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Luggage Transfer Correos

Another Backpack recommendation request

2020 Camino Guides

markss

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from SJPP (3/10 & 10/10); Primitivo (6/12)
Ion,

I purchased an Osprey's Aether 60 (Mens size large) over the internet and found it perfect in every respect! The quality is very good; it was durable, well fitting and comfortable and also adequate for carrying everything including the extra water, food and odd botttle of wine that I bought from time to time along the way. As a point of reference, I am 6'2", weighed 180 lbs. at the beginning of the Camino, dropping to about 165 by the end. Maybe I didn't carrry enough food after all

You might end up paying a fortune in restocking fees and return postage under your method of ordering so many backpacks just for the sake of trying to determine a preference. There are all kinds of websites that review various features and make comparisons for you. Proper fit and structure of the pack is key as the pack will become part of you as you walk.

Buen Camino!
 

ion

New Member
Markss, Thank you ! I am looking to this one in case I go with a " Smaller " Pack, Thank you a bunch ! by the way, did you walk the Camino Frances ? and would you wish you had a Bigger or smaller pack, Even tough you said it was a perfect pack, but do you think it could be a bit bigger ? a bit smaller ? Or as you stated, Just PERFECT !

You guys are the BEST !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
P.s, I Knew about the wine as well, one of the reasons i want a lit bigger pack !! lol :D
 

markss

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from SJPP (3/10 & 10/10); Primitivo (6/12)
The Osprey Aether 60 is not small. To give you an idea, without food and liquids my filled backpack weighed more than 30 lbs (13+ kilos). Against all advice on this forum I carried 5 shirts, 3 shorts, pair of pants, fleece jacket, 5 pair socks, 3 books, sleeping bag, you get the idea. Way too much!

The feature I most appreciated was that the design of the backpack was such that weight was well distrubuted on the hips and back to make it comfortable walking despite that much weight. And I always had adequate space to add at least 1.5 liters of water, food and a bottle of wine.

Don't recommend taking all of that stuff, could have gotten by well with half of it. But the backpack is large enough to carry even more.

I'll stick with the assessment that it was the perfect size.
 

Beverley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2009, Camino Portuguese 2010, Del Norte 2011, Pamplona to Burgos and Santiago to Finnesterra 2012
Markss, your post is informative and funny :!: I can't believe you carried all that stuff :lol:
 

PadreQ

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept Oct 2011, de Astorga 2015
Primitivo Oct 2013
Lebaniego & Ingles Sept (2017)
I bought my pack today - the Osprey Exos 46L (Large) 2lbs, 2 ozs. It was a full lb. lighter than the Atmos 50L. I also picked up a 1lb down sleeping bag. The kit is coming together!
 

ion

New Member
Hey Padre, dont forget to tell us, how heavy your pack will get...... seems like a nice Pack !!!! :D
 

andy.d

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Levante 2009
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2011
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2014
Pilgrims Way Winchester - Canterbury
Camino Ingles (Ferrol) 2015
Cistercian Way (Wales) 2016
If you carry a rucksack like this, you can have tea properly,

Andy
 

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Sojourner47

Guest
markss said:
Ion,

I purchased an Osprey's Aether 60 (Mens size large) over the internet and found it perfect in every respect! The quality is very good; it was durable, well fitting and comfortable and also adequate for carrying everything including the extra water, food and odd botttle of wine that I bought from time to time along the way. As a point of reference, I am 6'2", weighed 180 lbs. at the beginning of the Camino, dropping to about 165 by the end. Maybe I didn't carrry enough food after all

You might end up paying a fortune in restocking fees and return postage under your method of ordering so many backpacks just for the sake of trying to determine a preference. There are all kinds of websites that review various features and make comparisons for you. Proper fit and structure of the pack is key as the pack will become part of you as you walk.

Buen Camino!
Sorry to be such a pain, repeating my obsession about stuff carried, but how on earth do you fill a 60l pack?
I've just bought a Deuter 20l Airwalk daysac, and on a test packing, I managed to get my sleeping bag,selfinflating mat,hooped bivi bag,spare clothes,washing gear etc,raingear,and 2 500ml water bottles in it. When I did the Ingles in April, I had a smaller, less technical pack (no frame/airspace), and carried 4kg all up, including sleeping bag and 1 litre of water.
What do you guys carry to need such a huge rucsac?
As I've said in another post, years ago I travelled overland from the UK to Australia, over a period of 3 months, carrying just a small airline shoulder bag - about 8 litre capacity.
The one thing which will literally weigh you down is the excess stuff carried, as many have said before on this forum.
 

+@^^

Active Member
hmmmm
interesting debate here
.
i am full of admiration for those of you that can fit your stuff into a teeny bag
but i detect an obsession with having the smallest bag
and i dont get it
as long as you keep your kit weight down to a manageable number
and you are comfortable
whats the big deal
.
i have seen pilgrims with mini-size bags with huge amounts of stuff strapped to the outside of the bag - its a complete hoot
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
Nothing stapped to the outside of my pack - just a variation of Parkinson's Law : work expands to fill the available time - stuff expands to fill the available rucsac..... :mrgreen:
And, dear Tam, if you've ever lugged a large pack through teeming Asia in the monsoon season (as I did on my first journey) you would definately go for SMALL on future trips......
 

markss

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from SJPP (3/10 & 10/10); Primitivo (6/12)
andy.d said:
If you carry a rucksack like this, you can have tea properly,

Andy
There were two petite young Israeli woman beginning the Camino from SJPP each with backpacks every bit as large as the one pictured in the photo. All were amazed at their site. Even more astonishing was to see them roll into Roncesvalles that same day after having heaved those things over the mountain. They confessed that it would be their last day with all of that in tow as the searched for a solution to carry on.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Just found the pack of all packs! For women with a shortish back this is super. It is the Deuter Groeden SL 30. It is about 2 to 4 ltrs less than what I normally take, but funnily enough after packing everything into it I have more space left than ever before, it is weird. Also it weighs just over 1 kg empty, I took the raincover off, which saved 100 gms, as I have an Altus, so no need for a cover. I attach my packing list, so you can see what I can fit into it. Cheers, Gitti
 

