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Anyone use Hoka One One shoes?

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Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
I purchased the Tor Summit hiking shoes. Waterproof with Vimram soles.
Experience tells me never to buy shoes without Vibram soles.
I also bought, for training, the Hoka Speed Goats. Very well ventilated, also with Vibram soles. A much more lightly constructed shoe. They held up well and imo would be suitable for late spring/summer/early autumn Caminos.
Regards
Gerard
 

Jan_D

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aragones (2011)
Frances (2012)
Norte (2013, 2014)
Hospitalera (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I bought a pair as I'd heard they were great for dealing with Portuguese cobblestones. Initially a bit hesitant as they're not always the most aesthetically pleasing (those colours), but now I'm a total convert. They literally give you a spring in your step! I was worried the 'squishy-ness' would affect stability, but the soles are wide so they feel stable once on. They're also very light weight. I've never been obsessed with gear, but these really have changed my walking experience. Have had them for about 8 months and they seem to be holding up well.
 
Last edited:

Sunbun

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Zip
Best shoes ever! I walked the entire CF in them in September/ October. Not a single blister and so springy. I also have the boots, but the tennis shoes/trainers are sooo much more comfy. Didn’t get a lot of rain, so can’t comment on that part.
 

josephmcclain

Active Member
YES!! I finished my first Camino Frances in November and wore my Clifton HOKAS all the way. I never got a blister and still am wearing the shoes. They were a major factor in my being able to finish the Camino in good shape at age 74! At the end of each long day, I would literally thank my HOKAS for being there!
 

josephmcclain

Active Member
I purchased the Tor Summit hiking shoes. Waterproof with Vimram soles.
Experience tells me never to buy shoes without Vibram soles.
I also bought, for training, the Hoka Speed Goats. Very well ventilated, also with Vibram soles. A much more lightly constructed shoe. They held up well and imo would be suitable for late spring/summer/early autumn Caminos.
Regards
Gerard
I love HOKAS and would like to try the hiking boots. How are you liking them as compared to the regular shoes. I have Clifton’s and Bondis
 

Finnie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2015 Camino Portugese (April 2016)
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
I walked the Portugues last year in Hokas and they were incredibly comfortable on the cobbles and asphalt. I had just recovered from a long bout of PF so I was a bit paranoid about protecting my feet. I highly recommend Hokas unless you have very narrow feet, I think they tend to be on the wide side.
Hope this helps
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I walked the Portugues last year in Hokas and they were incredibly comfortable on the cobbles and asphalt. I had just recovered from a long bout of PF so I was a bit paranoid about protecting my feet. I highly recommend Hokas unless you have very narrow feet, I think they tend to be on the wide side.
Hope this helps
Do you think they would be good on slippery rocks in rain? The soles are kind of different, not vibram, but interesting.
 

kmccue

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
After breaking my calcaneous I became a hoka convert. Will do Portuguese in September in the low hiking shoe... love love love
 

mcopeland

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - April-June, 2016
Portuguese Lisbon-Santiago - October, 2017
Love, love, loved them. After Keens on the Frances I used them on the Portuguese, and they were great on the cobblestones. Yes, they have thick soles, but if you look inside the shoe you will see that the foot bed sits low in the shoe, providing lots of stability (my balance is not the best). The support is good too. I have super feet but left them at home. Didn't need them.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
All these positive comments are making me feel more confident about these shoes. Thank you!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF August to September 2016
I walked in Hoka Challenger trail running shoes. I did get one very small blister on the outer side of my heel, but I think that was more the result of my sock. Very, very comfortable and held up well! I love them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances/SJPP 2015, 2016, 2018
Way of St. Francis, Italy 2017
Portuguese/Finisterre 2018 (2019)
I love HOKAS and would like to try the hiking boots. How are you liking them as compared to the regular shoes. I have Clifton’s and Bondis
I wore the Hoka tor summit mid on 3 Caminos and loved them. Unfortunately, they have discontinued this boot and I don't feel the same about the replacement. It is not nearly as cushy. I still see that they have the Hoka tor summit low which I have and like also. I bought every pair of the boots in my size that I could find and am good for a few years. ;)
 

Finnie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2015 Camino Portugese (April 2016)
Much as I love the Hokas ( challengers) for Camino hiking I find the fabric on the uppers goes into holes fairly easily. Probably they were developed for running rather than hiking on rugged terrain like the Norte.
 

