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Arles Route

lynmclean

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Route France (2007) Le Puy (this year)
#1
I am considering doing the Arles route in early May. Last year I commenced the Le Puy route but found it a bit tough ... the weather was awful, rain and sleet. I was hoping for something a bit easier this year. Has anybody done the Arles Route ... anybody done both Arles and the Le Puy Routes?
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#2
From Toulouse the Arles route starts gently and only become difficult when you head up to Somport. The Arles-to-Toulouse section is a bit more rigorous.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#3
Yep, done them both.

I think the Arles route is a bit tougher, and while it was not too wet in May a cold wind blew through the Haute Languedoc. I'd rather be there in bad weather than the Haute Aubrac though.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
#4
Started the Arles Route "in bits" last year. I was advised to start from Montpellier. Advice I should have taken! Back in September, can't wait.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016
#5
Started the Arles Route "in bits" last year. I was advised to start from Montpellier. Advice I should have taken! Back in September, can't wait.

Can you say why? I'm a single female from Sydney considering doing the Arles route in May and a bit concerned about isolation. I walked Le Puy last May and enjoyed it despite the rain and snow. How much tougher is the Arles route?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Arles Route (2013/2014 onwards)
#6
Arles is beautiful and interesting but the walking between Arles and Montpellier is dull. Much road walking and dull countryside. I used the bus to skip half a day. Beyond Montpellier gets so much better. I got to St Guilhem le Desert and believe that from there to Castres (this year's project) will be wonderful. If you're a purist walk it all but if you're after a good walk visit Arles then train to Montpellier or just start there. To me the walking is the most important thing; I'm a terrible pilgrim.
Ultrëia.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#7
a bit concerned about isolation
Last June from Toulouse I rarely saw another pilgrim. It is much less traveled than the Chemin du Puy. It is a solo walk until you get to Puente la Reina (if you continue on the Camino Aragones).
 

karenhypes

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (09), Chemin Le Puy (10/11), hospitaleros (11), Chemin Arles (Apr 13), Caminho Portuguese (15).
#8
I am considering doing the Arles route in early May. Last year I commenced the Le Puy route but found it a bit tough ... the weather was awful, rain and sleet. I was hoping for something a bit easier this year. Has anybody done the Arles Route ... anybody done both Arles and the Le Puy Routes?
Hi, we've done both routes, the Arles route from Montpellier to Puente la Reina this past April/May. As Falcon said definitely more Pilgrims on Le Puy route. As far as difficulty I would probably say the Arles route is a bit tougher, especially from Montpellier to Toulouse. That being said it is very gentle for a few days entering Toulouse along the Canal du Midi. The climb from Oloron Ste. Marie over the Somport Pass is three days fairly difficult, however depending on conditions, ie. snow, a good bit of it is road walking. You will meet pilgrims along the way ,just not as many......it is a Camino and while there might be fewer they are still pilgrims. It took us 35 days to get to Puente la Reina and like any Camino, they are all tough, but you take it one day at a time and when you finish you don't remember whether it was difficult or not, you remember the experiences of a rewarding journey. You will enjoy it. Dayton and Karen
 
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newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#9
the walking between Arles and Montpellier is dull. Much road walking and dull countryside. I used the bus to skip half a day.
I can see how one could feel that way, but to me that part is wonderful. You start at the Roman amphitheater in Arles, go into the massive wetland of the Camargue with flamingos, white horses and flowers. It is barren in a Meseta sort of way, but full of wildlife. Also you get to visit the amazing cathedral at St Giles with the scenes of beheadings and animals ripping apart the sinners.

camarg3.JPG camarg4.JPG amargue

camarg1.JPG camarg2.JPG
 

FatmaG

Active Member
#10
If you are not very fit when beginning to walk, it might also be a good idea to start on a flater terrain... (Arles-Montpellier), because just after Montpellier, there starts the up- and downhill (from Saint-Guilhem till Castres)
 
#11
The section Arles - Toulouse starts off flat and finishes flat but has strenuous bits in the middle. Arles is a wonderful place to visit and starting from there gives you a bit of time to get into the rhythm of walking every day before you hit the strenuous bits.

There won't be as many people as on the Le Puy route. There were five others walking from Arles at the same time as me though some of the gites were quite busy because of groups doing local walks. There were a reasonable number of pilgrims after Toulouse, quite a few more joined at Oloron Ste Marie and lots more at Jaca.

I wouldn't rate it as a tougher walk than Le Puy. I haven't compared profiles but, from memory, the Le Puy route had lots of little ups and downs with a few strenuous spots thrown in. You are into a work-out right from the beginning. Though the Arles route has some more strenuous sections than the Le Puy, you have a gentle lead-in to prepare yourself and are well-seasoned by the time you're approaching the Somport.
 

