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Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#5
Such utter simplicity has great appeal, I must confess. We are so often prisoners of our stuff these days; de-cluttering has become a very popular profession. On the other hand, it's very true money doesn't buy everything - or even the most important things.

A notion to ponder while we walk.
 

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Paladina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cycled caminos francés, Finisterre, primitivo & del norte (2017); VdlP/Sanabres, ingles et al (2018)
#11
How would it be if you had plenty of funds to support you for a life time ... and all you had was a backpack and what was in it.
Backpack + Wanderlust + unlimited funds = credit card nomadism
Backpack +/- Wanderlust - unlimited funds = vagrancy (and we know how vagrants are treated)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#13
Nice! But there is something strange growing in your wine glasses!
I thought the same - presumably they drink from the bottle/can? ;)

Lordy that van is tidy, I start out like that but after a week it's a pig pen! First year of retirement, wonderful summer and I've hardly used it because it needed some parts :( Oh well, next year or maybe October if the weather stays fine.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#14
How would it be if you had plenty of funds to support you for a life time ... and all you had was a backpack and what was in it.
I enjoy traveling but I also enjoy sitting down comfortably at the end of the day - hotel beds, hardback chairs and benches don't do it for me so can I have a rucksack, all it contains and a La- Z-Boy recliner?
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#15
More so because Ian built every single thing in our van. Under instruction of management, of course
I love my van! It's my latest adventure. I sold my house to my son and I've been vanning all year long.
Loving it! Here's my new van dwelling blog. If you start back in February, you can see the changes I've made since beginning:

https://anniesantiago2.blogspot.com/
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#18
I love my van! It's my latest adventure. I sold my house to my son and I've been vanning all year long.
Loving it! Here's my new van dwelling blog. If you start back in February, you can see the changes I've made since beginning:

https://anniesantiago2.blogspot.com/
THAT is an incredibly full vehicle! Why do Americans call them "vans" though? I thought station wagon?

Couldn't live with that much gear - I've a fold down bed, sink, gas hob, microwave and a little counter top oven the French call a "four minute" which has nothing to do with time, literally "mini-oven". There's also a free standing tent-annex for longer stays.

Anybody else want to fess up to not walking all the time?
DSCF0052.JPG
 

MeandIan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May2018
#19
I thought the same - presumably they drink from the bottle/can? ;)

Lordy that van is tidy, I start out like that but after a week it's a pig pen! First year of retirement, wonderful summer and I've hardly used it because it needed some parts :( Oh well, next year or maybe October if the weather stays fine.
We’ve tried to have a home for everything in the van. And when we travel we pack minimally. In the beginning we overpacked and I had enough precooked food for a family of ten. But now we just take what we need. Plus we believe in: don’t put it down put it away. Because the space is so small
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (Zwolle, Netherlands to Rome) 2013
Camino Vienna to Santiago de Compostela 2018
#21
I have been living out of my backpack for most of the last 6 months and it is so easy. Saves time too: you never have to think about what to wear (the set that is not wet from doing laundry) and everything is within reach! But I do miss my guitar, too heavy to bring along..
I just switched from a 38 liter pack to a 22 liter pack for this month, freedom!!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#22
I have been living out of my backpack for most of the last 6 months and it is so easy. Saves time too: you never have to think about what to wear (the set that is not wet from doing laundry) and everything is within reach! But I do miss my guitar, too heavy to bring along..
I just switched from a 38 liter pack to a 22 liter pack for this month, freedom!!
So now you have space for a guitar. Or buy a mandoline ;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (Zwolle, Netherlands to Rome) 2013
Camino Vienna to Santiago de Compostela 2018
#23
So now you have space for a guitar. Or buy a mandoline ;)
I did buy a Ukulele, but on a training hike I kept being scared that it would break or that it would rip through my poncho when it rained.
My 22liter pack is pretty full also, but the size is awesome!
 

MeandIan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May2018
#24
I love my van! It's my latest adventure. I sold my house to my son and I've been vanning all year long.
Loving it! Here's my new van dwelling blog. If you start back in February, you can see the changes I've made since beginning:

https://anniesantiago2.blogspot.com/
Love your van Annie! I’ve always wanted to do vanlife but it was impossible in South Africa. So when I came to Australia and met Ian, and found that we shared likes and goals, it was like all my Christmases came all at once
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 will be Camino #14.
#25
THAT is an incredibly full vehicle! Why do Americans call them "vans" though? I thought station wagon?