Walking Lover

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CdS from Leon to Santiago, June 16, 2016 to June 30, 2016.
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
I wore Hoka on two Caminos, same shoe that I run in.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
I love HOKAS and would like to try the hiking boots. How are you liking them as compared to the regular shoes. I have Clifton’s and Bondis
The waterproof Hoka Tor Summit shoe and boot models are sturdier, therefore slightly heavier. I was anticipating using them in rain/mud and my feet don't like getting wet. Another reason for selecting them was my intention to travel in Europe, attending family gatherings, going out in the evening. They are more acceptable as evening wear. I'd feel like I was wearing a Xmas tree on each foot with the other colourful models.
Regards, I'm on my way, (transiting in Singapore airport typing this)
Gerard
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Regards, I'm on my way, (transiting in Singapore airport typing this)
Gerard
Stop typing on your phone @gerardcarey Look up, look around you - I’m sure there’s a atory happening somewhere nearby!
Eagerly anticipating your next installment.
 

gerardcarey

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF x2, CPL
Stop typing on your phone @gerardcarey Look up, look around you - I’m sure there’s a atory happening somewhere nearby!
Eagerly anticipating your next installment.
You telling me off again? Us kiwi blokes need a little direction now and then right? I'm off up the Acropolis tomorrow morn. Even St Paul preached up there. He was on a pilgrim's way also eh?
Regards
Gerard
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
You telling me off again? Us kiwi blokes need a little direction now and then right? I'm off up the Acropolis tomorrow morn. Even St Paul preached up there. He was on a pilgrim's way also eh?
Regards
Gerard
Coming soon to a pilgrim forum near you.... @gerardcarey ‘s first sermon!
 

Janbrovold

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2013
Francés (2015)
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
My husband and i both have worn them on two Caminos, and we loved them! Planning to walk again in October and will be wearing them (new ones) again. My first pair showed hardly any wear after finishing the Francés. They dried easily in the rain and feel like floating on clouds. Buen Camino!!
 

Elisha

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning April/May 2018
I have Speedgoats; I’m taking them on my first Camino in 3 weeks, starting from SJPDP on 20th April. They’re a fantastic shoe, I just hope they hold up to the elements, taking into consideration the rain & cold on the Frances at the moment.
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
We were in a sports store the other day supposedly buying raincoats for the kids.....I remembered this thread.....I tried on all their Hokas.....both in my normal size and bigger.....they do feel floaty....but they also pinch my toes so I won’t be joining this club!
 

Paul nelson

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-2015
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
Hokas are the best---wore them on frances and Podiensis
 
Camino(s) past & future
😱
We were in a sports store the other day supposedly buying raincoats for the kids.....I remembered this thread.....I tried on all their Hokas.....both in my normal size and bigger.....they do feel floaty....but they also pinch my toes so I won’t be joining this club!
Which store?
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Torpedo 7, K Rd - look online too
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
@Keith H they’ve got a few on special at the moment - some just over $100, but limited sizes.
 

Banjo&Matilda

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances October 2018
I walked in Hoka Challenger trail running shoes. I did get one very small blister on the outer side of my heel, but I think that was more the result of my sock. Very, very comfortable and held up well! I love them.
Great to hear. I'll be walking the Frances in october in the same shoes. I've walked about 500km in them so far (will get a new pair for the Camino) and I love them! Thanks for sharing your feedback!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I have another thread going on Altras, because that is what my guy in REI recommended. Lots of positive comments for them as well.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/question-about-altras.53802/

So keeping with my tradition of obsessing about shoes, I thought I would see if I could figure out the difference between these two. Seems that they are very similar in what they do, with the main differences being the no-drop in the Altras and the toe box being more foot-shaped in the Altras. I found a video that compares them. It is too long, but has left me with the sense that the Altras are right for me, not because of any flaw in the Hokas but because what I have been told I need is a wide toe box. And that is definitely wider in the Altras. If that is not something you need, looks like the Hokas would be the better shoe.


