A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement


Buy any book, get free camino shell

All the ways that the movie “The Way” was spot on...

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Aragones/Frances/Finisterre (2018), Operation Sabre (2018), Marin Ramble (2017)
#1
I’m sure I’m scratching the surface here, but having finished 550 miles on the CI/CA/CF yesterday, I’m amazed at the way that “The Way” was accurate (especially in parts that I totally thought were ridiculous but were proven to be true):

- you DO run across the same people over and over despite different walking speeds, rest breaks, and albergues! At SdC tonight, it was a veritable reunion of nearly everyone we had met in the past 40 days

- even more amazing is that your trail friends also know each other because they all met on different days too!

- we did meet a writer, a man trying to lose weight for his wife, and a woman giving up cigarettes

- when you have a tough moment, your trail mates will bail you out with no questions asked, then forgive your indiscretion just as quickly

- the first night you stay alone in a fancy hotel, you’ll wish you had some buddies with you

- there really is a Galician liqueur made from secret herbs picked by monks

- there IS a difference between pintxos and tapas, plus the waiter will happily explain the difference at length despite your obviously limited understanding of Spanish

- impromptu dance parties will break out among pilgrims, though it doesn’t have to be at a gypsy party

- other pilgrims will know who you are even before you meet them through stories that mutual friends have shared

- Ramon does exist (and in multiple places!!!)

- the butofumiero will awe you (and possibly make you cry); PS: don’t video it, just enjoy the moment

- finally, upon reaching SdC, you will have a strange desire to just keep walking to the ocean...

Sure, there was no stolen backpack and the path is waaaaay harder than the stroll that they show, but it’s so tight in so many ways that I forgive the minor faults 73C0F986-A00E-4B34-9BBE-4BC85DC45986.jpeg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#3
@Vacajoe, I love the comparisons you made and you are right, there really are numerous similarities as one walks as portrayed in the movie. It seems most folks usually comment on how the movie does not follow the correct order of "when and where" Martin Sheen stayed in the albergues, but your focus was on the many aspects of the film that often closely follows many of our real Camino experiences while we walk.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France (2015 and 2016)
#6
I have to share this story from my CF in 2016. I want to believe it’s true. I stayed at a Casa Rurale in Hornillos del Camino. The host, Samuel, was the loveliest, most helpful guy. He had a poster of the movie The Way on the wall near reception, signed by Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez, and I asked him how he came by it. He said Martin, his son Emilio, and his grandson/Emilio’s son waked the Camino the year before they made the movie. They wanted to stay at his place but he was full and he sent them around to his sister’s place. The next day the grandson stayed behind. He’d fallen for the sister’s daughter and eventually married her.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
(2019: Planning to return!)
#7
I have to share this story from my CF in 2016. I want to believe it’s true. I stayed at a Casa Rurale in Hornillos del Camino. The host, Samuel, was the loveliest, most helpful guy. He had a poster of the movie The Way on the wall near reception, signed by Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez, and I asked him how he came by it. He said Martin, his son Emilio, and his grandson/Emilio’s son waked the Camino the year before they made the movie. They wanted to stay at his place but he was full and he sent them around to his sister’s place. The next day the grandson stayed behind. He’d fallen for the sister’s daughter and eventually married her.
That one is true! I've read it too, and it's been mentioned on the Forum. Lovely story.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#10
Emilio’s son waked the Camino
That part may be true. He met his wife on the trek. The other two were dabblers for a few sections, but I don't think they did even the last 100 km. That said, what they did is completely unimportant for what the rest of us do! It was a film that caused an explosion of pilgrims from the English speaking world, and it seems to ring true even if it is not true (gypsies in Burgos, for example). We all worry about our children, gypsy or not, so it is "true" even if most of the thieves in Burgos are not gypsies.
 

Aysen Mustafa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan on walking the Camino April 2018.
#11
I’m sure I’m scratching the surface here, but having finished 550 miles on the CI/CA/CF yesterday, I’m amazed at the way that “The Way” was accurate (especially in parts that I totally thought were ridiculous but were proven to be true):

- you DO run across the same people over and over despite different walking speeds, rest breaks, and albergues! At SdC tonight, it was a veritable reunion of nearly everyone we had met in the past 40 days

- even more amazing is that your trail friends also know each other because they all met on different days too!

- we did meet a writer, a man trying to lose weight for his wife, and a woman giving up cigarettes

- when you have a tough moment, your trail mates will bail you out with no questions asked, then forgive your indiscretion just as quickly

- the first night you stay alone in a fancy hotel, you’ll wish you had some buddies with you

- there really is a Galician liqueur made from secret herbs picked by monks

- there IS a difference between pintxos and tapas, plus the waiter will happily explain the difference at length despite your obviously limited understanding of Spanish

- impromptu dance parties will break out among pilgrims, though it doesn’t have to be at a gypsy party

- other pilgrims will know who you are even before you meet them through stories that mutual friends have shared

- Ramon does exist (and in multiple places!!!)

