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Alto del Perdon

Alex M

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan for 2017 - Sarria to Santiago
I noticed before taking the downhill path that there was a pedestrian option on the left and a cycle option on the right. I took the former. Has any pedestrian taken the cycle option? I'd like to pass any thoughts on this to friends who at doing Camino shortly. Kindly resist the temptation of making comments like: "What? You can't be serious! I waltzed down that in my sleep" etc. Thanks.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdeP-FIN(09/2018)
PORTO-SANT(11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe(01/2019)
SJPdeP- SANT(09/2019)
Madrid(7/2020)
I'm not sure what your asking, the mount of forgiveness is my favourite part of the Francè and I've taken both paths on the descent and both are reasonably steep but can be easily negotiated on a mountain bike or if too hairy it doesn't take long to walk with bike. Its my understanding that theres also a public road that leads from motorway which might be another option.Btw, I tumbled down it in my sleep but found forgiveness in my life 🤠
 

Terry Callery

Chi Walker
Camino(s) past & future
"Portuguese Camino - In Search of the Infinite Moment" Amazon/Kindle books authored
"Slow Camino"
On all my three caminos I choose to walk on the better graded roads, than on the rocky pilgrim pathways whenever possible i.e. roads with little traffic.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
I didn't waltze down it but I certainly didn't have any particular difficulty and I still wonder why so many people think that it is difficult.

I picked my path so as to avoid the biggest rocks, sometimes taking the narrower side shortcuts but other than that did not take any specific care.

I didn't notice two paths so I can't say which one I took. One cyclist did pass me going down but there were also lots of other walkers, most of whom were walking much slower than I and so I passed them.

In NZ we encounter "scree" quite often in the mountains and so perhaps I am just more used to walking in those conditions. I put my feet down heel first and this does seem to help me.

The people I passed seemed, to me, to be trying too hard to avoid the stones and that made it more complicated and difficult for them whereas I just stepped into the stones.

Not sure if this helps or not?
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015, 2017, 2019) and plans for 2021 (Sept, Oct)
The rocky descent to Uterga is brutal! During our camino last fall, no doubt this contributed to my four black toes and I eventually lost all four toenails. Great to know that there is an option to just walk a roadway to Uterga! We will likely try this during our camino this fall.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Has anyone encountered a set of giant sized steps on the left side of the scree?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I’ve walked down the hill more times than I can count with no problems at all. I just watch where I put my feet. Its not hard to miss rocks and find stable footing if you are slow and cautious. It’s not a particularly long descent and the entire trail is not rocky. I certainly wouldn’t call it ‘scree.’ You CAN take a taxi down, which is often waiting.

I’ve never worn boots on the Camino. I wear New Balance trail runners every year.
 
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CaminoTrails

Camino Trails
Camino(s) past & future
(2017) (2018) (2020) all on the Camino Frances.
Hubby and I took this path down and we were wearing our hiking boots that we wear when we backpack the Sierras of California. If I would have worn regular sneakers, then there would have been no way to make it down safely. It's not that it's steep, it's your footing that you have to be careful with. There are many rocks, but it's do-able if you take your time since you got nothing but time. Otherwise, if you want to prevent from getting any injuries, then yes, by all means, take a different path - never forget, it's your Camino and you ultimately have to decide for yourself. There's no shame in not taking this path because the French Camino is not the original Camino and many of the French way has been re-routed to take paths through small towns for tourism. I love the Camino and I'm planning on going again in May, God willing if the coronavirus doesn't shut it down. Take care and Buen Camino.
 

owms2323

Credential question
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances (2014) Camino Frances (2016) Camino Finisterre/Muxia (2017)
I’ve walked down the hill more times than I can count with no problems at all. I just watch where I put my feet. Its not hard to miss rocks and find stable footing if you are slow and cautious. It’s not a particularly long descent and the entire trail is not rocky. I certainly wouldn’t call it ‘scree.’ You CAN take a taxi down, which is often waiting.

I’ve never worn boots on the Camino. I wear New Balance trail runners every year.
Which NB due you wear? I did my first CF in 2014 and wore the Ultra 910's. They don't make them anymore.
 

gerip

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, Lourdes to Burgos, Oct 2018
CF, Burgos to Santiago, May 2019
Ingles, Sep - Oct 2019
I noticed before taking the downhill path that there was a pedestrian option on the left and a cycle option on the right. I took the former. Has any pedestrian taken the cycle option? I'd like to pass any thoughts on this to friends who at doing Camino shortly. Kindly resist the temptation of making comments like: "What? You can't be serious! I waltzed down that in my sleep" etc. Thanks.
I realize that in the end I can always get to my destination more quickly by taking the paved route, as it's usually not that much longer than the footpath. So next time I'll be taking the road, thank you.
 

Lucyk

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo 2015
I walked down the footpath in Hoka trail runners last year around this time, and no walking poles. It required all my concentration but was not particularly difficult, nor did I feel myself to be in any danger. Conditions were dry, which I am sure helps. At the time I was very ill, though i didn't realize quite how ill I was until later. I'm in my fifties and not especially fit, nor was I used to any sort of hiking. And it was my first day.
 

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