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Albergue Etiquette


2018 edition Camino Guides
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, September 2014
Both Rebekah have given a great list of do's and don'ts. I would like to add one more:
Don't put your backpack on the bed, it's been put down on the floor, in bars, on the street, in fields, near fountains, etc., so many times each day, before you ever get to see your precious bed for the night.
I have to admit that I have been very guilty over the past, until this was pointed out to me! Anne
annakappa, I am leaving for my first Camino this evening, leaving from SJPdP on Thrusday morning. So with your comment "Don't put your backpack on the bed" has confused me. I thought, from my readings here, that to put your backpack on the bed was the only way to save your bed for the night. Am I wrong?
 

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Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2006,9,11,12,13,14, 16, Aragones 2011,12,
VDLP 2011, 13, Lourdes 2012, Portuguese 2008, Madrid 2014, (2016)
Because of the bedbug situation, people are not advised (or allowed) to put their backpacks on the beds in the albergues.

That said, I NEVER put my pack on the floor.
Bedbugs do not fly, they crawl from bed to bed on the wall or floor.

I always hang my pack from the bedpost or put it on a chair.
If there is no chair, I ask for one.
If that fails, I carry a plastic garbage sack and tie it up in there.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, September 2014
Because of the bedbug situation, people are not advised (or allowed) to put their backpacks on the beds in the albergues.

That said, I NEVER put my pack on the floor.
Bedbugs do not fly, they crawl from bed to bed on the wall or floor.

I always hang my pack from the bedpost or put it on a chair.
If there is no chair, I ask for one.
If that fails, I carry a plastic garbage sack and tie it up in there.
By hanging something from the bed post that is a pilgrims way of saying "that's my bed"?
 

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2006,9,11,12,13,14, 16, Aragones 2011,12,
VDLP 2011, 13, Lourdes 2012, Portuguese 2008, Madrid 2014, (2016)
No. That's my way of keeping my backpack up off the floor where the bedbugs walk!:eek::p
 

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wawpdx

Active Member
Since this is the thread about how to be considerate of others in the albergue, I would add this. Do not put your personal pack on the chair beside a bunk bed unless the bunk has a ladder. If there is no ladder, whoever is getting up and down from the top bunk needs that chair! If you intend to claim the chair as your own, claim the top bunk too.
 

falcon269

sidra; no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Do not put your personal pack on the chair beside a bunk bed unless the bunk has a ladder. If there is no ladder, whoever is getting up and down from the top bunk needs that chair!
And a chair is for sitting, not pack storage or clothes drying. Don't be offended when someone removes your belongings to sit down or climb to a top bunk! Unless you brought the chair from home, it is for everyone. :)
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
annakappa, I am leaving for my first Camino this evening, leaving from SJPdP on Thrusday morning. So with your comment "Don't put your backpack on the bed" has confused me. I thought, from my readings here, that to put your backpack on the bed was the only way to save your bed for the night. Am I wrong?
You save your bed for the night by putting out your sleeping bag, or maybe a towel and some ítems of clothing. But usually it's a sleeping bag. Anne
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
No. That's my way of keeping my backpack up off the floor where the bedbugs walk!:eek::p
I totally agree if the floor is a wooden one and an old one at that, but if the dorm has a tiled ceramic floor, I don't think that there is such a risk. Anne
 

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2006,9,11,12,13,14, 16, Aragones 2011,12,
VDLP 2011, 13, Lourdes 2012, Portuguese 2008, Madrid 2014, (2016)
I totally agree if the floor is a wooden one and an old one at that, but if the dorm has a tiled ceramic floor, I don't think that there is such a risk. Anne
Why? You think bedbugs won't walk on tiled ceramic?
They DANCE across it! :p
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2006,9,11,12,13,14, 16, Aragones 2011,12,
VDLP 2011, 13, Lourdes 2012, Portuguese 2008, Madrid 2014, (2016)
Yes, but there's nowhere to hide on a ceramic floor. Anne;)
Except in your PACK! :D

