• Remove ads on the forum by becoming a donating member. More here.

Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Any advice for when you want to quit?

Vetzrah

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
July 20th
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I would probably take a bus to a city ahead (in your case, maybe Leon) and stay there for a few days in a hotel.
That would allow me to relax and gather my thoughts.

It's difficult to make decisions when we are tired, in pain, frustrated, etc.
 
I think many people feel like you do at times.
I presume this is your first Camino.
On my first I wanted to go home quite a few times.

I was injured before I even started and my injuries just got worse as I progressed.
I was on pain killers and anti inflammatories all the way. It hurt.
My wife was caring for her very sick father and I felt guilty being on Camino.
It just built up over time.

Each time I felt down, I would just focus on the hour ahead, never 'how far' I still had to go.
And I told myself to enjoy it!
I gave myself a good 'talking to'!
And I just kept going.

Some tips.
Make an effort to enjoy everything around you, however small.
The trees, the animals, the views.
Try to engage with other Pilgrims. It will lift your spirits.
Get a private room for a few days so you can rest well.
Some can be as little as 20-25 euros. I got one for 15 on my Camino this year.
Eat well, hydrate well.

If you are injured, see a local doctor. They are great.

You can do it. I'm sure your Spirits will lift soon :)

If you hole up somewhere for a few days.
I think you might end up stewing on it and over thinking things.

Why not walk a few short days instead?
Mix with others, enjoy the fresh air, keep moving slowly forward.

I was so glad that I kept going, even though I was down to 10 kms a day by the end......
 
Last edited:
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
My spouse had to leave the Camino and go home early. Thought the hip & leg pain was muscle or arthritis related but it turns out she needs a total hip replacement. She’s 59. We’ve had to wait 2 months for the surgery and it will require several months to return to normal. She tried to push through the pain on the Camino too. See a Dr. if you’re hurt. It might be something more severe. We’ll be back!😊
 
I would take the bus ahead to Leon - will get rid of the " I'm behind schedule" sensation.
If budget allows , I'd also splurge on a nice, private roomin a hotel, to have proper rest and recover physically. Then I'd take a day to enjoy Leon (the cathedral, the Romanesque Church, the templar building at the parador), to ease out camino resentments.

Then I would decide what to do.
At the moment, you sound tired, overwhelmed and disappointed. A horrible state to make any decision. Take some time off to enjoy a beautiful city in Spain and make your decision with a clearer mind.

And if you decide to continue, consider shorter stages. Private rooms. Change a few things and it may get better. You don't need to prove anything to anyone, not even to yourself.
 
First of all big hugs! No matter what you decide, it sounds like body and mind need a few moments of rest and contemplation before any decisions are made. Are you able to upgrade accommodation to something more restful, private and possibly air conditioned? Another idea is to perhaps do shorter days with more rest and relaxation time? Even though you may not walk in the way you originally planned, it may make it whole lot more pleasant? All the best wishes and take care!
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Is it worth it?

Good question. And only you can answer it. From what you write, you seem to have not the best time on the camino. Tips have been given on how to improve that. Beyond them, only you can decide if the camino is worth walking it. Nobody is forcing you to do it. Me and many others loved the experience, but if you come to the conclusion that it is just not your thing, there is not much point in forcing yourself to continue.

And yes, by all chance, many of us had moments where we wanted to quit. But if moments turn into days...
 
the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues,
Some good suggestions here and, as others have said, only you can know the right choice. But I would say that consecutive nights of not enough sleep can affect your energy and resilience - in your usual life let alone while walking a camino. So I do like the idea of booking some private accommodation for a few nights or more to catch up on some sleep coupled with a few short days and / or a rest day or two. Short days will keep you out of the worst of the afternoon. heat. These adjustments won’t do your troublesome feet and knees any harm either.

Maybe try that before deciding whether to leave the camino for now. If it doesn’t work, nothing is lost

Wishing you all the best. 😎
 
Last edited by a moderator:
With respect to previous posts, I certainly would not suggest leaving the camino and heading for a city. Find a quite place locally. Yes, splash out for a private room where you can rest up and get a couple of nights good sleep. Get your laundry done, let your knee and leg heal. Stay close to the camino where you can see, meet and chat to other pilgrims. Give it a day or so, see how you feel.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
So sorry you feel like this but know that you are not alone, many (including me when injured) have also gone through similar - doesn't lessen what you feel, but it is not "just you" and you are NOT a failure.

You are probably in or near Castrojeriz?

First - be kind to yourself ... above all, be kind to yourself.

So - I siesta most days, just an hour, and it is transforming - you are in a siesta nation, in the heat .. suffering from lack of sleep at night? Siesta!

Your stabbing foot and knee pain? In Spain pharmacists also give medical advice so go to a doctor or pharmacist and get some kind help - but in the end these pains are only helped by not walking for a couple/few days.

Soreness and headaches? What is this? Are you sure that you are keeping fully hydrated plus electrolyte sachets? (You can buy the sachets in any pharmacy). Or is it exhaustion? If neither then, again, doctor or pharmacist!

Now, none of us know if you have spare funds, nor if you are time poor - as in a booked flight home ..
So -
Did you promise yourself that you would walk every single step on your Camino? Really promise yourself? If so and you want to keep to that stop where you are, get a private room in a guest house or small hotel with your own bathroom and be kind to yourself, raise and rest that leg, use the medication the pharmacist or doctor gave you. Eat some lovely food - have treats! Sleep. Sleep. Sleep!
If not then take a bus a few days forward to a town, even Leon, and do all that there - be kind to yourself.

Saint Theresa of Avilia did the Camino in a coach and four with servants - you don't have to be puritanical about this - you are on pilgrimage, you will get to Santiago - but be kind to yourself.

You are missing home and bed and so on because you feel unloved and are exhausted - so love yourself, and rest awhile. When you get that lovely private room and sorted laundry and all that silent privacy, have a huge big cry - it is really healing, will let all the tension out, and you will feel so much better - it is not a sign of weakness, it is a healing action..

Now, during your rest and recuperation days go through everything in your rucksack and ditch everything that you can that you don't use - lighten the pack, even if you think it is light already. Then, when you get back on the road take shorter days, walk upright and relaxed like a dancer and take much shorter steps ... don't stretch your steps out, keep them short, and walk upright, smiling, in a relaxed manner, as if it is a gentle stroll in a park with a small child.

and you must let us know what happens next! keep us updated ..

oh, did I mention be kind to yourself?? ❤️
 
Last edited:
It must certainly be hard staying in sweltering albergues in this heat. This is my hottest Camino to date and I'm now in Astorga.
You could try for private rooms with air-con and even nonair-con rooms get cool enough by 10. I've really appreciated a private shower / bath this time more than ever and the air-con in some places has been heavenly.
You say you are about 6 days from Leon. Try to stay a night or two in San Zoilo monastery hotel as it will surely raise your spirits. In Sahagun a quiet place with excellent cold air-con I stayed in was San Juan Hostal.
I have had ankle pain this year and I've been using ibuprofen cream for my feet. It has really helped and not just psychologically. I also bought Bioglow anti-inflammatory cannabis spray and I've been using it on my feet too and it's great!

Whatever you decide, best of luck and if course the Camino will always be waiting for your return to complete it if you do choose to cut loose.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
As above. Skip ahead to Leon; get a room with AC and take a day or two off; get a massage and some decent sleep. Get rid of anything superfluous in your sack.

Maybe then take the bus to Astorga.

Then get on with it using shorter stages. It’ll be worth it when you get to Santiago.

As Henrythedog and others suggested, take public transport to LEON. There get an AC room for a few days. See a doctor, review, with the doc, all of your medical concerns.
Then make a decision, not now when you are on the fence.

