Search 57,387 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.

all these Caminos coming from SE Spain?

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Past OR future Camino
2018
Looking at the lovely Camino wall map I bought from Ivar's shop - which I spend a lot of time doing - I notice a number of Caminos emanating from the SE part of the country, north and south of Alicante. I haven't heard much about these walks. Ruta del Argar from Lorca? I am wondering if they are well-marked and/or well traveled?
 
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
Unlikely to be well-travelled, but these sorts of secondary and tertiary routes are at least partly waymarked nowadays, though you may find yourself drifting off and back on the trail from time to time.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Looking at the lovely Camino wall map I bought from Ivar's shop - which I spend a lot of time doing - I notice a number of Caminos emanating from the SE part of the country, north and south of Alicante. I haven't heard much about these walks. Ruta del Argar from Lorca? I am wondering if they are well-marked and/or well traveled?
If you look around on this forum you will find some really good information from people who have walked many of these less traveled routes. I am planning on some of these in the future as the main routes are way too crowded for me. My takeaways so far are it will definitely be a little easier if you are an experienced pilgrim, which it looks like you are. It seems extra planning is necessary. Especially because there may be long stretches between places to get food and water. There seems to be towns that may be a destination that have no services outside of a simple albergue and one must bring food. A working knowledge of Spanish. Good resources of albergues, hostels, etc. It will probably cost more money for someone like me who almost always stays in albergues or donativos. Finally and I think at the top of the list the appeal of spending days without contact with other pilgrims or a willingness to want to face that challenge and look forward to really finding out we are our own best friends. Maybe I will see you out there one day!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
1989
For what it's worth, Sara Dhooma walked the Ruta de la Lana and vlogged her journey on YouTube. The link will take you to the vlogs, so you can see what it is like. They seem relatively well-marked but not well-travelled by modern Camino Frances standards. On the plus side, once we emerge from the other side of the current situation, I would expect these routes to be the least affected, as their infrastructure wasn't reliant on a lot of pilgrims.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Looking at the lovely Camino wall map I bought from Ivar's shop - which I spend a lot of time doing - I notice a number of Caminos emanating from the SE part of the country, north and south of Alicante. I haven't heard much about these walks. Ruta del Argar from Lorca? I am wondering if they are well-marked and/or well traveled?
You’re right — the Alicante area seems to have been bombarded with many different caminos, criss-crossing each other but finally sorting things out when they get to about midpoint or a little further north in Spain. And there the routes all seem to blend in with well established routes — Francés and Sanabrés mainly.

I know these routes are all historically documented — many who arrived on the Mediterranean coast in boats started walking from their point of entry, so it’s not surprising that there are so many.

I’ve started from Valencia, Almería, and the Delta del Ebro and would recommend a GPS for all three. And since the Mozárabe, the Ebro, and the Levante are three of the “better known” untraveled routes, and I rarely met anyone, I think that you are very unlikely to see anyone on routes like the Algar. Markings vary a lot — the Mozárabe was excellent, the Levante was pretty good, and the Ebro was really hit or miss, but this was years ago, so things may have gotten better or worse. Definitely a GPS, especially if walking alone.

Which one are you tempted by @JillGat
 
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store
When the Romans developed the Iberian peninsula, their focus is treasure. If a Roman road led anywhere, it was toward wealth. Secondary was defensive locations that protected the wealth ways. Consequently, the SE of present day Spain offered the Mediterranean as in and out from Rome. The better traveled Caminos of today are often along Roman roads. The Via de la Plata (Silver road) is a good example. No wealth...no road. The scenic routes of today are likely along those roads and feature locations lost in time. The exception being the Camino to Finisterre which the Romans considered the end of the world.
 
Last edited:

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Past OR future Camino
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
You’re right — the Alicante area seems to have been bombarded with many different caminos, criss-crossing each other but finally sorting things out when they get to about midpoint or a little further north in Spain. And there the routes all seem to blend in with well established routes — Francés and Sanabrés mainly.
Most of the coastal villages between Barcelona and Cap Saint-Vincent at the southern tip of Portugal have their own particular Camino routes -- though of course the port towns Barcelona, Valencia, Alicante, Almería, Málaga, Gibraltar, and Cadiz are where the more important routes "start".
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 101 ratings
Downloads
15,186
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,867
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,671
Updated

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top