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Lia

New Member
I think I might need some help on this subject. :oops:
You see I have read through this thread and checked out most of the ones that other people have recommended. The thing is that most of them are simply beyond the range of my purse.
So am now wondering if I have actually brought the wrong one.
I have had a Berghaus before and it always performed well and I am use to travelling light.
But I have never walked the Camino, or ever walked that fer either.
Would someone who knows better than me please take a look and give me their considered opinion.
Thank you. :D

http://www.gaynors.co.uk/productdetail. ... 0501430005
 

Lia

New Member
andy.d said:
If you carry a rucksack like this, you can have tea properly,

Andy
I think stopping for a nice afternoon tea might make carting all that worth it. :?
Especially if you get to use a pretty cake stand :oops:
Although hubby might have something to say about it, what with me making him carry it all :shock:
 

andy.d

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Levante 2009
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2011
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2014
Pilgrims Way Winchester - Canterbury
Camino Ingles (Ferrol) 2015
Cistercian Way (Wales) 2016
Lia,

if the rucksack is comfortable and you can get what you need for the Camino into it, you have the right one. There is, in my opinion, no need to spend hundreds of pounds on kit,

Andy
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Lia said:
I think I might need some help on this subject. :oops:
You see I have read through this thread and checked out most of the ones that other people have recommended. The thing is that most of them are simply beyond the range of my purse.
So am now wondering if I have actually brought the wrong one.
I have had a Berghaus before and it always performed well and I am use to travelling light.
But I have never walked the Camino, or ever walked that fer either.
Would someone who knows better than me please take a look and give me their considered opinion.
Thank you. :D

http://www.gaynors.co.uk/productdetail. ... 0501430005
Hi Lia,
We both have Berghaus Freeflow rucksacs. This looks like the updated model of the one that Terry took on his Camino, is still using and will use again next year. It held all he needed and was a great fit. So long as you are happy with its fit for comfort it should be OK for you. Mine was the smaller 25+5 which suited me best, but Terry carried my sleeping bag, partly to help with weight. You should have plenty of room etc and no need to spend money on another pack. Better maybe to use it to treat yourself to some extra-lightweight hi tec 'ultra silver' undies from Rohan :)

Buen Camino
 

+@^^

Active Member
ancient pilgrim saying.....
.
the happiness of the pilgrim with her backpack
is determined more by what goes on between her ears
than the pack she puts on her back
.
 

John Hussey

Active Member
Expensive but arguably the best one can buy is a custom pack designed to fit your body. This way there is no doubt that it will fit your torso. It is likely the last one you will ever buy. Peruse:

http://www.mchalepacks.com/

Mine is now 10 years old or better. I have used it on the Appalachian Trail, Continental Divide Trail, Camino Frances, Via de la Plata and now, next month, I'll use the very same pack on the Camino Frances once more. It still looks new and has no worn or torn areas areas. McHale first started designing heavy packs that would take a serious beating for mountain climbers and still makes about the best packs for that endeavor. I was one of the first back then to convince him to begin a line of lightweight packs. he balked some and designed the lighter weight pack I still use today, then incorporated it into a new line for the lightweight hiking crowd. My pack is precisely 43 L, weighs 3.25 pounds and precisely fits my torso length, one of the most important considerations in a backpack.. I confess it is much to large for the Camino, is only slightly to large for the AT but is just right for the CDT where I have had to travel for more than a week at times carrying all my food and extra water for the desert areas. I'll never need to buy another pack.
 

Lia

New Member
Thank you to everyone who replied to my question. :D
I do feel more confident now; that I actually haven't wasted my money on something silly. :)

I have Fibromyalgia, which basically causes immense pain all over, but I have a problem with my shoulders mostly and brought the Berghaus because it only weighs 1.31kg (approx 2lbs) which is important to me, as I need to carry light.
I have used it already in my hikes. Hikes that are meant to be training runs lol And am slowly building up the weight.
So far it has been great and very, very comfortable on my back and shoulders.
So I really was hoping that this would be right for the Camino.
Now thanks to your replies I feel that it is.
I must say the fact that it as a freeflow system which means it is away from you back is great, as I hate it when your back gets all sweaty from the backpack.

Would love to have one made especially for me, but not possible really. But what a great idea.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
I would be very interested in hearing from any women (or any walkers built like women, i.e. hips bigger than waist) who can report on the Osprey Exos 46 pack. It seems built for the narrow-hipped male walker, and there is no comparably constructed "women's model". Is the hipbelt comfortable? The light weight of this pack is really attracting me.
 

ria

Member
Hi Kitsamber,
I'm a woman, and i have an Exos 46. For me it's the perfect pack. After having walked 1700 kms in Spain with it last year, I decided that i could do with less space and weight this year, so I bought an OMM (25 l) with a chest pouch (4l). So I started with the OMM this year, and was really happy with it (also because it only carried 4,5 kilo). After 500 kms I started walking in the south, and I needed to bring more water every day, and the OMM - which has no frame - started to feel a bit uncomfortable on the shoulders. Since my husband was visiting me when i was near Madrid, I asked him to bring the Exos from Amsterdam. And after that I decided I was really, really happy with the Exos: enough space for everything, really light & comfortable, good frame, adjustable in many ways, i love all the pockets and the mesh thing on the back that makes the pack less sweaty. I didn't have any problem with the hipbelts, so I don't think it is especially meant for 'male postures' (i am quite slim, but have kind of wide hips :)).
Small disadvantage: I always have to 'dig' everything out, because it is only toploading, so i would have liked a zipper somewhere down. And I do not really like the colors, although i started to get used to it. And - worst thing - mine smells horrible now and there is now way to get that out (but maybe now after 4000 kms i could buy a new one...). Does anyone have a tip for washing backpacks with a frame?
ria
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
@ria: Thanks for the feedback!

As for deoderizing your pack - I know our troops use Febreeze on their packs and it works a dream. This is a spray-on solution designed for fabrics, and sold here in the US. I can't speak to other locations or what similar products might be labelled in Europe, but we've had it here for over 15 years, so surely it is available elsewhere.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
Fabreeze does an excellent job of masking the smell. To wash a backpack, put it in a large tub or sink with Woolite. Rinse it well, and hang it to dry. If you put permethrin in the final rinse, you will bed bug-proof your pack as well!
 