My first camino a day before we got to Burgos Igot bitten by bedbugs, and received more than40 bites. I had an allergic reaction, and was ina lot of pain in the middle of a heatwave in September. I made it to Burgos but knew that I did not want to walk under these conditions. It took almost a month for the bite to clear with meds. A year and a half later, I returned in,I’d March to walk. What a difference it made.

If you decide to stop in Leon, you may want to return during a cooler period like late April or early May. Lots of pilgrims then but much less heat. Makes a big difference.

Whatever you decide…do what is best for your physical health! If you want to return, you’ll find a way back.
 
Thanks for all the responses- I think I want to bus to Leon and try to get to Santiago in 12 days after that. It’s not ideal but gives me great relief and is better then quitting or being miserable.

I’m in Castrojeriz right now- which is probably one of my favorites towns on the camino so far- and found an albergue with a fan. I think I was overreacting a bit when I wrote my initial message, because I feel more put together at the moment. Can I get a bus ticket at the Castrojeriz bus station or is there one online? I couldn’t find one directly from here to Leon.

This Camino was a last minute decision- I wanted to do something in between my first and second year of college and my mom brought up the Camino. A week later I was in Paris! It’s been an eye opening experience so far and I’ve already changed the direction I want to take my life. I had no expectations coming into this Camino but I know I want to finish it, even if I have to take a bus. I regret pushing myself hard over the Pyrenees and following stages- I should have warmed into it and avoided injuries. Thanks for all the help!
 
Thanks for all the responses- I think I want to bus to Leon and try to get to Santiago in 12 days after that. It’s not ideal but gives me great relief and is better then quitting or being miserable.

I’m in Castrojeriz right now- which is probably one of my favorites towns on the camino so far- and found an albergue with a fan. I think I was overreacting a bit when I wrote my initial message, because I feel more put together at the moment. Can I get a bus ticket at the Castrojeriz bus station or is there one online? I couldn’t find one directly from here to Leon.

This Camino was a last minute decision- I wanted to do something in between my first and second year of college and my mom brought up the Camino. A week later I was in Paris! It’s been an eye opening experience so far and I’ve already changed the direction I want to take my life. I had no expectations coming into this Camino but I know I want to finish it, even if I have to take a bus. I regret pushing myself hard over the Pyrenees and following stages- I should have warmed into it and avoided injuries. Thanks for all the help!


Screenshot_20230810_142403_Chrome.jpg

I think you will be ok with just showing up at the busstop tomorrow.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
If you bus to Leon, I recommend a couple of days in the fantastic Monastica Pax. It has big rooms, good AC, an excellent restaurant, friendly staff, a tranquil reading lounge, peace, a lovely bathroom and you are right in the main pilgrim complex as well as being a short walk from the cathedral.
Monastica Pax will really help to raise your spirits and prepare you for the next couple of weeks.
 
Good luck. Remember that whatever you decide it's ok. The Camino will be waiting if this is not your year to complete it. I thought I would have to stop walking on my first camino due to tendonitis, I had a few short days. Even if I only walked 8km ít felt as if I was still on Camino. I shortened my stride, a lot, I think I was over striding. I managed to finish and enjoy it. The one thing I'd advise is getting some medical advice to see if it wise for you to continue walking right now. Buen Camino
 
@Vetzrah , good to see you're feeling more positive already.
Frankly, I'm impressed. First, that you've reached out to us, a bunch of strangers, for help. That's huge. Respect.
Second, that you took the massive leap that you did, from home to the Camino. Impulsive maybe, but in a very positive way. You could have lounged around on a beach somewhere, instead you took on a personal challenge.
Third, that considering all the issues you've faced ( yes, I've been following you), your still on the Camino. You - yes, you, no one else - have overcome every obstacle to date. Even if you stopped right now, you've already covered over 300 KMs right? At your age I sure as heck hadn't walked that far in one stretch !! Well done.

On this forum you'll read time and time again, listen to your body. I'm glad you are. Rest, relax, enjoy. Be a simple tourist for a few days, enjoy the sights, a few good meals, a couple of decent night's sleep. If you then want to continue, go for it. Shorten it even further, just walk the last 100 km if needs be.
If not, take that bus to Santiago.
You've already accomplished more than most, and remember -
You can always come back - the Camino will wait for you ❤️


,
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Thanks for all the responses- I think I want to bus to Leon and try to get to Santiago in 12 days after that.
I agree with all of those who suggest getting to León, or some other place that will allow you to finish - maybe a bit past León because 12 days is a little fast to finish from León if you are already having some physical issues. For example Gronze suggests 13 days from León. Maybe choose Astorga for your "reset" point. Don't put yourself in the situation again where you are racing to get to Santiago.
 
Whether you finish the Camino or don’t, I challenge you to stop for a minute, look around and say, “I’m in Spain!” Take it all in. You are becoming an intimate part of this country by walking through its woods, streams, little towns with unique and often incredible churches. some people walk the Camino for a week at a time and then just return the next year where they left off in the end, it’s your coming out and it can be done in any way that works for you!
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I agree with all of those who suggest getting to León, or some other place that will allow you to finish - maybe a bit past León because 12 days is a little fast to finish from León if you are already having some physical issues. For example Gronze suggests 13 days from León. Maybe choose Astorga for your "reset" point. Don't put yourself in the situation again where you are racing to get to Santiago.
I agree with Astorga - it was where I started my first Camino 😀 and it gets into very nice walking right away. Perhaps recover a day or more in Leon, then get a bus to Astorga to restart.
 
Vetzrah:

What Peterexpatkiwi and henrythedog and others have said, and let me try to help a bit more.

I learned before my first Camino that there would be obstacles in my and my husband's way to prevent us finishing. I also learned (perhaps Brierley mentioned it first?) that a pilgrim usually faces three stages of obstacles.

The first set is usually physical, and typically can last a week You got that in spades, and are still acclimating to the challenges. BTW - please make sure you're replacing the salt/potassium/calcium/magnesium (commonly called electrolytes) that you're sweating out. Too much water and too little electrolytes equates to feeling like crap.

The second set is mental, which you're encountering now. The questioning of one's resolve and one's expectations is part of the process of being a pilgrim (or of doing any enduring task, I would add). Like others have said here, put yourself in a better space to make decisions, and I would add, do nothing in haste until after a couple of nights of good sleep.

The third set of challenges is, depending on your worldview, either another set of mental challenges, or a spiritual set.

Based on your account, you may not be used to facing long-term enduring physical and mental challenges, and its hard to know when to trust your feelings and when to tell them to "put a sock in it, you're gonna finish what you start."

Bottom line: Tell your expectations to stuff it. Spend a couple of nights getting good sleep and food. Practice smiling and enjoying little things, even when you don't feel like it. See a doctor for your aches/pains. Decide after all of the above.

Buen Camino.
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
Definitely don't be afraid to take a bus between cities, even a few times. I injured my foot on my camino, and that's what I did. It was tremendously helpful. Take a rest day when you can, massage your feet and knees every night. Take care of yourself, good luck to you and buen camino. ❤️
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
The wonderful thing about the Camino is that you can enjoy the experience in your own way, There is no right or wrong way to get to Santiago, (I took 4 years)..there is no demand to walk every inch...don't listen to debates or opinions about "real Pilgrims",,, if you are tired try to rest, don't give your power away to judgmental and competitive walkers...the Ego has no place on the Way..if you are in pain or ill look after yourself and seek medical attention...one year my companion fell and broke her arm and we were very well treated by the medical services and we were assisted by fellow pilgrims...all shall be well and all shall be well and all manner of things shall be well ......
 
