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The big map o the Caminos de Santiago

LIVE from the Camino Aragones Jaca to Sanguesa

Camino(s) past & future
Walker from St Jean to Santiago in September "2017" YAY
#1
This Aragones Way is very different. Either you have short walking days (10-13km) or long ones (21-28km) per day. There is nothing in between.

Most of the villages are very small with just one albergue to stay in. Only one bar and no supermarkets.

Lots of huge vistas across the valleys with some forest in between. Mainly no shade as we walk through farm land. It is rather hot here at the moment.

Arres was a lovely place. There were more pilgrims than residents that night. 23 of us stayed there including 3 on the dining room floor. The donativo Albergue was brilliantly run. The hospitaliro gave a guided tour of the village, the church and the tower. All in very fast Spanish but luckily a fellow pilgrim translated for both the English and German speakers.

In Artieda an elderly man sits outside in the plaza with his big key to open the church and give a stamp to interested pilgrims. It was very special. I think that is his reason to get up in the morning. Our Catholic American walking friends were very touched.
Here we had one of the best pilgrims meals I’ve ever had. Of a choice of three I chose: Spinach and carrot soup, rabbit and local veges, with watermelon drizzled in chocolate to finish off. The wine was even uncorked in front of us.

A longs days walk from Artedia to Sanguesa through very pretty but tough terrain. Only Ruesta for a coffee con leche

Still very few pilgrims on the trail, no one passed us and we passed no one. We only saw the same friendly faces at night.

Sanguesa is a lovely town with all the services. A good place to stock up.

Enjoy the pics
 

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amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
#3
Thanks for your report, it is great to hear that people still love the Aragonés, Arrés is a special place, as is Ruesca, a unique, beautiful experience that fewer and fewer pilgrims seem to chose. The small church in Arres is just gorgeous!
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes, Aragones-Frances-Finisterre, Operation Sabre, Marin Ramble
#4
Love that route - thanks for the report (I hope you post more)
 
#7
In Artieda an elderly man sits outside in the plaza with his big key to open the church and give a stamp to interested pilgrims. It was very special. I think that is his reason to get up in the morning. Our Catholic American walking friends were very touched.
Enjoy the pics
Love the photos! And I liked your snippet about the man in Artieda. I don’t want to overstate this, but I do think that the camino has brought some life and intereste into these tiny towns filled with old people and on their way to oblivion. I also remember a couple of years ago at the new albergue in Vilaserio. An elderly woman had opened an albergue in the family home after the death of her husband. Her daughter was at the albergue when i was there and she told me that in her opinion the albergue had given her mom back her reason to live. From depression, resignation, sadness, to getting up in the morning and having to get going. It’s nice that it’s one of the side effects, maybe for more people than these two.

And you are probably already beyond Sangüesa, but I wonder if you were moved to take the alternative through the Foz de Lumbier, a river canyon gorge type place, sorry for my inartful description. One of my few regrets when walking the Aragonés was that I was oblivious to its existence, and it looks like a beautful walk.
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
#8
Hi Isobel. We are one day behind you. Albergue in Sanguesa is full tonight. There have been many pilgrims along the way. We stayed in Artieda last night and had a delicious dinner.
Planning to walk the Foz/ Lumbier gorge route tomorrow to Monreal.
Many of us have walked from France so we were very pleased to be together again in Sanguesa, which by the way looks much better after dark when the buildings and streets are lit.
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
#9
Foz de Lumbier. Enjoying this dramatic gorge first thing in the morning on your own, surrounded by the river and tens of vultures is a unique experience in all Caminos. A small tip: you have to cross old train tunnels where there is no light. You can do it the easy way, using a torch or your mobile, or you can be brave and do it the sensible way: just carry a stick/pole on your hand and point it at the wall on your side. Drag it along the way, and as long as you are dragging it agains the wall you can be sure you will not be breaking your nose in the dark. You start slowly, but when you realize it is perfectly safe, it is eery to walk at a good pace in complete darkness until you start seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.

Incidentally, that place was famous for some squirmish between ETA terrorists and Guardia Civil a few years ago, that is why the name was familiar to me. DO NOT MISS IT!
 