Buen camino, Laurie
 

Ballari

Walking Quietly
Camino(s) past & future
SJ-SdC Ap-May14
Navx-Muxia Mar-Ap17
SJ-SdC May17
SJ-Fterre F-Mar18
SJ-Muxia F-Mar19
Porto-SdC May19
I have just finished my first winter Camino in Hoka tor summit. This was my 4th Camino and my 3rd wearing Hoka's. I had deep snow, rain, mud and trails that had become creek crossings. In 34 days of walking, only 2 days did my Hoka's get a slight bit of moisture inside. And they were dry by morning (newspaper!) Most likely from walking through deeper water. I also wore gaiters, which was great for the cold and mud as well as snow.
These shoes are like walking with pillows tied to my feet.
Just make sure that you replace the innersole with something comfortable and sturdy. The sales guy told us that the innersoles supplied were not meant for long term use.
Buen Camino!
 

CatherineAnn

CF summer 2016
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012)
Camino Frances (2016)
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
I used the trail Hokas and loved them. They held up. I used Merrill Moab ventilators the first time with great results but developed plantar faciatis while training for my second and the Hokas were the only shoe I could wear without pain walking or not.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF St Jean - Santiago (2015)
St Jean - Ronsenvalles (2016)
St Jean - Santiago (aug 2018)
Wondering about the sizing with Hoka Tor Summit mids - Did those who’ve worn them on the camino comfortably buy them one size up to get the toe clearance? I used Merrill Moab’s first time and ended up in a lot of pain.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances/SJPP 2015, 2016, 2018
Way of St. Francis, Italy 2017
Portuguese/Finisterre 2018 (2019)
Wondering about the sizing with Hoka Tor Summit mids - Did those who’ve worn them on the camino comfortably buy them one size up to get the toe clearance? I used Merrill Moab’s first time and ended up in a lot of pain.
They do not make the Hoka Tor Summit mids anymore. I've walked 3 times in these boots and loved them and was so disappointed in their replacement the Tor Tech Mids. They aren't nearly as cushy as the Tor Summit.
 

SilverPoint59

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
August (2018)
I have been training for the Camino in Hokas, on the recommendation of my sports podiatrist, for the past few months. I have both the low cut Tor Summit and Mafate Speed 2. Both have Vibrum soles and I have waterproofed the Mafate shoes. Just love them both. In the past and on other long distance treks, I have always worn boots ( Scarpa, Salamon, Grisport) and I absolutely love my Grisport boots. So I'm torn - do I go for ankle support but firmer under foot - or no ankle support and softer underfoot on the Camino ? Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
😱
I have been training for the Camino in Hokas, on the recommendation of my sports podiatrist, for the past few months. I have both the low cut Tor Summit and Mafate Speed 2. Both have Vibrum soles and I have waterproofed the Mafate shoes. Just love them both. In the past and on other long distance treks, I have always worn boots ( Scarpa, Salamon, Grisport) and I absolutely love my Grisport boots. So I'm torn - do I go for ankle support but firmer under foot - or no ankle support and softer underfoot on the Camino ? Thanks!
My 2 centavos. Again, caveat here: I havent walked the Camino yet. But I have hiked a lot in some pretty rough spots and trail runners have been great. The research on the benefits of ankle support for most boots indicates it is of little actual value because the boots don’t go high enough to be of use. You need to get up toward ‘punk rocker in Doc Marten’s’ sort of level. Comfort is waaaay more important in the successful completion of a walk imo.

