't on a road but it is paved. For the later section, particularly around La Robla, Cistierna, Buiza, Puente Almuhey, Ender has marked out some mountain alternatives. I would be hesitant to embark on those in April, though. Bring tracks for the "old route", which I walked and has a lot of pavement, and the "new route," which is longer, more beautiful, mountainous, but may be snowbound in April (I hope to walk these new mountain alternatives in June, when the chance of snow is hopefully gone!). .

I think you can get current weather info from the facebook page, especially in the province of León. Posting a question on this facebook page usually produces a quick response, at least that is what people have told me.


I have not looked at finding 15-20 km segments, but I think that might be a challenge, particularly on the mountain parts. If you have proposed stages, post them, and some of us can help to evaluate whether they are realistic or if they would be particularly tough.

I think you will love this walk. If you happen to be a fan of Romanesque, taking a detour to Villasana de Mena for a 5 km loop (after you have dropped your pack off at the hotel) out to two rural churches is absolutely wonderful.

Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
We are planning to walk Olvidado in April 2019. Any advise? How easy was it to get water? Was it necessary to carry food for the day or was it available within a 10K walk? Is there typically snow on the route this time of year? How much of this is path, vs pavement? We plan to follow others Wikilocs tracks. Anything different we should take besides what we carried on Del Norte at same time last year? Have printed out both guides posted on this site, thanks for sharing. Has anyone walked this that broke it down into 15-20K segments (at least in the beginning or really mountainous parts)? Thanks and Buen Camino!
Thanks so much for the quick response. The plan is Olvidado to La Robla, San Salvador to Oviedo, then Primativo. I am sure hoping for trail rather than pavement. Walked your alternates on Del Norte last year. My favorite parts!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thanks so much for the quick response. The plan is Olvidado to La Robla, San Salvador to Oviedo, then Primativo. I am sure hoping for trail rather than pavement. Walked your alternates on Del Norte last year. My favorite parts!
Here is my first cut at stages, but they may be longer than what you want to do. This is a work in progress, and it will not be finalized till I am actually walking and see what feels right, but this is what I used for purposes of buying my round trip international plane ticket.

Aguilar- Cervera (28 km)
Cervera - Guardo (36 km)
Guardo to Puente Almuhey (31 km) -- this is a mountain alternative. The non-mountain alternative here is about 15 km I think.
Puente Almuhey to Cistierna (21 km)
Cistierna to Boñar (30 km)
Boñar to Vegacervera (27 km) (new mountain alternative)
Vegacervera to Buiza or Pola de Gordón (16 or 23) -- this is where you will get off the Olvidado and go on to La Robla.
Vegacervera to Magdalena (22 km) (new mountain alternative)
Magdalena to Vegarienza (29 km)
Vegarienza to Igüeña (37 km) (or break it up in Fasgar, a wonderful, beautiful little town with friendly people and a population of about 15. I hate to miss a stop here...)
Igüeña to Cobrana (32)
Cobrana to Ponferrada (18)

Have you taken a crack at stages? Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. Which of the mountain alternatives did you do on the Norte? Some people have wondered about whether the Ruta del Flysch in particular is too hard core, just wondering if you have an opinion on that or any other one.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
Here is my first cut at stages, but they may be longer than what you want to do. This is a work in progress, and it will not be finalized till I am actually walking and see what feels right, but this is what I used for purposes of buying my round trip international plane ticket.

