A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Alternative to Cruz de Ferro

0 Euro Camino Bank Note
Camino(s) past & future
September [2019}
Hola Peregrinos,
Making my first foray into the Camino world in September. With limited time and commitments, (both of which sound like bogus excuses for not taking a longer leave of my home country) and compadres needs to consider, I (we) will be starting at Sarria with a view to make it to Fisterra. Whilst I have made my peace with not being able to, at this point in my life, make it anywhere near Cruz de Ferro, I feel a certain yearning to be mindful of my life's shortcomings during my journey, as well as being in complete gratitude for every step, and somewhere, lay a stone, offering it all up to the universe. Would anyone be able to offer an alternative cruz between Sarria and SdC? I have something aside to go back to the oceans in Muxia but am also drawn to the ritual of the cross and the symbolism behind it.
Welcoming any suggestions from the community.
Gracias por leer!
Saludos
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes/Burgos/SdeC 77; Frances 12,15,17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes/Aragones 18; Meseta 19.
Dont beat yourself up too much over missing the Cruz de Ferro. I've been there three times and it's never been what I might have liked it to be.... The noisy vans, the school-kid crowds, the whole "Please -- take my photo?!" business, all conspired to strip it of any trace of the odor of sanctity.... Not the best place for prayer or meditative reflection.

You can do much better. One possibility? If you are carrying on from SdeC? Just past the point at which the path to Fisterra divides from the path to Muxia, on the path to Fisterra, stands a truely majestic and completely isolated cruceiro. Stop for a spell. Rest. Absorb the silence. Consider how truely blessed you are to be able to be there, then offer your stone to, well... 'the universe'.
 
Last edited:

Kat Kostrzewska

Online guide https://caminodesantiagobybike.co.uk
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2006, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2018), Via Tolosana (2012) Camino Norte (2014)
Cruz de Ferro is often crowded, that's true. However if you are blessed to be there by yourself (and it can happen even in season) then you will never forget it because it is like standing at the foot of Golgota.

But do not worry - I think that I have a place you are looking for - Cruceiro de Lameiros. Let me quote my own guidebook https://caminodesantiagobybike.co.uk/guidebook/13-samos-to-melide-75-90-km/

"When you pass the tiny hamlet of Lameiros, you will see a stone cross on your left, considered the most famous on the Camino Frances. It depicts the Virgin and Child on one side and the Passion and Our Lady of Sorrows on the other. The depiction of Mary as a mother looks almost as if was worked by a 20th-century sculptor. Cruceiro de Lameiros was founded in the 17th century by Ulloa – the famous medieval noble family from Galicia. The family ruled this part of Galicia – their coats of arms decorate two houses in the villages on the Camino. 3 km from Ventas de Naron you will go past Ligonde (630m; 52.50 km→1.20 km to Eirexe), a village that had two Kings staying in the 16th century."

Famous cross is midway between Sarria and Santiago:)
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe (01/2019)
SJPdP- Meseta (28/09/2019)
I'm mindful of my own offering I carried from home. Had expected too leave it at iron cross but it didn't feel that I was in the right place and some time later at Castrojeriz the right time presented itself so I presented to another pilgrim. Your 'alternative' can exceed your expectations 🙏🤠
 

Chenahusky

Happy Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
CFSJPP to SDC 2016
CIng x 2 2018
CPort. Tui May 2019
CF Ponf. June 2019
CPort Tui "2020"
CIng "2020"
Personally,I think I prefer almost anywhere else on the Camino. And, if the weather is not on your side you will see what I mean! You will pass many Cruceiro's on your route, some big and some small. They all mean something to somebody. Big is not always best.
Have a wonderful Camino, keep it simple and keep it happy.
 

Attachments

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
"When you pass the tiny hamlet of Lameiros, you will see a stone cross on your left, considered the most famous on the Camino Frances. It depicts the Virgin and Child on one side and the Passion and Our Lady of Sorrows on the other.
I wasn't going to comment in this thread but I'm really curious. Where is the Virgin and Child depicted on the cruceiro of Lameiros? Every image I see shows the crucified Jesus on one side and Mary holding the dead body of her own son on the other side. The base shows the instruments of the Passion, ie the instruments with which Jesus was tortured and later removed from the cross. Of course, one can give any kind of meaning to anything nowadays but the original meaning of the cruceiro is quite clear ...

