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Albergue situation from Lisbon

Sam Hardman

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007 Camino Francés
2017 SJPdP - Belorado
2018 SJPdP - Fisterra/Muxía
2019 Camino Primitivo
I'm at the early stages of planning to walk from Lisbon to Santiago this year and am wondering what the albergue situation is like? I have walked the Camino Francés and Primitivo before and didn't do book any accommodation in advance and always managed to find somewhere to stay. Is this the same in Portugal? From what I have read I should have no problems after Porto but what about before that. Can I relax and assume I will always find a place or do I need to do a lot more planning this year?

Thanks for the advice as always!
 

Hansel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances and Fisterre (2018,08) ,Camino Primitivo, and Fisterre,(2019,04)
I'm at the early stages of planning to walk from Lisbon to Santiago this year and am wondering what the albergue situation is like? I have walked the Camino Francés and Primitivo before and didn't do book any accommodation in advance and always managed to find somewhere to stay. Is this the same in Portugal? From what I have read I should have no problems after Porto but what about before that. Can I relax and assume I will always find a place or do I need to do a lot more planning this year?

Thanks for the advice as always!
Hi,again,I cheated slightly,and got the train to Azumbuja,but mainly because I had walked some of the Lisboa,bit in reverse,I walked from Azumbuja to Tui,last September and October and never booked once,you'll enjoy the quieter bit to Porto,about the same amount of pilgrims as the Primitivo,
Nom cahmino,Bill.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I'm at the early stages of planning to walk from Lisbon to Santiago this year and am wondering what the albergue situation is like? I have walked the Camino Francés and Primitivo before and didn't do book any accommodation in advance and always managed to find somewhere to stay. Is this the same in Portugal? From what I have read I should have no problems after Porto but what about before that. Can I relax and assume I will always find a place or do I need to do a lot more planning this year?

Thanks for the advice as always!
Look at the list of the Via Lusitana (the Lisbon-based amigos group that runs the Alpriate albergue and will soon be opening another albergue in Azambuja). For the 300 kms between Lisbon and Porto, I count 22 albergues and numerous other places to stay for 20 euros or less. I think the infrastructure is quite adequate for the number of people who walk. Not sure what kind of stages you walk, but if you look at that list, I think you will see plenty of options.

And one thing I have forgotten to mention lately. The Via Lusitana has an SOS pilgrim help line. This has been in operation for years and years and was particularly helpful when the infrastructure was much more sparse and infrequent. But the association is there 24/7 with a phone call, so if you are worried about accommodation, having their phone number is not a bad idea.

SOS Pilgrim phone — speaking English, French, some German, Portuguese, Spanish (+351) 915 595 213
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 Francés, Le Puy / Francés (parts), 2018 Norte (Biarritz), Francés, 2019 Portuguese (Lisbon)
I did it last year from Lisbon. There's plenty of accommodation and never once did it get anything close to full. There's nothing to worry about.
 

Sam Hardman

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007 Camino Francés
2017 SJPdP - Belorado
2018 SJPdP - Fisterra/Muxía
2019 Camino Primitivo
Look at the list of the Via Lusitana (the Lisbon-based amigos group that runs the Alpriate albergue and will soon be opening another albergue in Azambuja). For the 300 kms between Lisbon and Porto, I count 22 albergues and numerous other places to stay for 20 euros or less. I think the infrastructure is quite adequate for the number of people who walk. Not sure what kind of stages you walk, but if you look at that list, I think you will see plenty of options.

And one thing I have forgotten to mention lately. The Via Lusitana has an SOS pilgrim help line. This has been in effect for years and years and was particularly helpful when the infrastructure was much more sparse and infrequent. But the association is there 24/7 with a phone call, so if you are worried about accommodation, having their phone number is not a bad idea.

SOS Pilgrim phone — speaking English, French, some German, Portuguese, Spanish (+351) 915 595 213
Thanks a lot for this, that's really useful. Amazing that they have a 24h phone number. I hope I don't need it but I will definitely make a note of it.
 

Sam Hardman

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007 Camino Francés
2017 SJPdP - Belorado
2018 SJPdP - Fisterra/Muxía
2019 Camino Primitivo
I did it last year from Lisbon. There's plenty of accommodation and never once did it get anything close to full. There's nothing to worry about.
Excellent! Thanks for this. May I ask which route you took and how you liked it?
 