Aguilar- Cervera (28 km)
Cervera - Guardo (36 km)
Guardo to Puente Almuhey (31 km) -- this is a mountain alternative. The non-mountain alternative here is about 15 km I think.
Puente Almuhey to Cistierna (21 km)
Cistierna to Boñar (30 km)
Boñar to Vegacervera (27 km) (new mountain alternative)
Vegacervera to Buiza or Pola de Gordón (16 or 23) -- this is where you will get off the Olvidado and go on to La Robla.
Vegacervera to Magdalena (22 km) (new mountain alternative)
Magdalena to Vegarienza (29 km)
Vegarienza to Igüeña (37 km) (or break it up in Fasgar, a wonderful, beautiful little town with friendly people and a population of about 15. I hate to miss a stop here...)
Igüeña to Cobrana (32)
Cobrana to Ponferrada (18)

Have you taken a crack at stages? Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. Which of the mountain alternatives did you do on the Norte? Some people have wondered about whether the Ruta del Flysch in particular is too hard core, just wondering if you have an opinion on that or any other one.
We did all the alternatives on the Wise Pilgrim app. We also took a day and hiked Ruta del Cares in the Picos. I wouldn't say mountainous, but less pavement. We walked the Ballotas route as well.
 

omicko

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances,
May 1999 and others.
We are planning to walk Olvidado in April 2019. Any advise? How easy was it to get water? Was it necessary to carry food for the day or was it available within a 10K walk? Is there typically snow on the route this time of year? How much of this is path, vs pavement? We plan to follow others Wikilocs tracks. Anything different we should take besides what we carried on Del Norte at same time last year? Have printed out both guides posted on this site, thanks for sharing. Has anyone walked this that broke it down into 15-20K segments (at least in the beginning or really mountainous parts)? Thanks and Buen Camino!
Hello Jeri, FIRST OF ALL OPEN UP MY PDF "CAMINO OLVIDADO FROM BILBOA MAY 2018", (Actually the guide was finished in October 2018) AND PERUSE THE FIRST COUPLE OF PAGES TO GET A FEEL FOR THE FORMAT.
The distances between villages/towns are in kilometres. I purposely did not put them into daily stages so other people could make up THEIR OWN STAGES to suit their own requirements.😉
THE GUIDE IS COLOUR CODED SO AT A GLANCE YOU CAN FIND WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR.
A RED TITLE DENOTES ACCOMMODATION. YOU CAN EASILY MAKE AN ITINERARY OF UNDER 20km A DAY. JUST TWO STAGES WOULD BE ABOUT 24 km AND 25 km.
A GREEN TITLE INDICATES THERE ARE BARS, CAFES/RESTAURANTS OR/AND SUPERMARKETS.
A BLUE TITLE INDICATES THERE IS ACCOMMODATION, SUPERMARKETS, BARS, RESTAURANTS ETC.
👂YOU NEED TO STUDY THE GUIDE. 😁

A knowledgeable person told me that after the 15th of April there should be no snow. I left Bilbao on the 2nd of May. You can see in my photo signature, the one of the two places, where there was a patch of snow.
I'm not sure I understand your question about water - are you talking about fountains? IT'S VERY EASY TO GET WATER. I carry a water bladder with a capacity of 2.5 litres. I carry what I deem sufficient based on how hot the day is.
IF YOU RUN OUT OF WATER THE BARS ETC WILL GIVE YOU TAP WATER FOR FREE.