Pilar

Active Member
To clean my pack, I fill the bath tub with enough water to cover it. I use a mild soap (Dr. Bronner's would work) and let it soak for 15 minutes. I agitate it in the tub and rinse with clean water until the suds are all out of it. The shower works well for rinsing. If you use a soap with a little scent it has a nice smell without using any other products. Hang to dry. You will be surprised how dirty your water ends up. Well, maybe not totally surprised!
 

ria

Member
thanks for the washing the pack tips. I allready tried bathing it in the tub, but somehow the smell did not really get out: in between the nice flowery soap smell i every now and then smelled the horrible scent of old dried up sweat :). but i'm curious about this febreeze thing: i have something at home that is called febreeze, but it's meant to make your living room smell nice (after a night of booze and cigarettes). but maybe there are other types of febreeze in the shop; i will go and look for it.
i was thinking of taking the pack to a dry cleaner. anyone has experience with that?
thanks,
ria
 

lynnejohn

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2005), VDLP(2007), Madrid(2009), Ingles(2009), Sur (2011), VDLP(2011)-partial, VDLP(2014)
I have taken my packs to the dry cleaner after each camino and they come back clean and smelling good. It's not too expensive either. Then you can pack it away until next time knowing it won't be horribly rank when you drag it out.
 

bromeliad

Member
I wouldn't dry-clean my backpack. Perchloroethylene is a petrol-based solvent that degrades your pack's
waterproof coating.

10 minutes soaking in a big pail, or sink, or bathtub filled with warm water and baking soda takes care of the smell. Then rinse, soak 2-3 minutes in a mild solution of Woolite and warm water, use a soft brush on dirty spots, knead the sweaty shoulder straps, swish around a bit, rinse well several times in cold water, hang to dry, voilà...
 

ria

Member
thanks. I don't think my pack is waterproof anyway. but first i'm going to try the baking soda. If that doesn't work i'll go to the dry cleaner :)
ria
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
Well I've just washed my sleeping bag(1st time) after 13yrs, amazing it's like new again, all fluffed-up & no 'balls inside! & not smelly!
now I'm about to embark on my rucksacks of same age, this time I'm going to reproof them, just incase. They are both macpacs so I don't think they will need reproofing (to be sure to be sure).

Now both washings were/are taking place in the bath, perfect for sleeping bag, & both are using the correct nikwax product. my friend washes his yurts with their stuff & I'd swear they look better after washing than they do originally!

My s/bag took 2 days, rucksack will be similar, great thing about bath is you can drain it then dry it a bit before other drying techniques are used!
 

Gar-bear

New Member
Has anyone here actually owned and used one of Gossamer Gear back packs on the Camino? If so, I would be grateful, if you would let me know what your experience with it was, and what model it was, of course. Thanks in advance!

Gary
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
I have used GoLite packs, similar in concept to the Gossamer, on several caminos. The ones without a frame, naturally the lightest ones, will sag onto your shoulders. If they weigh over 20#, they will give you sore neck muscles. If you make an internal structure, as with a Z-fold sleeping mat, then the problem is less. However, if you add the weight of the sleeping mat and the pack, then you could instead use a lightweight internal frame backpack for the same weight. GoLite has internal frame packs that are quite light.
 

Gar-bear

New Member
Thanks Falcon,
I was thinking of the Gossamer's, a Mariposa Plus, or a Gorilla, they both have internal frames, and are just under 1 1/2 pds. I will look further into The Golite options with internal frames. The 'Jam' looks good, (plus they are on sale right now), but it makes sense to me that the pack without an internal frame, or even a mat, would quickly start loosing its shape, and wind up feeling like dead weight. I clearly don't want to carry a 'might or maybe need' mat, and its unneeded weight, in place of an internal frame system.

Thanks for the feedback!

Gary
 

TrekkMouse

New Member
Would these backpacks work?

Hi everyone.

Im new here so please excuse me if i ask dumb questions! 8) Im planning to do the Camino de santiago in 2013. I have read all the suggestions for backpacks and i like these: Black Diamond Speed 30l Backpack : Black Diamond Axiom 40l Backpack : Black Diamond Demon 32l Backpack: now i havn't tested them yet but i see on the website that they recomend these packs for no more than a weeks travel.....Is this relevant or not really?.....Any other good packs in this price range?

Thanks.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Hi - I don't know these packs myself but have a look here:

equipment-questions/topic9167.html

The important thing is to try out the pack thoroughly before buying and also to check the long distance walking sites to see if there are customer reviews which might be helpful. The smaller packs in the Blackdiamond series seem to be like daypacks designed for speed and as you say not recommended for long distance travel. On that basis I'd be cautious.

But they have a very innovative design. Please let us know what you decide.

John
 

Mysticl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May (2015) - pending
I too am considering the Gossamer Gorilla or Gossamer Mariposa ... both bags are larger than I expect to need BUT they have a roll top closing and I think their size more or less scales down to how full you pack them. The one I am considering weighs in a 658 grams or about 1.5 pounds. One of the lightest bags I've seen online.

There is an awesome Youtube review here that shows the versatility of the mariposa pack. The mariposa is the larger of the 2 options, the gorilla (not reviewed) being the smaller version of basically the same pack. The Gorilla is about 40L and the Mariposa is 60L (still oddly lighter than the gorilla due to materials) Both packs seem large at first glance but like I said they roll to close so basically are as big as you pack them in the end. Personally i like the outside webbed pockets on the Mariposa better which is why I'm waffling between the two. Any real life experience/opinions with either of these packs on the Camino would be appreciated. From all accounts both are quite comfortable to carry, perhaps larger than needed but ultra lightweight so not sure size (as opposed to weight) is a good measure of the whether this pack would be useful or not. Would love to hear opinions.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jny0EzbaBCQ[/youtube]
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Mysticl said:
I too am considering the Gossamer Gorilla or Gossamer Mariposa ... both bags are larger than I expect to need BUT they have a roll top closing and I think their size more or less scales down to how full you pack them. The one I am considering weighs in a 658 grams or about 1.5 pounds. One of the lightest bags I've seen online.
snip
Would love to hear opinions.
Mysticl, I cannot tell how much bushwalking/trekking /backpacking you have done, and whether you realise that the term ultra-light can also mean many other things when it comes to long distance hiking. The nice sales pitch video does much to avoid discussing the compromises of this type of design, but here are a few:
  • the pack is a single tube design, with only one entry at the top. Anything you want at the bottom of the bag will require all the pack contents to be removed. This saves weight, but it will mean you will have everything spread over your bed in the albergue. If you pack your sleeping gear at the bottom of the pack, you cannot pre-pack in the evening, but must pack everything in the morning.
  • You will be able to carry a lot of gear in the mesh pockets, but this will have to be stuff that can survive getting at least a little bit wet. In the video, the demonstrator showed maps and guidebooks, two of the items I think you would definitely not want to ever get wet. It might work in the desert where the video was shot, but I doubt it will work in Spain.
  • The hip and shoulder padding will be very thin on any ultra-light design. In this one it is so thin that they have made special provision for you to be able to add padding, like your socks, rolled up underwear, etc. Call me cynical, but that doesn't sound like it will be comfortable for more than a couple of days.
  • Similarly, back padding and shaping are going to be compromised, and light weight given priority over air flow, anatomical shaping etc.
  • roll top designs are a real compromise, although this design appears to have addressed having suitable strapping points so that you can carry light items on top of the pack.
  • The volume to weight ratio is appalling, at least for the Mariposa. A 60li pack that has a max load of about 14kg! The Gorilla seems to be better - 45li and 16kg max load. This indicates that the harness is the limiting factor, not the pack size itself. This may not be an issue if you keep your packing list tight, but it does go to the general issue of comfort when used over several days.