Ungawawa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017 Francés, Le Puy / Francés (parts), 2018 Norte (Biarritz), Francés, 2019 Portuguese (Lisbon)
Excellent! Thanks for this. May I ask which route you took and how you liked it?
Well until Porto it's all the same, but from Porto I went to the Coastal route as far as Caminha. Then the weather started to turn, so I took the route that rejoins the inland instead. I found the Coastal route lovely. It's a good mix of wild heathery trails, cute beachside villages and touristic beach towns.

The path from Lisbon I found fairly boring, to be honest. Perhaps every three or so days there would be an interesting stage, but much of the route was plain and many of the places I stayed in were quiet and unremarkable, often with very few other pilgrims.

Something that really got to me was the sheer amount of hard cobblestone I had to walk on, pre-Porto and then again once I rejoined the main route.

Probably worth it to me to do it once so I can say I've done it, but the bit from Lisbon to Porto is not something I'd repeat.
 

robproct

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP from Lisbon 2018
I spotted this sign as I was walking into Barcelos. Its probably not up to date though.

View attachment 70444
I only had one night when there was no accomodation at all, the first night out of Porto, 27km, Vilarinho where there is not much accomodation. Everything full so I took a taxi on to Sao Pedro de Rates as I was not up to walking any further that day. There is a really nice small auberge there.View attachment 70444
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Frances 2019
SdC to Muxia and Fisterra 2019
Camino Portuguese "2021"
I am starting in Lisbon. Where in Lisbon can I get a Pilgrim's Passport/Credential?
 

Old Kiwi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Camino Frances 2019
SdC to Muxia and Fisterra 2019
Camino Portuguese "2021"
Thank you Peregrina 2000.
 

robproct

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP from Lisbon 2018
And look for the small yellow arrow low down on the wall on the right as you enter the cathedral for the start of the Camino.
 

robproct

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CP from Lisbon 2018
Apologies for putting two of the same pics of the Albergues list. I don't know how that happened and don't seem to be able to remove one of them.
 

Sam Hardman

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007 Camino Francés
2017 SJPdP - Belorado
2018 SJPdP - Fisterra/Muxía
2019 Camino Primitivo
And for any of you who don’t mind seeing pictures ahead of time, a peregrino currently walking from Lisbon is posting every day on Facebook.
Thanks for this :) I'll follow it with interest
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
And look for the small yellow arrow low down on the wall on the right as you enter the cathedral for the start of the Camino.
I read somewhere that the Camino Portuguese started at the Igreja de Santiago, and proceeded from there to the cathedral. Is that true? It might only be 400m or so, but it would be interesting to start there if that is indeed the start point, not the cathedral.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I read somewhere that the Camino Portuguese started at the Igreja de Santiago, and proceeded from there to the cathedral. Is that true? It might only be 400m or so, but it would be interesting to start there if that is indeed the start point, not the cathedral.
As far as I know, the first arrow is at the Cathedral. But the Igreja de Santiago is very close. If it is open, I believe there is a stamp available. So it would be easy to start there, meander over to the cathedral and then be on your way. That church does not sell credentials, however, at least they didn’t the last time I was there. But the information desk to the right when you enter the cathedral should have lots of the beautiful Via Lusitana credentials.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I am starting in Lisbon. Where in Lisbon can I get a Pilgrim's Passport/Credential?
I ordered mine online from the Associacao de Amigos dos Caminhos de Fatima (caminho.com.pt). They have several variants, some just for the pilgrimage to Fatima, others if you are walking to Santiago.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
As far as I know, the first arrow is at the Cathedral. But the Igreja de Santiago is very close. If it is open, I believe there is a stamp available. So it would be easy to start there, meander over to the cathedral and then be on your way. That church does not sell credentials, however, at least they didn’t the last time I was there. But the information desk to the right when you enter the cathedral should have lots of the beautiful Via Lusitana credentials.
The reason I ask is that I have tracks from two sources that have start points at the Igreja de Santiago, while the CSJ guide (2017) is silent on this in the main text, listing both the cathedral and the church without indicating one or other is the definitive start point. In an appendix that guide suggests the cathedral as the start point.

