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An Alcohol-Free Camino?

markvanoss

New Member
Reading some of these "Camino Chronicles," it sometimes seems like the wine never stops flowing! Any tips (or experience to share) concerning an alcohol-free experience? (Leaving SJPP May 19)
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Easy to do...order lemonade!

Now on a more serious note:

Many of the folks that I traveled with did not drink any alcohol. That didn't diminish the experience for anyone.

In my youth, I didn't drink more than a glass of wine with supper. Later in life, much later, I developed a taste for fine single malt whisky. Today, I'm back to the vino.

As with anything in life...you need to take responsibility for your own actions.

Buen Camino,

Arn
 

vinotinto

Active Member
markvanoss said:
Any tips (or experience to share) concerning an alcohol-free experience? (Leaving SJPP May 19)

Well, if I could make it though six years in the Marines without drinking a drop, then you should be able to do thirty dry days on the Way (I didn't start imbibing until my 30s, and only then after my first year in seminary. But I digress). There's plenty of soda and other non-alki stuff along the Way (the coffee is great - try cafe con leche with some azucar [I think that's spanish for sugar]).

That said, the only day on the Camino that I didn't drink alcohol is the only day I got sick. Since Paul advised Timothy to "take a little wine for your stomach's sake" in the Bible, I recommend that you bring along some bismuth and/or apple cider vinegar tablets to coat your gut and help protect you from the nasties (yogurt will also help you adjust to the local bacteria - can't remember the brand, but I often enjoyed a pina colada/tropical flavored bottle of drinkable yogurt).

Best regards,

VT
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
Mark,
I don't drink alcohol and it was never any problem. When a meal is served in a restaurant there is almost always a jug of water there alongside the wine. In the mornings I used to have the equivalent of a hot chocolate in a bar- except it has another name- (cola cao con leche perhaps?). When I felt like a fizzy drink I found kas limone to be delicious and available everywhere. Nobody ever comments on the fact you are not having wine..... you can drink whatever you prefer.
Margaret
 

crhutch

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2010) March/April SJPP to Santiago and hence to Finisterre
(2016) Hospitalero Grañón 15-31 March
(2016) April Logroño to Santiago
(2017) Hospitalero Zamora 15-31 March
(2017) Hospilatero Emaus, Burgos 1-14 April
Vinotinto wrote:
Well, if I could make it though six years in the Marines without drinking a drop,

Glad to see you came over to the dark side 8)..must have been an interesting six years without a drop

My wife and I will toast to you when we get to Bordeaux especially since you gave us the idea to stop there before heading to SJPP.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
markvanoss said:
Reading some of these "Camino Chronicles," it sometimes seems like the wine never stops flowing! Any tips (or experience to share) concerning an alcohol-free experience? (Leaving SJPP May 19)

I am not exactly sure if the OP is asking how to avoid drinking alchohol himself.....or how to avoid SEEING others do it????

I am not sure where the ..."sometimes seems like the wine never stops flowing!"...
comes from. I do not drink and can't say that I noticed any type of excessive wine drinking. Some people drank wine with dinner and some, like me, drank water. Not a big deal and I never saw anyone drunk at any time. Alcohol was not a big deal.

If the point was to not see or be near anyone who might have a glass of wine, I would suggest buying your own food at a grocery store and eating in a park. Most meals are only obtainable in bars along the way so unless you wore eyeshades it will be difficult. :wink:
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
As a tee totaller, my drink of choice after a hard and hot day's walking in Spain was a refreshing Kas Limon (in France I had Limonade)

cheers, Janet
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
I can't help you. The Fuente del Vino was my main reason for going.
 

rolf

Member
same here... and everytime I get to Iratche the fountain is broken, no wine, should that be a sign to stop drinking or just another reason to walk the camino again?
I met many people not drinking anything at all, and we still had great evenings together, so alcohol or not is no real issue on the camino.
 

vinotinto

Active Member
crhutch said:
My wife and I will toast to you when we get to Bordeaux especially since you gave us the idea to stop there before heading to SJPP.

Salud! I hope you have as good a time there as I did. Rick Steves thinks it's kind of a boring town, but to me, if one loves vino, then Bordeaux is a must-visit...:)

Cheers,

VT
 

crhutch

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2010) March/April SJPP to Santiago and hence to Finisterre
(2016) Hospitalero Grañón 15-31 March
(2016) April Logroño to Santiago
(2017) Hospitalero Zamora 15-31 March
(2017) Hospilatero Emaus, Burgos 1-14 April
VT, where did you sign up for the "sideways" tour? Also how far is the Ibis hotel from the train station? I read Rick Steves' account too, but like you I like my vino :D
 

vinotinto

Active Member
crhutch said:
VT, where did you sign up for the "sideways" tour?