- the butofumiero will awe you (and possibly make you cry); PS: don’t video it, just enjoy the moment

- finally, upon reaching SdC, you will have a strange desire to just keep walking to the ocean...

Sure, there was no stolen backpack and the path is waaaaay harder than the stroll that they show, but it’s so tight in so many ways that I forgive the minor faults View attachment 42721
Do you recommend the Galician liqueur?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Inglés (from Ferrol June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (from Tui May 2015)
#14
The Galician liquor (licor de hierbas is what's described above) is usually served after dinner with coffee. It's meant for sipping, not chugging! (but I'm not judging anyone else's habits!;)) Also sometimes offered is licor café, a coffee flavored liquor that is really nice with coffee. You'll see locals enjoying it even with their morning coffee.:cool:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2016 Camino Frances to Leon
Fall 2017 Camino Frances to Finisterre
#15
I’m sure I’m scratching the surface here, but having finished 550 miles on the CI/CA/CF yesterday, I’m amazed at the way that “The Way” was accurate (especially in parts that I totally thought were ridiculous but were proven to be true):

- you DO run across the same people over and over despite different walking speeds, rest breaks, and albergues! At SdC tonight, it was a veritable reunion of nearly everyone we had met in the past 40 days

- even more amazing is that your trail friends also know each other because they all met on different days too!

- we did meet a writer, a man trying to lose weight for his wife, and a woman giving up cigarettes

- when you have a tough moment, your trail mates will bail you out with no questions asked, then forgive your indiscretion just as quickly

- the first night you stay alone in a fancy hotel, you’ll wish you had some buddies with you

- there really is a Galician liqueur made from secret herbs picked by monks

- there IS a difference between pintxos and tapas, plus the waiter will happily explain the difference at length despite your obviously limited understanding of Spanish

- impromptu dance parties will break out among pilgrims, though it doesn’t have to be at a gypsy party

- other pilgrims will know who you are even before you meet them through stories that mutual friends have shared

- Ramon does exist (and in multiple places!!!)

- the butofumiero will awe you (and possibly make you cry); PS: don’t video it, just enjoy the moment

- finally, upon reaching SdC, you will have a strange desire to just keep walking to the ocean...

Sure, there was no stolen backpack and the path is waaaaay harder than the stroll that they show, but it’s so tight in so many ways that I forgive the minor faults View attachment 42721
Thanks for my first laughs of the day!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
#16
Yep, it is true. Stayed at the same place. On the wall is a picture of the wedding party. I really loved this place. Grandma did the cooking which was splendid and brought out the liquors after dinner. There were only 6 of us that were staying there that night (others were in a wedding party). Ended up walking with two Brits (husband and wife, home restorer and beekeeper) for a couple of days off and on after that. We all had a bit too much (but not too too much) to drink and laughed with the owner until about midnight. Made the next day a little long, but well worth the pain. Thanks for reminding me of the experience.
 

Liam Ryan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016
#17
That part may be true. He met his wife on the trek. The other two were dabblers for a few sections, but I don't think they did even the last 100 km. That said, what they did is completely unimportant for what the rest of us do! It was a film that caused an explosion of pilgrims from the English speaking world, and it seems to ring true even if it is not true (gypsies in Burgos, for example). We all worry about our children, gypsy or not, so it is "true" even if most of the thieves in Burgos are not gypsies.
Hope the thieves are gone from Burgos when we arrive on Tuesday 29th May to resume our Camino and head out into the meseta!! I am sure we will have plenty of company. Can't wait to get back on the 'Way'
Liam
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015); February/March (2019)
#18
I’m sure I’m scratching the surface here, but having finished 550 miles on the CI/CA/CF yesterday, I’m amazed at the way that “The Way” was accurate (especially in parts that I totally thought were ridiculous but were proven to be true):

- you DO run across the same people over and over despite different walking speeds, rest breaks, and albergues! At SdC tonight, it was a veritable reunion of nearly everyone we had met in the past 40 days

- even more amazing is that your trail friends also know each other because they all met on different days too!

- we did meet a writer, a man trying to lose weight for his wife, and a woman giving up cigarettes

- when you have a tough moment, your trail mates will bail you out with no questions asked, then forgive your indiscretion just as quickly

- the first night you stay alone in a fancy hotel, you’ll wish you had some buddies with you

- there really is a Galician liqueur made from secret herbs picked by monks

- there IS a difference between pintxos and tapas, plus the waiter will happily explain the difference at length despite your obviously limited understanding of Spanish

- impromptu dance parties will break out among pilgrims, though it doesn’t have to be at a gypsy party

- other pilgrims will know who you are even before you meet them through stories that mutual friends have shared

- Ramon does exist (and in multiple places!!!)

- the butofumiero will awe you (and possibly make you cry); PS: don’t video it, just enjoy the moment

- finally, upon reaching SdC, you will have a strange desire to just keep walking to the ocean...