Whether this is the best place to offer something to the Universe is another question altogether, of course.

Screenshot 2019-08-06 at 18.35.19.png
 
Last edited:

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I found Cruz de Ferro do be completely underwhelming. I don't know what kind of photographic tricks were used in the movie The Way to make it look majestic, but it was quite disappointing to see it in person. It's a small cross surrounded by rubble and litter. Find a beautiful spot that speaks to you to leave your stone.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
For an interesting discussion on the Cruz and its significance some might find this older thread interesting https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/is-this-true.26343/#post-210386.

This is not to denigrate the tradition that has developed of laying a stone at the Cruz as a symbol of a burden carried and now laid down. I've been there and done that and I walked down that mountain with a lighter heart. I could have carried my friends departed to the sundering seas and set them sail. An older tradition. I could have lit candles to help light their way to Heaven. I could have spilt wine for their blood and lit a fire for their sparks... I chose to carry two stones of some significance and weight and to lay them on the cairn that rises by the Way about half-way between Foncebadon and Manjarin. Not because of some pagan necessity or modern requirement but because I chose to. What others do at the Cruz and why they do it - be it lay down a burden or take a selfie for the blog is not within my compass.

I'm minded that, over time, places of no significance at all acquire significance because so many people attribute it: that rituals acquire significance by repetition - and that social media or a movie can help create a ritual in a matter of weeks: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_lock.

Suggestions here: that the OP find their own place to lay down their burden(s), or let that place find them, are good and kindly. First carry that burden 'till you know it, then bear it as a friend and, when its time and place come, then lay it down.
 

Kat Kostrzewska

Online guide https://caminodesantiagobybike.co.uk
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2006, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2018), Via Tolosana (2012) Camino Norte (2014)
Internet may sometimes create a bit of confusion.

Cross of Lameiros depicts the Passion and the Virgin and the Child, while on the pedestal are Christ, with the symbols of his Passion and His feet and Mary again this time as Our Lady of Sorrows.

Clear photos of Cruceiro de Lameiros has on his website Pilgrim Michael https://michaelspilgrimage.wordpress.com/tag/lameiros/

I hope that it will resolve doubts:)
 

Anthony18

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
Having recently arrived from the CF, I can tell you that Cruz de Ferro was a major highlight for me-but I was fortunate to have it all to myself for a good 10 min. If you arrive with throngs of people there, it will be underwhelming-that happened to me at Alto de Perdon. Summer camps with kids everywhere. I agree with Tincatinker suggestions at the end of his reply to this thread. You'll know in your heart when and where to lay what you bring.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Internet may sometimes create a bit of confusion.
Cross of Lameiros depicts the Passion and the Virgin and the Child, while on the pedestal are Christ, with the symbols of his Passion and His feet and Mary again this time as Our Lady of Sorrows.
Clear photos of Cruceiro de Lameiros has on his website Pilgrim Michael https://michaelspilgrimage.wordpress.com/tag/lameiros/
I hope that it will resolve doubts
That just confirms what I suspected and already knew about the internet 😂. Descriptions are copied from one place to the next, mistakes and all. Never mind. It doesn't really matter ... :(

But if, after all, you want to correct your guide, have another look, either at the Cruceiro on site or at the detailed photos here: https://www.christianiconography.info/spain2005/cruzeiroLigonde.html . Mary appears only once and not twice on the Cruceiro and she is holding the body of Jesus after he has been taken from the cross and not Jesus as a child. Just look at the position of his arms, his hair, the crown of thorns he is still wearing ... exactly the way he is depicted on the opposite side of the Cruceiro.
 
Last edited:

Texas Walker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2017 summer)
Portugues (2015)
Frances (2014)
That just confirms what I suspected and already knew about the internet 😂 and how descriptions are copied from one place to the next, mistakes and all. Never mind. It doesn't really matter ... :(

