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Are these all the Spanish and Portuguese Caminos?

anthikes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2016 SJPdP > SdC
2018 Porto > SdC
2019 Sevilla > SdC
I made this map earlier in the year and will be updating it in 2021. I tried to include all known Caminos but I suspect there might be a couple that slipped through the net??
Would really appreciate any experts out there who may know of other routes. Thanks.
IMG_20200410_210911.jpg
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Vasco Interior (Irun - Santo Domingo de la Calzada)
Santo Grial (San Juan de la Peňa - Valencia)
Ruta la Defensa del Sur (Valencia - Alicante)
Voie de la Nive (Bayonne - SJPdP)
Teresiano (Avila - Salamanca con/w Plata & Torres)
Estrecho (Algeciras - Cadiz con/w Augusta)
Algarviana (Cabo de Sao Vicente - Algarve)
Fishermans Trail
Mendocino (Guadalajara - Manzanares del Real con/w Madrid)
Serrana (Gibraltar - Cadiz con/w Augusta)
Lusitana (Faro - Ourense)
del Alba (Xabia - Almansa con/w Levante/Sureste)
Mariana (Braga - Muxia)
Requena (Valencia - Monteagudo de las Salinas con/w la Lana)
dos Faros (Malpica - Fisterra)
Baix Maestrat (Vinaros - Vallivana con/w Castellon)
Ucles (Ucles - Madrid)
de Geira e dos Arreiros (Braga - SdC)

For now. Might come up with few more :)
 
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Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
The Camino Geira from Braga, has its own route into Santiago and is officially recognized by the cathedral so you can get a Compostela.
Camino Ucles into Madrid, this is very relevant especially with the man who restablished it and who has worked tirelessly to promote it, now in a 150 + day ongoing battle with Cvd19. There is a few others but you have given yourself a near impossible task to put them all on, well done anyway.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
...
Camino Ucles into Madrid, this is very relevant especially with the man who restablished it and who has worked tirelessly to promote it, now in a 150 + day ongoing battle with Cvd19. There is a few others but you have given yourself a near impossible task to put them all on, well done anyway.
Original direction of Camino Ucles is actually Madrid - Ucles but because it connects with Camino de Madrid we tend to understand it "in reverse". So did I in post no.2 :)
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
Via Kuning ( Herrerias to Lugo) a friend walked pre lockdown and is waymarked.

Camino Ossau via Sabinaniego ( and onto Jaco, I have walked it.

Via Celanova, from Castro Labaniero to Ourense- some areas have waymarked it.

Camino Benidorm( waymarked and pilgrim accomodation joins the Lana at Vilaneva

The Camino Mozrabe variant via Trujillo.

One I found out about today and was only inaugurated a few days ago by the group who had carried the special backpack fro SJPdP to Santiago - Camino do Barbanza A Orixe, which starts of on the coast and runs to Pontesecures on the Camino Portuguese.
There is probably more but I can't pull them out the ether at the moment😉

Edit
The Camino from Acala De Henares to the east of Madrid,it goes over the Sierra De Madrid near or over 2000 metres stays up there for a couple of stages and passes through Rescafria I think, and joins the Camino de Madrid about 10 km before Segovia.

Camino Caravanca de la Cruz ( while not a Camino de Santiago so people use these route to join Camino de Santiago. It's in Murcia

Via Aquitania ( Burgos to Carrion de Los Condes on a more northern route)

Camino de las Asturias ( thanks VN walking) Pamplona to Oviedo

There is loads over the Pyrenees along it from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic. Two senior French gentleman used to have a blog on the routes and loving detailed their stages over the mountain chain, the routes were usually waymarked by the local authorities with scallop shell signs. You would have to add at least 6 or seven routes and more variants.
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
...
The Bilbao to Burgos Camino whose name I never remember, it was waymarked in 2009 I'm not sure what's its status at the moment.
...
It's called Camino del Valle de Mena and is on the OPs map.