Sure, there was no stolen backpack and the path is waaaaay harder than the stroll that they show, but it’s so tight in so many ways that I forgive the minor faults View attachment 42721
I agree completely. While the movie doesn't go out of its way to show the actual albergues, it does a wonderful job of getting across the feel of the Camino and the camaraderie of Camino families and friends. I'm glad you had a wonderful experience on your Camino.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#19
Do you recommend the Galician liqueur?
Only if you enjoy waking up in the morning in a coma.
Hierbas is interesting if your interests include rocket fuel flavoured with herbs and sweetened to the point that dentists recommend it. Orujo on the other hand is the recommended accompaniment to that first cafe solo of the morning as it will mollify the caffeine impact while reminding you that you are alive and breathing (ok, gasping).

Many years ago I found myself strongly attracted to the Asturian campesino life-style - Day break; coffee, Orujo, go to work: 11 am, coffee, Orujo, go back to work; 2 pm, Orujo, Menu del Dia, Orujo, sleep......

It had the same comfort as - walk, eat, sleep, repeat. And did nothing for my dentist :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#21
That one is true! I've read it too, and it's been mentioned on the Forum. Lovely story.
Yes, I saw an interview of Martin Sheen and Emilio discussing the movie and he talked about his grandson falling in love and marrying a local girl along the way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
St. Francis Route 2017
#22
Do you recommend the Galician liqueur?
Oh, yes! It's intended as a digestif and comes in a clear version that is akin to grappa, as well as the traditional version, orujo de hiervas (herbs), that is a yellowish-chartreuse color. It is always served ice cold in a small glass. It was the reward I gave to myself at the end of the day before walking back to the albergue or hostal. I first discovered it in Triacastela at a busy restaurant with a delicious pilgrim menu. It's hard to simply sip it...
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#23
Hierbas is interesting if your interests include rocket fuel flavoured with herbs and sweetened to the point that dentists recommend it. Orujo on the other hand is the recommended accompaniment to that first cafe solo of the morning as it will mollify the caffeine impact while reminding you that you are alive and breathing (ok, gasping).

Many years ago I found myself strongly attracted to the Asturian campesino life-style - Day break; coffee, Orujo, go to work: 11 am, coffee, Orujo, go back to work; 2 pm, Orujo, Menu del Dia, Orujo, sleep......

It had the same comfort as - walk, eat, sleep, repeat. And did nothing for my dentist :)
Maybe that is what I saw an older, local gentleman drinking in a cafe one morning on the Camino Frances. I stopped there to get coffee and had taken a seat at the bar. The older man came in, sat at the bar, did not say a word and the bartender simply placed the drink in a liquor/cordial type glass (biscotti on top) in front of the man and he drank it in a couple of sips, placed money on the counter and left. I guess it was his morning drink to get the engine warmed up, ha ha.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
#24
It was an un-named and un-marked bar, in El Burgo, north of Malaga in the roots of the Sierra Nevada. 5 am, June, 1960/70 something. I'd just left the Fonda, it was going to be a long walk to Ronda. I heard voices and saw a doorway with beer crates stacked outside, and several long handled 'scotch' hoes leaning against the wall. Inside there was a long bar and a line of men. The camerero was pouring coffee from a pot, and adding hot milk from another for those that wanted it. His second trip along the bar he brought a label less bottle, full of a clear liquid with a few dry stems of something poked inside. He poured a shot into a little glass beside each coffee. Except mine.

All conversation had stopped when I walked in but I'd wished everyone 'buenas'' and conversations resumed. Now I queried, senor?, and pointed at my neighbours 'shot'. He shrugged and poured me a large one. All conversation stopped again. Looking left and right from about the centre point of the counter I realised two things - I'd just acquired a shot of the local, very local, aguadiente and that I was about to be the mornings entertainment. So I knocked it back, stopped it with some coffee and smiled at everyone. Conversations resumed.

I didn't have the heart, or the Spanish, to explain that I had trained in the Picos de Europa and that the Orujo of Asturias was an old friend.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF15, CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF17, CP17, CdN, CM, CF18, LePuy19
#26
Oh, and BTW, my "Ramon" was the owner of the albergue Virgen de Guadalupe in the ghost town of Ciruena! He was quite "unusual", to say the least! ;)
I love Pedro, he is quite a character with very large golden heart. My first encounter with him was stiff and he was gruff until he realized I live in Basque Country and he admitted he was from San Sebastián. Ramon, he is not.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#27
I only said he was "my" Ramon...Quirky, dyed black hair and he played opera music to wake us up in the morning (similarities to the movie). I found it odd that he paid tribute to Jesus and Mary by artifacts in his attic chapel, but also had a big Buddha statue in his lounge area. An interesting albergue experience I will never forget!
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago 2017
#30
I have to share this story from my CF in 2016. I want to believe it’s true. I stayed at a Casa Rurale in Hornillos del Camino. The host, Samuel, was the loveliest, most helpful guy. He had a poster of the movie The Way on the wall near reception, signed by Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez, and I asked him how he came by it. He said Martin, his son Emilio, and his grandson/Emilio’s son waked the Camino the year before they made the movie. They wanted to stay at his place but he was full and he sent them around to his sister’s place. The next day the grandson stayed behind. He’d fallen for the sister’s daughter and eventually married her.
I stayed there too and it was a great story. Samuel was on of my best hosts on the whole camino and I highly recommend his place. The connection to the movie was fun.
 