Waterproofing is another thing many discuss. It only helps if water gets on the shoe, it’s actually a hinderance if water gets ‘in’ the shoe. If water gets inside then it can take ages for them to dry out.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Update- I wore Hoka One One trail runners on my recent Camino on the Le Puy route. They performed fabulously! Others have commented that they are like "walking on pillows" and that was my experience, too. The thick soles are very soft and pliable. They grip well, even on wet rocks. I never slipped nor lost my footing and the soles extend slightly beyond the shoe itself, so twisting an ankle is nearly impossible due to this extra support. My friend, wearing her new Salomons, had a few issues on wet rocks as the hard, deep treads slipped quite easily as they had very little grip on the hard wet surfaces. Thumbs up on the Hoka's!
 

kathrynofloxely

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Francis "April/May 2019"
I have Speedgoats; I’m taking them on my first Camino in 3 weeks, starting from SJPDP on 20th April. They’re a fantastic shoe, I just hope they hold up to the elements, taking into consideration the rain & cold on the Frances at the moment.
Just wondering if they held up in the elements and comfort blisters etc
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Just wondering if they held up in the elements and comfort blisters etc
Hi, Kathryn. . . .

The Speedgoats would hold up just fine.

As to blisters, that is unrelated to footwear as a direct element. It is primarily related to how effectively one eliminates shear force friction to the skin of the foot, including achieving a proper fit of the footwear.

Likewise, one cannot predict comfort of a shoe based on the experiences of others. Hoka One One have models of shoes, like the Bondi, which are among the most cushioned and are also proven for backpacking and Camino trekking

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Blisters are a product of friction.... often referred to as shear force friction. The skin of your foot, and the sock that is in contact with that area of skin, are sliding and rubbing together.

Strategies for the prevention of shear force friction and blisters have changed and matured over recent years.
  1. A properly fitting shoe. In brief, it needs to be long enough and wide enough to accommodate any insoles, orthotics, metatarsal pads, etc, PLUS the socks that you will be wearing, PLUS the increased pressure on the feet from wearing a loaded pack.
  2. Light padded Merino wool sock designed for walking or backpacking, or the same type of sock in a good synthetic blend. A heavy pad on a sock allows potentially more movement against the skin, takes longer to air out, and takes longer to dry when washed.
  3. A sock fit that is snug and form fitting to the foot, but not gangrene-inducing tight. You want the shear force to be between the sock and the interior of the shoe, not the sock and the skin. A snug fitting sock will help to make that happen.
  4. Allow the shoe to move over the sock a bit. By keeping the shoes a bit looser on the feet, the sock will take the brunt of the shear force. If a shoe is tied snug, then that forces the foot to move more in the sock, which means the sock and skin are absorbing the shear force. An exception occurs on long downhill grades; the shoes need to be tied tight enough to keep your toes from hitting the front of the shoe which can cause injury and trauma to the nail bed and toe joints.
  5. While there are foot lubricants, from Body Glide and Hiker's Goo to plain old vaseline, they have a fairly short viable working span as the material rubs off of the skin and is absorbed by the socks. For prophylactic protection from shear force friction to blister prone areas on the feet, a long lasting barrier is the better option. The placement of tapes, like Leukotape P, or moleskin-type products, if adhered correctly, will last the whole day.
  6. To apply tapes and moleskin type products,
    1. Clean off the area of application with a bit of alcohol to remove grease, dirt, and body oils. A bit of regular hand sanitizer works for this, in addition to hand cleansing.
    2. Cut a piece of your chosen barrier material to fit the area you want protected; be sure to cut rounded corners rather than square in order to help the material from rolling up away from the skin.
    3. Apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin to the skin area where the adhesive will stick. This will increase the holding power of the tape or moleskin.
      1. If the tape or moleskin, etc. is going on top of a blistered area, avoid getting the Benzoin on the roof area of the blister, and add a thin coating of ointment/vaseline onto the blister roof, avoiding the surrounding skin area. This will allow removal of the product without hurting the blister wound.
    4. Place the barrier on the area, taking care to not handle the adhesive; spend a bit of time rubbing the material to create friction so that the adhesive will heat up and adhere more firmly.
    5. At the end of the day, remove the barrier and use some alcohol to wipe the area that was covered.
      1. Since fungus (athletes foot) and pathogens splash around in showers, shower shoes are not necessarily preventative to one's feet being exposed or infected. It is helpful to use an alcohol or astringent product applied to the feet after showering.
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As you go looking for shoe, here are some tips which I have posted before that may help you.