Calzada de los Blendios (Suances on Norte - Carrion de los Condes, EDIT: apparently same as Besaya)
Ruta del Argar (Almeria - Mora con/w Levante)
Camino de San Juan de la Cruz (Granada - Ciudad Real con/w Manchego, EDIT: it's on the map but under different name)


There are some nice connections between Caminos like Senda del Duero for example.
Here are even more of them:
http://www.jaholgado.com/senderismo/GR73Calzada de los Blendios/Resumen de Etapas/Resumen de Etapas.htm
Knock yourself out :D
 
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Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
I edited my post but have a feeling you beat me to it, regarding the Murcia one and Caranvanc de la Cruz, darn it🤪
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Calzada de Los Blendios is Ruta del Besaya 😉 just saying🤺
Thanks! Didn't even check where exactly this Suances is. I guess it's very close to Santander. :)

Yeah, I forgot Camino de la Cruz which is mistaken for Camino de San Juan de la Cruz if I'm not wrong again...
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
Yeah, I forgot Camino de la Cruz which is mistaken for Camino de San Juan de la Cruz if I'm not wrong again...
I was thinking more the Ruta del Argar, I don't know it went from Almeria, I have seen photos of a start point in Cabo de Gato which isn't far away , and the route heads north and then eventually north west to CdlC, I think.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I don't know what to do, camino-wise, with all these lists. For myself, I accept whatever anyone suggests, but the only routes that I am interested in walking are those whose goal is Santiago and which have some historical evidence for being used over time as routes to Santiago. If I find myself on the Camino Teresiano as I walk the Levante, I may be drawn to look on Avila as a special place because of this particular Catholic saint, or I may not. My impression of pilgrimage, which is what I am about when I walk in Spain, is that it is the following of a historically significant route to the dwelling or place of veneration of a saint. For me, local community pilgrimages to the hermitage, etc. of a saint, or local pilgrimages to a place of special revelation of the Virgin Mary, seem to fit this model. But the multiplication of routes in modern times feels to me to be more a strategy of Tourist Boards to bring in more cash to a locality. And the more there are, the less significant they seem to me.
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
Many of the 'new' routes are hundreds of years old. Maybe some local authority is taking advantage- and I can't say one way or the other unless I know personally all the circumstances. But what happened in 2008 and 2009 with a proliferation of old routes being waymarked is happening again before the holy year,and for you pilgrims who haven't seen the run ups to a holy year it's not just about extra feet on those routes, it's about communities and areas wanting to be involved, they want a recognition of their historical claims, they want pilgrims walking on their paths. There is a strong motivational power around a holy year, this is what you are seeing. I give you two instances, the Camino Geira ( the new route into Santiago) the route is hundreds of years old, has strong links to The order of Malta, they had a good go at getting recognition in 2009, then it went into hibernation until about 2016/2017 then people felt a determination because of the holy year to try again for official recognition, they succeeded.
The 2nd instance is the ' new route' Camino do Barbanza, they claim there is an historical reference to it in the Caldex Codex, it was the upcoming holy year that made them get organised.
All these routes ( mostly) are reflection of the pull of a holy year and its energy,. I have to laugh when I read comments on the forum about the extra pilgrims in Holy Year and how crowded it will be( maybe not now), they miss such much about what the holy year means to so many people especially in Spain
 