When I was boarding the plane for my first Camino in 2000 I made a promise to myself that if I had three days in a row where I wanted to quit, that would be perfectly fine and I could go and do something else. That didn’t happen in 2000, but when I was walking in 2019 I took the option to go and do something else.

So, like others have said, I would suggest that you head to Leon, take a break and when you resume, do it with the idea that if it continues to be an awful experience, you can give yourself permission to head home to comfort. You have already proven that you can endure pain and suffering, so why prolong the ordeal?

Look back what motivated you to undertake the Camino and see if that motivation has already been satisfied. You should not view it as a failure if you decide not to continue on to Santiago. Perhaps the lesson that the Camino has for you that the Journey is as important as reaching the destination.
 
I agree with all of those who suggest getting to León, or some other place that will allow you to finish - maybe a bit past León because 12 days is a little fast to finish from León if you are already having some physical issues. For example Gronze suggests 13 days from León. Maybe choose Astorga for your "reset" point. Don't put yourself in the situation again where you are racing to get to Santiago.

Agree completely with Trecile’s advice! Exiting Leon is not inspiring. Definitely take the bus to Astorga. Alsa.com. has buses to Astorga. Astorga is a very smalll city. Easy to get around from there-you will head over another mountain and a steep downgrade into Molinesceca. Take your time. If you need to skip a few more stages do so. The only stages, if you want to get a Compostela in Santiago, that are the stages from Sarria. If you are hurting, maybe consider taking a taxi from Acebo (after Foncebadon) to Molinesceca or Ponferrada. Lots of folks ride share as well. It is a steep downhill!

BTW, I love Monastica Pax, the Hotel section…. if you can afford a private room! however the albergue is austere, not nearly as nice. and I wouldn’t recommend it.
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
You are about a day away from Boadilla, beside the albergue, en el Camino, Eduardo has a very classy hotel in Boadilla and he is a Camino saint. Next stop is Fromista, great food and several wonderful places to find a/c like Hotel San Telmo. Bus ahead to Leon, sure but why not chose San Isidora because it has a breakfast buffet fit for the Pope. Astorga is a great suggestion, there is a world class spa there and as someone else mentioned a very compact town and getting around from restaurant to restaurant is very easy.
Quit, I did that on my first Camino. The very last day shortly after I arrived in Santiago. I had been walking in torrential rainstorms for about a week and I was totally demoralized. I stood in the square and cried, went to a late mass and caught the first bus I could find that evening to get me back to Biarritz where I was living at the time.
 
Thanks for all the responses- I think I want to bus to Leon and try to get to Santiago in 12 days after that. It’s not ideal but gives me great relief and is better then quitting or being miserable.

I’m in Castrojeriz right now- which is probably one of my favorites towns on the camino so far- and found an albergue with a fan. I think I was overreacting a bit when I wrote my initial message, because I feel more put together at the moment. Can I get a bus ticket at the Castrojeriz bus station or is there one online? I couldn’t find one directly from here to Leon.

This Camino was a last minute decision- I wanted to do something in between my first and second year of college and my mom brought up the Camino. A week later I was in Paris! It’s been an eye opening experience so far and I’ve already changed the direction I want to take my life. I had no expectations coming into this Camino but I know I want to finish it, even if I have to take a bus. I regret pushing myself hard over the Pyrenees and following stages- I should have warmed into it and avoided injuries. Thanks for all the help!
Still feeling a bit better? Great. Half the battle is offloading, sometimes. I only scanned replies above, but you have the information, so stick a pin in the replies, decide, and don't look back. Buen camino.
 
The only thing I would add that I didn't see mentioned is to maybe send your backpack on ahead with one of the transfer services. We have used Jacotrans, which is only 6 Euros to send a pack ahead, on really long or hard days. Its OK to just carry what you need for the day and lighten your load once in awhile! It has saved our camino! Best of luck to you whatever you decide. ❤️
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
Yes, it is so worth it! The icing on the cake is getting to see the botafumeira swing in the cathedral in Santiago. I had to go 3 times, noon, evening & noon again, before it actually swung - has to do with how much $ they collect to pay for the incense. But remember, each village & town has its own uniqueness that you would miss if you quit. God always has a way of showing the peregrino something special if we are looking for it. Could be a creek for dipping hot feet in or a shepherd out with his sheep, Psalm 23 brought to life or someone working the vineyard - John 15, not to mention meeting people worldwide on a similar journey, sharing in a bottle of wine, pulpo or patatas bravas. See familiar face? Ask to join them. Your life will be changed. As for pain, pray & praise God & He may send you the Helper to get you through. It worked for me. I’m so glad I finished. And then I went back 3 years later & did it again with better knowledge on how to prepare ahead so I didn’t suffer blisters & scrapes. May you be lifted up to carry on!
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?


Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
Maybe stay in a private room for a few nights and catch up on your sleep. Everything is better if you are well-rested.
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
You always can go back, and continue walking. If you are not enjoying el Camino de Santiago, just stop. I did it once, got to Galicia and wasn't enjoying it. I decided to stopped and go back the next summer.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
So sorry you feel like this but know that you are not alone, many (including me when injured) have also gone through similar - doesn't lessen what you feel, but it is not "just you" and you are NOT a failure.

You are probably in or near Castrojeriz?

First - be kind to yourself ... above all, be kind to yourself.

So - I siesta most days, just an hour, and it is transforming - you are in a siesta nation, in the heat .. suffering from lack of sleep at night? Siesta!

Your stabbing foot and knee pain? In Spain pharmacists also give medical advice so go to a doctor or pharmacist and get some kind help - but in the end these pains are only helped by not walking for a couple/few days.

Soreness and headaches? What is this? Are you sure that you are keeping fully hydrated plus electrolyte sachets? (You can buy the sachets in any pharmacy). Or is it exhaustion? If neither then, again, doctor or pharmacist!

Now, none of us know if you have spare funds, nor if you are time poor - as in a booked flight home ..
So -
Did you promise yourself that you would walk every single step on your Camino? Really promise yourself? If so and you want to keep to that stop where you are, get a private room in a guest house or small hotel with your own bathroom and be kind to yourself, raise and rest that leg, use the medication the pharmacist or doctor gave you. Eat some lovely food - have treats! Sleep. Sleep. Sleep!
If not then take a bus a few days forward to a town, even Leon, and do all that there - be kind to yourself.

Saint Theresa of Avilia did the Camino in a coach and four with servants - you don't have to be puritanical about this - you are on pilgrimage, you will get to Santiago - but be kind to yourself.

You are missing home and bed and so on because you feel unloved and are exhausted - so love yourself, and rest awhile. When you get that lovely private room and sorted laundry and all that silent privacy, have a huge big cry - it is really healing, will let all the tension out, and you will feel so much better - it is not a sign of weakness, it is a healing action..