But if, after all, you want to correct your guide, have another look, either in the field or perhaps here: https://www.christianiconography.info/spain2005/cruzeiroLigonde.html
And the skull/bones beneath the cross refers to an ancient tradition that Adam (himself) was buried at the place later called Golgotha. I have always taken this as a mystical interpretation myself, but YMMV. The skull is included in many paintings of the Crucifixion. Which are works of art. As are the many ancient crucifix style waymarkers along the path. (I think I remember that they appear also at various points near the end of the Portugues also. At this point, don't remember whether they're also near the end of the Norte--but that merges into the Frances near the end anyway.) The crosses had the Pieta/taking down from the Cross on the reverse side. It seems to be a constant element, this juxtaposition of the Crucifixion and the Pieta on the old stone crosses.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September [2019}
Thank you all so much for your input. Such a wide expanse of knowledge and experience resides on this forum with it's members! So honest and willing to share.
Much of what you all mentioned resonated with me. I just hadn't thought to make this ritual for, and from myself, not doing it for it's own sake.
I honestly feel differently about the 'stone' since reading your comments and can now say that I don't know where I'll lay my burden down... but wherever it is, it will be the right place and the right time.
Thank you also for the information about the cruceiros. I'll get busy reading. :D
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
My thoughts are mirrored by others on this thread...walk and you will know where you want to leave your stone.
Cruz was a special place for me...no others around but my son and I. The pile of stones and rubble touched me as I envisioned the sincerity and prayers of the majority who left their tokens.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Cruz de Ferro was a nice place for us. It wasn't foggy, the sun was shining. There were no vans, no busses, no groups, just a few people - some of them on foot and others in cars - who came and went. They walked up the pile of stones, looked around a bit at what was on the ground, and left again. It was pleasantly quiet.

I subscribe to the lesser known narrative of the seasonal Galician reapers and therefore I wasn’t particularly attracted by any symbolism. I was a bit curious to see whether I would be overwhelmed by it all, though. It turned out that I wasn't but I know that others were since they report it and some even have themselves photographed in a kneeling praying position next to the wooden pole or have their emotions and tears recorded on video and then put it online to share with us. It is what it is.

So for me the Cruz de Ferro remained a pile of stones with a weirdly long mast on it, topped by a metal cross that you can barely see. In fact it was just a mountain top with a cross on it, like you can find them on many mountain tops in the Alps. An unusual thing was there, too: a large sun dial on the ground on which you can stand and work out the time in hours and minutes with the help of your own shadow. Also a pleasant shaded picnic area with trees, tables and benches where you can enjoy a long rest. And a mountain stream spring nearby (if you have PocketEarth to discover it) with possibly the nicest tasting natural spring water on the whole Camino Frances.

I might stop there again but I wouldn't beat myself up if it were not possible. Have a very good camino, @WalkingGoddess!

Cruz de Ferro sun dial:
Cruz de Ferro sundial.jpg
 
Last edited:

Kat Kostrzewska

Online guide https://caminodesantiagobybike.co.uk
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2006, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2018), Via Tolosana (2012) Camino Norte (2014)
WalkingGoddess I am sure that you will find the right place to leave all of your fears, sorrows, hopes and thanksgiving.

Wish you Buen Camino from all my heart!

I miss the Way so much...
 

GraemeHall

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: St-Jean-PdP - Santiago dC - Muxía - Fisterra (Aug 2017 and March/April 2018)
Off topic relative to the OP's question...but I was at El Cruz de Ferro on 11 April last year. I arrived quite early, there was a lot of snow, but I was completely alone for half an hour except for God and some birds. One of the most memorable half-hours of my life.
I left my stone and its associated burdens, and as I left I collected a small one from the roadside. This one and its associated blessing mow have pride of place in our garden. 20180411_084107.jpg 20180411_083522.jpg
 

MarkyD

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
Hola Peregrinos,
Making my first foray into the Camino world in September. With limited time and commitments, (both of which sound like bogus excuses for not taking a longer leave of my home country) and compadres needs to consider, I (we) will be starting at Sarria with a view to make it to Fisterra. Whilst I have made my peace with not being able to, at this point in my life, make it anywhere near Cruz de Ferro, I feel a certain yearning to be mindful of my life's shortcomings during my journey, as well as being in complete gratitude for every step, and somewhere, lay a stone, offering it all up to the universe. Would anyone be able to offer an alternative cruz between Sarria and SdC? I have something aside to go back to the oceans in Muxia but am also drawn to the ritual of the cross and the symbolism behind it.
Welcoming any suggestions from the community.
Gracias por leer!
Saludos
A good place would be at the feet of the statues of the two pilgrims on Monte do Gozo. There are many stones, shells, ribbons and messages there already. It has a lovely "vibe" to it, in my opinion.
IMG-20181015-WA0019.jpg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015

