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Albergues and such

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
Starting 1st camino this May and wish to thank everyone for sharing their knowledge. Appreciated!!
I do have a question for my curious mind (still on this side of the waters).. It may be silly, but it would be nice to know, so here it goes...
How does one know what kind of establishment it is when viewing from the outside? Is it posted somewhere? Is there a symbol telling the pilgrim which type it is? Thank you in advance.
(ps. hoping I have posted this correctly, 2nd effort....technically challenged...VERY))
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Starting 1st camino this May and wish to thank everyone for sharing their knowledge. Appreciated!!
I do have a question for my curious mind (still on this side of the waters).. It may be silly, but it would be nice to know, so here it goes...
How does one know what kind of establishment it is when viewing from the outside? Is it posted somewhere? Is there a symbol telling the pilgrim which type it is? Thank you in advance.
(ps. hoping I have posted this correctly, 2nd effort....technically challenged...VERY))
Hi, Joziane,

The easiest way to recognize certain albergue as municipal, private etc. is to check it in guide book or online (Gronze, Mundicamino, Eroski,...). Usually it's incorporated in the name of the albergue:
https://www.gronze.com/castilla-y-leon/burgos/san-juan-ortega/albergue-parroquial-san-juan-ortega
But otherwise if you click on albergue then scroll a bit down and see under Otros datos/Titularidad:
https://www.gronze.com/castilla-y-leon/burgos/ages/albergue-taberna-ages

Hope that helps. Ultreia!
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
Hi, Joziane,

The easiest way to recognize certain albergue as municipal, private etc. is to check it in guide book or online (Gronze, Mundicamino, Eroski,...). Usually it's incorporated in the name of the albergue:
https://www.gronze.com/castilla-y-leon/burgos/san-juan-ortega/albergue-parroquial-san-juan-ortega
But otherwise if you click on albergue then scroll a bit down and see under Otros datos/Titularidad:
https://www.gronze.com/castilla-y-leon/burgos/ages/albergue-taberna-ages

Hope that helps. Ultreia!
yes, that does help....thank you
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
The name of some municipal albergues can be misleading about its character. For example, the Siervas de María, in Astorga ; I thought I was going to be received by nuns...:). The name comes from the building, which belonged formerly to a religious order.
Many times you will see arrows indicating the way to a parochial or muni albergue; local people always know them, which is not always the case with the private ones.
Some hostals and even hotels are trying to profit from the pilgrimage bonanza; they offer pilgrim-style accomodations, even if they are not registered as albergues.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
The name of some municipal albergues can be misleading about its character. For example, the Siervas de María, in Astorga ; I thought I was going to be received by nuns
True, hahaha, but still it doesn't has municipal/parrochial or anything else in its name so why misleading??? :D
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
They are well marked with "Albergue" in the name, and sometimes a large "A." If you are specifically heading for one of the "municipio" or "parroquial" church-run places, it is helpful to know the name in advance. If you are open to private albergues, there are many options, so just watch for the word on the sign. Many of them offer both dorm accommodation and private rooms. By the way, a "hostal" in Spain is a small, often family-run hotel, with private rooms.
Some hostals and even hotels are trying to profit from the pilgrimage bonanza; they offer pilgrim-style accomodations, even if they are not registered as albergues
I'm not sure what this means. Is there a single albergue registry? I expect that the private albergues are appropriately registered with the legal authorities to offer their accommodation. Without the private albergues, there would be a huge shortage of beds during the busy season. I doubt that most of them make a huge profit!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
And you won't be going alone. You will have lots of other pilgrims who will help you find your way, so don't worry! Have fun, Joziane.
 
N

nathanael

Guest
And you won't be going alone. You will have lots of other pilgrims who will help you find your way, so don't worry! Have fun, Joziane.
I agree with JillGat, Joziane, have an awesome experience you will profit much if you a few friends along the Camino for guidance.
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
The name of some municipal albergues can be misleading about its character. For example, the Siervas de María, in Astorga ; I thought I was going to be received by nuns...:). The name comes from the building, which belonged formerly to a religious order.
Many times you will see arrows indicating the way to a parochial or muni albergue; local people always know them, which is not always the case with the private ones.
Some hostals and even hotels are trying to profit from the pilgrimage bonanza; they offer pilgrim-style accomodations, even if they are not registered as albergues.[/QUOTE
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
Will remember that, I would have thought the same. Thank you
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
They are well marked with "Albergue" in the name, and sometimes a large "A." If you are specifically heading for one of the "municipio" or "parroquial" church-run places, it is helpful to know the name in advance. If you are open to private albergues, there are many options, so just watch for the word on the sign. Many of them offer both dorm accommodation and private rooms. By the way, a "hostal" in Spain is a small, often family-run hotel, with private rooms.

I'm not sure what this means. Is there a single albergue registry? I expect that the private albergues are appropriately registered with the legal authorities to offer their accommodation. Without the private albergues, there would be a huge shortage of beds during the busy season. I doubt that most of them make a huge profit!
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
This is helpful...Large A, word on the sign for Private. Thank you
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
I did my best to reply to all the responses but in case it didn't work out individually (as I did struggle at times with the technology even tho it is well indicated)....Thank you ALL!! It is part of the journey and as I have learned it starts at home in so many ways...it is all good.
 