If possible I like to stop in the morning and in the afternoon to have a coffee in a bar. I always carry food for the day - bread, cheese, tomatoes,sardines etc.
I can't comment about what you would bring differently from the Camino Norte -we are all different. I travel ultralight. ( I cut the handle shorter on the toothbrush etc ).
The mountainous sections are mainly in the second part of this Camino.
This is what I recommend for you.
From BOÑAR do the "BOÑAR TO LA MAGDALENA VIA LA ROBLA STAGE" up to CANDANEDO DE FENAR. 1km past CANDANEDO is EL VALLE HOSTAL. (25.1km ). The next day a short stage of 7 km to LA ROBLA or continue on to the San Salvador Camino to BUIZA (15km ).
IF YOU WANT TO CONTINUE ON THE CAMINO OLVIDADO FROM EL VALLE HOSTAL CARRY ON TO LA MAGDALENA. THEN THE NEXT DAY GO TO PANDORADO OR VEGARIENZA OR FASGAR BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT. Continue by using the guide.
In general the signs are easy to follow, but in my opinion, the GPS tracks are essential in the mountainous sections.They give you that added confidence as backup. Are you starting in Bilbao? GOOD LUCK AND BUEN CAMINO, Mick.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
Hello Jeri, FIRST OF ALL OPEN UP MY PDF "CAMINO OLVIDADO FROM BILBOA MAY 2018", (Actually the guide was finished in October 2018) AND PERUSE THE FIRST COUPLE OF PAGES TO GET A FEEL FOR THE FORMAT.
The distances between villages/towns are in kilometres. I purposely did not put them into daily stages so other people could make up THEIR OWN STAGES to suit their own requirements.😉
THE GUIDE IS COLOUR CODED SO AT A GLANCE YOU CAN FIND WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR.
A RED TITLE DENOTES ACCOMMODATION. YOU CAN EASILY MAKE AN ITINERARY OF UNDER 20km A DAY. JUST TWO STAGES WOULD BE ABOUT 24 km AND 25 km.
A GREEN TITLE INDICATES THERE ARE BARS, CAFES/RESTAURANTS OR/AND SUPERMARKETS.
A BLUE TITLE INDICATES THERE IS ACCOMMODATION, SUPERMARKETS, BARS, RESTAURANTS ETC.
👂YOU NEED TO STUDY THE GUIDE. 😁

A knowledgeable person told me that after the 15th of April there should be no snow. I left Bilbao on the 2nd of May. You can see in my photo signature, the one of the two places, where there was a patch of snow.
I'm not sure I understand your question about water - are you talking about fountains? IT'S VERY EASY TO GET WATER. I carry a water bladder with a capacity of 2.5 litres. I carry what I deem sufficient based on how hot the day is.
IF YOU RUN OUT OF WATER THE BARS ETC WILL GIVE YOU TAP WATER FOR FREE.

If possible I like to stop in the morning and in the afternoon to have a coffee in a bar. I always carry food for the day - bread, cheese, tomatoes,sardines etc.
I can't comment about what you would bring differently from the Camino Norte -we are all different. I travel ultralight. ( I cut the handle shorter on the toothbrush etc ).
The mountainous sections are mainly in the second part of this Camino.
This is what I recommend for you.
From BOÑAR do the "BOÑAR TO LA MAGDALENA VIA LA ROBLA STAGE" up to CANDANEDO DE FENAR. 1km past CANDANEDO is EL VALLE HOSTAL. (25.1km ). The next day a short stage of 7 km to LA ROBLA or continue on to the San Salvador Camino to BUIZA (15km ).
IF YOU WANT TO CONTINUE ON THE CAMINO OLVIDADO FROM EL VALLE HOSTAL CARRY ON TO LA MAGDALENA. THEN THE NEXT DAY GO TO PANDORADO OR VEGARIENZA OR FASGAR BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT. Continue by using the guide.
In general the signs are easy to follow, but in my opinion, the GPS tracks are essential in the mountainous sections.They give you that added confidence as backup. Are you starting in Bilbao? GOOD LUCK AND BUEN CAMINO, Mick.
Thanks Mick!!!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hello Jeri, FIRST OF ALL OPEN UP MY PDF "CAMINO OLVIDADO FROM BILBOA MAY 2018", (Actually the guide was finished in October 2018) AND PERUSE THE FIRST COUPLE OF PAGES TO GET A FEEL FOR THE FORMAT.
The distances between villages/towns are in kilometres. I purposely did not put them into daily stages so other people could make up THEIR OWN STAGES to suit their own requirements.😉
THE GUIDE IS COLOUR CODED SO AT A GLANCE YOU CAN FIND WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR.
A RED TITLE DENOTES ACCOMMODATION. YOU CAN EASILY MAKE AN ITINERARY OF UNDER 20km A DAY. JUST TWO STAGES WOULD BE ABOUT 24 km AND 25 km.
A GREEN TITLE INDICATES THERE ARE BARS, CAFES/RESTAURANTS OR/AND SUPERMARKETS.
A BLUE TITLE INDICATES THERE IS ACCOMMODATION, SUPERMARKETS, BARS, RESTAURANTS ETC.
👂YOU NEED TO STUDY THE GUIDE. 😁