Camino(s) past & future
First one in 1977 by train. Many since then by foot. Next one ASAP.
But the multiplication of routes in modern times feels to me to be more a strategy of Tourist Boards to bring in more cash to a locality. And the more there are, the less significant they seem to me.
Agreed. ... I'll put on my "grumpy viejo" hat -- and say that it rather looks as though any old walk in the Spanish woods now rates designation as a "Camino"!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I don't know what to do, camino-wise, with all these lists. For myself, I accept whatever anyone suggests, but the only routes that I am interested in walking are those whose goal is Santiago and which have some historical evidence for being used over time as routes to Santiago. If I find myself on the Camino Teresiano as I walk the Levante, I may be drawn to look on Avila as a special place because of this particular Catholic saint, or I may not. My impression of pilgrimage, which is what I am about when I walk in Spain, is that it is the following of a historically significant route to the dwelling or place of veneration of a saint. For me, local community pilgrimages to the hermitage, etc. of a saint, or local pilgrimages to a place of special revelation of the Virgin Mary, seem to fit this model. But the multiplication of routes in modern times feels to me to be more a strategy of Tourist Boards to bring in more cash to a locality. And the more there are, the less significant they seem to me.
As @Isca-camigo already said pilgrims throughout the history were using different ways (Caminos in Castellano) to get to the shrine(s). Santiago being just one of them on Iberan peninsula for example. Some weren't as well trodden as others. But maybe multiplication of them that we see in recent years is just a result as a reaction to the official Caminos (de Santiago!) as recognised by the Cathedral authorities.

Furthermore we should not equalize pilgrimage with obtaining the Compostela. In my thinking it doesn't make any difference (apart from the number of albergues and signage) on which route or "route" you end your pilgrimage.

Just to add something about Avila. You'll get there either you walk Levante or Sanabres or starting the Teresiano. Which actually ends in Alba de Tormes (just one day walk from Salamanca) where St.Teresa's grave is believed to be. Also it was disputed few times that it should start in Gotarrendura (one day after Avila) where she was born. But I'll leave it to historians and just use Teresiano some day as a connection between Levante and Torres :)
 
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Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
To go back to the Op I suspect he probably wishes he never asked, I have feeling there is a few more Caminos out there at least, One such one is a historical Camino that runs parallel to the San Salvador, it starts more north of Leon but I can't rember the places it goes through apart from that it connects up with the San Salvador in Mieres, but Spain is full of examples like that, they illustrate Spain's rich history and over a thousand years the Caminos don't fit neatly into genuine path or false one.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
it's about communities and areas wanting to be involved, they want a recognition of their historical claims, they want pilgrims walking on their paths. There is a strong motivational power around a holy year, this is what you are seeing.
I find this most interesting: the local desire for "a recognition of their historical claims" seems to be what was going on re: the Invierno some years ago. And the connection with the Order of Malta is a historical claim. I think what I am trying to express is that I feel a special connection to the traditions and spirituality which has grown over the centuries around the routes to Santiago. I have seen something similar in a village on the Madrid which I walked in 2019, in the local public celebration of a feast of the Virgin, to whom the local church was consecrated. But I personally cannot feel it with respect to pilgrim routes associated with St Teresa or St Ignatius. I have read, and I hope absorbed, the writings of St Teresa. And I completely missed the connection with the Holy Year. Is there something religious/spiritual present for those who walk the caminos dedicated to Teresa or Ignatius? Is it similar to the spirit of pilgrimage present to many on the routes to Santiago? I have been welcomed on the Camino de Santiago by many devout Spanish Catholics, and I have prayed for them and for their intentions in Santiago. No doubt I still have a great deal to learn about the spirit of pilgrimage in Spain.
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
Thank you for your reply it is a very honest one.