Camino(s) past & future
July/ Aug (2016): StJPdP to Viana
Apr (2017): Viana to Castrojeriz
Apr (2018): Castrojeriz to Leon
#31
IMG_20170418_075501951.jpeg And here he is in all his glory. It was really fascinating to meet someone involved so closely with the film .... and yes, he was a great host with a great place!
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Aragones/Frances/Finisterre (2018), Operation Sabre (2018), Marin Ramble (2017)
#32
We had the Galician liqueur over ice pre-dinner as an appertif and later just in a glass as a digestiva. The next day we mixed into into pineapple juice(!!!!) for a party cocktail! Don’t judge me: we only had two nights in SdC to finish the bottle... ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
First time pilgrim and walking solo. Leaving SJDP around April 5, 2018.
#34
I just returned home Monday night and my husband wanted to rewatch the film with me Tuesday. I was surprised by how emotional I felt watching it again having just finished the Camino last week. The original list is spot on (though I never got to see the buto fly). What really struck me to add to the list is what I originally thought was a Hollywood narrative conceit: on the Camino, you will never eat or drink alone if you do not want to. Being a solo pilgrim, if I was at a table alone other pilgrims would always invite me to join them or ask to sit at my table with me. After the first week or so, I dropped my own American isolationist habits and started inviting solos to join me. It’s a thing! And it’s wonderful, and it would never happen in West Coast America, and I miss it already.

Cheers, Jen
Caminojen.com
 
Camino(s) past & future
French route (2013)
French route (2017)
#35
I have to share this story from my CF in 2016. I want to believe it’s true. I stayed at a Casa Rurale in Hornillos del Camino. The host, Samuel, was the loveliest, most helpful guy. He had a poster of the movie The Way on the wall near reception, signed by Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez, and I asked him how he came by it. He said Martin, his son Emilio, and his grandson/Emilio’s son waked the Camino the year before they made the movie. They wanted to stay at his place but he was full and he sent them around to his sister’s place. The next day the grandson stayed behind. He’d fallen for the sister’s daughter and eventually married her.
The Casa Rurale is named El Molino due to past function as a grain mill.
 

Attachments

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#36
I just returned home Monday night and my husband wanted to rewatch the film with me Tuesday. I was surprised by how emotional I felt watching it again having just finished the Camino last week. The original list is spot on (though I never got to see the buto fly). What really struck me to add to the list is what I originally thought was a Hollywood narrative conceit: on the Camino, you will never eat or drink alone if you do not want to. Being a solo pilgrim, if I was at a table alone other pilgrims would always invite me to join them or ask to sit at my table with me. After the first week or so, I dropped my own American isolationist habits and started inviting solos to join me. It’s a thing! And it’s wonderful, and it would never happen in West Coast America, and I miss it already.

Cheers, Jen
Caminojen.com
None of the Americans I met on any of my Caminos were non-sociable. Quite the opposite, in fact. Broke bread with quite a few, and tipped back many a beer and on one occasion, bourbon whiskey's. Yum...;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#37
None of the Americans I met on any of my Caminos were non-sociable. Quite the opposite, in fact. Broke bread with quite a few, and tipped back many a beer and on one occasion, bourbon whiskey's. Yum...;)
That's because you didn't meet the unsociable ones because they um, don't like to meet people and socialize ;):D
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#38
That's because you didn't meet the unsociable ones because they um, don't like to meet people and socialize ;):D
Ha ha...makes sense.
I can say I definitely did not see that many pilgrims overall who were not sociable in some way. Definitely no pilgrims walking by with the dark cloud of isolationism looming overhead, ha ha. That would actually be quite strange. For someone who considers themselves to be a total unsociable animal, to venture forth on a long walk shared with approximately 250,000 people a year, and want to be alone, ha ha. Maybe an ice floe in the Arctic would be a better locale.
Anyway, the few I did observe to keep to themselves on the Camino in no way could I determine their country of origin, nor did I have an interest in doing so.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF15, CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF17, CP17, CdN, CM, CF18, LePuy19
#39
Maybe that is what I saw an older, local gentleman drinking in a cafe one morning on the Camino Frances. I stopped there to get coffee and had taken a seat at the bar. The older man came in, sat at the bar, did not say a word and the bartender simply placed the drink in a liquor/cordial type glass (biscotti on top) in front of the man and he drank it in a couple of sips, placed money on the counter and left. I guess it was his morning drink to get the engine warmed up, ha ha.
Pastis is the same eye opener all over Provence.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF15, CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF17, CP17, CdN, CM, CF18, LePuy19
#40
On my 4th trip to the Camino, I finally met someone called Tom.
We could all finally say "Hey, Tom" ;)
As t2a knows well every time I get with in shouting distance of the Pilgrim Office I start asking where is “Tom” and telling everyone, “This man is a fraud.” Just like the movie, he hates it, but then we are best friends.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Pomplano to Santiago (March 29-May 6 2018)
#41
I’m sure I’m scratching the surface here, but having finished 550 miles on the CI/CA/CF yesterday, I’m amazed at the way that “The Way” was accurate (especially in parts that I totally thought were ridiculous but were proven to be true):

- you DO run across the same people over and over despite different walking speeds, rest breaks, and albergues! At SdC tonight, it was a veritable reunion of nearly everyone we had met in the past 40 days

- even more amazing is that your trail friends also know each other because they all met on different days too!