Anthony18

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019

Telboyo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I intend to leave the UK the day Before Brexit and walkMarch -April 2019 Camino Frances
Personally,I think I prefer almost anywhere else on the Camino. And, if the weather is not on your side you will see what I mean! You will pass many Cruceiro's on your route, some big and some small. They all mean something to somebody. Big is not always best.
Have a wonderful Camino, keep it simple and keep it happy.
Totally agree
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I just hadn't thought to make this ritual for, and from myself, not doing it for it's own sake.
I'm pleased to read this. I understand the importance of a ritual act of letting go. It is also good to realise that one doesn't have to act out other people's scripts, or a movie script, or follow a tradition that isn't ancient after all. Nothing wrong with new traditions, of course.

I have grown fond of the cruceiros of Galicia and feel a bit protective. Pilgrims don't have to pay attention to them or learn about them but when they are used as props I feel it would be only right if they knew why they are there and what story they are telling.

When you walk the Camino Frances, you see heaps and heaps of stones piled at the foot of crosses and sometimes even on their arms. Initially I thought it's a local habit. It is not - locals deposit flowers. I wonder whether they all represent prayers and laid down burdens or whether pilgrims just give in to the powerful urge to imitate or wrongly believe it's the thing to do. And while it starts with stones, it doesn't take long until the photos and the small gadgets appear and eventually the discarded shoes follow. I've removed several pairs of such shoes from the base of ancient crosses and consider it as my duty. I don't care about the noble intentions of the donor.

An article of a few years ago says that the habit is firmly established on the Camino Frances now and has started to spread to the Camino Ingles. The inhabitants of Vizoño didn't know what to do about their cruceiro in view of the annual feast of their patron saint: they would like to have a tidy cruceiro but they are also respectful of the "gifts" that pilgrims had deposited (see photos below). One piece of paper at the foot of the cruceiro even said: "I don't understand this but why not?" I know what I would do if I lived in Vizoño ... btw, having looked at quite a few photos, I get the impression that the beautiful cruceiro of Lameiros near Ligonde does get cleaned of the deposited stones from time to time.

As I said, nothing wrong with new traditions and I don't want to criticise them as such. Having read the recommendations, I feel however that this thread needs a bit of a counterbalance ... and I did register the moderator's earlier subtle warning. So this is not addressed to you personally, @WalkingGoddess but more generally to readers and their potential recommendations. 😌

Vizoño:

Vizono.jpg
 
Last edited:

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
@Kathar1na, the word is cruceiro.:)
😂. It must be my bad pronunciation in Spanish or because I've read cruciero too many times in non-Spanish travel blogs. I think I caught them all and have corrected them now ... Thank you!
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Is the Cruceiro Marco do Couto on the way to Fisterra one of the suggestions? La Voz de Galicia has this to say: Leaving stones is ok for places like the Cruz de Ferro where it is already part of its identity and which is one of the classic landmarks of the Camino itinerary, but it is not ok for century old stone crosses. The reason they give is damage to the base due to overloading and movement of the base stones (and no doubt damage to the base when it is decorated with sculptures; erosion is bad enough as it is), in addition to the aesthetic issue. See here.

Of course, anyone here would only leave a tiny pebble but as the saying goes: Nip it in the bud. There is so much other space between SJPP and Fisterra ... and even between Sarria and Fisterra. ☺

Here's the whole range throughout several years, including the textile feature in 2015 and the footwear feature in 2016, with stones that appear and are removed again. It seems that a major effort of cleaning up the site was made in 2018/2019 and all the pebbles and rocks are gone! For a while ...

2015:2018.jpg
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes/Burgos/SdeC 77; Frances 12,15,17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes/Aragones 18; Meseta 19.
Is the Cruceiro de Marco do Couto on the way to Fisterra one of the recommendations?
That is almost certainly the crucerio I was thinking of, in re my earlier post! (See Item #3, above.) Perhaps best to leave one's stone elsewhere...! 'The universe' won't mind either way.

(I'm not into the stone thing, myself.)
 
Last edited:

Tony Maguire

Member
Camino(s) past & future
20th August 2014
Dont beat yourself up too much over missing the Cruz de Ferro. I've been there three times and it's never been what I might have liked it to be.... The noisy vans, the school-kid crowds, the whole "Take my photo?!" business, stripped it of any trace of the odor of sanctity.... Not the best place for prayer or meditative reflection.