Gareth Griffith

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago de Compestela in May(2016)
Look on the resources section for the list of favourite albergues on the Camino Frances on this forum. Download it and print it off. When you have some time on wet weekend. Sit at your computer and Google the ones that you might want to stay at. Highlight them on the list. There are some albergues that you won't want to miss and there are some that don't make the list of the favourite albergues. Those that offer a communal meal are great for meeting new friends and catching up with old friends.
 

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
Look on the resources section for the list of favourite albergues on the Camino Frances on this forum. Download it and print it off. When you have some time on wet weekend. Sit at your computer and Google the ones that you might want to stay at. Highlight them on the list. There are some albergues that you won't want to miss and there are some that don't make the list of the favourite albergues. Those that offer a communal meal are great for meeting new friends and catching up with old friends.
Mind reader!! It just started pouring here....LOL!!! Good tip for today Thank you!!
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
They are well marked with "Albergue" in the name, and sometimes a large "A." If you are specifically heading for one of the "municipio" or "parroquial" church-run places, it is helpful to know the name in advance. If you are open to private albergues, there are many options, so just watch for the word on the sign. Many of them offer both dorm accommodation and private rooms. By the way, a "hostal" in Spain is a small, often family-run hotel, with private rooms.
I'm not sure what this means. Is there a single albergue registry? I expect that the private albergues are appropriately registered with the legal authorities to offer their accommodation. Without the private albergues, there would be a huge shortage of beds during the busy season. I doubt that most of them make a huge profit!

Two cases: my last time I arrived in Portomarin and all albergues were "completo". A kind hospitalera made a phone call and gave me the address of a place. The accomodations were albergue-like (shared dorms, etc.) but the owners were careful to tell us that they were not properly an albergue. I suppose that there was some kind of regulation behind this explanation (about which I don't really care). It was nice and pleasant, not very expensive.
Leaving Molinaseca I saw a quite stately hotel (I think it was the "Floriana") with a big sign: "Pilgrims! a shared four bedroom by only 60e!" I think that hotels are half empty in low season, and they are trying to make a profit.
For the record, I have nothing against private albergues (or hotels turning into ones). And although some family managed albergues are struggling to survive, it is a business with good profits opportunities for many. I was impressed to see so many brand-new albergues between Sarria and SdeC, some built specifically to this purpose, and many more than the registered in guides.
It has become very relevant for the local economy. It is good, provided that they offer satisfactory services with reasonable prices to customers and pilgrims.
 
Last edited:

Joziane

Lifes` moments, memories & aspirations....
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) Cam.Frances May 17-July2
Two cases: my last time I arrived in Portomarin and all albergues were "completo". A kind hospitalera made a phone call and gave me the address of a place. The accomodations were albergue-like (shared dorms, etc.) but the owners were careful to tell us that they were not properly an albergue. I suppose that there was some kind of regulation behind this explanation (about which I don't really care). It was nice and pleasant, not very expensive.
Leaving Molinaseca I saw a quite stately hotel (I think it was the "Floriana") with a big sign: "Pilgrims! a shared four bedroom by only 60e!" I think that hotels are half empty in low season, and they are trying to make a profit.
For the record, I had nothing against private albergues (or hotels turning into ones). And although some family managed albergues are struggling to survive, it is a business with good profits opportunities for many. I was impressed to see so many brand-new albergues between Sarria and SdeC, some built specifically to this purpose, and many more than the registered in guides.
It has become very relevant for the local economy. It is good, provided that they offer satisfactory services with reasonable prices to customers and pilgrims.
Comforting to know there are even more out there than in the guides. Started to fret a bit with "full bookings" that I read on another post. Plan to walk and stop whenever it is needed. Hence, the question in the first place...but have received much information here and yours added is bonus! Thank you.
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
Don't worry. In my experience, pilgrims are incredibly resourceful, and help each other.
I have been a couple of times in a situation where everything seemed "completo", and I had to ask, walk, and talk with local people. Hospitaleros usually try to get you a place, and same with clerks in tourism offices. It is only a problem if you want everything to be perfectly organised and pre-arranged (and I have nothing against that, neither).
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Two cases: my last time I arrived in Portomarin and all albergues were "completo". A kind hospitalera made a phone call and gave me the address of a place. The accomodations were albergue-like (shared dorms, etc.) but the owners were careful to tell us that they were not properly an albergue. I suppose that there was some kind of regulation behind this explanation (about which I don't really care). It was nice and pleasant, not very expensive.
Leaving Molinaseca I saw a quite stately hotel (I think it was the "Floriana") with a big sign: "Pilgrims! a shared four bedroom by only 60e!" I think that hotels are half empty in low season, and they are trying to make a profit.
For the record, I had nothing against private albergues (or hotels turning into ones). And although some family managed albergues are struggling to survive, it is a business with good profits opportunities for many. I was impressed to see so many brand-new albergues between Sarria and SdeC, some built specifically to this purpose, and many more than the registered in guides.
It has become very relevant for the local economy. It is good, provided that they offer satisfactory services with reasonable prices to customers and pilgrims.

As I understand it, the only difference between hostels and albergues is that albergues are exclusively for pilgrims and you must show a pilgrim's credential to get a bed.
There are also a lot of hostales, pensiones, casa rurales etc., that are advertising to pilgrims along the trail. Many of them will give a discount if you have a pilgrim's passport/credential.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
As I understand it, the only difference between hostels and albergues is that albergues are exclusively for pilgrims and you must show a pilgrim's credential to get a bed.
In Spain (youth) hostels as we know them are named "albergue turistico" and others are just albergues (for pilgrims) whether they are municipal, parrochial, private etc.
But otherwise you are spot on, Trecile!
 

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