A knowledgeable person told me that after the 15th of April there should be no snow. I left Bilbao on the 2nd of May. You can see in my photo signature, the one of the two places, where there was a patch of snow.
I'm not sure I understand your question about water - are you talking about fountains? IT'S VERY EASY TO GET WATER. I carry a water bladder with a capacity of 2.5 litres. I carry what I deem sufficient based on how hot the day is.
IF YOU RUN OUT OF WATER THE BARS ETC WILL GIVE YOU TAP WATER FOR FREE.

If possible I like to stop in the morning and in the afternoon to have a coffee in a bar. I always carry food for the day - bread, cheese, tomatoes,sardines etc.
I can't comment about what you would bring differently from the Camino Norte -we are all different. I travel ultralight. ( I cut the handle shorter on the toothbrush etc ).
The mountainous sections are mainly in the second part of this Camino.
This is what I recommend for you.
From BOÑAR do the "BOÑAR TO LA MAGDALENA VIA LA ROBLA STAGE" up to CANDANEDO DE FENAR. 1km past CANDANEDO is EL VALLE HOSTAL. (25.1km ). The next day a short stage of 7 km to LA ROBLA or continue on to the San Salvador Camino to BUIZA (15km ).
IF YOU WANT TO CONTINUE ON THE CAMINO OLVIDADO FROM EL VALLE HOSTAL CARRY ON TO LA MAGDALENA. THEN THE NEXT DAY GO TO PANDORADO OR VEGARIENZA OR FASGAR BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT. Continue by using the guide.
In general the signs are easy to follow, but in my opinion, the GPS tracks are essential in the mountainous sections.They give you that added confidence as backup. Are you starting in Bilbao? GOOD LUCK AND BUEN CAMINO, Mick.
Mick, I wonder if you remember your walk from Cistierna to Boñar. Ender's new guide has two different options, and I think these tracks show them.

One alternative, maybe more road walking? https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-12-camino-olvidado-cistierna-bonar-24880779

Second alternative, through the town of San Pedro Foncollada, seems to have more off-road.
https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-12-b-cistierna-bonar-por-san-pedro-de-foncollada-y-la-serna-camino-olvidado-25635752

I can't see any clear differences. Thanks, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
Mick, I wonder if you remember your walk from Cistierna to Boñar. Ender's new guide has two different options, and I think these tracks show them.

One alternative, maybe more road walking? https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-12-camino-olvidado-cistierna-bonar-24880779

Second alternative, through the town of San Pedro Foncollada, seems to have more off-road.
https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-12-b-cistierna-bonar-por-san-pedro-de-foncollada-y-la-serna-camino-olvidado-25635752

I can't see any clear differences. Thanks, Laurie
Thanks to both of you. I'm keeping options open right now. I am excited about the mountains. Considering staying on Olvidado the whole way. I have printed both your guides and have downloaded Ender's in English as well as the new Spanish version that just came out. I have also downloaded Ender's tracks. We will start in Bilbao. Concerning the longer couple of stages... instead of carrying parachute nylon sleep socks, this trip we will carry MSR Bivy socks. In the unlikely event we need to sleep rough we will have shelter. Thanks for your help! I can hardly wait!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
Hello Jeri, FIRST OF ALL OPEN UP MY PDF "CAMINO OLVIDADO FROM BILBOA MAY 2018", (Actually the guide was finished in October 2018) AND PERUSE THE FIRST COUPLE OF PAGES TO GET A FEEL FOR THE FORMAT.
The distances between villages/towns are in kilometres. I purposely did not put them into daily stages so other people could make up THEIR OWN STAGES to suit their own requirements.😉
THE GUIDE IS COLOUR CODED SO AT A GLANCE YOU CAN FIND WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING FOR.
A RED TITLE DENOTES ACCOMMODATION. YOU CAN EASILY MAKE AN ITINERARY OF UNDER 20km A DAY. JUST TWO STAGES WOULD BE ABOUT 24 km AND 25 km.
A GREEN TITLE INDICATES THERE ARE BARS, CAFES/RESTAURANTS OR/AND SUPERMARKETS.
A BLUE TITLE INDICATES THERE IS ACCOMMODATION, SUPERMARKETS, BARS, RESTAURANTS ETC.
👂YOU NEED TO STUDY THE GUIDE. 😁