None of this should deter you from using this pack, but my own view is that I wouldn't use my ultra-light packs for a long multi-day walk like the Camino.
 

Mysticl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May (2015) - pending
That's exactly the type of insight I was looking for, thanks!

I see your point about pre packing the night before. I was ok with the top loading tube style before that .. now, not so sure. I also noted the weight to size ratio for load but figured since I was going to be less than 10kg total (hopefully 8kg) I didn't think that would be much of an issue for me. From all the reviews I've read however this pack is extremely comfortable over distance and a lot more rugged than first appearances might suggest. The current straps however are generally thought to be too wide and they are undergoing a redesign which will likely take away the ability to stuff them with socks but that's ok by me. I won't likely purchase this pack (if I do at all) before that redesign is on the market in the next couple months or so.

The pocket issue you point out is also something I will be reconsidering ... I had thought they would work well but you could be right.

I am not going to be one of those who race off before the break of dawn so packing in the morning might not bother me as much as it would an eager beaver but it is definitely something I'll keep in mind when making my decision. I will be travelling with my husband who may well get a different pack .. maybe he could carry the maps ;) The reason I liked this one so much were all the glowing reviews, specifically praising it's lightness and comfort but the concerns you raise are all justified and I'll have to keep them in mind when making up my mind ... but 658g is hard to beat!

Thanks so much for taking the time to give me such a thorough and well thought out critique! It will help me a lot! If anyone else has tried this pack on the trail I'd love to hear from you as well!
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
I walked with the GoLite Dawn (40L, 400g) - it was fine, and next time I'd go even lighter - I've got a Gossamer Gear Murmur that weighs under 250g; I carried under 5kg plus liquid of 2L in the side pockets and had room to add fruit and chocolate to keep me going during the day; when you've got such a light weight to carry, then internal frames and shoulder straps with thick padding are not needed; if all the rest of your kit is light, then this is the ultra-lite way to go
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
Just for interest, my Deuter 20L pack, fully loaded including 1 litre of water and trail snacks comes in at 4.1kgs. I do have a smaller, lighter daysac which would be 400grms less but have no room for more food or jacket/fleece if carried rather than worn.
This is complete kit for Camino Frances start this Friday.
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
Good choice - a 20L pack forces you to only carry what you really need - probably silk liner rather than sleeping bag - can probably get by with 2 x 0.6L water bottles - and carry another plastic bottle on the Meseta
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
Sojourner47 said:
Just for interest, my Deuter 20L pack, fully loaded including 1 litre of water and trail snacks comes in at 4.1kgs. I do have a smaller, lighter daysac which would be 400grms less but have no room for more food or jacket/fleece if carried rather than worn.
This is complete kit for Camino Frances start this Friday.
That to me seems a bit overloaded for size of sac, reckon you'll have a bulge against your back, which is not-so-comfortable, if you can get away with it good luck, i would be not-so-happy!

Finally weighed mine last night 5kgs with a few bits & water missing,
reckon you must have skimpt lots, like there's not Brierley(think I should cut mine in2 as we start Astorga next Mon 0420hours). 1st April :D
 

spursfan

Veteran Member
The main problem with the Deuter 20L packs is that they are so relatively heavy (530-680g: they also have an AC Lite 22 that weighs 930g!); the walk from Astorga only needs 80 pages from the Brierley guide - so you can save weight by taking only those pages with you and add to John's royalties by buying another copy when you get back
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Sojourner47 said:
Just for interest, my Deuter 20L pack, fully loaded including 1 litre of water and trail snacks comes in at 4.1kgs. I do have a smaller, lighter daysac which would be 400grms less but have no room for more food or jacket/fleece if carried rather than worn.
This is complete kit for Camino Frances start this Friday.
I tried packing one of your previous packing lists, and only just managed to get it into a 30li pack with 1 li of water and no food bag. What have you done to get down to 20li?

Regards,
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
dougfitz said:
I tried packing one of your previous packing lists, and only just managed to get it into a 30li pack with 1 li of water and no food bag. What have you done to get down to 20li?

Regards,
Doug:
Deuter Aircomfort 20l pack, lined with plastic carrier bag.
Bag 1: Deuter Treklite down bag
Bag 2: Spare baselayer top and underpants, 2 prs liner socks, 1 pr outer, handkerchief, 2 x muslin squares,soap,facecloth,toothpaste and brush,sink plug/disc,buff,prescription sunglasses
Bag 3:Cloth pencil case with compeed,elastoplasts,savlon,antihistamine,mycota,vaseline (all small amounts)neurofen tabs,needle and floss,string,earplugs,scissors. ipod,phone,small book (Rubiayat of Omar Khyyam),small kitchen knife,safety pins,small inscribed piece of slate to leave at Cruz.
Loose: Lightwt foam sandals,square of plastic,guidebook,carrier bag. Plastic bag with TP,antibact wipes,more plastic bags,high powered LED torch.
Rucsac pockets: 2 x 500ml water, trailsnacks, rainpants in lid pocket.
Jacket pockets: credential,notebook and pencil,more trail snacks, tiny monocular telescope.
Wallet in zipped pocket with daily cash,E111 card,YHA card etc
Neckpouch under shirt with passport , bulk of cash, debit card
Worn: NB trailrunners (goretex), Craghoppers zipoff pants, baselayer top and underpants, longsleeved fleece, Berhaus goretex jacket,hat.
Homemade walking poles, which I will likely ditch fairly quickly....
For the outward fight I've booked hold baggage, on the return I will ditch knife,scissors and poles and just carry on rucsac.
Strategic decision made not to take bum bag or camera.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
Hi Sojourner 47.
I am sure you will have everyone intrigued with your packing list. Just a couple of questions - how much did your pack weigh excluding water and did you have anywhere to put food, even just a bocadilla. David
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
Thank you Sojourner47 for publishing your list, most helpful in trying to get my 'pack' lighter