Nah - I tried to get on a tour the day of, but when I got to the tourist office they told me it was full. All the more reason to return one day... :wink:

crhutch said:
Also how far is the Ibis hotel from the train station?

Probably about 500 meters or so to the right of the station front door. The odd thing about the Ibis deal was that when I made my reservation at the CDG station, they told me I had to go to another Ibis located farther away from the station (I guess there are two in town).

But when I got to Bordeaux I decided to play ignorant and try the one nearer to the station. When I got there, they said I was in the right place after all, and I stayed there for 3 nights. Just watch out for all the doggie doo-doo on the way...I think curbing is unknown in France.

As for places to eat...well, they were nice to me at the Cafe Gaia, and really everywhere else I ate, especially at a cafe by the river where I smoked a good Cuban supplied by lovely French waitresses...and the fountain around that area is a nice place to enjoy the present moment...

VT
 

ajp

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept-October (2009), Sept-Oct (2013)
If you don't drink, don't drink, it is just as simpe as that on the Camino as it is at home. I did the Camino in fall 2009 and came across a lot of pilgrims that did not drink....and it was not a big deal to anyone.

Do what pleases you, no one will pressure you to drink alcohol and there are lots of alternative beverages available.

Having said that, if you do enjoy a glass of wine like I do, then you will not want to miss some of the outstanding wines that I experienced throughout the Camino....Spain has to be the wine country of the world!

Cheers, and salud,

AJP
Victoria
 

Lemonkid

Member
rolf said:
same here... and everytime I get to Iratche the fountain is broken, no wine, should that be a sign to stop drinking or just another reason to walk the camino again?
I met many people not drinking anything at all, and we still had great evenings together, so alcohol or not is no real issue on the camino.

The wine fountain is often broken! Oh no, I'm really looking forward to it.
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
Lemonkid said:
The wine fountain is often broken! Oh no, I'm really looking forward to it.

Maybe it's empty. With the numbers now on the Camino they must drain the barrels pretty quickly. Mind you when I tried it it was pretty rough stuff, not too good for walking having drunk it on a hot day.

I know one or two of us do mention wine quite often but really consumption of alcohol on the Camino is no different to the rest of Spain and it is not a winos' walk. It does however pass through many vineyards in Navarra, Rioja and the Bierzo.
 

Jutta Kankkunen

New Member
I don't drink alcohol as strange behaviour for someone from Finland that might be (one is too many and... you get the idea). This did not cause any kind of problems during the 2 caminos I have been in. Last time though there was this odd dinner where a couple of over -aged teenagers(old ladies from Norway) giggled and tried to urge a "funny" french lad to pour some wine to my glass...But all in all there's no problems if you want to drink water or some other alcohol- free beverage. On the contrary; there was a group of German people who were delighted to hand me the jug of water and take care of the wine- bottle themselves :D. There were not any problems with pilgrims that wer ea little too full of spirit either ;).
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
I concur with everyone else. Wine (and spirits) are available at every bar - as is food, cafe con leche, and minerales (non - alcoholic drinks). Take your pick - no one pays any attention. Wine is included in the Pilgrim menu - but there is no need to drink it.

As for Irachi? I arrived at 8 am. - extremely poor planning on my part, I think! I was wishing that the tap adjoining the wine were dispensing cafe con leche! Just one more reason to return to Irache at a more civilized hour of the day to partake of the monks' generosity.

Buen Camino,
 

scikowski

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2009, 2010, 2013, 2014 Camino Portugues 2016
As someone who does not drink alcohol, I agree that choosing water instead of wine does not usually cause heads to turn. They do offer water, after all. There has only been one time on my caminos that some obviously intoxicated pilgrims badgered a young man as to why he didn't drink, which I thought was fairly rude. His gentle reply was, "It isn't good for me." I thought this was a brilliant reply and plan to use it if needed in the future.
 
A

AJ

Guest
scikowski said:
His gentle reply was, "It isn't good for me." I thought this was a brilliant reply and plan to use it if needed in the future.

There really is no need to say anything else, is there? Or even to raise the subject at all.
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
Fanta Limon is great. The problem is I sometimes add beer to make a dodgy looking (but perfectly tasting) shandy. That village just before O Cebreiro is great for shandy. You're exhausted after the climb and wonder what will put things right in your jaded body. Shandy is the answer, with Fanta Limon. (Cerveza con limon. Una jarra, por favor).