A knowledgeable person told me that after the 15th of April there should be no snow. I left Bilbao on the 2nd of May. You can see in my photo signature, the one of the two places, where there was a patch of snow.
I'm not sure I understand your question about water - are you talking about fountains? IT'S VERY EASY TO GET WATER. I carry a water bladder with a capacity of 2.5 litres. I carry what I deem sufficient based on how hot the day is.
IF YOU RUN OUT OF WATER THE BARS ETC WILL GIVE YOU TAP WATER FOR FREE.

If possible I like to stop in the morning and in the afternoon to have a coffee in a bar. I always carry food for the day - bread, cheese, tomatoes,sardines etc.
I can't comment about what you would bring differently from the Camino Norte -we are all different. I travel ultralight. ( I cut the handle shorter on the toothbrush etc ).
The mountainous sections are mainly in the second part of this Camino.
This is what I recommend for you.
From BOÑAR do the "BOÑAR TO LA MAGDALENA VIA LA ROBLA STAGE" up to CANDANEDO DE FENAR. 1km past CANDANEDO is EL VALLE HOSTAL. (25.1km ). The next day a short stage of 7 km to LA ROBLA or continue on to the San Salvador Camino to BUIZA (15km ).
IF YOU WANT TO CONTINUE ON THE CAMINO OLVIDADO FROM EL VALLE HOSTAL CARRY ON TO LA MAGDALENA. THEN THE NEXT DAY GO TO PANDORADO OR VEGARIENZA OR FASGAR BY PUBLIC TRANSPORT. Continue by using the guide.
In general the signs are easy to follow, but in my opinion, the GPS tracks are essential in the mountainous sections.They give you that added confidence as backup. Are you starting in Bilbao? GOOD LUCK AND BUEN CAMINO, Mick.
I have been training in both my light hiking boots and trail runners. My thought is to wear the trail runners on the beginning sections where there is more road and then go with the light hikers for the rougher off road sections. If this were your plan, where would you switch? Thanks Mick.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I have been training in both my light hiking boots and trail runners. My thought is to wear the trail runners on the beginning sections where there is more road and then go with the light hikers for the rougher off road sections. If this were your plan, where would you switch? Thanks Mick.
I am going to wear trail runners on the entire Olvidado. I was convinced of that after @davebugg pointed out that the most popular shoes, by far, on the Appalachian Trail and on the Pacific Crest Trail are trail runners. My thought is that if they are good enough for hard core hikers, they’ll be fine for me. I wore them last year on the Mozárabe, and they were wonderful. I had always thought I got better ankle support from boots or hiking shoes, but that was another urban myth busted. I wouldn’t go without hiking poles, though. I would not want the weight of carrying one pair of shoes, but that’s a personal decision of course.

From BOÑAR do the "BOÑAR TO LA MAGDALENA VIA LA ROBLA STAGE" up to CANDANEDO DE FENAR. 1km past CANDANEDO is EL VALLE HOSTAL. (25.1km ). The next day a short stage of 7 km to LA ROBLA or continue on to the San Salvador Camino to BUIZA (15km ).
Mick, I take it you are recommending the stage through La Robla to avoid the mountains? According to Ender’s guide, you can either take three days from Boñar to La Magdalena, with stages of 27, 17, and 27, or the previously waymarked route from Boñar to La Robla (33) and then on to La Magdalena (16). I did the second alternative years ago when it was the only one marked, and there is a lot of road walking through coal country. One of my main incentives for going back to the Olvidado is to enjoy some of these mountain alternatives.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
I am going to wear trail runners on the entire Olvidado. I was convinced of that after @davebugg pointed out that the most popular shoes, by far, on the Appalachian Trail and on the Pacific Crest Trail are trail runners. My thought is that if they are good enough for hard core hikers, they’ll be fine for me. I wore them last year on the Mozárabe, and they were wonderful. I had always thought I got better ankle support from boots or hiking shoes, but that was another urban myth busted. I wouldn’t go without hiking poles, though. I would not want the weight of carrying one pair of shoes, but that’s a personal decision of course.