Even the Camino de Invierno is an example of local associations and authorities getting together before a holy year and marking a route, even if it was 2015(?) before they got official recognition
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Edit
The Camino from Acala De Henares to the east of Madrid,it goes over the Sierra De Madrid near or over 2000 metres stays up there for a couple of stages and passes through Rescafria I think, and joins the Camino de Madrid about 10 km before Segovia.
These two stages must be:
Miraflores de la Sierra (1147m) - Puerto de la Morcuera (1796) - Rascafria (1163); 21,18 km.
and
Rascafria (1163m) - Puerto del Reventón (2079) - Granja de San Ildefonso (1193) ;19,62 km.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Many of you are far too deep for me with your knowledge of obscure, little walked trails. I will be happy if I can walk an additional five of the ones I am still familiar with before I have to hang up my trail runners for the last time.
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
I went through a phase when I discovered Caminos of wanting to walk little traveled long routes. Now I'm quite happy to walk 1-3 weeks max on any route as long as it lacks an abundance of asphalt, CdN excepted.
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
I made this map earlier in the year and will be updating it in 2021. I tried to include all known Caminos but I suspect there might be a couple that slipped through the net??
Would really appreciate any experts out there who may know of other routes. Thanks.
View attachment 80419
It is amazing how many of you know all these lists. I would also love to one day see a map showing all the paths. But let us give credit where it is due, Anthikes great job love the map
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
It is called "the hamster syndrome" collecting info and making the list of weirdest Camino combos for the future :D
Kinky one I would love to hear about crazy/weird/different camino combos. I would love to try some. What I would like to know most (well at least after we get through this period of insane weirdness) is how well these secondary and tertiary caminos are supported with albergues and how well, if any they are marked. I am retired and I could not afford a long camino (I need at least 7-800 kilometers as it takes a few weeks for me just to get warmed up) if I had to stay in hotels and private hostels.
 
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KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Kinky one I would love to hear about crazy/weird/different camino combos. I would love to try some. What I would like to know most (well at least after we get through this period of insane weirdness) is how well these secondary and tertiary caminos are supported with albergues and how well, if any they are marked. I am retired and I could not afford a long camino (I need at least 7-8 kilometers as it takes a few weeks for me just to get warmed up) having to stay in hotels and private hostels.
Even in pre-CoViD years those less walked Caminos were quite poor on the pilgrim albergues side. Some villages have some infrastructure within their townhalls, sports/social centers etc. But not all so sometimes you depend solely on private accommodation or busing/taxing back and forth on the route just for the sake of cheaper overnight stays.

Anyway there are so many Caminos as you can see from the OP's map that it is easy to decide on certain Camino combo. For example:
1: Estrecho + Augusta + Plata + CF
2: Girona + Catalan + Ebro + Castellano-Aragones (i.e. Soriano) + La Lana + CF
3: Mozarabe (from Almeria) + San Juan de la Cruz + Manchego + Levante/Sureste + Teresiano + Torres + Portugues

:D
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
Even in pre-CoViD years those less walked Caminos were quite poor on the pilgrim albergues side. Some villages have some infrastructure within their townhalls, sports/social centers etc. But not all so sometimes you depend solely on private accommodation or busing/taxing back and forth on the route just for the sake of cheaper overnight stays.

Anyway there are so many Caminos as you can see from the OP's map that it is easy to decide on certain Camino combo. For example:
1: Estrecho + Augusta + Plata + CF
2: Girona + Catalan + Ebro + Castellano-Aragones (i.e. Soriano) + La Lana + CF
3: Mozarabe (from Almeria) + San Juan de la Cruz + Manchego + Levante/Sureste + Teresiano + Torres + Portugues

:D
How many of these could be walked in one go by someone who lives outside the schengen zone and walks a moderate 20-25 km a day? Or are you suggesting a life on camino?
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Even in pre-CoViD years those less walked Caminos were quite poor on the pilgrim albergues side. Some villages have some infrastructure within their townhalls, sports/social centers etc. But not all so sometimes you depend solely on private accommodation or busing/taxing back and forth on the route just for the sake of cheaper overnight stays.