- we did meet a writer, a man trying to lose weight for his wife, and a woman giving up cigarettes

- when you have a tough moment, your trail mates will bail you out with no questions asked, then forgive your indiscretion just as quickly

- the first night you stay alone in a fancy hotel, you’ll wish you had some buddies with you

- there really is a Galician liqueur made from secret herbs picked by monks

- there IS a difference between pintxos and tapas, plus the waiter will happily explain the difference at length despite your obviously limited understanding of Spanish

- impromptu dance parties will break out among pilgrims, though it doesn’t have to be at a gypsy party

- other pilgrims will know who you are even before you meet them through stories that mutual friends have shared

- Ramon does exist (and in multiple places!!!)

- the butofumiero will awe you (and possibly make you cry); PS: don’t video it, just enjoy the moment

- finally, upon reaching SdC, you will have a strange desire to just keep walking to the ocean...

Sure, there was no stolen backpack and the path is waaaaay harder than the stroll that they show, but it’s so tight in so many ways that I forgive the minor faults View attachment 42721
RIGHT!!?? I miss my close walking buddies so much!
 
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#42
I have to share this story from my CF in 2016. I want to believe it’s true. I stayed at a Casa Rurale in Hornillos del Camino. The host, Samuel, was the loveliest, most helpful guy. He had a poster of the movie The Way on the wall near reception, signed by Martin Sheen and Emilio Estevez, and I asked him how he came by it. He said Martin, his son Emilio, and his grandson/Emilio’s son waked the Camino the year before they made the movie. They wanted to stay at his place but he was full and he sent them around to his sister’s place. The next day the grandson stayed behind. He’d fallen for the sister’s daughter and eventually married her.
I saw an interview of Martin Sheen where he spoke of this.
 

TomAptos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Camino Portugues 2017, Via St Francis (Italy) 2018
#43
I agree with much of what you have said. I have watched the movie several times and I recommend it to my friends when they ask "what was it like"? Biggest "difference" was that Martin Sheen walked with same three people for the entire way. Our experience was that we walked/dined/wined/hung out with many different people along the Camino frequently crossing paths again and again. Other than that though the movie is "spot on".
 

Terri B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1998 St Cuthberts Way
1999 West Highland Way
2016 Camino Frances SJPDP to Santiago
#45
Ha ha...makes sense.
I can say I definitely did not see that many pilgrims overall who were not sociable in some way. Definitely no pilgrims walking by with the dark cloud of isolationism looming overhead, ha ha. That would actually be quite strange. For someone who considers themselves to be a total unsociable animal, to venture forth on a long walk shared with approximately 250,000 people a year, and want to be alone, ha ha. Maybe an ice floe in the Arctic would be a better locale.
Anyway, the few I did observe to keep to themselves on the Camino in no way could I determine their country of origin, nor did I have an interest in doing so.
RJM, just don't do anything they don't like. To help summit some of the bigger hills and keep up my pace I would sometimes put my iPod on without earbuds (I didn't want to be unsociable), Most people would hear it as they overtook me and commented that it was nice to hear a little music, but not one particular American lady. She didn't like this and well and truly made her thoughts on the subject known. It was on a low volume and quieter than than the conversations occurring around me, and when I pointed that out to her she remarked "well I'm not talking" and stormed off. Didn't see her again.
Buen Camino Terri
 
Camino(s) past & future
[April 2014] Camino Frances; St Jean -Finisterre & Muxia. [2019, May-July] Le Puy -St Jean
#46
As per the honorable gypsie father in the movie - after you stop in Santiago de Compostela, continue on to Muxia to complete your journey.
Yes! if you enjoyed the atmosphere and the relative space and quiet of Finisterre, then do go onto Muxia. I loved the place and the chance to stay a few days to unwind, to soak up the history and the peace I found there. There were so few pilgrims in town (early July, 2014) and at no time did I feel as anyone other than a welcomed visitor able to blend in to the gentle, local way of being.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#47
Yes, I saw an interview of Martin Sheen and Emilio discussing the movie and he talked about his grandson falling in love and marrying a local girl along the way.
Hola @Camino Chris , yes its very true. (I think they met either in Burgos or at the overnight accommodation.) Martin's grandson's in-laws operate the El Molino "casa rural" - its not really on the Camino - about 15-20km from Hornillos del Camino. There was a scene where Yuste was assisting with cooking a meal outdoors - that is El Molino. Cheers
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#48
RJM, just don't do anything they don't like. To help summit some of the bigger hills and keep up my pace I would sometimes put my iPod on without earbuds (I didn't want to be unsociable), Most people would hear it as they overtook me and commented that it was nice to hear a little music, but not one particular American lady. She didn't like this and well and truly made her thoughts on the subject known. It was on a low volume and quieter than than the conversations occurring around me, and when I pointed that out to her she remarked "well I'm not talking" and stormed off. Didn't see her again.
Buen Camino Terri
????
Sorry, don't understand. Who's "they"?
 