The most important theme for achieving a proper fit is: You do not choose a shoe based on measurements, you buy a shoe based on its Fit N Feel regardless of instrument measurements.
  1. When you go to the store, do so toward the end of the day.... you will have been up on your feet, so that will help with getting the correct fit. Additionally, you will need to wear the same backpack with the same gear you will be carrying... you want this additional weight on you as this will put the same downward pressure on the foot that you will be having while on Camino.
  2. Wear the exact same sock(s) you will be wearing while you are walking on the Camino. And if you have a special insole or orthotic, bring it with you.
  3. At the store, the measuring that will be done on your feet is only to get you in the ballpark for the correct shoe size.
  4. Start by standing up; never measure while sitting. You want the full weight of your body, with the pack on, to put the same pressure on your feet to spread them out as will happen while walking. That alone will increase the volume and size of your feet.
  5. Make sure those 'Camino' socks are on your feet; if you wear socks with liners while walking, do the same thing at the store.
  6. While standing, have someone near to you that you can use to steady yourself. With the measuring device on the ground, step onto the instrument and center all of your weight onto the foot being measured. Do the same for the other foot.
  7. Start with that size, but be aware that both the width and the length need to feel like there is adequate room for your feet. Ideally, like Goldilocks, everything will be just right. But, don't count on it. Be picky.
  8. If you have special insoles or orthotics, put them into any shoe you try on as they will take up space inside the shoe.
  9. When you find what you think will fit you well, you will need to see if your toes have enough clearance. Toes should not be able to be forced to the front of the shoe and touch the shoe. Not even a little. If they do, long walking and downhill grades on the trail or path or road will traumatize the bed of the nail, and that is when toenails can blacken and fall off.
  10. With your shoes tied securely, but not too tight, walk around the store with your pack on. Go up stairs and down stairs, scuff the shoes to the floor so that your feet are forced to do any movement they will do and see if your toes so much as butterfly kiss the front of the shoe. Kick the front of the shoe into a post or stair or wall or someone's shin.... does that make any of your toes touch the front of the shoe? That goes for all the little piggies.
  11. Next, pay attention to the width of the shoe. It shouldn't feel snug on the sides and there should be no rubbing or pressure points at all. They will not go away with "break in". They will create soreness, pain, and blistering. Even if it seems to be tolerable, it is like water torture; as your feet are continually exposed to those pressure points your feet will break down against them bit by bit, and bruising, blisters, and soreness will follow.
  12. You may need to go up a size to a size and a half in length, and go with a wider width to avoid those things I mentioned above. The notion that one avoids blisters by wearing snug footwear has been shown to do just the opposite.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I'm a believer! Broke my calcaneus (heel) 3 summers ago. Wore the Bondi's on CP. PLanning on Le Puy in ther same. NO complaint!!!
I wore the Hoka.one ones last summer on the Le Puy and they were perfect grabbing the wet rocks without slipping and oh so comfortable! I will try the Bondi's on the Portuguese this spring... the opposite of you!
 

kathrynofloxely

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Francis "April/May 2019"
Hi, Kathryn. . . .

The Speedgoats would hold up just fine.

As to blisters, that is unrelated to footwear as a direct element. It is primarily related to how effectively one eliminates shear force friction to the skin of the foot, including achieving a proper fit of the footwear.

Likewise, one cannot predict comfort of a shoe based on the experiences of others. Hoka One One have models of shoes, like the Bondi, which are among the most cushioned and are also proven for backpacking and Camino trekking

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Blisters are a product of friction.... often referred to as shear force friction. The skin of your foot, and the sock that is in contact with that area of skin, are sliding and rubbing together.