Mick, I take it you are recommending the stage through La Robla to avoid the mountains? According to Ender’s guide, you can either take three days from Boñar to La Magdalena, with stages of 27, 17, and 27, or the previously waymarked route from Boñar to La Robla (33) and then on to La Magdalena (16). I did the second alternative years ago when it was the only one marked, and there is a lot of road walking through coal country. One of my main incentives for going back to the Olvidado is to enjoy some of these mountain alternatives.
Last year on the Norte I switched back and forth. With my weight (not a little girl) and the weight of my pack I completely destroyed a couple of pairs of trail runners and a pair of light hikers. I plan on using poles.
 

omicko

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances,
May 1999 and others.
Mick, I wonder if you remember your walk from Cistierna to Boñar. Ender's new guide has two different options, and I think these tracks show them.

One alternative, maybe more road walking? https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-12-camino-olvidado-cistierna-bonar-24880779

Second alternative, through the town of San Pedro Foncollada, seems to have more off-road.
https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-12-b-cistierna-bonar-por-san-pedro-de-foncollada-y-la-serna-camino-olvidado-25635752

I can't see any clear differences. Thanks, Laurie
Well Laurie, I can't remember if the alternative was available, but if it was I will have downloaded the track through YUGUEROS solely on the fact it is about 3 km shorter and I was hoping that there would be a bar in YUGUEROS for coffee😉. As it turned out it was raining from early in the morning and a part of the track was boggy so I was glad of the road between YUGUEROS to ERCINA. (There was no bar in YUGUEROS BUT IN ERCINA there was a bar and I was told there is also an Albergue ). Cheers,Mick.
 
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omicko

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances,
May 1999 and others.
I have been training in both my light hiking boots and trail runners. My thought is to wear the trail runners on the beginning sections where there is more road and then go with the light hikers for the rougher off road sections. If this were your plan, where would you switch? Thanks Mick.
Well Jeri, I have no experience of trail runners, but I wouldn't bring another pair of footwear for walking the Camino. (I told you before, I travel ultralight). I bring some lightweight sandals to change into at the end of the day. Cheers,Mick.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Well Jeri, I have no experience of trail runners, but I wouldn't bring another pair of footwear for walking the Camino. (I told you before, I travel ultralight). I bring some lightweight sandals to change into at the end of the day. Cheers,Mick.
One more question, Mick,
Did you stay with Adolfo in Nava de Ordunte? Did you see how the albergue in progress was progressing?

Susanna and I slept in Vilasana de Mena, but Adolfo came to meet us, and the next day, he walked for a few hours with us. I am sorry I won't be back to that part of the Olvidado this year.
 

omicko

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances,
May 1999 and others.
Mick, I take it you are recommending the stage through La Robla to avoid the mountains? According to Ender’s guide, you can either take three days from Boñar to La Magdalena, with stages of 27, 17, and 27, or the previously waymarked route from Boñar to La Robla (33) and then on to La Magdalena (16). I did the second alternative years ago when it was the only one marked, and there is a lot of road walking through coal country.


HOLA LAURIE, my recommendation to go to La Robla was for Jeri, due to the terrain, ascent, descent, and nearly 1700m altitude etc of the Vegacervera route. As you already know it is not the distance of a route but the total ascent, descent which can be the biggest factor.