#10
Foz de Lumbier. Enjoying this dramatic gorge first thing in the morning on your own, surrounded by the river and tens of vultures is a unique experience in all Caminos. A small tip: you have to cross old train tunnels where there is no light. You can do it the easy way, using a torch or your mobile, or you can be brave and do it the sensible way: just carry a stick/pole on your hand and point it at the wall on your side. Drag it along the way, and as long as you are dragging it agains the wall you can be sure you will not be breaking your nose in the dark. You start slowly, but when you realize it is perfectly safe, it is eery to walk at a good pace in complete darkness until you start seeing the light at the end of the tunnel.

Incidentally, that place was famous for some squirmish between ETA terrorists and Guardia Civil a few years ago, that is why the name was familiar to me. DO NOT MISS IT!
You’re killing me with these descriptions. How in the world did LT and I not know about this when we walked a few years ago??????
 
Camino(s) past & future
Walker from St Jean to Santiago in September "2017" YAY
#11
Love the photos! And I liked your snippet about the man in Artieda. I don’t want to overstate this, but I do think that the camino has brought some life and intereste into these tiny towns filled with old people and on their way to oblivion. I also remember a couple of years ago at the new albergue in Vilaserio. An elderly woman had opened an albergue in the family home after the death of her husband. Her daughter was at the albergue when i was there and she told me that in her opinion the albergue had given her mom back her reason to live. From depression, resignation, sadness, to getting up in the morning and having to get going. It’s nice that it’s one of the side effects, maybe for more people than these two.

And you are probably already beyond Sangüesa, but I wonder if you were moved to take the alternative through the Foz de Lumbier, a river canyon gorge type place, sorry for my inartful description. One of my few regrets when walking the Aragonés was that I was oblivious to its existence, and it looks like a beautful walk.
Somehow we missed the sign to the gorge, I was looking forward to the tunnel
 

amancio

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Primit, Salvador, Portug, Arag, Ingles, VdlP, Leban-Vadin, Fisterra, Invierno, LePuy
#12
You’re killing me with these descriptions. How in the world did LT and I not know about this when we walked a few years ago??????
Bueno, I only realized the day before, it was not so well signposted, I used the map on my mobile to cut across some fiels without realizing the GPS does not show fences or bad falls! I eventually made it. You will have to come back for this, Laurie! The old railway path is in carved in the cliff on the right hand side of this photo, I went down to the river to cool down a bit, and there was nobody else but me and a few dozens of different types of vultures
 

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#13
Bueno, I only realized the day before, it was not so well signposted, I used the map on my mobile to cut across some fiels without realizing the GPS does not show fences or bad falls! I eventually made it. You will have to come back for this, Laurie! The old railway path is in carved in the cliff on the right hand side of this photo, I went down to the river to cool down a bit, and there was nobody else but me and a few dozens of different types of vultures
That’s a really beautiful picture, just keep on doing this Amancio, ;)but I wonder if you could explain how you walk through the gorge with those water levels.
 

wayan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Camino Fisterra (Oct-Nov 2013)
Camino Aragones, Frances, Portuguese (Sep-Nov 2015)
#14
That’s a really beautiful picture, just keep on doing this Amancio, ;)but I wonder if you could explain how you walk through the gorge with those water levels.
The trail runs along the right side of the gorge. It was wide enough for a train to travel along.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes, Aragones-Frances-Finisterre, Operation Sabre, Marin Ramble
#16
This was May 2018 - cold and a bit damp, the river in the gorge was raging and way to dangerous to approach. We also stumbled through the field trying to follow the old path as the new one took a very large detour around a road. A p BD683FAD-37C5-4D1E-BA96-0AB68A1FD94E.jpeg ost-gorge picnic lunch was our reward!



DC9F34C8-26E5-477F-A721-A0C5EE26DD23.jpeg 840A83E9-17C7-49E7-B629-572F3CBB087F.jpeg
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Oct 2013, Porto, San Salvador & Primitivo 2014. Norte 2016, VdLP & Via Francigena 2017
#17
Vow, this is supremely beautiful.

Some quick questions - is the Aragones just as nice in mid October? Is this bus going up to SAN Juan de la Pena still operate in Mid October, and most albergues still open? And I assume I could get to Somport from Madrid city or airport? *(I know I should read past postings, but seeing all these beautiful pictures really get me excited)!!
Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
#18
I took a train from Madrid to Zaragoza and the small regional train to Canfranc and taxi to Somport. Tourist office in Jaca will help you arrange a taxi to San Juan de la Pena, 50 euros well spent. I am in Sanguesa right now and have seen only 4 pieces of litter the entire way. The hospitalero in Arres says that this route is for intelligent people, very true.
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
#19
Vow, this is supremely beautiful.