Strategies for the prevention of shear force friction and blisters have changed and matured over recent years.
  1. A properly fitting shoe. In brief, it needs to be long enough and wide enough to accommodate any insoles, orthotics, metatarsal pads, etc, PLUS the socks that you will be wearing, PLUS the increased pressure on the feet from wearing a loaded pack.
  2. Light padded Merino wool sock designed for walking or backpacking, or the same type of sock in a good synthetic blend. A heavy pad on a sock allows potentially more movement against the skin, takes longer to air out, and takes longer to dry when washed.
  3. A sock fit that is snug and form fitting to the foot, but not gangrene-inducing tight. You want the shear force to be between the sock and the interior of the shoe, not the sock and the skin. A snug fitting sock will help to make that happen.
  4. Allow the shoe to move over the sock a bit. By keeping the shoes a bit looser on the feet, the sock will take the brunt of the shear force. If a shoe is tied snug, then that forces the foot to move more in the sock, which means the sock and skin are absorbing the shear force. An exception occurs on long downhill grades; the shoes need to be tied tight enough to keep your toes from hitting the front of the shoe which can cause injury and trauma to the nail bed and toe joints.
  5. While there are foot lubricants, from Body Glide and Hiker's Goo to plain old vaseline, they have a fairly short viable working span as the material rubs off of the skin and is absorbed by the socks. For prophylactic protection from shear force friction to blister prone areas on the feet, a long lasting barrier is the better option. The placement of tapes, like Leukotape P, or moleskin-type products, if adhered correctly, will last the whole day.
  6. To apply tapes and moleskin type products,
    1. Clean off the area of application with a bit of alcohol to remove grease, dirt, and body oils. A bit of regular hand sanitizer works for this, in addition to hand cleansing.
    2. Cut a piece of your chosen barrier material to fit the area you want protected; be sure to cut rounded corners rather than square in order to help the material from rolling up away from the skin.
    3. Apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin to the skin area where the adhesive will stick. This will increase the holding power of the tape or moleskin.
      1. If the tape or moleskin, etc. is going on top of a blistered area, avoid getting the Benzoin on the roof area of the blister, and add a thin coating of ointment/vaseline onto the blister roof, avoiding the surrounding skin area. This will allow removal of the product without hurting the blister wound.
    4. Place the barrier on the area, taking care to not handle the adhesive; spend a bit of time rubbing the material to create friction so that the adhesive will heat up and adhere more firmly.
    5. At the end of the day, remove the barrier and use some alcohol to wipe the area that was covered.
      1. Since fungus (athletes foot) and pathogens splash around in showers, shower shoes are not necessarily preventative to one's feet being exposed or infected. It is helpful to use an alcohol or astringent product applied to the feet after showering.
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As you go looking for shoe, here are some tips which I have posted before that may help you.