MtoM

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arles route (in part) 2013 - planning Le Puy route
#12
I am considering doing the Arles route in early May. Last year I commenced the Le Puy route but found it a bit tough ... the weather was awful, rain and sleet. I was hoping for something a bit easier this year. Has anybody done the Arles Route ... anybody done both Arles and the Le Puy Routes?
I did two sections of the Arles route in May and June last year, from Arles to near Castres and beyond Auch to Somport. I am surprised at how often I hear people recommending against the section from Arles to Montpellier. I thought the first days walk to St Gilles was particularly beautiful and peaceful, taking the route along the Petit Rhone (I think there is an alternative to this which may not be as good), and the second day also went through some lovely countryside. People I was walking with were also puzzled by the bad reputation of this stretch. The walk through Haut Languedoc was spectacular, but pretty strenuous. There were quite a few pilgrims on the first part of the Arles route, but approaching the Pyrenees they dwindled to a very few, and I was often the only person in pilgrim accommodation, which got a bit lonely. This may have been because it was an unusually wet year, with many days of rain. I'm told its not normally like that.
 

dalston999

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked Le Puy/Santiago/Fisterra/Murxia Sept/Oct 2012, Portugues march 2013, Arles April 2013
#13
I have walked both routes as a single female in May and not encountered any problems. I agree with the earlier posts, not more difficult, but the day from Lodeve I think it was, was very long and lonely through endless pines on forest roads. Each section was very beautiful, but just a little tooooo long! And a very long descent on shale at the end. Exhausting! But there was a very good Gite to sleep in.

I started in Montpellier, saw a few people between there and Toulouse, but between Pau and Puenta la Reina only 3 French men and 3 German women. I would definitely do it again with no worries if you want a more solitary experience.
 
M

Metropolly

Guest
#14
All routes have their difficulties, and perhaps the Le Puy seems tougher because it has quite a lot of climbing on the first few days (but worth every knee creak, in my opinion). I was worried before setting out from Arles because I'd read the mountains before Castres were very challenging, but in fact there was nothing to worry about. The way was quiet but there was always at least one other pilgrim (I walked in April from Arles, then returned to start again from Toulouse in October). The biggest problem I encountered was dehydration (horrible!), but that was my fault for not bringing enough water or wearing a hat on the long, flat, shadeless sections at the start near Arles. I suppose the conclusion I came to was that nothing is too challenging as long as one takes the appropriate steps to meet those challenges!
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#15
All routes have their difficulties, and perhaps the Le Puy seems tougher because it has quite a lot of climbing on the first few days (but worth every knee creak, in my opinion). I was worried before setting out from Arles because I'd read the mountains before Castres were very challenging, but in fact there was nothing to worry about. The way was quiet but there was always at least one other pilgrim (I walked in April from Arles, then returned to start again from Toulouse in October). The biggest problem I encountered was dehydration (horrible!), but that was my fault for not bringing enough water or wearing a hat on the long, flat, shadeless sections at the start near Arles. I suppose the conclusion I came to was that nothing is too challenging as long as one takes the appropriate steps to meet those challenges!
How was the wal;k from Toulouse to Orolon?
I will then head to StJ and on to Muxia.
Not sure id knees can get Samport
Any advice appreciated Metro,
Thanks David
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#16
How was the wal;k from Toulouse to Orolon?
I will then head to StJ and on to Muxia.
Not sure id knees can get Samport
Any advice appreciated Metro,
Thanks David
It's an easy walk. Seems a pity to stop at Oloron. The walk up the valley of the Aspe is something special.
 
M

Metropolly

Guest
#17
How was the wal;k from Toulouse to Orolon?
I will then head to StJ and on to Muxia.
Not sure id knees can get Samport
Any advice appreciated Metro,
Thanks David
The walk after Toulouse is one of the loveliest - brilliant accommodation, lovely people, gorgeous places. The Pyrenees looming ever closer, the fields getting greener and fresher the closer you get to the mountains. The actual exit from Toulouse is the one time I've ever skipped the walk and taken the bus - simply because I just kept getting lost. I still don't regret it, if only because of the sweet contrast between the hot, unforgiving city and the cool early evening arrival at the small town (sorry, can't remember the name) and its lovely old gite, run by devoted local volunteers.
It seems you are worried about your knees and the Somport pass. There certainly are some tough sections, and the ascent to the pass is probably more tiring than the hike over to Roncesvalles from St Jean Pied de Port, but I don't recall it being a particular problem. It was one of the most satisfying sections of any camino I've walked. It would be a pity to break your journey there, and you would miss the incredible Camino Aragones
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#18
It's an easy walk. Seems a pity to stop at Oloron. The walk up the valley of the Aspe is something special.
Only a few weeks ago Kanga it nearly killed me walking into Cahors on the road section.
We did however make it a 30km day from Bach
Thank God for those two great guys [ brothers] with the drinks in La Quintarde.
Its the down hill that hurt these old knees.