Now, during your rest and recuperation days go through everything in your rucksack and ditch everything that you can that you don't use - lighten the pack, even if you think it is light already. Then, when you get back on the road take shorter days, walk upright and relaxed like a dancer and take much shorter steps ... don't stretch your steps out, keep them short, and walk upright, smiling, in a relaxed manner, as if it is a gentle stroll in a park with a small child.

and you must let us know what happens next! keep us updated ..

oh, did I mention be kind to yourself?? ❤️
Totally agree, couldn’t said it better.
Take care of yourself ♥️
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
My only advice - no matter what you decide - it’ll ALL be good… allow yourself to let go of judgement and ego…I agree with everyone’s advice to bus further ahead …. take some time to rest, hydrate, soak In kindness and then revisit a question that only you can answer. All the best and I’ve put you in my prayers.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
I quit on my second camino. Did the Portuguese in 2016, 2021 and 2022 and didn’t quit. The big difference was not thst I never felt alone , though not often.
But in 2017 I started the Camino Frances with no prebooking. And that appeared to turn out to stressful for me.
I struggled and stopped in Burgos and went home. Felt also mixed feelings, felt frozen, couldn’t decide.
The other Camino’s I prebooked and that gives me the peace of mind to enjoy only walking, nature, connecting with others. Sleeping in private rooms.For ne that’s the way I can walk a Camino alone and enjoy it all.
Send luggage sometimes, that’s also more relaxing, though carrying your iwn backpack gives less stress to sort out every day what to pack and what to send. But that’s not a big issue.
Thus year I will start again in Leon/Astorga and will finish that Camino from 2017.
Have prebooked all.
Maybe that can make it easier for you too?
It’s different for all of us, but it’s your camino and do what makes it better for you or more doable.
First some rest in a nice private room when possible for you and then think it all over.
Hope you will do what’s the best for you.
Like to hear how you’re doing.
Sending positive vibes, be kind to yourself 🌷👣👣💛
 
If we dwell on soreness and leg problems, there is some sense in letting a physio look at your problems and, as I found out, possibly get some instructions in KT tape. Physio will apply it if you ask...
My first time out, I had lot of knee problems as my orthotics were not sufficient and my knees were hurting.
KT tape, in case you do not know, is a tape that is elastic and will be easy to remove which isn´t the case with say sports tape. you can shower with it, it lifts off after 4 days...
It will give you a respite of 4- 5 days of some comfort and support.
I have since changed the soles and have used kt tape usually after 1 week in where your legs get exhausted and they cry for restitution...
There is nothing like pain that will spoil your sleep and takes away your resilience...
So bear it out and seek some assistance
Good luck.....
 
Last edited:
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
Hi, my advice is don’t. As others have advised, seek medical advice, even just talk to a pharmacist. Regret is a heavy burden to carry. I’ve done the Francés 3 times and the third time, alone, was the best. Early on that Camino I had serious men challenges- why am I not doing a different route, the guilt of having such a wonderful wife that she lets me do these things solo, and I started out across the Pyrenees on a 36°c day with mild plantar fasciitis.
I read where you never decide in the first 7 days to quit, so I pushed through.
I was once a purist who believed you had to carry everything and walk every kilometre, but after my wife had a serious fall in Población in 2014, that view changed. Not only did we have to use public transport for a few days, to keep on schedule, and her pack was transferred for the rest of her Camino and she used transportation for a week while my son and I walked, just so she healed. My point is this. If you are four days behind, just catch up on a bus. Don’t carry all your stuff and place strain on your body, do what needs to be done. After Leon it all gets easier. I think. The Meseta has been more than a mental test for you, but just by posting here is a cry for help. My wife’s Camino, on foot, was 480 kilometres. The last day she had bad shins but would not catch a bus or taxi. We told her she had earned her certificate but she insisted on walking. I know I’ve mentioned my wife’s Camino a lot, but you are in a similar predicament and I know, with some minor tweaks , you will do it. Share your concerns with those around you. The Camino is a very supportive family. Go well, I really hope you make it, sincerely, Steve
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
So sorry you feel like this but know that you are not alone, many (including me when injured) have also gone through similar - doesn't lessen what you feel, but it is not "just you" and you are NOT a failure.

You are probably in or near Castrojeriz?

First - be kind to yourself ... above all, be kind to yourself.

So - I siesta most days, just an hour, and it is transforming - you are in a siesta nation, in the heat .. suffering from lack of sleep at night? Siesta!

Your stabbing foot and knee pain? In Spain pharmacists also give medical advice so go to a doctor or pharmacist and get some kind help - but in the end these pains are only helped by not walking for a couple/few days.

Soreness and headaches? What is this? Are you sure that you are keeping fully hydrated plus electrolyte sachets? (You can buy the sachets in any pharmacy). Or is it exhaustion? If neither then, again, doctor or pharmacist!

Now, none of us know if you have spare funds, nor if you are time poor - as in a booked flight home ..
So -
Did you promise yourself that you would walk every single step on your Camino? Really promise yourself? If so and you want to keep to that stop where you are, get a private room in a guest house or small hotel with your own bathroom and be kind to yourself, raise and rest that leg, use the medication the pharmacist or doctor gave you. Eat some lovely food - have treats! Sleep. Sleep. Sleep!
If not then take a bus a few days forward to a town, even Leon, and do all that there - be kind to yourself.

Saint Theresa of Avilia did the Camino in a coach and four with servants - you don't have to be puritanical about this - you are on pilgrimage, you will get to Santiago - but be kind to yourself.

You are missing home and bed and so on because you feel unloved and are exhausted - so love yourself, and rest awhile. When you get that lovely private room and sorted laundry and all that silent privacy, have a huge big cry - it is really healing, will let all the tension out, and you will feel so much better - it is not a sign of weakness, it is a healing action..

Now, during your rest and recuperation days go through everything in your rucksack and ditch everything that you can that you don't use - lighten the pack, even if you think it is light already. Then, when you get back on the road take shorter days, walk upright and relaxed like a dancer and take much shorter steps ... don't stretch your steps out, keep them short, and walk upright, smiling, in a relaxed manner, as if it is a gentle stroll in a park with a small child.

and you must let us know what happens next! keep us updated ..

oh, did I mention be kind to yourself?? ❤️
What a beautifully uplifting post, David!
Vetzrah, the thoughts & prayers of so many "Camino Cousins" are with you right now. ♡
I'm lying in bed after surgery, with maybe another surgery or two to go, dreaming of doing CF for the third time earlyish next year. I'm reading the forum, Googling lightest weight sleeping bags, etc ( knowing how cold it was in snow in early 2022- I wish I could send you a little handful of snow right now).
Take some calm time to rest & soak in all the suggestions offered, don't push, decide gently on the next best thing.
Not everyone's Camino is a straight through, gung-ho walk. Physical, mental, emotional & spiritual challenges seem to find the perfect opportunities to arise on the Camino. Embrace them as best you can, but make sure you embrace yourself first.

Sending lots of big hugs. We are all here for you. ♡♡♡♡♡
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.

I leave in 2 weeks for St. Jean. I am EXPECTING to want to quit probably way before you did! I'm planning to use all my resolve, lots of rest days and Tylenol to get through those tough days/nights. I prepare NOW by telling myself, "It's a pilgrimage--it's not supposed to be easy. Thousands before me have done it, I can do it too." And yes, I would feel defeated and regret giving up now. But since it's YOUR Camino, you do what you have to do. As others mentioned, take a taxi to catch up to your schedule. You can do it!
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
The Camino is like our lives. It has its ups and downs; it is full of surprises and lessons to learn. I am sure many of us have been in your situation where the thought of giving up comes to mind each time we are confronted with a challenging situation. I remember asking myself: why am I doing this? Is this a self-inflicted punishment? And then I looked up way ahead of me and the sight of other.pilgrims overcoming the same challenges encouraged me to trust in myself, to remember why I started this journey, to relive the excitement of the unique experiences that lie ahead. I also learned to take one step at a time, and to don't turn it into a race to reach Santiago . Don't hesitate to take breaks when needed. 1 or 2 days to rest and recharge. Consider talking to fellow pilgrims for support, and remember, this is your Camino; this journey is mainly about the lessons you are to learn along the way. This is about your personal growth and your sense of accomplishment as you push through these tough moments. Buen Camino
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
I’m waiting for the bus to Burgos, then I’ll take one from there to Leon. I already feel more motivated to continue. I slept about 1 hour last night because of the heat- I don’t think anyone in my hostel slept much as well. I soaked one of my shirts in water and laid it on my body which I think helped a little. My legs will probably feel better in a couple days and I’ll continue. I know that I can make it to Santiago.
 