Anyway there are so many Caminos as you can see from the OP's map that it is easy to decide on certain Camino combo. For example:
1: Estrecho + Augusta + Plata + CF
2: Girona + Catalan + Ebro + Castellano-Aragones (i.e. Soriano) + La Lana + CF
3: Mozarabe (from Almeria) + San Juan de la Cruz + Manchego + Levante/Sureste + Teresiano + Torres + Portugues

:D
You are always so helpful to anyone who asks, Kinky...a "great" guy or whatever that word is in Slovenian. 😊
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
How many of these could be walked in one go by someone who lives outside the schengen zone and walks a moderate 20-25 km a day? Or are you suggesting a life on camino?
I didn't do any exact mileage count on mentioned combos but I can say for sure they are within 90 days. Although I can walk more (and less :D ) 20-25 km/day is also my personal comfort zone ;)
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
Camino del padre Sarmiento?
Ray and Rosa from Camino de Madrid walked it in the last few days, I even watched their live video of them walking into Santiago yesterday, but I wasn't sure whether to consider it as a Camino de Santiago, it only became that when they arrived at the place where you take the boat to Padron.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Camino Viejo - Pamplona to Aguilar de Campoo, there merging with the Olvidado to Cacabellos (or Ponferrada)

Camino de las Asturias - Pamplona to Oviedo
 

murraydv

Via de la Plata / Sanabres / Camino de Levante
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Via de la Plata (2018).
Started Camino de Levante (2019).
I made this map earlier in the year and will be updating it in 2021. I tried to include all known Caminos but I suspect there might be a couple that slipped through the net??
Would really appreciate any experts out there who may know of other routes. Thanks.
View attachment 80419
There is a poster out there that you can see online and it has 11 primary and 41 secondary caminos, all leading to Santiago. You may be able to validate your map. you will find it at www.postersantiago.com Regards, Dave Murray
Poster.jpg
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
This just came in to my email from a friend. Has this route already been posted by one of you savvy walkers?

 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Even in pre-CoViD years those less walked Caminos were quite poor on the pilgrim albergues side. Some villages have some infrastructure within their townhalls, sports/social centers etc. But not all so sometimes you depend solely on private accommodation or busing/taxing back and forth on the route just for the sake of cheaper overnight stays.

Anyway there are so many Caminos as you can see from the OP's map that it is easy to decide on certain Camino combo. For example:
1: Estrecho + Augusta + Plata + CF
2: Girona + Catalan + Ebro + Castellano-Aragones (i.e. Soriano) + La Lana + CF
3: Mozarabe (from Almeria) + San Juan de la Cruz + Manchego + Levante/Sureste + Teresiano + Torres + Portugues

:D
Thanks my friend I will check these out. I plan on my next Camino to walk the VDLP. One of these may be the camino after the VDLP. Thanks!
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
This just came in to my email from a friend. Has this route already been posted by one of you savvy walkers?

I'm not sure, the Camino do Barbanza starts in the place mentioned as the start for this one, Corrubedo, it is 112 km long, this one is 113 km, it could be the same one or it could be competing local authorities claiming the route goes through their area.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Thanks my friend I will check these out. I plan on my next Camino to walk the VDLP. One of these may be the camino after the VDLP. Thanks!
The first one contains VdlP (to Astorga, the traditional way).
 
Camino(s) past & future
Ingles 2018
I guess it makes sense that there are so many smaller routes that eventually connect to the main ones seeing as pilgrims hardly had the option of getting a bus, plane, etc to a preferred starting position in times gone by.
Anyway a great map, to add all the additional routes mentioned the map could look like a child has gone overkill scribbling lines everywhere??
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
The Gronze website lists three ways to get from Barcelona to Montserrat where you can continue to Santiago via the Camino Catalan. Here is a translation of part of their webpage at https://www.gronze.com/camino-santiago-barcelona

The Camino de Barcelona a Montserrat connects the Catalan capital (Sant Jaume church) with the Montserrat Monastery, in a couple of days. It has several signposted routes :

Through the Llobregat Valley (L'Hospitalet de Llobregat - Martorell - Collbató);

by the GR-6 (Parc del Laberint d'Horta - Sant Cugat - Olesa de Montserrat - Monistrol de Montserrat);

and also along the path marked by the Terrassa Association (Tibidabo - Sant Cugat - Terrassa - Monistrol de Montserrat).
 