Fanta limon on its own is great and distinct from the lemonade we get here in the UK. Also very refreshing.

Buen Camino!
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
There was always a choice of water or wine offered with a menu del dia.
We enjoyed the freshly squeezed orange 'zumo de naranja'. The only way to get anything as good in the UK is to squeeze it ourselves.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
My observation is that the pilgrims who encourage others to drink are the ones with a drinking problem; they talk obsessively about drinking and their next drink, the beer at the end of the day, and the rapture of vino tinto. They rarely can see the discomfort that they cause those who do not want to drink alcohol for whatever reason. I have lost count of the pilgrims I have met who are in recovery. They usually have the courage of their sobriety, but I am always uncomfortable when we are with those obsessed with alcohol. The problem drinker, of course, is oblivious to the subtleties of the situation.
 
A

AJ

Guest
falcon269 said:
My observation is that the pilgrims who encourage others to drink are the ones with a drinking problem; they talk obsessively about drinking and their next drink, the beer at the end of the day, and the rapture of vino tinto. They rarely can see the discomfort that they cause those who do not want to drink alcohol for whatever reason. I have lost count of the pilgrims I have met who are in recovery. They usually have the courage of their sobriety, but I am always uncomfortable when we are with those obsessed with alcohol. The problem drinker, of course, is oblivious to the subtleties of the situation.


Phew!!!
 

DesertRain

Member
falcon269 said:
My observation is that the pilgrims who encourage others to drink are the ones with a drinking problem; they talk obsessively about drinking and their next drink, the beer at the end of the day, and the rapture of vino tinto. They rarely can see the discomfort that they cause those who do not want to drink alcohol for whatever reason. I have lost count of the pilgrims I have met who are in recovery. They usually have the courage of their sobriety, but I am always uncomfortable when we are with those obsessed with alcohol. The problem drinker, of course, is oblivious to the subtleties of the situation.

Wow. It is not all or nothing. I am completely understanding of those who -- for whatever reason -- choose not to partake of alcohol. And I respect it fully. And I often choose not to partake at all when I know someone I am with has struggled with/chosen/opted for sobriety. And I have not had more than two glasses of wine on any given evening more than perhaps five times in my 45 years.

But please.... It is ridiculous to imply that every person who enjoys a glass of wine/beer/martini/whatever is -- even those who talk about it -- are problem drinkers. It is not Sobriety OR Obsession. Like other things in life, it is not all or nothing for most people. As I noted in the conversation about food, there seems to be an almost puritanical approach to the Camino among many on these forums. And very frequently, a judgmental one.

It is possible to have healthy or unhealthy relationships with alcohol, food, coffee, exercise, our parents, our partners, the people we meet in our daily lives, other pilgrims. But because some people -- for example -- suffer from bulimia does not mean that no one should ever speak of large meals. Or because some people have suffered from abusive spouses, one should never speak of (or engage in) marriage.

Yes.... when we know of the challenges that someone faces with alcohol, it is rude and inconsiderate to speak of having a cold beer at the end of the day's walk. But each of us has demons that others cannot know. I found myself weeping last night while reading the Master Degree thesis of a very smart student who treated the life one of the people I have been closest to in my life as a topic for academic exploration. Was she wrong to discuss him because it would cause ME pain? No. It is MY responsibility to create the healing I need. And in the end, by being exposed to her perspective, I learned something of myself as painful as it was.

Each of us is responsible for our own healing. Each of us should be considerate of the challenges of others when we are aware of them. And each of us must refrain from judging others by viewing their actions solely through our own lens.
 

Stephen Nicholls

Steve Nicholls, Suffolk, U.K.
Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
What a great response!
For me, one of the beauties [yes!] of Spain is the 'menu-del-dia' which comes at a bargain price, and often with a full bottle of cold white wine. In the UK - because of the price and tax on wine - you'd probably try to finish the bottle, or ask for the cork. In Spain that isn't the case. You'd probably take a glass of refreshing wine - maybe even two glasses - and the bottle would go back to the kitchens.
Of course there will be folk who take more than they need/should. That might apply to many things - religion, sex, food, the sun, gambling, alcohol, football [!] but we shouldn't deny folk the pleasure of things in moderation.
I'll drink to that!
Stephen
http://www.calig.co.uk/camino_de_santiago.htm
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
It is refreshing to read boorish behavior being defended! Twenty pilgrims drink water and wine around a table. One urges the water drinkers to try the wine. Nineteen know it is none of their business. Whose behavior needs defending? None, I think.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
It is an interesting subject - let´s keep it friendly please and not insult people with whom we disagree.