I know that I will be in the minority here. I would always regret not walking every step from the start to the finish. In your situation, providing that I was medically Ok, I would try every other option:- transfer backpack, private accommodation, start very early, stop every 90/120 minutes for a coffee/orange juice, tortilla de patatas, eat plenty, at the finish every day after shower/bath lie on my bed and rest for an hour - sleep if I could before venturing out. Meet and chat with fellow walkers trying not to be alone and decide that I was going to finish as pain is only temporary (subject, as above, that I was medically OK).

My comment after my first long-distance walk in 2005 sums me up "A lifetime experience that I may never do again, but one that I can look back on with pride. Nobody will know what it took me to complete the Pennine Way, but I know that I came through it with determination remembering when the blisters really hurt that "pain is only temporary" the definition of temporary needs a bit of clarification!"

We are not all the same but I guess that I am happy to be uncomfortable as the achievement is then even greater. Trust that I don't appear to be too self-congratulatory accepting that others and the majority have a different and perhaps more realistic view.
 
Last edited:
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
I know that I will be in the minority here. I would always regret not walking every step from the start to the finish. In your situation, providing that I was medically Ok, I would try every other option:- transfer backpack, private accommodation, start very early, stop every 90/120 minutes for a coffee/orange juice, tortilla de patatas, eat plenty, at the finish every day after shower/bath lie on my bed and rest for an hour - sleep if I could before venturing out. Meet and chat with fellow walkers trying not to be alone and decide that I was going to finish as pain is only temporary (subject, as above, that I was medically OK).

My comment after my first long-distance walk in 2005 sums me up "A lifetime experience that I may never do again, but one that I can look back on with pride. Nobody will know what it took me to complete the Pennine Way, but I know that I came through it with determination remembering when the blisters really hurt that "pain is only temporary" the definition of temporary needs a bit of clarification!"

We are not all the same but I guess that I am happy to be uncomfortable as the achievement is then even greater. Trust that I don't appear to be too self-congratulatory accepting that others and the majority have a different and perhaps more realistic view.
Yeah I agree- I think part of me will wish I had kept walking when I am back home. Perhaps I will come back and do another Camino, but with better preparation and mental attitude. The Camino Norte sounds nice.
 
Train for your next Camino (or keep the Camino spirit alive) on Santa Catalina Island
Honestly at the moment I feel pretty bad. I have to wait 6 hours for the bus, and I’m extremely tired from last night. My legs are kind of throbbing and my feet hurt even to walk around a little bit.. I can’t wait to get to my room so I can sleep.
Burgos is a nice place. If you feel like, go inside the cathedral and look for a curious carving on a white marble arch to the left: it shows Joseph celebrating the birth of Jesus with a huge mug of beer! 🤣
Hope you can have a good rest and recover a bit, then go to Leon, and so on. All the best!
 
When you walk through the big city gate south of the cathedral there is a small park with a few nice restaurants and cafes. I had some lovely chocolate con churros there last year.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
If you bus to Leon, I recommend a couple of days in the fantastic Monastica Pax. It has big rooms, good AC, an excellent restaurant, friendly staff, a tranquil reading lounge, peace, a lovely bathroom and you are right in the main pilgrim complex as well as being a short walk from the cathedral.
Monastica Pax will really help to raise your spirits and prepare you for the next couple of weeks.
I second Pax - you can also attend vespers in the chapel next door whether you are religious or not - mesmerising! You can also visit the adjoining Albergue to do your washing and then hang out with other pilgrims if you prefer not to be alone
 
Thanks for all the responses- I think I want to bus to Leon and try to get to Santiago in 12 days after that. It’s not ideal but gives me great relief and is better then quitting or being miserable.

I’m in Castrojeriz right now- which is probably one of my favorites towns on the camino so far- and found an albergue with a fan. I think I was overreacting a bit when I wrote my initial message, because I feel more put together at the moment. Can I get a bus ticket at the Castrojeriz bus station or is there one online? I couldn’t find one directly from here to Leon.

This Camino was a last minute decision- I wanted to do something in between my first and second year of college and my mom brought up the Camino. A week later I was in Paris! It’s been an eye opening experience so far and I’ve already changed the direction I want to take my life. I had no expectations coming into this Camino but I know I want to finish it, even if I have to take a bus. I regret pushing myself hard over the Pyrenees and following stages- I should have warmed into it and avoided injuries. Thanks for all the help!
I walked Leon to Santiago in 12 days It took 7 to 8 hours a day as I am 76 yrs old with two steel knies. You can make it but you can also make it a bit easiet by taking a taxi from Rabanal to the iron cross and also down hill to the next village .I met a young lady who had feet filled with blisters who took that ride just to have a break. The driver stopped by the cross and helped her to leave a stone by the cross. Then she walked with me all the way to Santiago - slowly
 
I think many people feel like you do at times.
I presume this is your first Camino.
On my first I wanted to go home quite a few times.

I was injured before I even started and my injuries just got worse as I progressed.
I was on pain killers and anti inflammatories all the way. It hurt.
My wife was caring for her very sick father and I felt guilty being on Camino.
It just built up over time.

Each time I felt down, I would just focus on the hour ahead, never 'how far' I still had to go.
And I told myself to enjoy it!
I gave myself a good 'talking to'!
And I just kept going.

Some tips.
Make an effort to enjoy everything around you, however small.
The trees, the animals, the views.
Try to engage with other Pilgrims. It will lift your spirits.
Get a private room for a few days so you can rest well.
Some can be as little as 20-25 euros. I got one for 15 on my Camino this year.
Eat well, hydrate well.

If you are injured, see a local doctor. They are great.

You can do it. I'm sure your Spirits will lift soon :)

If you hole up somewhere for a few days.
I think you might end up stewing on it and over thinking things.

Why not walk a few short days instead?
Mix with others, enjoy the fresh air, keep moving slowly forward.

I was so glad that I kept going, even though I was down to 10 kms a day by the end......
Great advice 🙏
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Honestly at the moment I feel pretty bad. I have to wait 6 hours for the bus, and I’m extremely tired from last night. My legs are kind of throbbing and my feet hurt even to walk around a little bit.. I can’t wait to get to my room so I can sleep.
Dear Pilgrim,
Please make sure you get your electrolytes, the heat and the exertion is enough to give you headaches and make your legs ache at night. You may be consuming lots of water and think you are well hydrated, but you may not be replacing the salts you are losing causing your legs to throb at night.

Sending you best wishes on your journey. Buen Camino🙏
 
Thanks, I might go check that out. I’ve just been half sleeping on a bench for the last few hours outside of the cathedral, listening to some live music. I feel a bit better now.
I’m waiting for the bus to Burgos, then I’ll take one from there to Leon. I already feel more motivated to continue. I slept about 1 hour last night because of the heat- I don’t think anyone in my hostel slept much as well. I soaked one of my shirts in water and laid it on my body which I think helped a little. My legs will probably feel better in a couple days and I’ll continue. I know that I can make it to Santiago.
Hope you feel better. I start in Leon in september in a nice hotel, 13 Suites. Must be a beautiful city and beautiful to explore.
Buen Camino 🌷
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
I would probably take a bus to a city ahead (in your case, maybe Leon) and stay there for a few days in a hotel.
That would allow me to relax and gather my thoughts.