MY ETAPAS VIA VEGACERVERA
Day one : 27.3km from Bonar to Vegacervera. Day 2 : 16.2km to Buiza (Albergue Municipal) then day 3 : 27.5km to La Magdalena.
If I did it again (and I will) instead of staying in Buiza I would continue the 4.8km more to La Pola de Gordon. Then 3rd etapa to LA Magdalena would be 22.7km.Cheers,Mick.[/QUOTE]
 
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peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Laurie, my recommendation to go to La Robla was for Jeri, due to the terrain, ascent, descent, and nearly 1700m altitude etc of the Vegacervera route. As you already know it is not the distance of a route but the total ascent, descent which can be the biggest factor.

MY ETAPAS VIA VEGACERVERA
Day one : 27.3km from Bonar to Vegacervera. Day 2 : 16.2km to Buiza (Albergue Municipal) then day 3 : 27.5km to La Magdalena.
If I did it again (and I will) instead of staying in Buiza I would continue the 4.8km more to La Pola de Gordon. Then 3rd etapa to LA Magdalena would be 22.7km.Cheers,Mick.
Thanks, Mick, I don't disagree with the recommendation, I didn't know she wanted to keep the stages to 20 km when I wrote my answer.

On a related topic, though, I am finding that the total altitudes that different GPS tracks show are wildly inconsistent. The Boñar to Vegacervera tracks I see here say "only" 685 m ascent
https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-13b-camino-olvidado-bonar-vegacervera-24882201

Ender's guide says total elevation gain and loss is 635 m, so that is way under Ray and Rosa's figures. BUT Ender's wikilocks tracks say 1058 m total elevation gain. https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-13-b-bonar-vegacervera-camino-olvidado-15178298

I have never paid much attention to elevation gain and loss other than to look at a profile map and see high points and low points as well as how squiggly and up and down the line is. This crazy amount of variation makes me think I should continue to ignore these numbers!
 

omicko

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances,
May 1999 and others.
Thanks, Mick, I don't disagree with the recommendation, I didn't know she wanted to keep the stages to 20 km when I wrote my answer.

On a related topic, though, I am finding that the total altitudes that different GPS tracks show are wildly inconsistent. The Boñar to Vegacervera tracks I see here say "only" 685 m ascent
https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-13b-camino-olvidado-bonar-vegacervera-24882201

Ender's guide says total elevation gain and loss is 635 m, so that is way under Ray and Rosa's figures. BUT Ender's wikilocks tracks say 1058 m total elevation gain. https://www.wikiloc.com/hiking-trails/etapa-13-b-bonar-vegacervera-camino-olvidado-15178298

I have never paid much attention to elevation gain and loss other than to look at a profile map and see high points and low points as well as how squiggly and up and down the line is. This crazy amount of variation makes me think I should continue to ignore these numbers!
Laurie, I never read or bring any information about elevation gain or loss on any of my caminos. In fact I usually just bring a list of the villages/towns in a similar format to what you find in [ https://godesalco.com/plan ]. 😊 I like it to unfold as a daily surprise.Cheers Mick.
 

omicko

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances,
May 1999 and others.
One more question, Mick,
Did you stay with Adolfo in Nava de Ordunte? Did you see how the albergue in progress was progressing?
Susanna and I slept in Vilasana de Mena, but Adolfo came to meet us, and the next day, he walked for a few hours with us. I am sorry I won't be back to that part of the Olvidado this year.
Yes Laurie, I did stay with Adolfo in Nava de Ordunte and I've been in contact with Adolfo a few times since I've come back and in fact I spoke to him a few days ago. The albergue is still on track for opening in May and until then pilgrims can still use what was the old school which has been turned into a social venue for the area. I only found out about this accommodation and Adolfo purely by accident ( it's along story ). And yes we did have a conversation about you and he did remember you. Yes he's a very helpful and nice man. Anyway good luck with your preparations for this wonderful Camino. Cheers, Mick
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
We did all the alternatives on the Wise Pilgrim app. We also took a day and hiked Ruta del Cares in the Picos. I wouldn't say mountainous, but less pavement. We walked the Ballotas route as well.
I have taken a cut at several alternatives. See my excel file.
Here is my first cut at stages, but they may be longer than what you want to do. This is a work in progress, and it will not be finalized till I am actually walking and see what feels right, but this is what I used for purposes of buying my round trip international plane ticket.