Given the Igreja is more or less on the way from where I will be staying when I arrive, I guess that I will go there first in any case.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
I read somewhere that the Camino Portuguese started at the Igreja de Santiago, and proceeded from there to the cathedral. Is that true? It might only be 400m or so, but it would be interesting to start there if that is indeed the start point, not the cathedral.
The Igreja de Santiago claims that it is the starting point (there is a sign on the church saying just that). Whether that makes it true or not, I don't know.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Vol Pilgm office 15
CF 16+17
Vol Pilgm House 18
Kerry&Ingles 19
Portuguese X2020 (2021?)
I hope to pick up a Portuguese credential at the Cathedral in Lisbon or la igreja de Santiago or the Pilgrim's office. One of them has to be open on the day before I start. I will be staying a little north of the Igreja and the cathedral so it won't be out of my way to visit both on the start of my Camino.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I hope to pick up a Portuguese credential at the Cathedral in Lisbon or la igreja de Santiago or the Pilgrim's office. One of them has to be open on the day before I start. I will be staying a little north of the Igreja and the cathedral so it won't be out of my way to visit both on the start of my Camino.
I am virtually certain that the Santiago church does not sell credentials, and there is no pilgrims office in Lisbon. But the cathedral is a sure bet!

It hasn't been delivered yet, but I am expecting it to have different artwork, etc.
And I ask that question only because I remember there was quite a kerfuffle a few years ago about the cathedral’s decision to only accept approved credentials for the Compostela. See Ivar’s post in this thread.
I know that part of the reason for the long time it took the Via Lusitana to actually produce their credential had to do with getting that cathedral approval. I would also be stunned if the office actually denied the compostela to someone who was using a credential issued by the Fátima association (I doubt they have gotten cathedral approval, but I could be wrong), but anyway it is just a little factoid to consider. I know that their main targets were the tour companies issuing their own credentials and selling them to their clients, not a small religious association like the Fátima group.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
And I ask that question only because I remember there was quite a kerfuffle a few years ago about the cathedral’s decision to only accept approved credentials for the Compostela. See Ivar’s post in this thread.
Thank you for your concern. I do recall that discussion, but hadn't considered this would be an issue with an association credential. Perhaps I am being naive. That said, I have a credential that Ivar sent with the Brierley guide as well, so I can use that from Tui if I cannot confirm that the Associacao de Amigos dos Caminhos de Fatima is authorised. The Pilgrim Office FAQ on who are authorised is being updated at present, and isn't providing any information on this.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
The reason I ask is that I have tracks from two sources that have start points at the Igreja de Santiago, while the CSJ guide (2017) is silent on this in the main text, listing both the cathedral and the church without indicating one or other is the definitive start point. In an appendix that guide suggests the cathedral as the start point.

Given the Igreja is more or less on the way from where I will be staying when I arrive, I guess that I will go there first in any case.
And Brierley's guide, which arrived today, doesn't help clarify the matter. The Lisboa map on p 33 would indicate the route starts at Igreja de Santiago, but over the page on the Section map (p 35) it looks like the start is at Se Cathedral.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Thank you for your concern. I do recall that discussion, but hadn't considered this would be an issue with an association credential. Perhaps I am being naive. That said, I have a credential that Ivar sent with the Brierley guide as well, so I can use that from Tui if I cannot confirm that the Associacao de Amigos dos Caminhos de Fatima is authorised. The Pilgrim Office FAQ on who are authorised is being updated at present, and isn't providing any information on this.
I really don’t think there will be any problem, just wanted you to know . The notice that Ivar posted indicates that the credential will indicate whether it has cathedral authorization. It was a headache for the Via Lusitana to get that authorization but they decided to wait it out and it finally happened. Since the Fátima group isn’t a camino group, I have no idea whether they would think it worthwhile to go through the hassle. Anyway, there is boilerplate ”cathedral authorization language” that you can see on the one from Ivar, and it will be the same on any “officially recognized” one. If I didn’t know you like rules even more than I do, :p I wouldn’t have mentioned it at all because I really can’t imagine there will be a problem.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Vol Pilgm office 15
CF 16+17
Vol Pilgm House 18
Kerry&Ingles 19
Portuguese X2020 (2021?)
I am virtually certain that the Santiago church does not sell credentials, and there is no pilgrims office in Lisbon. But the cathedral is a sure bet!