I must confess on all of my caminos I have never seen anyone trying to persuade anyone else to drink alcohol who didn´t want to or who had ordered a non alcoholic drink.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I've walked more than a dozen caminos, and like John, I've never seen anyone "push" or "encourage" another to drink. In fact, my son, who walked the camino at age 20 and decided on the alcohol-free approach, told me that he was always most welcome at the table because it just meant more wine for the rest of them!

Buen camino, Laurie
 

Janet Lee

New Member
Wow! My Camino does not start until March of 2013 and I'm very concerned. First at the judgemental spirit I am finding in this forum. Is it everyone on the Camino or just the people here who seem so quick to condemn? And second, I realize now that I don't know the rules for behavior on the Camino as they seem to be different from normal life. If I experience something that I think is great and want to share with others, when is it appropriate and when is it not? If I will offend others by saying "this wine is delicious, would you like to try it?" does that also apply to food? Should I keep all of my opinions to myself and not share what I consider to be an enjoyable experience ? Will it offend someone who is gluten free if I recommend a bakery? or a vegan if I recommend a restaurant that serves meat? or a particular view to someone who may not be able to see well? And how do I know? Maybe everyone should wear a sign informaing others as to what might cause offense. I am planning a solo Camino and was looking forward to comraderie along the way, but now it seems that it will be a more solitary journey than I had expected or wanted. I will be wearing a sign that says "please freely share your thought, ideas, recommendations, and experiences with me". Even if I don't agree, I promise not to be offended or judgemental.
 

BlackDog

Older Peregrino
Camino(s) past & future
Francés part 2012, Francés 2013, Inglés 2014, Muxía 2014, Fisterra 2012, 2014, Portugués 2016, 2018
Janet Lee said:
I will be wearing a sign that says "please freely share your thought, ideas, recommendations, and experiences with me". Even if I don't agree, I promise not to be offended or judgemental.
ROFL :p :p
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
I think we're all just talking ourselves round in circles. If we want to make a problem where there isn't one, it will just be boring for people who want to know what they really have to prepare for before, during and after their Camino. They don't want to waste time on these non 'issues'.

Nobody forces you to drink or not to drink (although there may be some restrictions inside some albergues etc). It's just like anywhere else, so don't worry about it!

Buen Camino!
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
The original question, a non-trivial one, is whether the Camino is a big, drunken party. Several threads in the Forum could lead one to believe that there is an obsession with drinking, so two and one-half years ago, a concerned member asked a legitimate question.

I have met two pilgrims whose drinking was an obvious danger to themselves, one young female, one over-sixty male. They bought rounds until no one would drink with them anymore. Then they often continued alone. Two out of a thousand is not a large percentage.

I have met four drug addicts with behavior similar to Joost in "The Way." They seemed to take "no" for an answer because it never took long for them to find a willing codependent, so there was no need to pursue the unwilling.

I have met several dozen high functioning alcoholics on the Camino. They were generally obsessed about finishing the day so they could get to the beer and wine. Several of them fortified at bars during the day. All were on a constant search for codependents to share their drinking. They were the ones that always seemed to want to know why water was being consumed when alcoholic beverage was available. I found their behavior boorish. Abbeydore can attest that I am not a teetotaler, but neither do I think that the vino tinto is an objective. At most, it is a choice offered in Spain with the meal. I suspect that 95% of my fellow pilgrims think and act similarly.

It is most curious that there is hostility toward the discussion of problem drinking, and even the suggestion that the thread could be locked. Bus schedules and weather may have wider interest, but no one has to read topics that bore them. I confess that boots have lost my interest, but then I have a satisfactory pair. If alcohol is not a topic of interest, there must be another topic that does interest you. Read it instead. :mrgreen:
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
falcon269 said:
It is most curious that there is hostility toward the discussion of problem drinking, and even the suggestion that the thread could be locked. Bus schedules and weather may have wider interest, but no one has to read topics that bore them. I confess that boots have lost my interest, but then I have a satisfactory pair. If alcohol is not a topic of interest, there must be another topic that does interest you. Read it instead. :mrgreen:

I think the question is whether or not this is really a Camino-related thing. Hundreds of thousands walk each year. Some (statistically possibly tens of thousands) will have drug or alcohol problems and may find the Camino a way of addressing or getting over their issues. I'm not dismissing alcohol related issues (and I say that from experience), but question if it's any more an issue on the Camino, or manifests itself differently from anywhere else. If not, it's probably just a distraction on this forum.

Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Just say no?