It's difficult to make decisions when we are tired, in pain, frustrated, etc.
I did that. Did me a world of good.
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
I'd go spend a few days in Leon, then go home.
The Camino will be there when you're ready to return.
August is a vicious time to walk in my opinion, for all the reasons you listed.
Maybe try it again in the Spring?
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
Leon is a good rest stop - get a private room with ac and refresh. The cathedral is worth a day's look, lots of other things to explore as well. BTW there are no rules that say you can't hop a train to Leon - they you can continue on or return to your stopping point as you like. Or decide to return another time.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I’m waiting for the bus to Burgos, then I’ll take one from there to Leon. I already feel more motivated to continue. I slept about 1 hour last night because of the heat- I don’t think anyone in my hostel slept much as well. I soaked one of my shirts in water and laid it on my body which I think helped a little. My legs will probably feel better in a couple days and I’ll continue. I know that I can make it to Santiago.
When you have rested up in Leon, as advised earlier, count how many days you have and then calculate short days for yourself. So consider bussing again ahead to make your trek from here on out more relaxed so that you can meditate rather than suffer. Or, continue on to Astorga and rest there. My daughter and I skipped ahead for similar reasons, but not enough and had to skip again. Just keep that in mind. God bless and you are doing great.
 
Hi Vetzrah

I hope you feel better! It was a good first step for you to rant, do it as much as you need!
Nobody is judging you and there is no need to be excessively hard on yourself.
Yes, some tenacity is needed in life, but the Camino doesn't expect you to hurt yourself!
Understand yourself, accept any limitations you may have and be ready to adapt.
Good luck!

Oh,... have you thought about the option to rent a bike? It's much easier to cycle flats or downhills rather than walking on painful and sore feet and if you encounter a steep hill you can always push. This could be an easy way to catch up.
I am sure on the CF there are bike rental companies that deliver to your location and you can drop the bike off in SdC or anywhere else on the CF.
 
Last edited:
I would probably take a bus to a city ahead (in your case, maybe Leon) and stay there for a few days in a hotel.
That would allow me to relax and gather my thoughts.

It's difficult to make decisions when we are tired, in pain, frustrated, etc.
Good advice 😍
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
Take a rest day or to in an air conditioned hostel, hotel of airbnb
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
We started our first Camino in 2019, another route in 2021 and lastly this past spring. You never know what the future holds, for me it is stage 4 stomach cancer. If you really love the Camino, as we do there is an obvious answer;keep going as you are fortunate to be there. Buen Camino Pilgrim 🚶🏼‍♀️
 
Is it worth it?
You came this far and I think most people are never quite satisfied if they go home early. Shorter days, transport your pack, run up a credit card bill to stay in hotel rooms, maybe seek medical advice. Yes, all that. But finish.

In the big picture of things, unless you're deeply religious, of course the Camino isn't worth it.

So?

I think the fact that you're bothering to post about it here means it's worth it to you.

Two days into my Camino I injured my foot so bad that I couldn't walk more than that a few hundred yards. I ended up buying a used bicycle and saddlebags and finishing it that way. And I also couldn't easily sleep in the Albergues and ended up blowing my budget out of the water by staying in private rooms often.

It left me unsatisfied and yearning to come back and walk it, but at least I bloody well finished the thing!

And it sounds like you're on your way again, so bravo!
 
Last edited:
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I think many people feel like you do at times.
I presume this is your first Camino.
On my first I wanted to go home quite a few times.

I was injured before I even started and my injuries just got worse as I progressed.
I was on pain killers and anti inflammatories all the way. It hurt.
My wife was caring for her very sick father and I felt guilty being on Camino.
It just built up over time.

Each time I felt down, I would just focus on the hour ahead, never 'how far' I still had to go.
And I told myself to enjoy it!
I gave myself a good 'talking to'!
And I just kept going.

Some tips.
Make an effort to enjoy everything around you, however small.
The trees, the animals, the views.
Try to engage with other Pilgrims. It will lift your spirits.
Get a private room for a few days so you can rest well.
Some can be as little as 20-25 euros. I got one for 15 on my Camino this year.
Eat well, hydrate well.

If you are injured, see a local doctor. They are great.

You can do it. I'm sure your Spirits will lift soon :)

If you hole up somewhere for a few days.
I think you might end up stewing on it and over thinking things.

Why not walk a few short days instead?
Mix with others, enjoy the fresh air, keep moving slowly forward.

I was so glad that I kept going, even though I was down to 10 kms a day by the end......
Such good advice.
 
So, you have loads of comments, and I didn’t read thru them. I hope this is not horrid repetition. You need to find a place where you can rest up a few days. I haven’t done the Frances, but where I walked one could find very sympathetic hosts who would grant all-day access the thé gîte, supply ice for the injury, etc. I don’t know about Spain, but France has some great anti-inflammatoires (by prescription) that will rid you of all pain. Also, you don’t say how many days you’ve been walking, but the first bit is the hardest. Good luck and bon chemin!
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
I feel for you because I wanted to quit so many times. I think if you are feeling torn between finishing and quitting that you will feel better a month from now if you look back and know you did finish. But if the heat and environment are really getting to you, of course take care of yourself.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
Can you spend a few nights in a private room in Leon? You will feel better with sleep and rest.
 
I feel for you because I wanted to quit so many times. I think if you are feeling torn between finishing and quitting that you will feel better a month from now if you look back and know you did finish. But if the heat and environment are really getting to you, of course take care of yourself.
Hope you feel some better 🌷
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I would take the bus ahead to Leon - will get rid of the " I'm behind schedule" sensation.
If budget allows , I'd also splurge on a nice, private roomin a hotel, to have proper rest and recover physically. Then I'd take a day to enjoy Leon (the cathedral, the Romanesque Church, the templar building at the parador), to ease out camino resentments.

Then I would decide what to do.
At the moment, you sound tired, overwhelmed and disappointed. A horrible state to make any decision. Take some time off to enjoy a beautiful city in Spain and make your decision with a clearer mind.

And if you decide to continue, consider shorter stages. Private rooms. Change a few things and it may get better. You don't need to prove anything to anyone, not even to yourself.
This reminds me a bit of the movie The Way where just after they hit rock bottom, had a fight and he ended up in jail, he took luxury rooms for them all in the Parador in Leon and it lifted their spirits.
Maybe a bit of rest in comfort will do the trick for your body and spirits.
If that doesn’t help then perhaps bus to Sarria and walk the last 100 and head home. You don’t need to finish it if you are not getting anything but pain out of it.
People often say that the Camino is the place where you learn lessons about yourself. Perhaps there are lessons if you try to analyse what you are feeling.
I was in great pain for 22 days with tendinitis but I pushed on and enjoyed all the scenery, companionship, and food. My husband kept asking how I was and I realised that I was a person who could endure pain without complaining or wanting shortcuts or a taxi/bus. It was a good lesson to learn about myself and it could only come through facing suffering.
 
So there is nothing that says you have to walk Frances. You could bail out to Ourense, have some days in the hot springs to heal your body up and relax, then do a final 100km from there. It is a much more interesting camino, with nicer scenery.

Or more radical, walk from Porto.

So far the Frances seems to have brought you a lot of pain and dare I say suffering. Maybe it's time to cut your losses and try a different path. You can always come back and hammer it next year. There is no hard rule that says you have to stay on a single route. You can mix and match as much as you want. ;)
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
@Vetzrah

How/where are you today?
Right now I’m about 15 km from Santiago. I’m about to stop soon for the day and finish early tomorrow morning. About a week ago I took a bus to Astorga, walked a couple days to Ponferrada and ran into some Achilles’ tendon trouble. I decided to ride to Sarria and finish from there, since I didn’t know how well my legs would hold up and I wanted to at least walk the last 100 km. I think it was the right decision!

The last 100km are a totally different feeling so I’m glad I got to experience so much on the first half of the Camino. Overall this was a great experience- I’ve been able to think a lot and change the direction I want to take my life. I can’t believe I was about to join the military before I came here! I know from my posts it sounded like a lot of complaining but I only shared the most difficult parts because I needed help, thanks everyone for the support!
 