Terri B

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
1998 St Cuthberts Way
1999 West Highland Way
2016 Camino Frances SJPDP to Santiago
#49
????
Sorry, don't understand. Who's "they"?
That would be Americans, RJM. I would clarify first by saying many were lovely, but others were only sociable so long as they had things their way. As in how dare I ruin her Camino by playing music out loud.
 

LesR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
#50
The Galician liquor (licor de hierbas is what's described above) is usually served after dinner with coffee. It's meant for sipping, not chugging! (but I'm not judging anyone else's habits!;)) Also sometimes offered is licor café, a coffee flavored liquor that is really nice with coffee. You'll see locals enjoying it even with their morning coffee.:cool:
Lové the licor de hierbas! Despite its flouro green colour, it goes down a treat, and, yes, I could be tempted to overimbibe, but what a way to go..

Pity I cannot find any in Australia - Licor 43 is a substitue that I can find easily, but it isn’t ‘the real thing’.
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
#51
Our "Ramon" was a Spanish gentleman who was ex military parachute brigade. We were the only Pilgrim's in his hostel and the dinner was communal so my Portunhol (a hybrid language when Portuguese speakers attempt Spanish) was severely tested as he spoke no English. We got on well as I'm from a military family. That didn't prepare us for the morning though when the trumpet which we thought was decorative was put to its original use and our hospitaleiro played a reveille to signal it was time to get up. That was followed by a CD playing military marching music on the speaker system. It was two shell shocked pilgrims that made their way down for breakfast.

... and on the subject of orujo we pick up a bottle in Santiago airport and have a glass when we rewatch The Way.
 

paul.ferris

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2011 Camino Frances
2013 Camino Frances
2015 To be decided
#52
My first CF was either before the movie 'The Way' was released or at least it was little known. So my Camino experience was before I saw the movie. Although I enjoyed it, the movie seemed very unlike anything that I had experienced.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo
#53
I agree with the OP. I walked for several days (from Irache to Burgos) with an Italian gentleman, a surgeon, in 2016. He had the sad experience of having his rucksack stolen in Burgos – from the municipal albergue – while he was at Mass. He was able to buy new stuff in Burgos, as he had the really important stuff with him. I saw him again later. His name was Gaetano. If anybody reading this knows of him, send me a message.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#54
That would be Americans, RJM. I would clarify first by saying many were lovely, but others were only sociable so long as they had things their way. As in how dare I ruin her Camino by playing music out loud.
As someone with many relatives in the states, and who has spent a great deal of time in the states, I have to say your post is very offensive, and may even be considered a micro-aggression. Perhaps you should delete it. There is that option on this forum.
I never experienced that at all with fellow pilgrims from the US. I suggest you perhaps travel more. Remove prejudices from within.
This quote from the American writer Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) may be something for you to ponder:
"Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow mindedness...."
 
Last edited:
#55
I’m sure I’m scratching the surface here, but having finished 550 miles on the CI/CA/CF yesterday, I’m amazed at the way that “The Way” was accurate (especially in parts that I totally thought were ridiculous but were proven to be true):

- you DO run across the same people over and over despite different walking speeds, rest breaks, and albergues! At SdC tonight, it was a veritable reunion of nearly everyone we had met in the past 40 days

- even more amazing is that your trail friends also know each other because they all met on different days too!

- we did meet a writer, a man trying to lose weight for his wife, and a woman giving up cigarettes

- when you have a tough moment, your trail mates will bail you out with no questions asked, then forgive your indiscretion just as quickly

- the first night you stay alone in a fancy hotel, you’ll wish you had some buddies with you

- there really is a Galician liqueur made from secret herbs picked by monks

- there IS a difference between pintxos and tapas, plus the waiter will happily explain the difference at length despite your obviously limited understanding of Spanish

- impromptu dance parties will break out among pilgrims, though it doesn’t have to be at a gypsy party

- other pilgrims will know who you are even before you meet them through stories that mutual friends have shared

- Ramon does exist (and in multiple places!!!)

- the butofumiero will awe you (and possibly make you cry); PS: don’t video it, just enjoy the moment

- finally, upon reaching SdC, you will have a strange desire to just keep walking to the ocean...