Couldn't live with that much gear - I've a fold down bed, sink, gas hob, microwave and a little counter top oven the French call a "four minute" which has nothing to do with time, literally "mini-oven". There's also a free standing tent-annex for longer stays.

Anybody else want to fess up to not walking all the time?
View attachment 46172
Ha! It doesn't feel full at all! I don't have a microwave or a sink, like you do. No counter top, and plenty of space to sit and work on my computer or play my guitar or watercolor. I don't miss standing up. I do that outside. In fact, I tell people I don't live IN my van, I live OUT of my van, when I'm traveling. The 25-28 mpg helps a lot too! :)
 

Stephen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Twice walked from St Jean to Estella and once from Sarria to Santiago. Maybe someday I'll find the time to do the entire walk.
I've found the time. Just completed SJPP to Santiago. 25 Aug to 1st Oct, 2016.
And now the Portuguese from Lisbon.
#28
It's good to get back home and rest for a little while.
This thread brought to mind this from Shakespeare: If all the year were playing holidays, to sport would be as tedious as work.
 

Thomas Yingst

Caminodetom.com
Camino(s) past & future
Walking the Camino summer 2016
#30
I have been living out of my backpack for most of the last 6 months and it is so easy. Saves time too: you never have to think about what to wear (the set that is not wet from doing laundry) and everything is within reach! But I do miss my guitar, too heavy to bring along..
I just switched from a 38 liter pack to a 22 liter pack for this month, freedom!!
Need a decent acoustic guitar I can strap on my pack
 

Syncro

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francais
#31
How would it be if you had plenty of funds to support you for a life time ... and all you had was a backpack and what was in it.
This is literally my dream and it has been since I was in my teens. I would spread love and joy everywhere with words and pictures. I still believe I will do this...and I’m not that far off from achieving my dream.

Btw, the became a minimalist about 2 years ago. I gave away all of my beautiful belongings to the Salvation Army during a move. It’s another story, I won’t bore anyone with, but I will tell you, the freedom I felt from not being bogged down with possessions was amazing. Plus, I love that my donations went to a wonderful organization that helps people get back on their feet again.

Less is more!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#32
Need a decent acoustic guitar I can strap on my pack
One of my nephews recently bought himself a parlor guitar for traveling - not sure I'd want to risk it on a backpack or whether his wife knows how much it cost!
Mind you, the Martin Backpacker could come in useful if you ever need to use a canoe and haven't got a paddle ;)
 

Morgan Holmes

Every day is a path to walk.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Santiago from SJPDP (2014); Sahagún to Santiago (2018).
#34
Just a reply about “van” vs “station wagon”... the reason is that they are based on different vehicles. The SW is based on the coach-wagon that used to be sent by the grand house to pick up and drop off guests at the train station with all their many pieces of luggage.
The van is based on adaptations to small cargo vans that were common mid century for deliveries, or hauling contractor supplies (esp plumbers and electricians). If one emptied them out they easily converted to small recreational vehicles and some started to design them that way on purpose.
There was a time when the Bronco was just a covered truck, not the beast of a sport utility that it is now.
And so it goes....
My dad remembered riding in the family Packard wagon for summer holidays and said it was so big the kids could step between front and rear-facing back seats.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#35
Just a reply about “van” vs “station wagon”... the reason is that they are based on different vehicles. The SW is based on the coach-wagon that used to be sent by the grand house to pick up and drop off guests at the train station with all their many pieces of luggage.
The van is based on adaptations to small cargo vans that were common mid century for deliveries, or hauling contractor supplies (esp plumbers and electricians). If one emptied them out they easily converted to small recreational vehicles and some started to design them that way on purpose.
There was a time when the Bronco was just a covered truck, not the beast of a sport utility that it is now.
And so it goes....
My dad remembered riding in the family Packard wagon for summer holidays and said it was so big the kids could step between front and rear-facing back seats.
That's what I would have thought but Annie has one of these

1536573131460.png
Which I'd describe as a Station Wagon (Estate Car in UK, Une Voiture Break - as in Shooting Break - in France)

BTW how's the walk going?
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#37
I did buy a Ukulele, but on a training hike I kept being scared that it would break or that it would rip through my poncho when it rained.
My 22liter pack is pretty full also, but the size is awesome!
Try one of these Makala Dolphins

1536574791260.png
The back is made of resin, tough as old boots, amazing sound quality for a ridiculously low price.