Right now I’m about 15 km from Santiago. I’m about to stop soon for the day and finish early tomorrow morning. About a week ago I took a bus to Astorga, walked a couple days to Ponferrada and ran into some Achilles’ tendon trouble. I decided to ride to Sarria and finish from there, since I didn’t know how well my legs would hold up and I wanted to at least walk the last 100 km. I think it was the right decision!

The last 100km are a totally different feeling so I’m glad I got to experience so much on the first half of the Camino. Overall this was a great experience- I’ve been able to think a lot and change the direction I want to take my life. I can’t believe I was about to join the military before I came here! I know from my posts it sounded like a lot of complaining but I only shared the most difficult parts because I needed help, thanks everyone for the support!
Congratulations, Vetzrah. You have inspired more people than you will ever know! Best wishes for the future!
Own it, just like you did your Camino!
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
Right now I’m about 15 km from Santiago. I’m about to stop soon for the day and finish early tomorrow morning. About a week ago I took a bus to Astorga, walked a couple days to Ponferrada and ran into some Achilles’ tendon trouble. I decided to ride to Sarria and finish from there, since I didn’t know how well my legs would hold up and I wanted to at least walk the last 100 km. I think it was the right decision!

The last 100km are a totally different feeling so I’m glad I got to experience so much on the first half of the Camino. Overall this was a great experience- I’ve been able to think a lot and change the direction I want to take my life. I can’t believe I was about to join the military before I came here! I know from my posts it sounded like a lot of complaining but I only shared the most difficult parts because I needed help, thanks everyone for the support!
I am happy for you ! It’s a big change in your direction after the Camino . Deeply respect ♥️
 
A final update…

The day before Santiago I magically happened to meet someone attending my university in my random corner of the USA. It’s truly insane that this would happen, given the number of hostels and all the times I delayed my plans, and the vast number of people on the Camino. He even is staying in my old dorm from last year, just a few minutes walk from my new dorm.

Instead of going to Santiago alone, I got to spend two days with a fast new friend, who I will get to see in a few weeks when school starts! Truly a lovely and amazing experience, I can’t imagine a better way to end my trip. Currently in the Santiago airport.

Vetzrah
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Well done Vetzrah - delighted for you that your Camino ended on a high, and with a new friend.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
Hey my friend. Whilst it is a pilgrimage I never considered it an endurance test. Life is a process and it should be joyful more than not. Each day on my Camino I found myself learning and eventually celebrating that the moment I was in was the destination - not the cathedral or the coast or the zero marker. If it’s seriously making you unhappy maybe look for joy elsewhere - contemplation or solace needn’t be tied to 767kms of walking. Go well.
 
Hey my friend. Whilst it is a pilgrimage I never considered it an endurance test. Life is a process and it should be joyful more than not. Each day on my Camino I found myself learning and eventually celebrating that the moment I was in was the destination - not the cathedral or the coast or the zero marker. If it’s seriously making you unhappy maybe look for joy elsewhere - contemplation or solace needn’t be tied to 767kms of walking. Go well.

😉 See post #80 😉

He made it!
 
Hello again..

Thanks everyone for the help when I lost my shoes, had uncontrollable nose bleeds and was feeling socially anxious. Now I have a new problem, which is I want to go home but I also want to finish.

I’m sure others have felt like this- the endless nights of only 4-5 hours of sleep in hot august albergues, the stabbing foot pain and knee pain which never seems to go away but is still manageable.. the headaches and soreness. I think I’m slightly suffering but I still want to finish this. I’m about 4-5 days behind my schedule because of the aforementioned leg troubles which has caused my moral to drop a bit. I miss the comforts of my old life, but my heart is urging me to finish even though I’m struggling and not even half way there. I know I would feel like a failure if I went home but the walking every day doesn’t feel good.

Is it worth it? Is this something everyone feels at some point? Should I listen to the part of me that wants to sleep in my air conditioned house and recover my body or should I push on through the heat and reach the end despite my suffering?

Right now I’m thinking of getting to Leon in about 6 days and deciding then. Anyways, thanks for letting me rant.
I’ve never done a Camino as yet, planning for next year. But I just wanted to jump in with something they tell you in Basic Training in the Marine Corp: live 30 minutes at a time. Get through that 30 minutes and then decide if you can do another. If the answer is yes, do the 30 minutes. If the answer is no, do the next 20 minutes. If not possible, do 10, 5, even 2 minutes. Again and again. This is how soldiers get through battles, loud, scary, terrifying bloody battles. They live 5 minutes at a time. Don’t think about minute 6, just continue to minute 4.59…
I’ve not been in battle either, but in the bad times I’ve had, this has gotten me through.
One step at a time.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
First of all big hugs! No matter what you decide, it sounds like body and mind need a few moments of rest and contemplation before any decisions are made. Are you able to upgrade accommodation to something more restful, private and possibly air conditioned? Another idea is to perhaps do shorter days with more rest and relaxation time? Even though you may not walk in the way you originally planned, it may make it whole lot more pleasant? All the best wishes and take care!
Yes, that's a good Idea. I'm just going in to my second week and I've been feeling g exhausted and despondent. I stayed in nice pensions whenever I feel wrecked. I also feel,as a senior, rest days are more Important. So im going totake at least one per week.❤️
 
Yes, that's a good Idea. I'm just going in to my second week and I've been feeling g exhausted and despondent. I stayed in nice pensions whenever I feel wrecked. I also feel,as a senior, rest days are more Important. So im going totake at least one per week.❤️
"Just going into your second week" should have been front and centre in your original post! I crashed and burned on day 10. I was stressed and anxious and VERY grumpy. Could not abide the noise at mealtimes, and frankly wanted to throw in the towel. I decided to rest. I took a day off, stayed in a small town and gite, slept, relaxed and enjoyed the coffee. The next day I felt fantastic and ready to head out again. I found on Day 21 a similar mood overtook me - My knee was brutally painful, I was taking allergy meds instead of anti-inflammatories, got hopelessly lost, etc. I called ahead to the gite where I was planning on staying, and they said "come early and abide for a while". The next day I wandered about the town, sat in their garden, and just chilled. By the following day I was ready to hit the road, spirits buoyed and energy fine. Rest days make all the difference.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
Day 4 for me last year, well Day 2-4. I almost booked a ferry back. I have ASD and I had decided for some hare brained reason to walk for 7 weeks. But the reality didn't hit until i was sat in my tent at the Cabo Mayor campsite up by the lighthouse in Santander. It was that WTF am I doing here. i talked to my sister and in the end I decided to do it one day at a time. I started out by walking up to Santilliana del Mar and set up camp for two days, then abandonded and went back to Santander. I had read about a slow train to Oviedo that takes a long time and i worked out how to get it and what time it left the next morning and that was the start of my adventure. A six hour journey through the hills and mountains to Oviedo and a night at the monastery albergue. The next day I was going to Leon to walk the Salvador and life wasn't going to be simple when my phone sims locked me out of the phone and that was an adventure in it's own right (finding a vodaphone shop in Oviedo that existed and was open).

In the end I walked a couple of stages on the Norte, a couple of stages on the Salvador, most of the Frances to Sarria, Sanabres from Ourense, Ingles from Ferrol and Portuguese from Vigo.

I had so many meltdowns and so many points where I sat down and considered quitting, but then decided to just walk another km and if all else failed, get on a bus and go somewhere and have a night around people, maybe go look around a church or do something different.

We are human and most of us struggle at some point. You just have to break the task down and apply common sense. I would say people i met along the way helped me further towards completion more than anything else. I also went from being scared to interact with Spanish people to being mostly happy with interactions (mostly via Google Translate).