Nobody is going to force feed you alcohol on the Camino.
There is water, fresh squeezed orange juice, soda, and milk in pretty much everyplace you might eat.
You'll be fine.
 

dmeclevy

El Camino de Santiago June 2012
Camino(s) past & future
May 24-July 3 2012
I had only 1 glass of wine while hiking, not because I don't drink but I did not want to add to the dehydration potential. Just ask for water when they ask "Vino"? That's what I did.
 

MoniRose

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(5/28-7/4, 2012) Camino Frances - SJPP to Santiago
(7/22-8/2, 2013) Camino Finesterra
(?) Camino Le Puy
I think the warm chocolate drink is Cola Cow, and I believe it is spelled, also. it's just a powder mixed with hot milk, but it is DELICIOUS, especially after a cool walk in the rain. - M :arrow:
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Hola Cola Cao is available in every bar in Spain - I prefer it to their traditional hot chocolate because you stand your spoon up in the latter but drink the former. Buy some churros to soack in the chocolate before munching them! :)
 

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sarsos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
St.J.PdeP. to Burgos Aug 2012 and Sarria to Santiago June 2003
Just completed 250km from SJpdP - Burgos without alcohol.
Had a wonderful Camino (tbc next spring)
Plenty of agua sans gas or agua con gas did the trick.
Some communal meals can be tricky but most pelegrines will respect your choice not to have a glass of wine.
"The steps I took helped me take each step each day."
A frend of Bill and Bob.
 

Szaboa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
October 2012
This is my favorite thread on the forum. What a great panorama of personalities.

A passionate subject releases passionate responses.

Could someone please direct me to the smoking/sex/politics threads?
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
Szaboa said:
Could someone please direct me to the smoking/sex/politics threads?
Not me. Smoke if you like (but it's banned indoors), sex as you like (but not in a bunk room), and redefine your politics as you go along. Buen Camino!
 

sarsos

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
St.J.PdeP. to Burgos Aug 2012 and Sarria to Santiago June 2003
I can tell you I will be wearing the triangle within a circle symbol on my pack when I do my walk in 2014. Hopefully I will meet some folks in the fellowship along the way :D Another friend of Bill and Bob

Hi Stefanie, just returned from 2nd year, can only do 3 weeks at time. (Burgos to Pontfradda) Tracked down a'meeting' in Leon (Tues 19.30. No.44 Playa Santa Ana) just round corner from church, if door not open ring bell for a warm embracing fellowship welcome.
Buen Camino
 

Peachy

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013 July/ august
Reading some of these "Camino Chronicles," it sometimes seems like the wine never stops flowing! Any tips (or experience to share) concerning an alcohol-free experience? (Leaving SJPP May 19)
It is very easy not to drink,..I rarely have here, and havent seen anything excessive. Walking so much I actually could not of imbibed in the heat here,..it would have knocked my socks off!!!! a billion other drink choices, like everyone here says.
 

stevenjarvis

Active Member
Wow! I will be wearing a sign that says "please freely share your thought, ideas, recommendations, and experiences with me". Even if I don't agree, I promise not to be offended or judgemental.
Janet, don't be dismayed by what you read here. This danger of forums like this is that it can create an impression of experts and novices, the right and the wrong, the judges and the judged. I'm sure you'll have a fantastic experience on your Camino and come across behavior and opinion as varied as humanity itself. Enjoy !
 

jimkaszynski

RIP 2014
Camino(s) past & future
First step June 1st 2013
I just finished the walk and am in recovery myself. I was surprised to see such little drinking.Most Pilgrims take this walk very seriously and don't want to walk with a hangover. I know if I take a drink it's all over for me! However most people can have a few drinks and quit, and that's what I saw. I have posted on the other link (A.A. meetings) where there are meetings along the way. I went to some and they were great. Someone was always at the meeting to translate for me. this walk was beyond an spiritual experience for me!
 

Stefania13/14

Active Member
Hey Jim and Sarsos (and everybody)!
Can't wait to see what meetings are like. Thanks for the encouragement. Jim, what postings/site are you referring to?
Stefania
 

dmantony

Member
Camino(s) past & future
9.19(13)
Johnny Walker - thank you for the info about Hola Cola Cao. Wine is not on my list of things to enjoy as I am on meds which prohibit it. I needed a coffee substitute as I know the effect coffee has on me and the restroom availability seems to be umm...non existent for large stretches of the Camino. This looks like just the drink I have been looking for to go with my morning...whatever.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
My only question would be---Why? In Basqueland we drink wine b/c it's cheaper than water. My favorite story from the Camino last month was these 2 Spanish guys who told one of my walking companions that it was a tradition in Spain to go out and drink martinis on Sunday and invited her to join in the fun with them. She did but little did they know she was a nun.
 

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