The most important theme for achieving a proper fit is: You do not choose a shoe based on measurements, you buy a shoe based on its Fit N Feel regardless of instrument measurements.
  1. When you go to the store, do so toward the end of the day.... you will have been up on your feet, so that will help with getting the correct fit. Additionally, you will need to wear the same backpack with the same gear you will be carrying... you want this additional weight on you as this will put the same downward pressure on the foot that you will be having while on Camino.
  2. Wear the exact same sock(s) you will be wearing while you are walking on the Camino. And if you have a special insole or orthotic, bring it with you.
  3. At the store, the measuring that will be done on your feet is only to get you in the ballpark for the correct shoe size.
  4. Start by standing up; never measure while sitting. You want the full weight of your body, with the pack on, to put the same pressure on your feet to spread them out as will happen while walking. That alone will increase the volume and size of your feet.
  5. Make sure those 'Camino' socks are on your feet; if you wear socks with liners while walking, do the same thing at the store.
  6. While standing, have someone near to you that you can use to steady yourself. With the measuring device on the ground, step onto the instrument and center all of your weight onto the foot being measured. Do the same for the other foot.
  7. Start with that size, but be aware that both the width and the length need to feel like there is adequate room for your feet. Ideally, like Goldilocks, everything will be just right. But, don't count on it. Be picky.
  8. If you have special insoles or orthotics, put them into any shoe you try on as they will take up space inside the shoe.
  9. When you find what you think will fit you well, you will need to see if your toes have enough clearance. Toes should not be able to be forced to the front of the shoe and touch the shoe. Not even a little. If they do, long walking and downhill grades on the trail or path or road will traumatize the bed of the nail, and that is when toenails can blacken and fall off.
  10. With your shoes tied securely, but not too tight, walk around the store with your pack on. Go up stairs and down stairs, scuff the shoes to the floor so that your feet are forced to do any movement they will do and see if your toes so much as butterfly kiss the front of the shoe. Kick the front of the shoe into a post or stair or wall or someone's shin.... does that make any of your toes touch the front of the shoe? That goes for all the little piggies.
  11. Next, pay attention to the width of the shoe. It shouldn't feel snug on the sides and there should be no rubbing or pressure points at all. They will not go away with "break in". They will create soreness, pain, and blistering. Even if it seems to be tolerable, it is like water torture; as your feet are continually exposed to those pressure points your feet will break down against them bit by bit, and bruising, blisters, and soreness will follow.
  12. You may need to go up a size to a size and a half in length, and go with a wider width to avoid those things I mentioned above. The notion that one avoids blisters by wearing snug footwear has been shown to do just the opposite.
Wow thanks, will carry pack and try shoes on in shop at end of day - trying to decide between Speedgoat 3 and the Torrent
 

Jeeves

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 2018
Hoka Bondi or Hoka Speedgoat 3? I've just spent an hour trying both on! They both seem great but can't decide. The Bondi's are more breathable and have road runner minimal tread. The Speedgoat's have less breathable upper (but sturdier), still cushioned and a vibram tread for trails. Can anyone tell me how the lighter Bondi tread cope with the 60% trail sections of the Frances?
 

Jeeves

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
August 2018
I have Speedgoats; I’m taking them on my first Camino in 3 weeks, starting from SJPDP on 20th April. They’re a fantastic shoe, I just hope they hold up to the elements, taking into consideration the rain & cold on the Frances at the moment.
I'm torn between the Bondi's which has thin road tread but more breathable upper and the Speedgoat's with vibram tread. I'm just wondering how did the Sg's tread work for you on the CF?
 

G3n0

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
no
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
I used HOKA One One Speedgoat 2 in April. St. Jean to Santiago to Finistere and Muxia. 596 miles in 32 days no blisters or any problem. Two days of snow, Roncesvalles and O'Cebreiro and I still wear them to walk at home. Glad to have them and I'd recommend you get them a size larger than normal. My feet did swell early in the Camino and I'm grateful to the sales person at REI that turned me on to them.
 

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RedRuby

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sept 2017)
Le Puy to SJPP (Sept 2019)
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
I have Hoka One One trail runners and yes they are very comfy and soft, however I find the heel a bit too wide and even lacing up in a heel lock I still have a bit too much movement. Also, I haven't found them that great uneven, rocky, bushland and forest terrain. I seem to have more confidence in hiking boots for the more rugged terrain. I'm doing Le Puy in September :)
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I wore the Hokas and loved them. So comfy, like walking on marshmellows and surprisingly grippy on large, smooth wet rocks! I too, continue to wear them often walking on my local trails.
 

RedRuby

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sept 2017)
Le Puy to SJPP (Sept 2019)
I am considering possibly using Hoka One One trail runner type shoes for my June Camino on the Le Puy. Has anyone out there used these, and if so, how did they hold up? I hear they are great for plantar faciatis, which I do not have. Do the squishy, thick soles hold up well? Thanks for any input.
Hi Camino Chrissy I did a hike today in Altra Lone Peaks. First time in these. Impressive, has a good wide toe box, soft and very comfortable with a zero drop. This zero drop is a new concept to me, anyway they were great. Not as squishy as the Hokas but almost as comfy on the insole. The sides near the heel aren't as soft as the Hokas. I may take these they were so good :)
 

Lucyk

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Primitivo 2015
Since i had to end my Camino shortly after starting it due to illness, I can't vouch for their long life, but I can tell anyone who is interested that my Hokas dealt very well with the rocky ground on that long descent from the Alto de Perdon.
 