And I ask that question only because I remember there was quite a kerfuffle a few years ago about the cathedral’s decision to only accept approved credentials for the Compostela. See Ivar’s post in this thread.
I know that part of the reason for the long time it took the Via Lusitana to actually produce their credential had to do with getting that cathedral approval. I would also be stunned if the office actually denied the compostela to someone who was using a credential issued by the Fátima association (I doubt they have gotten cathedral approval, but I could be wrong), but anyway it is just a little factoid to consider. I know that their main targets were the tour companies issuing their own credentials and selling them to their clients, not a small religious association like the Fátima group.
I have been doing so much reading and research about the CP that I am nearly on overload. I read somewhere on the forum about an office of tourism or the like near the Lisbon Cathedral not a Pilgrim Office as in St Jean or Santiago.

The Via Lusitana website says:
You can get the Pilgrim's Credential at
the Cathedral of Lisbon, every day from 9:30 am to 6:30 pm
At the Cathedral of Porto, every day from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm
At various hostels along the Way.
At Tui Cathedral.
It can also be ordered directly from the Association of Pilgrims Via Lusitana or from the Espaço Jacobeus Association, who send it by mail.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I have been doing so much reading and research about the CP that I am nearly on overload. I read somewhere on the forum about an office of tourism or the like near the Lisbon Cathedral not a Pilgrim Office as in St Jean or Santiago.

The Via Lusitana website says:
You can get the Pilgrim's Credential at
the Cathedral of Lisbon, every day from 9:30 am to 6:30 pm
At the Cathedral of Porto, every day from 9:00 am to 6:00 pm
At various hostels along the Way.
At Tui Cathedral.
It can also be ordered directly from the Association of Pilgrims Via Lusitana or from the Espaço Jacobeus Association, who send it by mail.
Well, overload is what happens when you can’t resist the researching and you realize that it is a very poor substitute for actually being there and walking! I love planning my caminos, but I always get to that point too, Desert Bruce. Hope you don’t have too much more time before you can actually start.

There is not, as far as I know, one official tourist office in Lisbon as there is in most Spanish cities. There is one on the Avenida Liberdade near Restauradores, but I can’t imagine it has credentials. The only other place I have heard for Credentials is the Igreja dos Martires near Chiado. But the hours are much more restricted than the Cathedral and I know some forum members had to make several trips to get theirs there. But this was before the Cathedral starting selling them, so I would just recommend the Cathedral.

And @Desert Bruce if you are on overload with planning Camino 2020, you could always start thinking about Camino 2021 as a distraction. :p
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugal route from Lisbon in May (2015)
Via de la Plata from Seville in April-May 2017
I walked the CP in 2015 starting from the cathedral. They were 'out' of credentials. Very disappointing! I collected stamps in my guide book until able to buy one a few days later at alburgue. When I walked VdlP in 2017, I obtained ahead of time from American pilgrim group ( I'm in USA).
 

Pilgrim9

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SdC (2017)
SdC-Muxia-Fisterra-SdC (2017)
Lisboa-SdC (2018)
Ferrol-SdC (2018)
I walked north from Lisboa about two years ago and I did have some difficulties finding suitable lodgings until I got to Porto. I was reserving a few days ahead using Booking.com and Google Maps and OsmAnd. To find lodgings I had to zig-zag east and west a fair bit. Some of the locations were uninteresting and/or lacked laundromats which I consider to be an essential infrastructure. Perhaps my planning method was suboptimal.

If I was ever to walk from Lisboa to Santiago again, instead of staying in local accomodations for the first few days north of Lisboa and of Porto, I would make much more use than I did of the excellent and economical commuter trains and Metro trains that run north from Lisboa along the river, and north from Porto along the coast. I would find pleasant lodgings in Lisboa/Porto, and walk daily stages northwards, then take the train back to my base lodgings in the big city. Next day I would take the train back northwards to wherever I left off the day before and then start walking north again. I would repeat this daily until I ran out of trains.