A photo of your sac loaded would be good too. Please

Yes JB is going to be shreaded to 80 pages, hope he'll forgive me!
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
David - pack weighs just under 3 kgs without food or water (rucsac itself is 785grms empty)
Yes, the reason I'm taking this pack is that there is space in the large side pockets and under the lid for food, and my fleece or jacket if I get too hot.
Abbeydore - no bulge in the back - the Deuter has a curved frame and mesh back to provide airspace between load and wearer. I've no idea how to get a photo onto here, I'm afraid.... :D
Spursfan - yes, the Deuters are heavy for the size - as I said, I was tempted to leave the down bag, take a silk liner instead, only 1x 500ml water,no sandals etc and pack it all in my small Karrimor daysac, which would be an all-up weight of under 3 kilos - OK for a frameless rucsac.
I'm still thinking of going that route, but am a mite concerned about leaving the sleeping bag at home at this time of year.
Incidentally, I did consider camping - I have a Lowe Alpine 35 Airzone pack, and can get tent, mat, sleeping bag, extra water and so on in that for an all up weight of just under 6 kgs....
 
I bought an Osprey Atmos 35 L. My back measurement was at the high end of the medium and the lower end of the large specs. I ended up buying the large version which actually provides 38 L of space.

Before deciding on the Atmos I considered the Osprey Talon. While the length of the Atmos could be a problem as a carry on with some airlines...the combined dimensions are within the requirements of United Airlines. In respect to comfort and access...I much prefer it over the Talon. The Atmos is loaded with thoughtful features, is extremely comfortable, and still has extra room after I load my complete list of Camino gear.

Buen Camino,
Charleston Tom
 

MCVet

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked (2012)
Has anyone used a Teton backpack before? I need to decide between this pack, which looks like it'd work out just fine, and an Osprey 45L at a nearby shop. The problem is, there's a $60 difference between the two, and I'm not sure if the Osprey is worth the extra $60.
 
Never heard of Teton, use an Osprey myself. But the Teton may be great. The important thing is for you to try them on with weight and walk aroun the store or even buy take home and try it out for a couple of days. An informed clerk can be a great help. I wanted a Deuter until I went into REI and tried one on, just didn't fit as well as the Osprey.
 

MCVet

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked (2012)
Well I ended up getting the Osprey any how. I figured it was better to try an unknown brand on a shorter excursion than the Camino. Ended up with a Kestrel 48 for $110 from a local shop who was getting rid of last year's models.

Pretty nice backpack. I think it's too large (in terms of liters) but it'll do. Fits real nice, so I reckon I'll just have a lot of open air in it. Maybe I can put helium balloons in there. :D
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
OK - the definitive rucsac.
This is the UK, but yesterday I bought a small polyester rucsac in the local "Pound Shop", for - £1 of course - takes all my gear, weighs, I kid you not, 35grams.
Total weight for next camino - 1.6kilograms, including water and trail snacks.
I know I've been obsessing about carrying minimal stuff on here for ages, but beat that!!
The one thing that will drag you down, and get to the knees etc (and I should know) is the weight carried on one's back.
Would you believe, one guy at L'Esprit du Chemin the day I started had 17 kilos in his pack.And an Aussie lady next to me on the flight out had 10 kilos. MADNESS.
As to walking boots/shoes - check out New Balance 573 goretex trail runners.
Just my opinion. of course.....
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
And, the beauty of having such a small pack is that you can wear your rain gear over the top of it, without the need of a cover, or putting everything into plastic bags inside the pack.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
And the brand is?...
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
falcon269 said:
And the brand is?...
Generic Far Eastern, I suspect....
But never mind the quality, feel the weight. At £1-00 it may be slightly overpriced, but at 35grms, who cares? Waterproof, zipped entry,mesh pocket,small zipped pocket - true hi tech features which should appeal to every taste and suit every need.Available from stock at Poundland shops throughout the UK. Overseas delivery at cost. Shoulder straps can be reduced in length to minimise weight.
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
I'm not joking here (makes a change, some say) - this little rucsac really is available for the princely sum of a pound.And is indeed remarkable value for the minimalist backpacker.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
Can you post a photo of this gem?? Thanks in advance.
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
falcon269 said:
Can you post a photo of this gem?? Thanks in advance.
I haven't the technical expertise. :mrgreen:
How does one post pictures on here?
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
Sojourner47 said:
falcon269 said:
Can you post a photo of this gem?? Thanks in advance.
I haven't the technical expertise. :mrgreen:
How does one post pictures on here?
Easy :
Copy the image from web site, usually gives an address (I usually copy image location if it asks)
Press post a reply
Press Img thingy above
paste where img thingy is now flashing
check preview
submit

good luck
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
Well, I've taken pictures and tried to add them but it tells me the file is too big - so how do I reduce it?
 

andy.d

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Levante 2009
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2011
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2014
Pilgrims Way Winchester - Canterbury
Camino Ingles (Ferrol) 2015
Cistercian Way (Wales) 2016
do you need a smaller rucksack for the photo to fit?
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
:D :D
Right - got it. Google "Outdoor Solutions Rucsac" - the Poundland site will come up with a picture of the rucsac. They also do a 3 pack of ponchos for one pound, as well as a load of other stuff designed for the modern lightweight pilgrim (Those weighing less than 10 stone... :lol: )
Complete walking kit for under a fiver. (the money I could have saved....instead of buying all this hitech gear....)
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Found it. I have something similar in ultrasil by Sea to Summit, which I plan to use as my carry on bag for my next pilgrimage. I admire your tenacity to the ultra-light ethic, but won't be emulating you on that front.

Regards,
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
I was tempted by the Ultrasil, Doug, but will try the cheaper alternative first - report back on it later.
I bought 3 ponchos for £1-00 and a waterproof raincoat for £1-00 this morning, so I'm really splashing out...
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
Total weight for next camino - 1.6kilograms, including water and trail snacks.
If a liter of water is a kilogram, are you taking just .6kg of equipment?