If you want to quit, don't. Like everyone on this thread has said, take a break. Make a list of what is making it hard for you and work out ways to overcome them. If at the end of the process you feel no better and can't mitigate the factors causing you an issue, then maybe it is time to quit walking, but if you have time, go explore Spain. I met a girl in an albergue on the Portuguese last year who was in tears and was basically operating on no real sleep for 4-5 days. She had been sold the postcard version of the Camino by a University friend. Then she discovered expectation vs reality. I sat with her for an hour or two and in the end I told her maybe she should. She was irrational and continuing beyond there wouldn't have done her any favours. it happens. Camino is hard, that's how it's supposed to be. You can make it easier, but walking for a week or seven is not easy. if you don't have some stubbornness or a hardy spirit, you will struggle and if you can't think laterally when encountering problems, then quitting is where you might end up. :)
 
Camino is hard, that's how it's supposed to be. You can make it easier, but walking for a week or seven is not easy
Hmm, lovely post @Pathfinder075 but I have to disagree with some of it. Yes, Camino can be hard, on feet and on our very selves. That’s not how it’s supposed to be. It’s supposed to be a journey to a place. That journey, especially the physical journey, can be hard on some. The emotional/spiritual journey can be even harder on some. But I notice you butterflied; skipped and hopped and fluttered between point and point. To my mind that is not undertaking Camino that is visiting Camino with out buy-in or commitment. The girl you met in Portugal? Perhaps she would have been better served by the advice that “tomorrow’s gonna be another day” or even “just book a Hostale for the night, have a bath, sleep till 10:00”.

I’ll repeat Camino isn’t supposed to be “hard”. No more than life is supposed to be hard. Some times some people find bits of the process difficult; daunting even. That’s what Camino offers: the opportunity to overcome obstacles, learn to achieve and even that being scared isn’t scary. Once anyone has done the one thing that they believed they couldn’t do there is absolutely nothing that they can’t do

Buen Camino - it’s only a way to somewhere 😉
 
I tried a lot of stuff with the girl on the Portuguese. Her complaints included "there are too many men on the Camino and they all snore so I can't sleep" and "everyone is depressed and seeking a point to there life and it makes me want to scream". I wasn't the only one who tried to convince her to stay. The hospitalera spent 30 mins and two other pilgrims also tried, but she was too far gone. From what she described she hadn't really slept since Porto and this was two stages after Vigo. But sometimes you have to let a person admit defeat. I couldn't fix her problems, neither could the other three people. She was walking on limited money and couldn't afford single accommodation, so dorms were the only option left. People snore in dorms, it's just part and parcel. I wish there was more I could have done, but after talking to her for two hours she started to get abusive, so i bugged out and went back to my bunk.

I also admit I did hop and skip around last year, but I factor in certain things. I already have a compostella for Sarria to Santiago (2016) and the thought of walking with 1000+ people at a time when Covid is still a thing and with me being immunosuppressed, it struck me as a wiser idea to go elsewhere. I still walked over 600km in total. Still hung another compostella on the wall (didn't want it but my parents insisted). There were a lot of reasons why and why not, we are all different. Most of mine come from having bad health and having to make choices based on that point. I still managed to walk from Leon to Sarria via Samos and the beautiful pilgrim. Still did a full Ingles. Did the Sanabres from Ourense and made it to Oseira (but couldn't find the mass at the monastery) this time. The Vigo/Portuguese was admittedly to kill time. I had no interest in walking that route, but needed to kill seven days. It was enjoyable and I met lots of Americans, but I wouldn't do it again. It was too busy.

I didn't do Salvador because I couldn't make the stages. My shoes created blisters and I had to buy new shoes in Santander. When i got to Leon and started the Salvador they weren't bedded in and I was barely making 15km a day. i wouldn't have made the stages after La Robla and I had some health issues as well. After talking to the Hospitalera at the albergue, she said I needed to make 20-30km the next day and it only got harder. I realised I couldn't do that so I pulled out. I was mentally, barely holding things together at that point.

I found walking hard. Walking 32km in a day wasn't easy either. I had some long days on occasion, Rabanal to Ponferrada being one after I found the albergue I wanted to use had dogs (and i'm massively allergic to dogs).

You are right in a lot of ways, I did pick and mix it a lot. But I also did entire sections in entirety. I never got to walk from Leon and Astorga on my first two times, so I decided I wanted to walk from Leon to Sarria when I got on the Frances and that goal was ticked off. I also wanted to go to Samos and Oseira monasteries and I did that too. Also wanted to swim in as many rivers as possible, the one at Oseira is brutally cold. :p For me I set some goals and just went for it. :)

Sorry this turned out longer than I intended.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I’ll make this statement. It is not made in any intent as a criticism of you or the of “the girl in Portugal” or of anyone else who has decided that Camino will be their great adventure. A Camino to the shrine of the Apostle, to the bones of one who may have touched the very divine is not “let’s have some fun in Spain” and those who confuse the two are, often, those most confused by the experience
 
A Camino to the shrine of the Apostle, to the bones of one who may have touched the very divine

This phrase is so evocative. On my less than two years on this forum, it has always stood out to me. And almost always it is you, Tincatinker, who says it. Thank you. In each circumstance, it really makes me think.
 
The camino is hard. Lots of people don't like that, many are shocked to discover that is so, the flashy ads of youthful smiling pilgrims will never let on, but it's true. Overcoming hardship is part of why it feels so amazing to arrive.
The Camino is also not for everyone. Lots of people don't like that, but that's true, too. It often takes more character to admit this trail is not your cup of tea, pack up and go home, than it does to push on through and whine and moan all the way, and maybe do permanent damage to your body or your relationships.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I walked the Portuguese from Lisbon, it rained the first 5 days walking through ankle deep mud & puddles, so my feet got lots of blisters, then 20 days of heat with very few places to rest up, pulled muscles & swollen knee, then arriving in Vigo I face planted crossing the street resulting in a bloody nose, a goose egg on my forehead where an ambulance was called to tend me but since I did not passed out, I refused going to the hospital and if all of this is not reason to quit, I do not know what is because I saw people quit for less. I arrived in Santiago on schedule - all I am saying is the Camino tests what you are made of and if you need to quit for whatever reason, you quit as long as you can live with your decision.
 

Most read last week in this forum

I am on CF right now and just stopped in Os Arroxos Crispeta bar in Trabadelo. A Spanish pilgrim had exactly the same order as me and he paid 6.50 euro and I was charged 10.00 euro!!! It is not...
I noticed the other thread about arranging for the Botafumeiro to swing and it suggests the cost is circa €300. Now if I was flying half way around the world and I wanted to see the Botafumeiro...
Hola, todos. It seems entirely likely this has been asked before, but I haven't been able to find any discussion. If (when!) one decides to have a day off from walking, is it possible to stay in...
Hi we will be in Pamplona on 28th July. We are Irish mostly from Armagh and would like to know where best to watch the all ireland gaa football final. Any Galway pilgrims walking too. Would...
In case you want to recreate this cake, here is an easy (and gluten-free) recipe, from a fairly well-known food maven. She's American but has lived and worked in Spain for a number of years...
Hi Camino pilgrims Thank you for having me on your forum. I will be travelling the Camino again this September,my second trip, and was wondering if it is acceptable to stay in the hostels and...

❓How to ask a question

How to post a new question on the Camino Forum.

Similar threads

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

This site is run by Ivar at

in Santiago de Compostela.
This site participates in the Amazon Affiliate program, designed to provide a means for Ivar to earn fees by linking to Amazon
Official Camino Passport (Credential) | 2024 Camino Guides
Back
Top