The commuter train and Metro route maps are available online.

This can be done for several days' walk north of each of those two cities and has the advantage of knowing where you will be staying for the first few nights in a row. Big cities offer a greater selection and better quality of lodgings and restaurants than do small towns and villages. One can take just a day pack on the train-supported days, if one so chooses. Also, one can alternate pilgrimage-walking days with tourist-exploration days in both of those very interesting cities There is certainly quite a lot to see in Lisboa, in Sintra (which is served by a high-speed commuter train westwards from Lisboa), and in Porto.
 

Pilgrim9

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SdC (2017)
SdC-Muxia-Fisterra-SdC (2017)
Lisboa-SdC (2018)
Ferrol-SdC (2018)
The facebook posts I referred to earlier just posted about a place in Ansiao that I had never seen or heard about. https://ansiturismo.com/. It looks like kind of a spa/hotel, with prices that are not out of the ballpark. The post describes a heated salt water pool, sounds pretty plush.
I stayed there. It is a very modern and very upscale spa hotel. Also, there is an excellent restaurant about 2 blocks north of the Ansiturismo spa.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I stayed there. It is a very modern and very upscale spa hotel. Also, there is an excellent restaurant about 2 blocks north of the Ansiturismo spa.
I didn’t stay in Ansiao and I’m not really sure this place was an operation then, but it looks like the town has really upped his game when it comes to private a competition. Isn’t this the place where there is an official mojon donated by the Galician government and sitting in a square?
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
And one thing I have forgotten to mention lately. The Via Lusitana has an SOS pilgrim help line. This has been in operation for years and years and was particularly helpful when the infrastructure was much more sparse and infrequent. But the association is there 24/7 with a phone call, so if you are worried about accommodation, having their phone number is not a bad idea.

SOS Pilgrim phone — speaking English, French, some German, Portuguese, Spanish (+351) 915 595 213
FYI, I called this number today and got a message saying it was disconnected.

Edit: we got in touch with them via email and they aren't sure what is wrong with the phone number. In any case, the Alpirate albergue is closed.
 
Last edited:

Zac123

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Soon
1599471441996.png
In: 31 JUL 2020

Albergue = Hostel;
Encerrado = Closed;
Aberto = Open;
Condicionado = Restricted (with conditions)


New List:
Others Albergues/Hosteis open in Portugal

Albergue de Vairão
Albergue cidade de Barcelos
Albergue Casa do Sardão
Albergue Peregrinos do Porto
Albergue o Ninho em Rubiaes
Albergue São Miguel - Marinhas
Albergue São Bento Seixas (em Stand-bye por um atraso de material)
Casa da Matriz - Fao
Pousada da Juventude de Fao (abre dia 10)
The Spot Hostel em Fao
Al Santiago - Castelo de Neiva
Pousada da juventude Viana (abre dia 10)
Albergue de S. João da Cruz dos Caminhos - Viana
Hostel da Avenida - Vila Praia da Ancora
Hostel Caracois e Borboletas - Moledo
Casa da Gwendoline - VN Cerveira
Café Mineiro em Valença
Hostel Eleven - Esposende
Pousada da Juventude de Ponte de Lima (abre dia 15)
BWay Guest House - Barcelos
Albergue de Albergaria-a-Nova
Hotel A.S. São João - S. João da Madeira
Thomar 2300 - Tomar
Hs Santarém
Casa Carolina - Anha
Sleep&Go - Esposende
In Barcelos
Refugio de Peregrinos em Rubiães
Casa da Fernanda
Casa Qta Cruzeiro - Fontoura
Refugio de Peregrinos da Senhora da Hora (a partir de 15/07)
Quinta do Caminho - Valença
Casa Católico, na Branca, entre Albergaria a Nova e São João da Madeira
Casa de São Sebastião - Lijó (Barcelos)
Albergue/Hostal o Caminheiro - Facha (Ponte de Lima)
Quinta Real - Fontoura
Albergue VN Gaia
Hostel Bulwark em Valença
Albergue PilgerPause - Fontoura
Hotel Van Flores - Valença
Residencial Portas do Sol - Valença
Albergue Santa Luzia - Viana do Castelo
 
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