At 30x40 cm, the pack seems a bit small, but that is the point of minimalist! The poncho appears to be the kind that rips easily and often is discarded. Rainwear needs to survive the storm and wind regardless of its weight! It won't fit over a standard backpack.
 

Attachments

andy.d

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Levante 2009
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2011
Camino Ingles (Coruna) 2014
Pilgrims Way Winchester - Canterbury
Camino Ingles (Ferrol) 2015
Cistercian Way (Wales) 2016
I'll be really interested to hear how you get on with this. Just back from the Pilgrims Way carrying 20lbs, but I was camping and cooking and conditions were like winter.

Buen Camino

Andy
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
Minimal list: 500ml water, spare baselayer top and underpants,2 pairs socks, buff, muslin towel, wash kit - sliver of soap,toothbrush and paste,facecloth. small 1st aid kit (smidgin of savlon,nivea,antihistamine in small poly bags,elastoplasts,ibuprofen,earplugs ),Rain coat,silk sleeping bag liner,ipod shuffle,mobile phone and spare battery (much less weight than taking a charger), safety pins, needle and thread, guidebook,documents,money (!!!) etc. All up, about 1.6 kgs.
I took a sleeping bag on the Frances in April, but didn't really need it, and I'm relying on your assertion that blankets are available everywhere... (as indeed they were in my much lesser experience of albergues than your's)
On the Frances, with the Deuter 20 rucsac, I carried about 4.5kgs, but that was with a litre of water - 500ml would be enough I think at that time of year. And this tiny (disposable?) rucsac has room for my fleece when it gets too hot to wear it - as indeed it did in April.
Apart from reducing even further the weight carried, next time I WILL PERSEVERE with my trekking poles, and hopefully not get the knee problems after descending Alto Perdon.....
It wasn't the extra mileage after Monjardin that did it, it was the steep descents in the days before. However, at least I know I can walk 46 kms a day if necessary....(at the age of 65) :D
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
I know I can walk 46 kms a day
I am not sure I could even spell that distance. :D :D
 

Krsta

New Member
In your opinion how important is to have in camino backpack two compartments and breathable carrying system? Backpack with two compartments is easier to pack in the morning. I don't need to take out everything. With breathable carrying system I'm not sweat as much. But... I'll have small backpack (30-35 liters) so I take only basic stuff. Besides how important is how much I sweat during the pilgrimage if I do laundry every day? So maybe better idea is to buy simple and light backpack. What do you think about it?
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
Next time - early September, returning to Najera to pick up the trail - I will be carrying ultra ultra lightweight pack.
Cheap ( £1-00) rucsac , with homemade foam back pad/ sitting mat - 75grms.
Spare clothes - underwear etc , washing kit and muslin pieces - 650grms
First aid kit, ipod, notebook, guidebook (reduced to a few sheets of A4), etc - 220grms
Cheap (£1-00 again) poncho, silk sleeping bag liner - 180grms
Foam sandals - 140grms
All up about 1.3kg, plus water.

Carrying such a low weight there's no need for a sophisticated framed "breathable" rucsac, in fact most such packs weigh considerably more than 1.3kg, including my own LoweAlpine 35 Airzone.
Plus another set of my super dooper homemade bamboo trekking poles, in 3 pieces (to go inside pack as airline carryon bag) which I will glue together on arrival this time, rather than relying on nuts and bolts (failed last time.) Cost: less than £2-00 for the pair. (orders now being taken.....lol)
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
Krsta said:
In your opinion how important is to have in camino backpack two compartments and breathable carrying system? Backpack with two compartments is easier to pack in the morning. I don't need to take out everything. With breathable carrying system I'm not sweat as much. But... I'll have small backpack (30-35 liters) so I take only basic stuff. Besides how important is how much I sweat during the pilgrimage if I do laundry every day? So maybe better idea is to buy simple and light backpack. What do you think about it?
Hola Krsta,
We have just come back from our Camino, walking in cool to warm conditions. We both carry airflow rucksacks (weight approx 1.06kg) as we find them comfortable, which is very important. For afternoon sightseeing, and also around Santiago, we used the ultra lightweight Sil-sac (weight 68gms), but they would have been awful on the Camino as there is no airflow and so are sweaty even in cool weather. Brilliant for around town or though with just fleece, poncho (?) and waterbottle.
My pack (Berghaus Freeflow 25+5) has one main pocket (draw string) with 2 side pouches and a top compartment (all zipped) and also 2 side pockets for water bottles. I use the 'camel back' pouch for papers. This gives plenty of space for one complete change of clothes, waterproofs, towel and extra undies and liner socks,shampoo etc. Total weight 6kg excuding water. I 'collared and under-armed' my shirt daily with a good wash every 3 days or so, pants and liner socks daily. All quick drying so often wash and wear.
Terry' packing was similar but he also had both sleeping bags in a slightly larger pack.
My feeling would be to make sure you are comfortable with both the fit and weight of the bag, and for me that means going for the airflow type.
Buen Camino
 

Abbeydore

Veteran Member
Just a reminder, if you want a sore back, carry the weight of your pack on your shoulders - guaranteed. :twisted:

Otherwise:
Hips is perfect and a good back is a good possibility :D

Walk straight up & down too, no bent back..........
 

Pieces

Veteran Member
maybe from a hygene perspective the sweating issue is not as bad if one does laundry every day, but for a comfortability point, how comfortable is walking in a wet tee for eight hours a day, not to mention the risk of being cold or chafing....

so to me it does matter slightly even if I am not prone to sweating...

on the double compartments on the other hand, I couldnt care less, I dont bring enough stuff that it bothers me to rummage for my sleeping bag, besides even with only one compartment my bagpack has a zipper in the bottom...

I do carry a sleeping bag as i can't really sleep without a cover and am prone to being cold, so i have a mostly half full 44 Liter (osprey, comes in at 1,1 kg) but with a total weight without water of about 5,5 kilo I found thay I can quite comfortably carry it for 30+ km a day without using the hip belt (which I mostly forfeited last year as I was afraid it made my injury worse)
 

Krsta

New Member
Thanks! :)

The more I think and read about it, the more it seems to me that the best idea will be to buy Deuter Futura 32. First of all I take this backpack as a carry-on baggage. Moreover I will able to take only really, really important stuff. :) OK., it's a little bit heavy, more then one and a half kilo, but... it has great carrying system. During thirty days of pilgrimage my backpack will be a part of my back. It would be nice to have it well-matched. ;)
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
At 1 lb., 7 oz., this Osprey has an internal frame from side rods. If it fits, it is a good value!

http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___65688
Overview

Why is the Osprey Hornet is one of the hottest new backpacks of 2011? There are several reasons:

First, the Hornet series represents a radical change in the Osprey Design Philosophy away from their overbuilt backpacks to a more customizable design with removable features and lighter weight fabrics.