You can do much better. One possibility? If you are carrying on from SdeC? Just past the point at which the path to Fisterra divides from the path to Muxia, on the path to Fisterra, stands a truely majestic and completely isolated cruceiro. Stop for a spell. Rest. Absorb the silence. Consider how truely blessed you are to be able to be there, offer your stone to, well... 'the universe'.
Ive been to Cruz de Ferro 3 times also and have always found it to be a very emotional experience. Thoughts of family and friends I left at home come flooding to me ad do thoughts and memories of family and friends that jave passed.... I am already looking forward ho my 4th visit to The Cruz sometime in late September
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2015) and (2019)
Some of the above confirm my deeply spiritual encounter with the Cruciero Leimeiros. I, too, was unable to walk by the Cruz de Fero and found the ancient, weathered stone cross near Leimeiros. It literally pulled me off the Camino and I knew it was the sacred space to leave my burden of sorrow rock. I spent well over an hour there, wandering around the cross studying every detail through tears that welled up from my soul. I sat under the huge grizzled oak tree deep in wrenching emotions that I still can't define with words. It is very true that certain sacred places will call to you. I hope the OP finds that special place on their own Camino just as I did. I slowly left that cross, looking back over my shoulder for a while trying to comprehend what I had been through. I was blessed to have that time almost uninterrupted to experience those treasured moments. They have made all the difference in my life!
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
That is almost certainly the crucerio I was thinking of, in re my earlier post! (See Item #3, above.) Perhaps best to leave one's stone elsewhere...!? 'The universe' won't mind either way. (I'm not into the stone thing, myself.)
It seemed like a good idea at first but on further reflection ... ☺.

I've been intrigued by this habit since the day I stood in puzzlement in front of the Croix Thibault on the way up on the Route Napoleon. The article that I quoted earlier says: "Es una vieja costumbre peregrina que en algunos lugares". My Spanish isn't that good. Does this mean "it is an old pilgrim custom only in some places"? I'd be very grateful if someone could tell me whether this is correct. It would confirm what I've read about this in other sources than contemporary camino guides and blogs and vlogs.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
It seemed like a good idea at first but on further reflection ... ☺.

I've been intrigued by this habit since the day I stood in puzzlement in front of the Croix Thibault on the way up on the Route Napoleon. The article that I quoted earlier says: "Es una vieja costumbre peregrina que en algunos lugares". My Spanish isn't that good. Does this mean "it is an old pilgrim custom only in some places"? I'd be very grateful if someone could tell me whether this is correct. It would confirm what I've read about this in other sources than contemporary camino guides and blogs and vlogs.
The two phrases don't mean the same.
The first one is incomplete. Could continue like this: "..que en algunos lugares se depositen piedras".
The second phrase in Spanish is"Es una antigua costumbre solo en algunos lugares".
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
The first one is incomplete. Could continue like this: "..que en algunos lugares se depositen piedras".
Thank you. The passage goes like this: Es una vieja costumbre peregrina que en algunos lugares, y puede tener algún sentido en lugares como la Cruz de Ferro, que ya son parte de su identidad y es uno de los hitos clásicos del itinerario, pero no sobre cruceiros centenarios de piedra que además pueden verse afectados por cargas y movimientos sobrevenidos, al margen de la cuestión estética.

I tried to find something about this grammatical use of "que" in Spanish but without success and I take it from your reply that's it's a bit unusual. Or even wrong?
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
'The universe' won't mind either way.
This nice comment reminded me that I sometimes feel if there is something like parallel universes it's on the Camino de Santiago. ☺

A proper guidebook on the Camino de Santiago which, I think, is largely well researched and knowledgeable about Camino and Spain but has the (for me ominous sounding) words "Sacred Sites" in the title, describes the Cruceiro de Lameiros (see above) as standing near an ancient and venerated [sic] oak. The base of the cross shows engravings of a mason's building tools on one side and a skull and bones on another. [...] The oak tree and the cross are echoes of the same idea. The oak is an ancient pagan representation of an axis mundi, a portal that connects earth with heaven and serves as a spiritual highway from one realm to the other. [...] Similarly, the cruceiro's base is planted in the mortal earthly realm, represented both by the mason's tools and the bones. The pillar is the portal, and the cross at the top represents the heavens.