Camino(s) past & future
😱
Hi Camino Chrissy I did a hike today in Altra Lone Peaks. First time in these. Impressive, has a good wide toe box, soft and very comfortable with a zero drop. This zero drop is a new concept to me, anyway they were great. Not as squishy as the Hokas but almost as comfy on the insole. The sides near the heel aren't as soft as the Hokas. I may take these they were so good :)
I love my Lone Peaks. Fantastic shoes. I haven’t tried One Ones yet so I can’t compare the two.
 

auburnfive

Active Member
I wore Hokas last year on the Portuguese and for the first time was blister free! The uppers did not stand up though and were falling apart after a relatively short Camino. However I have bought a new pair, as the comfort is worth the short life.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I had no problems with the uppers wearing out on my Hokas, but only walked 300 miles of the Le Puy. The Portuguese I'd think was not that long. I'm surprised you had issues with yours, but know manufacturers often make changes. Mine were an older model and I loved them! I've had pretty good luck with other brands overall, but the Hokas were the most comfortable for my feet! Like I said prior...like walking on marshmellows!
 
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prairiegirlmb

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Porto to SDC (September 2020)
I bought a pair of Speedgoats after reading all the good reviews of Hokas. So far I am so happy with them and love all the cushioning. I bought them at MEC (for those in Canada) and they have a "rock solid guarantee" in case they fall apart on me. Going to put in a bunch of miles in them in hopes that I will have found my Camino shoe for my walk next year!
 

jozero

Been there, going again...
Camino(s) past & future
CF
I have another thread going on Altras, because that is what my guy in REI recommended. Lots of positive comments for them as well.

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/question-about-altras.53802/

So keeping with my tradition of obsessing about shoes, I thought I would see if I could figure out the difference between these two. Seems that they are very similar in what they do, with the main differences being the no-drop in the Altras and the toe box being more foot-shaped in the Altras. I found a video that compares them. It is too long, but has left me with the sense that the Altras are right for me, not because of any flaw in the Hokas but because what I have been told I need is a wide toe box. And that is definitely wider in the Altras. If that is not something you need, looks like the Hokas would be the better shoe.


Buen camino, Laurie
I've not tried all Hokas but do have the Bondi 6 and they are very wide in the toe box when I compared them to the Altra Lone Peak 4.0. In both there was very adequate space for the toes to spread out. The three main differences I found were A) the Bondi 6 have soooo much more cushioning than the Lone Peak 4.0. Over the long haul this surely must account for something. B) The Lone Peak 4.0 are zero drop and while I'm sure most everyone could get used to it, the question is really does one want to get used to it? For running I understand the concept of a more natural foot placement. However, on a long walk with pronounced heel striking, while carrying substancial weight on our backs, having more cushioning under the heal could be very beneficial not to mention that the rocker style sole of the Bondi 6 helps to use momentum to roll you forward. C) The Lone Peak 4.0 have a sturdier set of supports around the foot. The worry I have about wearing the Bondi 6 on the Camino is for those stretches of loose, round rocks (think back side of Alto del Perdon) as they have virtually no side to side support as they are designed to run on flat road grades. The Lone Peak 4.0 are designed to run on offroad trails and it shows. So IMHO, the perfect Camino shoes is still waiting for someone to build it :)
 

Lynda Millington

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked Camino Frances April/May 2016 from St Jean to Santiago
Plan to walk the Le Puy in 2018
@Keith H they’ve got a few on special at the moment - some just over $100, but limited sizes.
shoe clinic have them as well. I have just bought the challenger for my portuguese walk in Oct and so far they feel amazing
 

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