Second, this pack clearly signals Osprey Pack’s entry into the lightweight backpacking market, where consumers are interested in the improved comfort provided by ultralight gear.

Lastly, there’s the jaw-dropping fact that the Hornet 46 liter pack (2760 cubic inch) only weighs 25 oz fully configured or 19 oz without the Hornet’s optional 3.2 oz frame sheet and 2.8 oz floating pocket. That’s a coup for Osprey and puts them in an enviable market position for bringing lightweight backpacking to a mainstream audience.
Suspension System - 4.0 out of 5

Out of the box, the Hornet 46 has an internal foam frame sheet that weighs just 3.2 oz. In addition, lightweight plastic rods run down the inside side corners of the pack, providing excellent load transfer to the hip belt. The frame sheet provides the pack with a stiffer feel, particularly when the pack is not stuffed full, but can be removed to save weight.

The Hornet 46 has a thin 5/8 inch webbing hip belt with un-padded oblong side fins that wrap around the back of the hips. For people who have never used an ultralight backpack, the lack of a padded hip belt may feel a bit strange, however given the lighter loads that you will carry, having a thick hip belt is unnecessary and only adds more weight to a pack.

Still, the Hornet hip belt has some deficiencies. First, the hip belt pockets are set too far back on the wings of the hip belt, making them very difficult to access while wearing the pack. A better solution would have been to leave the pockets off completely or sell them as an accessory add-on. On the flip side, the hip belt adjustment system is easy to use and provides a very secure fit.

Finally, the Hornet is outfitted with perforated shoulder straps lined with mesh fabric for enhanced ventilation like many of Osprey’s other packs. While comfortable with lighter loads, they are considerably less padded than on Osprey’s other packs and can lead to shoulder soreness on higher mileage days when carrying heavier loads.
 

sally_M

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012)
I'd like to thank Rambler for the suggestion to bring all your camino gear to the store and try it out in different packs. I did just that last week, looking for something lighter than my 30-year old Gregory pack, which weighed 5 pounds empty. I expected to spend 2-3 hours there and ended up spending 6 hours. (I looked at more than just packs, and I am notoriously slow at making decisions). I tried loading my stuff into three different packs (REI Flash 52 L, Osprey Aura 50 L and Gregory Sage 55 L). I really liked the pocket organization on the REI Flash, but after wearing it for half an hour or so with all my stuff in it, it gave me a sore pressure point on the back of my hips. Same thing happened with the Osprey Aura, and the ventilation system on the Osprey Aura made me feel like the weight was hanging too far off behind me. Fortunately the Gregory Sage 55 L was still comfortable after wearing it around the store for 45 minutes or more. I bought it and took it on a training hike last weekend, and I still like it. My only concern is that on the training hike the most comfortable position was the have the "load lifter" straps pulled all the way as far as they could go. I hope that's ok.

Sally
 

30daystosantiago

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 solo and 2013 with wife and toddler
Gregory makes an excellent pack for the Camino- I used a Gregory pack on my Camino. Try the savant model.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
I would not recommend any of those due to size. They are all much too large.
The brand are good but the size should be much closer to 50 ltr or less.
Yore not going to be carrying any camping gear. Just a 2nd set of clothes and a very light sleeping gear. Both Gregory and Osprey have excellent packs in the 50 l and under range.
 

capun

Active Member
After some research and looking at price, availability and future use we ended up with the Gregory Packs. Mine is the Z-40 and my wife's is the Jade 38, a bit heavier than I wanted. Originally we were looking at the GoLite Jam series.
 

Fishern1

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walking Leon to SDC in June 2013
I am going with the Gregory Jade 38L. Still filling it with gear but currently have it filled with about 14lbs. I wish I could find shoes that fit me and feel as good as this backpack!!
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
capun said:
Darn it, I went to check the GoLite Jams. they are now sold directly online and they have a sale.

$99.99 for the 35L!! and only 770g. They were Backpacker's Magazine Editor''s Choice. I may buy it and try to sell my wife's Gregory

http://www.golite.com/Jam-35L-Pack-Unisex-P46811.aspx
I'd sure recommend if you buy a pack online that you make sure there's a good return/refund policy. Just like with boots or hiking shoes, it's wise to try before you buy. I was enamored with the light weight of the Go-Lite Jam 35, and that was the first pack I tried -- along with the slightly larger Jam 50. I'm lucky to live in the Denver area where we have three Go-Lite factory retail stores so I could try them on with a load and walk around the store. My first impression was that they both felt quite good with 15-lbs (6.8 kg). But I did not buy on first impressions, and went to REI and tried several more conventional packs in that size range. While the empty packs all weighed more than the Go-Lite Jams, the extra weight was primarily in the internal frame system which helps to distribute the weight on one's back. I went back and tried the Go-Lite packs again before making a final decision, and decided on one of the conventional internal frame packs (Kestrel 38-L), which also has an adjustable suspension system and a built-in rain cover.

This is not to say that the Go-Lite Jam-35 or Jam-50 are not good packs -- they are indeed extremely light in weight and appear to be well-made, and they really did not feel that bad on my back with a load of approximately 10% of my body weight. They are probably a great pack for a typical overnight or 2 - 3 night camping or mountaineering trip. But for a month-long trip like the Camino where the pack is worn day after day, I just felt like the conventional internal frame pack was a better choice for me. You may love the Go-Lite packs after you try them, but then again, you may not. That's why I say to be sure there's a reasonable return/refund policy if you buy online and later discover that you really like a more conventional pack better.

Jim
 

capun

Active Member
We are only doing the last 100+ Km from Sarria on, right now our goal is 10Kg's total off-body weight and 7Kg's on the packs. We are also allocating a week to travel the section, allowing for some side tours and/or last moments whims to stop somewhere.

We bought the GoLite's straight from their website, looks like now they can sell online and not going through their store or a 3rd party store. According to their website there is a 100% satisfaction warranty.