Thanks Metropolly for the help.
I think the communal gite is in Leguevin which is highly recommended by many.
You have my thanks for making life hard with the coming decisions.................i will discuss all with Her Majesty and yes Aragones is a big possibility.
 
M

Metropolly

Guest
#19
Only a few weeks ago Kanga it nearly killed me walking into Cahors on the road section.
We did however make it a 30km day from Bach
Thank God for those two great guys [ brothers] with the drinks in La Quintarde.
Its the down hill that hurt these old knees.

Thanks Metropolly for the help.
I think the communal gite is in Leguevin which is highly recommended by many.
You have my thanks for making life hard with the coming decisions.................i will discuss all with Her Majesty and yes Aragones is a big possibility.
How I envy you! I must admit it's been years since I walked from Toulouse, and since I don't blog (and my scrawled notebooks tend to be filled with rhapsodies on dinner rather than any useful route information) I can't remember many specifics on downhill sections. What I do remember regarding the difficulty of the Somport crossing were: 1. As the road ascends, the path avoided it by climbing up into the forest where it narrowed dramatically at some steep sections, to the point where the only way to continue was to cling to the roots of nearby shrubs and pray they would hold my weight (the path may have changed now, given the heavy rains of the last few years, so others may be able to update you on that); 2. There are some very windy sections where all the air in Spain seems to be trying to force you back into France, and quite possibly beyond; 3. I do seem to remember a steepish descent into Jaca; 4. Despite eating duck confit every evening without fail in the French section, and extravagent menus del dia in Spain, in two weeks from Toulouse to Logrono I lost more weight per day than on any other camino I've done.
Let us know what you decide!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#20
Only a few weeks ago Kanga it nearly killed me walking into Cahors on the road section.
We did however make it a 30km day from Bach
Thank God for those two great guys [ brothers] with the drinks in La Quintarde.
Its the down hill that hurt these old knees.

Thanks Metropolly for the help.
I think the communal gite is in Leguevin which is highly recommended by many.
You have my thanks for making life hard with the coming decisions.................i will discuss all with Her Majesty and yes Aragones is a big possibility.
Thornley I've just re-read this thread and thought my comment that it is "an easy walk" was a bit misleading. It's an easy walk from Toulouse to Oloron, and also up the Valley of the Aspe. It's not easy from then on!
 
#21
I have walked from LePuy to Santiago and also Toulouse to Puenta la Reina. I found the route from Toulouse less traveled, with longer stages and difficult terrain. It rained a lot in September so that may be flavoring my impressions. The trail is a little harder to follow in some places and French, in my opinion, is mandatory on some level of communication. Definitely fewer folks walking. Very beautiful though and I am glad I did it.
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
#22
I walked the Toulouse section to the turn off to Lourdes then went that way. It was not as demanding as the Montpellier to Castres section which I had walked prior to that but still felt quite hard, probably because I was encountering more asphalt and some of the farm tracks were rock hard mud which had been previously rutted up by Tractors, these really tested my knees, However the Gites were the best ones I encountered whole Journey and some of the views on the first days out of Toulouse were of beautiful golden rolling planes. I am thinking of going back in October to walk the uncompleted section to Jaca.
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#23
Hi All ...
I have noted all your above advice and will make notes.
I am planning God willing of course to walk the Arles route starting end of Aug....
I would be very interested to see the break down of your stages if you could share that with me..
Did anyone take the variants/ detours as seen in the Miam Miam ...if so which ones can be recommended to take and for what reason...
I walked the Portuguese route in 2013 from Lisbon to Porto and this first section had a lot of dangerous road walking and also through industrial areas definitely not a great camino experience - then to Santiago.
Are there any sections like this on the Arles route .....which can be skipped/ bussed
How many days is the variante on the Canal de Midi? If I wanted to walk about 2 days on the Canal de Midi which days could you recommend which can easily be re- connected to the Gr 653.
Cheers
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
#24
Hi I walked from the outskirts of Montpellier to the turn off for Lourdes, I did miss out a section from Castres to Toulouse which took out about 100 - 120 km and that included the Canal du Midi,one of my guidebooks was giving a shortcut which connected more directly to the canal after Revel and missed out 30 km.
The Section from the outskirts of Montpellier to Castres is almost free of busy road walking, some Asphalt around 30-40% and those sections are on quiet country roads.
I restarted from St Sernin cathedral in the centre of Toulouse, my hotel was about 30 metres away, and walked to the 1st listed Gite at about 20-25 km. The walk out of the city requires a bit of patience, a good map and an understanding of basic French, I had the former but not the latter two and got misdirected on two occassions, once for a couple of hours going back and forth trying to understand if I was on the right route or not ( not), there is a few interesting parts where you are walking on the edges of roads with cars speeding past, my advice jump it, like it is advised on here. The sections after Toulouse are mixture of natural trail, roads and some busy road sections, asphalt now going up to around 50-60% mostly quiet roads. Apart from Toulouse section there is not anything I would say miss.
The gites are varied and you will come across some exceptional ones.