GBaker

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French
Many of the 'new' routes are hundreds of years old. Maybe some local authority is taking advantage- and I can't say one way or the other unless I know personally all the circumstances. But what happened in 2008 and 2009 with a proliferation of old routes being waymarked is happening again before the holy year,and for you pilgrims who haven't seen the run ups to a holy year it's not just about extra feet on those routes, it's about communities and areas wanting to be involved, they want a recognition of their historical claims, they want pilgrims walking on their paths. There is a strong motivational power around a holy year, this is what you are seeing. I give you two instances, the Camino Geira ( the new route into Santiago) the route is hundreds of years old, has strong links to The order of Malta, they had a good go at getting recognition in 2009, then it went into hibernation until about 2016/2017 then people felt a determination because of the holy year to try again for official recognition, they succeeded.
The 2nd instance is the ' new route' Camino do Barbanza, they claim there is an historical reference to it in the Caldex Codex, it was the upcoming holy year that made them get organised.
All these routes ( mostly) are reflection of the pull of a holy year and its energy,. I have to laugh when I read comments on the forum about the extra pilgrims in Holy Year and how crowded it will be( maybe not now), they miss such much about what the holy year means to so many people especially in Spain
 

GBaker

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French
hello, i'd also like historical back ground of the Camino, so tend to pick up ideas from random posts to inform me, wish there was a post/site. Could you let me know where to find the Caldex Codex, the web wasn't helpful. Thanks
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
hello, i'd also like historical back ground of the Camino, so tend to pick up ideas from random posts to inform me, wish there was a post/site. Could you let me know where to find the Caldex Codex, the web wasn't helpful. Thanks
I think the right source would be Codex Calixtinus not Caldex:

Codex is book.
Caldex/Caudex is tree trunk.
Calixtus II was Pope ;)
 
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David61

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2019
Frances (2020)
I have a different route I walked last year. Or as I called it a the time "The bloody lost again" route. Don't think its popular
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
I put this Camino in before but here is a link to a newspaper article for the Ruta Celanova.
 

AlwynWellington

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
Would really appreciate any experts out there who may know of other routes.
Many roads / routes used in Europe today come from Roman roads. In Spain these were created from about 200 BCE to about 400 CE. There are many sites providing their understanding of where they were. Their maps may show differing information as they take a "snapshot" at a particular time.

One thing I have learnt from them is that the names of many of present day towns and cities are derived (or corrupted) from the Latin names. For example present day Astorga appears to be derived from Asturica Augusta (from which the region Asturia would also seem derived). And similarly, Zaragosa from Caesar Augustus.

And I suspect, in many cases, the Romans were simply exploiting pre-existing routes.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Would it be feasible to do this from Burgos to Bilbao? Then you could connect the Castellano Aragonés to the Olvidado.
You can contact @Kinky One at his email address, located under the signature portion of his profile page. He has quite a bit of information that can be helpful to your question.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
It's a pretty decent map, but no map could possibly show every Camino, unless it were a full map showing every single road, track, trail, & pathway.

But even a map showing all the primary, secondary, and tertiary major & minor routes would be a difficult undertaking.

Just off the top of my head (I might take a more detailed look later) --

Several variants of the Via de la Plata are missing, including the one starting in Gibraltar for instance. Ditto the Mozárabe and the Sureste. And the network of interconnecting routes between these three major Ways is also missing.

All of the more southerly routes between about Sevilla and Valencia also have little-used variants via Madrid (little-used because modern hikers tend to try and avoid big cities where possible, whereas traditionally pilgrims wouldn't have), via Córdoba / Toledo / Cuenca / Uclés and so on as the case may be.

The Aragón-Castilla (and its variants) is missing, several routes between Zaragoza and Zamora, basically along the Duero, and a section of it is a section of the Soriano, with several options of where precisely to move up towards the Francés. Most traditional takes the Lana up to Burgos, though as previously noted there's also the variant to Santo Domingo de la Calzada -- whereas the lengthier versions would be via Aranda de Duero, thence either > Palencia then up to either Carrión de los Condes or Sahagún on the Francés ; or from Aranda to Valladolid, and up from there to León. Going as far as Zamora on that Way would be a stretch.