We do have the Gregory's as a fallback position, if I look at our gear list, the pack is the heaviest item and we are around 15 Lbs with 1/2L of water and some snacks and that is my load. Our "shared" items are ending up in my pack :) Her pack weight is currently about 5Kg's including the water and snacks.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
LePuy, Frances, Aragones, Ingles, Vezelay, Toulosana, Muxia, Fisterra, Portugues, Sanabres
We bought the GoLite's straight from their website
They have internal frame models that are very light weight. The frameless Jam is a great pack, but some will not like the way it carries. I describe it, somewhat unfairly, as a nylon sack with shoulder straps. Under 10kg, though, it is pretty comfortable, and you save a lot of empty weight.
 

capun

Active Member
Got the GoLite Jam 50 and started checking it out.

It is a light pack but not flimsy, the couple of other benefits is that the belt pockets are big enough to put snacks and other items (with the Gregory Z40 I needed to add an add-on pouch), a surprisingly loud whistle in the chest strap (one less item to carry) and the side pockets stretch out and hold lot bigger items.

It does feel that the bottom part is bulging out but I think by using the compression straps I should be able to narrow it a bit.

I do need to get accustomed to a frameless pack and one that does not puts the pack away from your back.

I'll let you know after I tried it fully loaded for a couple of times.
 

manoll

Peregrina 2013
Camino(s) past & future
CDN 2013, 2018
Camino Primitivo - 2013, 2018
Camino Sanabrés - 2016
Camino Portugués Coastal - 2019
ULA backpacks are awesome. I have both the Ohm and the Circuit; for the Camino the Ohm is my choice because it only weighs 29 ounces and has a 3,960 cu in capacity. If you start with a very light pack, add lightweight clothing/sleeping bag, and toiletries, etc. you'll end up carrying hardly any weight :D. One nice thing about the ULA business is that you actually speak with the owner, Brian, who is the maker of the pack. He is very easy to work with and best of all you can customize it to fit your needs. Here is the link: http://www.ula-equipment.com/index.asp

Buen Camino!

Mary
 

Caminomary525

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2014)
Well I spent a lonnng time at rei today. I wanted to compare my already purchased but not yet used rei flash 45 backpack (weight 34 oz) with the newly-heard-about osprey hornet 46 (weight 24 oz). I am currently at 16.5 lbs. on my pack spreadsheet and I want to get to no more than 14 lbs. it seemed saving 10 oz. on the pack would help a lot.

Well, I guess you get what you pay for (in weight in this case). Each pack was loaded with 10 lbs. the rei flash46 felt much sturdier and more comfortable. So I need to find more ways to lose weight.

Guess its not realistic to expect going commando is going to work for a late 60's female person. Probably moe uncomfortable than any backpack issues. Need to think some more..
 

HelenvE

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May to June 2014)
Camino Portuguese (2016)
Hello everyone. Has anyone walked the Camino with a One Planet backpack? They are made in Australia, so may only be available here. My son swears by them and has used his many times on hikes as well as for air travel. We need to try them to see how they feel etc, but I'm just wondering if anyone else has had experience with them? I'm thinking of the One Planet Tuk-Tuk which is 50l and weighs 2kg. I know they are renowned for being very robust and well made, a consideration for us given the long haul flight from Australia, but may be a bit heavy? Osprey is another possibility. We'll visit our local Scout shop which has staff with lots of expertise using the gear, so they will be able to help with fitting and advice.

We are planning our first camino (Camino Frances) for April to May 2014 starting in SJPdP and (if we make it), doing the full camino to SdC. We have never done anything like this before and really appreciate all the wise and experienced advice we can get from this forum. It's exciting (and a bit scary)!
 

John in Leeds

New Member
The Exos 46 is so well thought out in use on the move. Carries my lightweight camping gear, clothing and food, is comfortable and gives easy access to bottles, phone, pole etc without taking it off. Try one obviously but I am so pleased with mine, even got a few quid off it last year in Cotswolds.
 

jmcorrigan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk As Soon As Possible!
I give a hearty second for the Osprey Exos 46. I find it very comfortable because the weight is on my hips, and not my shoulders, and with its ventilation webbing keeping it off my back and also giving some ventilation for the hips and shoulders, I'm so much cooler and that makes me happier. Lots of well thought-out attachment points, such as the easy stowage for my poles under my left arm, and quick access to my water bottles without having to take off the pack (I'm not thrilled about a bladder used for such an extended period). And it's only 1 kilo even though it has a frame. I'm happy I picked if up on sale too :)
 

Roger Hogstrom

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2001 and 2006,Parts of Via de la Plata 2007 and 2010 Camino de Madrid 2012,Camino de Madrid 2013, Camino de Levante 2014, Camino de Madrid 2015
The best pack for me is Ospreypacks. Go to a good store and try them many times with 8-10 kg in the pack.
Among many things the Ospreypacks are very light empty, around 1,2 kg. Good luck

Roger
 

dfitzg773

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012), Camino Frances (2014), Camino Norte (Oct 2018)
I walked with a Gregory Z40 which Iliked a lot, but on my next camino I will not take a pack larger than a 30L. The more space you have the more you put in it. I had things I didnt use. It gets heavy after 29 days.

Dan
www.danscaminotravels.wordpress.com
 

Bajaracer

Camino Frances 2013 Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013) Jun-Jul SJPDP to Finisterre
I walked with a Gregory Z40 which Iliked a lot, but on my next camino I will not take a pack larger than a 30L. The more space you have the more you put in it. I had things I didnt use. It gets heavy after 29 days.

Dan
www.danscaminotravels.wordpress.com
I agree with you on a smaller pack, my next pack will be no bigger than a 30L, maybe even smaller after I test a few.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Dear Helen,
The most popular backpacks in Oz need to be robust because they are made for bushwalkers and our bush is so hard on gear - quite different conditions to the Camino. On my first Camino I took a great backpack from Paddy Pallin - and discarded it at Burgos and bought a lightweight Spanish replacement. Read this forum and particularly posts by people who have actually done the walk.
I like Aarn packs but they are a little weird and I would consider other packs that are lightweight.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I tried a few packs on the Caminos before I settled on the OMM (Original Mountain Marathon) pack from the UK. It s a 32L, weighs about 600g (21oz)when empty and has all the right straps, belts, pockets and completes. A very generous forum member sent me a Gossamer Gear pack when he visited South Africa recently but I haven't had the opportunity to test it yet. The Gossamer Gear are the lightest packs you can get (around 250g - 9oz) with no frills.
 

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