No, I realize you're more likely to see them on wooden floors or in older places, but I HAVE seen them in very new modern rooms as well.
I have a good friend who runs an upscale hotel chain in the USA, and he says they're a constant battle.
And these places are swanky.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
Well, when in doubt, put the pack in a large plastic bag and close it securely. I have actually done that in one rather dubious looking dorm! After all, hanging it on the bed post doesn't stop them from climbing in either!:(Anne
 
Camino(s) past & future
February (2018)
I agree with all that has been posted--especially what Grayland stated. If you are going to get up early, then for pete's sakes pack up your pack or atleast gather everything together in one lump and when you get up, take it immediately into another area away from those who are sleeping. My German ladies were the thorn of my last days on the Camino. They got up early, rustled around with plastic and conversation and the dreaded headlights, turned on the lights and otherwise woke everyone else up--then proceeded to sit around and make themselves tea before they left! Often they were the last ones to leave! When asked why they got up so early they said that it was because that was the time they always got up and they liked to enjoy their tea before starting out!!! It didn't seem to matter to them that they were making a whole lot of folks very angry--to the extent that folks tried to figure out how much further they would have to go to avoid them.

I carried a small LED light about the size of a quarter on a soft twine "necklace." It worked just fine for bathroom runs if the space was absolutely dark (only needed it once) and before sun-up trail marker finding. Because I always wore it around my neck, I always knew where it was. Some folks had big headlights and you cannot believe how irritating those suckers are in the morning or even on the Camino when flashed in your eyes. I also had a red one clipped to my pack so I could make a last minute check under my bunk if need be or to look at a map if I wanted to retain my night vision.

Another thing is to share clothesline space. If things are filling up, adjust your laundry so others have some room too. If yours is dry, you might want to remove it (especially if it is in a sunny spot) before someone else needing space takes yours down and puts it somewhere -- at one albergue this happened and someone thought the clothing pile was "for the taking." The owner of the clothes was not too happy.
Thanks for your reply - that begs the question of do we need to bring our own clothespins, or do most albergues have them? Thanks!
 

Momonne

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primtivo, Portuguese, VDLP
Thanks for your reply - that begs the question of do we need to bring our own clothespins, or do most albergues have them? Thanks!
Leave the clothespins at home, safety pins are lighter and not as bulky. And make it harder for someone else to « mistakingly » take your towel, socks or fleece.
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug - Sept (2016) SJPDP - Finisterre
July - Aug (2017) SJPDP - Muxia - Finisterre
Leave the clothespins at home, safety pins are lighter and not as bulky. And make it harder for someone else to « mistakingly » take your towel, socks or fleece.
I took both safety pins, and tiny craft sized clothespins. I only took safety pins on my first Camino, and I found that most clotheslines are not perfectly level, so when I used safety pins gravity usually landed all my clothes in a clump.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016. Seville-Astorga: Mar 2017.
when I used safety pins gravity usually landed all my clothes in a clump
But that is one of the little engineering challenges that make the camino fun. You might take just one tiny clothespin to use at the upper end, and connect all your other items via safety pins!
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug - Sept (2016) SJPDP - Finisterre
July - Aug (2017) SJPDP - Muxia - Finisterre
But that is one of the little engineering challenges that make the camino fun. You might take just one tiny clothespin to use at the upper end, and connect all your other items via safety pins!
:):):)
I also found it easier to attach/detach the mini clothespins.
 

HedaP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
Agree with all of you.
6 nappy pins 6 g.
6 cut off pegs 14 g.
I took both and sometimes used them all because always did handwashing and didn’t use washers or driers. Pegs best for the lines and pins particularly useful for securely attaching stuff to backpack such as still damp socks.
 

HedaP

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug - Sept (2016) SJPDP - Finisterre
July - Aug (2017) SJPDP - Muxia - Finisterre
Thank you. :) I went to the local bargain shop today and bought a selection. Good timing because there were various small pegs designed for hanging christmas cards still available. Most lighter than the 6 cut off pegs I already have. :D
Fantastic! They may not be strong enough to hold a regular bath towel, or a pair of jeans, but for the lightweight clothing we take on the Camino they are perfect.
 

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