Several secondary and tertiary routes of the Camí Catalán are missing, although from geographic constraints they do all tend to converge with the main Ways (BTW the Ebro route before it joins the Catalán via Lleida is mostly a modern hiking path parallel to the Camino rather than a Way in its own right, so the map incorrectly identifies it as a major Way) -- there are more simply two major variants of the Camí Catalán, via Lleida or via Huesca, which BTW "starts" in Barcelona, not in Montserrat). And it's true that the section of the Ignaciano between Loyola and Logroño is missing, though from there on it's identical to the Catalán via Lleida, then up the Girona to Manresa.

But multiple routes of the "French" Catalán / Via Romieu are missing, including three of the variants out from Perpignan, especially the major one via the Perthus towards Figueres which was historically the most traveled one (it's the major route out from Catalonia towards Rome), but also the coastal Way towards Llançá and from there up to Figueres, and the equally important Andorran Way -- plus many other secondary routes over the Pyrenees, including a route Lourdes > Gavarnie > Sabiñánigo > Jaca > Aragonés.

And as noted by others, many secondary and tertiary routes in the area between the Norte and the Francés are missing, especially those that can take you from the one to the other across those mountains.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
And let's not even get started on the complex network of Spanish & Portuguese Ways to Rome ; though the Way from Cadiz deserves special mention, as it keeps fairly near the Mediterranean coast along most of its length, really only moving inland at the end of the Riviera de Levante coast in Italy. That would be the "full" coastal Francigena from Spain through France to Rome, as it follows the entire length of the Via Aurelia, as defined in the most broad manner of course ; but it is one single Roman road, though several of its sections had different names originally, and so are usually called by different names nowadays.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Currently on a "Virtual" Camino and striding out across Castile y Leon!
Late to the party on this one but have you seen this?

1599642727017.png

Not quite sure where I got it, I thought it was from our Dutch friends HERE but it seems to be far more comprehensive - outside of Spain/Portugal it has routes extending to Eastern Europe as well as the Canaries.

The Dutch files are very good though and the latest versions are dated February 2020 for the Spanish routes and August 2019 for those in Portugal.

Unfortunately, although each Camino is tagged with its name, the original had all tracks in white (I changed them to yellow to make them stand out better against Google Earth's night sky) and includes many, many variants and sub-routes. At 21Mb the KMZ file and is too large to upload here but if you want a copy you can PM me with an email address and I'll either send it as an attachment or share via Google Drive.

Beautiful cartography in the original posting by the way.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
One thing I have learnt from them is that the names of many of present day towns and cities are derived (or corrupted) from the Latin names. For example present day Astorga appears to be derived from Asturica Augusta (from which the region Asturia would also seem derived). And similarly, Zaragosa from Caesar Augustus.

And I suspect, in many cases, the Romans were simply exploiting pre-existing routes.
I think that Asturias is not exactly a Roman name because it is possible that the people who lived there were called Astures or something like that before the Romans.
The Astures also lived In part of what is now Castilla y Leon (therefore Asturica for Astorga), a small part of Galicia (Valdeorras) and Portugal (Miranda do Douro) and were different to Galaicos who lived in Galicia and North Portugal.
 

Albertagirl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Aragones-Frances (2016); VdlP-Sanabres (2017); Madrid-Frances-Invierno (2019)Levante
I am interested in this thread, since I wish for all my pilgrimages to end in Santiago, but I would like to walk a variety of routes, not on the Frances any more than is necessary. Planning gets increasingly complicated, as I find myself repeatedly walking parts of the Frances and Sanabres to arrive in Santiago. However, I have bookmarked this thread and will undoubtedly find it useful in planning future camiinos. Thanks to all.
 

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