Some quick questions - is the Aragones just as nice in mid October? Is this bus going up to SAN Juan de la Pena still operate in Mid October, and most albergues still open? And I assume I could get to Somport from Madrid city or airport? *(I know I should read past postings, but seeing all these beautiful pictures really get me excited)!!
Thanks!
The bus takes workers up to SAN Juan Della Pena, so I presume that it keeps going while the monasteries are open. So I would say yes for mid October. Check on their website.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
#20
Double check the tourist office who five days ago told me the bus was not running which is why I took a taxi.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Oct 2013, Porto, San Salvador & Primitivo 2014. Norte 2016, VdLP & Via Francigena 2017
#21
I took a train from Madrid to Zaragoza and the small regional train to Canfranc and taxi to Somport. Tourist office in Jaca will help you arrange a taxi to San Juan de la Pena, 50 euros well spent. I am in Sanguesa right now and have seen only 4 pieces of litter the entire way. The hospitalero in Arres says that this route is for intelligent people, very true.
Thanks! I will consider this option, nice to visit Zaragosa too!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Oct 2013, Porto, San Salvador & Primitivo 2014. Norte 2016, VdLP & Via Francigena 2017
#22
The bus takes workers up to SAN Juan Della Pena, so I presume that it keeps going while the monasteries are open. So I would say yes for mid October. Check on their website.
Thanks Sharon, I have been reading your postings with great interest! I will check its website, hopefully they are still working and running! I am also researching how to walk to the monastery and continue walking there! Much appreciated the information from all fellow pilgrims!
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
#23
The tourist office obviously had incorrect information as there were 8 pilgrims and 4 workers on the bus the day we took it.
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
#24
The tourist office obviously had incorrect information as there were 8 pilgrims and 4 workers on the bus the day we took it.
It was Jose, the hospitalero from the municipal albergue, who told us about the bus.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016, Mansill de las Mulas to Finisterre and Muxia 2017, Camino Aragones 2018
#25
Hello, all and @sharon w, I do not think that the tourist office in Jaca would give incorrect information, but other information to fit our circumstances. If, for example, you arrived in Jaca later in the afternoon it makes sense to take the workers bus to San Juan de la Pena in the next morning. I arrived in Jaca during the morning and so going to the monestery by taxi in the afternoon worked well for me. Yes, 50 euros was no small amount of money but the driver and I had wonderful conversations in Spanish, he showed me his favorite lookouts and we also spent time at the churches in Santa Cruz de las Seros. So, any way that you get there, we all would agree that it is worth the time and effort.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Oct 2013, Porto, San Salvador & Primitivo 2014. Norte 2016, VdLP & Via Francigena 2017
#26
My sincere thanks to all peregrina and peregrino above for sharing valuable info and experience! I want to do this camino real soon!

By the way, is Somport pass still open in early or mid November to start the camino there, or it is cutting into ski season? The Camino Aragones does not have many pilgrims, probably even less in November or March and April?
 

sharon w

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
#27
Hello, all and @sharon w, I do not think that the tourist office in Jaca would give incorrect information, but other information to fit our circumstances. If, for example, you arrived in Jaca later in the afternoon it makes sense to take the workers bus to San Juan de la Pena in the next morning. I arrived in Jaca during the morning and so going to the monestery by taxi in the afternoon worked well for me. Yes, 50 euros was no small amount of money but the driver and I had wonderful conversations in Spanish, he showed me his favorite lookouts and we also spent time at the churches in Santa Cruz de las Seros. So, any way that you get there, we all would agree that it is worth the time and effort.
Yes. You would be right. Also, if I was by myself, the taxi option would probably be better, as the walk down is stony and steep.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes, Aragones-Frances-Finisterre, Operation Sabre, Marin Ramble
#28
The pass does not have a “closed season” like the Napoleon Route; whether you can cross is completely dependent upon the weather at that moment.

We walked the Aragones in April and it was virtually pilgrim-free! Over 8 days, we met 6 pilgrims.
 

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