Imagine how cool you'd look, poncho on and strumming one of these babies as you walk along.

Or not. :)
 

Morgan Holmes

Every day is a path to walk.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances to Santiago from SJPDP (2014); Sahagún to Santiago (2018).
#39
That's what I would have thought but Annie has one of these

View attachment 46189
Which I'd describe as a Station Wagon (Estate Car in UK, Une Voiture Break - as in Shooting Break - in France)

BTW how's the walk going?
Oh, that does look wagon-ish, but if it’s tall? I’d call it a van — like a Toyota Sienna.

Walk is all done!

Except for some upset tummy currently resolving, and apparent bed-bugs at successive points, it was all great. We begin heading home today. By tomorrow eve Santiago time, I will have at least one cat on my lap, and a visit with my much missed kiddo, and maybe even with my mum.

We’re already pondering the Portugues for 2019.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Roncesvalles-SdC Apr-Jun 2015
Roncesvalles-Sarria Sep-Oct 2017
(2019: Planning to return!)
#40
That's what I would have thought but Annie has one of these

View attachment 46189
Which I'd describe as a Station Wagon (Estate Car in UK, Une Voiture Break - as in Shooting Break - in France)

BTW how's the walk going?
I think this is one of those classic US/UK (and some others!) terminology differences. The kind of vehicle called a minivan in the US is generally called a people mover or people carrier in the UK (and here in NZ) - bit bigger than a station wagon, usually more seats. Whereas for me (UK-born, now in NZ) what I would call a van is much more of a commercial vehicle, panel van kind of thing. Minivan makes me think of those little white delivery vans seen everywhere in rural Spain. Don't you love the English language?!

(Edit - PS: @Anniesantiago I love your wheeled home, whatever we call it! Such an adventure!)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#42
I think this is one of those classic US/UK (and some others!) terminology differences. The kind of vehicle called a minivan in the US is generally called a people mover or people carrier in the UK (and here in NZ) - bit bigger than a station wagon, usually more seats. Whereas for me (UK-born, now in NZ) what I would call a van is much more of a commercial vehicle, panel van kind of thing. Minivan makes me think of those little white delivery vans seen everywhere in rural Spain. Don't you love the English language?!

(Edit - PS: @Anniesantiago I love your wheeled home, whatever we call it! Such an adventure!)
Now THIS is a Mini Van:

1536611179307.png

;);)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#50
Why three? You can only drive one at a time! at least they got four wheels!
Hahaha, first one was my grandmom's yellow one with just 600ccm (from the memory, which isn't really what it's used to be, I mean the memory not the car). And then I had a dark blue and red one with 850ccm's. Huh, what a blast :D

I liked those "umbrella shift sticks" in R4s:
https://www.google.si/search?q=R4+prestavna+ročica&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwikq-yk37HdAhWJw4sKHSYADOkQ_AUICigB&biw=1366&bih=662#imgrc=2x9hMje9iBgEiM:
For smokers it was great because you kept hand on that shift (with a cig) and there, just 5-10cm to the windshield there was an ashtray. Ideal.

And the R4 had sliding windows too! :D


PS (If you are interested there is a thread about R4 I started with lots of pics because I do photo of every R4 that I come across in Spain.)
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#51
AHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA, Rodney didn't either ;)

I had three of these and there were, ahem, well... you know... no problems ;)
View attachment 46206
Amazing piece of kit. A guy in Exeter (UK) used to install Steyr Puch rear axles to turn them into 4 x 4s.

Even when Renault "stopped" making them they were churning them out for the Gendarmerie.
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Coast - March 2019
Camino(s) past & future
March-April,2016 finished
March 2019 the Portugal Coastal Route
#52
I lived out of a ruck sack for 5 years traveling around the U S. This was back in the 60's and 70's. Now people would call me homeless. But then a hippie, hobo, traveler. I worked for meals, sometimes for cash. When I met the woman I was going to marry I settled down. We are now close to retirement. .we purchased a 16 ft trailer to travel and live in and travel in the U S and Canada. We plan on walking at least 3 Caminos in the next 5 years and the body holds up. My wife recently had mentioned trekking around the world. I love that woman.
 

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