Aguilar- Cervera (28 km)
Cervera - Guardo (36 km)
Guardo to Puente Almuhey (31 km) -- this is a mountain alternative. The non-mountain alternative here is about 15 km I think.
Puente Almuhey to Cistierna (21 km)
Cistierna to Boñar (30 km)
Boñar to Vegacervera (27 km) (new mountain alternative)
Vegacervera to Buiza or Pola de Gordón (16 or 23) -- this is where you will get off the Olvidado and go on to La Robla.
Vegacervera to Magdalena (22 km) (new mountain alternative)
Magdalena to Vegarienza (29 km)
Vegarienza to Igüeña (37 km) (or break it up in Fasgar, a wonderful, beautiful little town with friendly people and a population of about 15. I hate to miss a stop here...)
Igüeña to Cobrana (32)
Cobrana to Ponferrada (18)

Have you taken a crack at stages? Buen camino, Laurie

p.s. Which of the mountain alternatives did you do on the Norte? Some people have wondered about whether the Ruta del Flysch in particular is too hard core, just wondering if you have an opinion on that or any other one.
I have now taken a cut at various alternatives. A lot of the stages are still long. See attached.
 

Attachments

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
That took a lot of planning, I can see that Mick's list was essential. It looks like you have really figured things out. I suppose one way to deal with the stages that are still long would be to arrange transportation to either cut off some kms or to spend two nights in one place, split the stage, and take a cab out and back. Some of these small places may not have much in the way of taxis, though.

I don't know how you are going to decide which of the alternatives to actually walk!

Buen camino, Laurie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
That took a lot of planning, I can see that Mick's list was essential. It looks like you have really figured things out. I suppose one way to deal with the stages that are still long would be to arrange transportation to either cut off some kms or to spend two nights in one place, split the stage, and take a cab out and back. Some of these small places may not have much in the way of taxis, though.

I don't know how you are going to decide which of the alternatives to actually walk!

Buen camino, Laurie
We started in Bilbao yesterday. Good to be underway!
 

MikeJS

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (2012), VdlP (Apr 2016). Sureste/Invierno (Apr/May 2017).
I will be following this closely as I planned to walk this camino last year but life got in the way! Now hope to walk it in Sept…..
I wonder where your first stop is planned? I was planning on Balmesada and then Espinosa de los Monteros for the second night.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
I will be following this closely as I planned to walk this camino last year but life got in the way! Now hope to walk it in Sept…..
I wonder where your first stop is planned? I was planning on Balmesada and then Espinosa de los Monteros for the second night.
We stopped the first night in Guenes and the second night in Villlasane and the third in Villasante. The stages are too long for this old lady.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: (2016), Del Norte: (2018), Finisterre: (2018)
Olvidado/San Salvador/Primativo: (2019)
Yes Laurie, I did stay with Adolfo in Nava de Ordunte and I've been in contact with Adolfo a few times since I've come back and in fact I spoke to him a few days ago. The albergue is still on track for opening in May and until then pilgrims can still use what was the old school which has been turned into a social venue for the area. I only found out about this accommodation and Adolfo purely by accident ( it's along story ). And yes we did have a conversation about you and he did remember you. Yes he's a very helpful and nice man. Anyway good luck with your preparations for this wonderful Camino. Cheers, Mick
I met Adolfo and others from the Bilbao Camino club yesterday. The albergue will open but it is my understanding not yet.
 

MikeJS

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (2012), VdlP (Apr 2016). Sureste/Invierno (Apr/May 2017).
I do hope the rest of your trip goes well and will be watching closely for any clues!
 

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