Sure, there was no stolen backpack and the path is waaaaay harder than the stroll that they show, but it’s so tight in so many ways that I forgive the minor faults View attachment 42721 [/QUO
 
#57
I agree. And yes, the story is true about Martin's grandson. Martin Sheen wrote an article about this story. I read it before I went on my second Camino. I stayed, quite by accident, at the same country inn, and the woman who owns it told me her daughter had married Sheen's grandson. At the time, they lived in Santa Fe, NM. Last year I stayed at the same place (it's called El Molino). She told me they now live in LA. I like the movie, The Way. I highly recommend the documentary Walking the Camino (Six ways to Santiago), a film by Lydia Smith. It is the real story of several people who walked it. It tells the genuine ups and downs, triumphs and struggles.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Arriving in Lourdes for my first Camino 29th Aug 16 and starting to walk 31st.
#61
Hope the thieves are gone from Burgos when we arrive on Tuesday 29th May to resume our Camino and head out into the meseta!! I am sure we will have plenty of company. Can't wait to get back on the 'Way'
Liam
Enjoy Burgos, a lovely city. I did not encounter any thieves, just a lady playing music in front of the old archway into the cathedral square, by the river, who insisted in having money before I filmed her... What I did discover was the nicest Sevillian gin: 'Puerto de Indias'. Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
First time pilgrim and walking solo. Leaving SJDP around April 5, 2018.
#62
None of the Americans I met on any of my Caminos were non-sociable. Quite the opposite, in fact. Broke bread with quite a few, and tipped back many a beer and on one occasion, bourbon whiskey's. Yum...;)
I want to make sure you understand that I was NOT bashing Americans... especially since I myself am a proud American. The point I was trying to make is that the scenes in the movie where pilgrims boldly sit at tables with others they may not know -- or invite solos to sit with them -- is true in my Camino experience and not a Hollywood narrative device as I assumed the first time I saw the movie. That really, truly happens. Every. Single. Day (except one night in Samos when I really did eat dinner alone, and it happened to be my birthday). I offered this example to add to the original list and was trying to explain how unusual this was for a native-born West Coast American. Inviting singles to sit with you or taking their empty chair and launching into conversation just ain't done around here. I miss it, too, and I've only been home a week.

I will not add to the thread regarding which groups were anti-social or rude on the Camino. That type of discussion does nothing but fuel stereotypes. I met wonderful people from all over the world who served as excellent representatives of their home countries (including Americans). I also met rude jerks from all over the world who, to me, were betraying their own personality issues and not necessarily acting as true ambassadors of their countries.

Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo
#64
It's impossible to generalise about a whole nation - any nation - on the basis of a few people you've met on the camino or anywhere else. And it's pointless to try.
 
Camino(s) past & future
coastal camino portugues
#65
Do you recommend the Galician liqueur?
the liquor is called orujo or aguadiente.It can be plain firewater like raki, often a slug added to coffee, o mixed with various other ingredients. liquor de hierbas, liquor de cafe, liquor tostado, or with fruit eg. liquorbde cerezas (like cherry brandy) . they are great on a cold night! my favourite is crema de orujo which is the Gallego version of Baileys. with ice ...mmm !
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances starting SJPdP Sept/Oct 2015, April/May 2017
#66
Lové the licor de hierbas! Despite its flouro green colour, it goes down a treat, and, yes, I could be tempted to overimbibe, but what a way to go..

Pity I cannot find any in Australia - Licor 43 is a substitue that I can find easily, but it isn’t ‘the real thing’.
If you live near Sydney, looks like this CBD restaurant serves it by the glass. :cool:
https://www.dimmi.com.au/restaurant/casa-asturiana/menu
SPANISH BRANDIES & LIQUERS
30 ml

...
Licor De Herbas De Galicia
$9.00”
 
Last edited:

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#67
the liquor is called orujo or aguadiente
Orujo (aruxo, and several other spellings) starts as a distillate of the leftover pressings from grapes for wine production, and is clear. That is what you see most commonly added to morning coffee. It is produced like rakia and grappa. Aguardente (Galicia)/aguardiente (rest of Spain) is then infused with flavors/herbs to make orujo de hierbas in many varieties. The yellow hierbas is most common; it is made with a combination of herbs. The hospitalera in Ventosa makes her own, and has forty or fifty flavors going during the year.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 -SJPP- Santiago .Oct/Nov
2017 -Porto to Santiago.Oct
2017- Santiago- Finesterre. Nov
#68
A liquor I really loved and first tasted on the Camino in Galicia is Paxtaran or pacharan -which is a wonderfully strong and tasty liquor from the sloe berries . I started having that a lot on my Caminos after a long days walk in 2015 and also in 2017 and when I returned to Australia I couldn't seem to find it . But then I finally managed to get some through Spanish importer in Melbourne . I also loved Orujo.. but pacharan is my favourite
 

MikeyC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - September 2016
CF - April May 2017
Shikoku - October 2017
Kumano Kodo - October 2017
#69
A liquor I really loved and first tasted on the Camino in Galicia is Paxtaran or pacharan -which is a wonderfully strong and tasty liquor from the sloe berries . I started having that a lot on my Caminos after a long days walk in 2015 and also in 2017 and when I returned to Australia I couldn't seem to find it . But then I finally managed to get some through Spanish importer in Melbourne . I also loved Orujo.. but pacharan is my favourite
I'll definitely look out for some next time. Did you find that sloe berries reduced your speed?