A really, erm, universal view ...
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Thank you. The passage goes like this: Es una vieja costumbre peregrina que en algunos lugares, y puede tener algún sentido en lugares como la Cruz de Ferro, que ya son parte de su identidad y es uno de los hitos clásicos del itinerario, pero no sobre cruceiros centenarios de piedra que además pueden verse afectados por cargas y movimientos sobrevenidos, al margen de la cuestión estética.

I tried to find something about this grammatical use of "que" in Spanish but without success and I take it from your reply that's it's a bit unusual. Or even wrong?
It's wrong. The phrase makes sense without the "que".
 

Lindsay53

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances April / May 19
Having recently arrived from the CF, I can tell you that Cruz de Ferro was a major highlight for me-but I was fortunate to have it all to myself for a good 10 min. If you arrive with throngs of people there, it will be underwhelming-that happened to me at Alto de Perdon. Summer camps with kids everywhere. I agree with Tincatinker suggestions at the end of his reply to this thread. You'll know in your heart when and where to lay what you bring.
I was fortunate enough to have a similar experience. I arrived early on a foggy morning and for about 5 minutes had the place to myself, then another pilgrim arrived who waited at the foot of the mound as I finished my contemplation after placing my stone. A few minutes later and the vans and buses began to arrive....definitely time to leave.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lourdes/Burgos/SdeC 77; Frances 12,15,17; Finisterre 17; Lourdes/Aragones 18; Meseta 19.
This nice comment reminded me that I sometimes feel if there is something like parallel universes it's on the Camino de Santiago. ☺

A proper guidebook on the Camino de Santiago which, I think, is largely well researched and knowledgeable about Camino and Spain but has the (for me ominous sounding) words "Sacred Sites" in the title...
Good heavens! Which guide book is that?! I want it! Does Ivar sell copies? ... And does it say anything about the Sundering Seas? ;)

 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
Which guide book is that?! I want it! Does Ivar sell copies? ... And does it say anything about the Sundering Seas? ;)
On the whole, I have a good impression of this guidebook so I won't name them to spare them any potential embarrassment. But I just had to share this. 😇
 

J F Gregory

Portugal Central - October 2019
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (March-April,2016) finished, (October 2019) Portuguese Central Route.
We were at the Crus de Ferro on our winter walk and we were the only people there. It was a Holy place for us . I had the previous day heard that one of my dear friends that I went to school had passed into everlasting life. We left a stone in memory of Cal and prayed for his family that was left.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
(I think I remember that they appear also at various points near the end of the Portugues also. [...] The crosses had the Pieta/taking down from the Cross on the reverse side. It seems to be a constant element, this juxtaposition of the Crucifixion and the Pieta on the old stone crosses.
Now that the question of the first poster has been answered, I hope she doesn't object when this line is pursued a little bit further. There's a good article about ornamented cruceiros that show imagery from the Passion of Christ and, often, the Original Sin. The author is called Lily Arad and the title is Jerusalem in Galicia: From the Navel of the World to the Ends of the Earth. It costs something like $25 to read but it also pops up in books.google.com, about 20 pages, and can be read for free without any pages being omitted. ☺

It describes these Passion cruceiros as a unique monument type that is characteristic of the material and religious culture of Galicia and Northern Portugal and investigates what kinds of memory they keep and what they are witnessing.

Apparently, until about 1550, the image of the Virgin holding the Child on one side was paired with the Crucifixion on the other side but thereafter the Pietà predominates, "with the Virgin bearing a disproportionately small figure of her dead son". That's exactly what you see in Lameiros. I can understand that people if they look at it at all, may think it's Mary holding a baby, hence numerous blogs on the internet that claim that it represents maternidad o vida - maternity or life!!! And even the editors of Gitlitz/Davidson didn't notice that there was a kind of erroneous doublespeak in their paragraph on p. 325.

It all had to do with the Counter-Reformation and it is also the reason why there are at least 27 places called 'Calvary' (Calvario) in Galicia, far more than in any other region in Spain.

I'll have to look at my photos again. Usually, the sun is in a bad place when I take a picture, the sculptures are high up and eroded, you can barely make out any features. Maybe I can see more now. 🙂
 
Last edited:

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 6 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 43 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 165 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 265 24.4%
  • June

    Votes: 83 7.7%
  • July

    Votes: 21 1.9%
  • August

    Votes: 23 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 311 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 133 12.3%
  • November

    Votes: 13 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.6%
Top