(I'll get my coat....)
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte to Primitivo
#70
"often a slug added to coffee, o mixed with various other ingredients. " Is that like the 'worm' they put in bottles of tequila (actually a caterpillar they put in bottles of mezcal)? :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 -SJPP- Santiago .Oct/Nov
2017 -Porto to Santiago.Oct
2017- Santiago- Finesterre. Nov
#71
I'll definitely look out for some next time. Did you find that sloe berries reduced your speed?

(I'll get my coat....)
Haha. That's a good one ..it did slow my pace .. it relaxed me totally .. It's such a great drink . Cheers mate
 

LesR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
#72
Orujo (aruxo, and several other spellings) starts as a distillate of the leftover pressings from grapes for wine production, and is clear. That is what you see most commonly added to morning coffee. It is produced like rakia and grappa. Aguardente (Galicia)/aguardiente (rest of Spain) is then infused with flavors/herbs to make orujo de hierbas in many varieties. The yellow hierbas is most common; it is made with a combination of herbs. The hospitalera in Ventosa makes her own, and has forty or fifty flavors going during the year.
which albergue in Ventosa, if i may ask?
 

LesR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
#73
I'll definitely look out for some next time. Did you find that sloe berries reduced your speed?

(I'll get my coat....)
A liquor I really loved and first tasted on the Camino in Galicia is Paxtaran or pacharan -which is a wonderfully strong and tasty liquor from the sloe berries . I started having that a lot on my Caminos after a long days walk in 2015 and also in 2017 and when I returned to Australia I couldn't seem to find it . But then I finally managed to get some through Spanish importer in Melbourne . I also loved Orujo.. but pacharan is my favourite
Have managed to track a bottle down through am importer in Airport West - Ilikewine. Haven't cracked the bottle yet, but am looking forward to it - had heard about pacharan while we were on the Camino but didn't see any (or ask) any... Ms Google tells me that Rathdowne Cellars in Melbourne and Petersham Cellars in Sydney also sell it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 -SJPP- Santiago .Oct/Nov
2017 -Porto to Santiago.Oct
2017- Santiago- Finesterre. Nov
#74
Thanks mate .

I actually didnt know it was available via Rathdowne cellars in Melbourne . When I returned from my first Camino in 2015 I asked around everywhere and nobody seemed able to help me so I got in touch with an importer and that was ok but a bit expensive .

.I'm going to write that down (Rathdown cellars ) and pay them a visit :)

I was able to order a six pack of through company called 'Spanish acquisition ' but I think it will be better just to buy one or two bottles at a time from rathdowne cellars .

Thanks heaps for letting me know . Cheers :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spain 2013 (Roncesvalles to Santago de Compostela)
France 2015 (Le Puy to Roncesvalles)
Portugal 2017 (Porto to Santiago de Compostela)
#75
Wonderful to hear that Patxaran can be sourced in Australia. We were introduced to this wonderful liqueur at the Hotel Costa Vella in Santiago de Compostela after finishing our walk from Roncesvalles in 2013. The waiter who served it didn't measure the quantity - just poured it over ice till the glass was full. (Maybe he thought we looked like we needed a drink!) Needless to say we didn't stop at one.
We tried to find it back in Australia but had no luck. We returned to the same hotel on completing a walk from Porto in 2017 and were reacquainted with this great drink. The brand was Zoco. It would be interesting to know if that is the brand you have been able to obtain.
We will certainly contact Rathdowne cellars and search further online.
Thank you for making us aware of this.
 

Attachments

LesR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2017)
#77
There is only one!!! San Saturnino.:)
Thank you - stayed there in 2017, but unfortunately was not introduced to licor de heirbos until Melide where it was served as an after-dinner drink as part of the pilgrims menu at Pulperia Ezequiel - had seen it being served in a bar coming across the meseta, but didn't know enough to ask for it myself (my loss!). Had also heard about a sloe-based spirit without being told its name (Patxaran/Pacharan) so I missed it too...
 
Last edited:

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#78
stayed there in 2017, but unfortunately was not introduced to licor de heirbos until Melide
The shelves in the tienda are lined with her brewing hierbas, and much of it is for sale, but she does not push it on pilgrims. But ask, and she will wax eloquent!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#79
I find it humorous that this thread turned a corner early on and switched gears...it seems approximately 60% of the posts are alcohol related (and are mostly from men who "know their stuff")! Oh what fun we have! :);):)
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
#80
I commented on this thread quite awhile ago. Nice to see it is still going strong. Out of all the useful threads, this one is not necessarily packed with advice but it does, in stellar fashion, have the spirit (or spirits) of the Camino and should be made required reading. :) :). About to start the Lisbon to Santiago walk next month. Boa caminho! (Hope my Portuguese is about right)
 

OLDER threads on this topic




A few items available from the Camino Forum Store




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 9 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 34 4.4%
  • April

    Votes: 112 14.6%
  • May

    Votes: 188 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 54 7.1%
  • July

    Votes: 15 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 12 1.6%
  • September

    Votes: 228 29.8%
  • October

    Votes: 93 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 11 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top