My sections were a real mix, I cut some in half or a third, that was too see where my knee was at and try to ease my way into the 65 days.

The one little detour I missed was the chapelle St Eutrope a few km after St Gervais sur Mare. If you feel you can make the climb up to it, I have been told it is worth it.

Good Luck

Mike.
 
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M

mikevasey

Guest
#25
The other detour I did was going to Lourdes, you rejoin the Arles route at Oleron St Marie, is about 20-30km longer than if you stayed with the Arles route and takes 5- 6 days. You need the French Randonee book for Toulouse to Jacca which has maps and covers this detour, I used the tourist office map for the GR101, you might as well get a A-4 of paper and draw your own squiggly line across it, write Lahitte- Toupiere at the top( this is where you turn off the Arles and Lourdes at the bottom.
IMG_20140611_165508414.jpg

The Gr101 is about 60-65 km long, I was going to do it in 2 days but ended up staying in Ibos.

First night I stayed in the Abbaye Notre Dame de l' Esperance very near Tarasteix ( tel 05. 62 31 11 93), demi pension €25, book it,the route is devoid of shops, cafes, there was just one water tap in a cemetery on the 1st day. About 25-27km, very beautiful forest/woods trail walking, very solitary

IMG_20140612_173600860.jpg

2nd day I was going to kick it and get to Lourdes, but stopped at a cafe bar in Ibos had a 1/4 carafe of rose with my meal and that was it. Asked about hotels in the cafe and they said go to the Marie they have somewhere for pilgrims, they do. It is a local reception house they have, kitchen, toilets and sinks, gardens and bed but no shower or bath, donativo. This would be hard to book at the weekend if the Marie was shut. A traditional Sardinian voice group sang at the church that night next to the reception, it was a beautiful night, the locals were walking the streets singing in a Occitane Pyrennees tradition and the group were incredible.

IMG_20140613_153122577_HDR.jpg

The next day was the walk to Lourdes less natural walking and more Asphalt, still very beautiful.

From Lourdes you follow the Piedmont route, there is a section on this Forum on that route with good info. IMG_20140614_140533284.jpg
 
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SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#26
Hi I walked from the outskirts of Montpellier to the turn off for Lourdes, I did miss out a section from Castres to Toulouse which took out about 100 - 120 km and that included the Canal du Midi,one of my guidebooks was giving a shortcut which connected more directly to the canal after Revel and missed out 30 km.
The Section from the outskirts of Montpellier to Castres is almost free of busy road walking, some Asphalt around 30-40% and those sections are on quiet country roads.
I restarted from St Sernin cathedral in the centre of Toulouse, my hotel was about 30 metres away, and walked to the 1st listed Gite at about 20-25 km. The walk out of the city requires a bit of patience, a good map and an understanding of basic French, I had the former but not the latter two and got misdirected on two occassions, once for a couple of hours going back and forth trying to understand if I was on the right route or not ( not), there is a few interesting parts where you are walking on the edges of roads with cars speeding past, my advice jump it, like it is advised on here. The sections after Toulouse are mixture of natural trail, roads and some busy road sections, asphalt now going up to around 50-60% mostly quiet roads. Apart from Toulouse section there is not anything I would say miss.
The gites are varied and you will come across some exceptional ones.

My sections were a real mix, I cut some in half or a third, that was too see where my knee was at and try to ease my way into the 65 days.

The one little detour I missed was the chapelle St Eutrope a few km after St Gervais sur Mare. If you feel you can make the climb up to it, I have been told it is worth it.

Good Luck

Mike.
Hi Mike

Thank you for your reply.. and a few more questions..

..... my advice jump it, like it is advised on here. please explain the jump from where to where? ...by bus ?
Luckily I speak a bit of French..but would probably also get lost if its not marked properly leaving town.
When you mention 65 days ...was that from Arles to Santiago?
I would also like suggestions on how to shorten the longer days of 25-30+ km a day..
I will try remember to visit the little chapel and take a pic for you..



Which guide books did you have?
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#27
The other detour I did was going to Lourdes, you rejoin the Arles route at Oleron St Marie, is about 20-30km longer than if you stayed with the Arles route and takes 5- 6 days. You need the French Randonee book for Toulouse to Jacca which has maps and covers this detour, I used the tourist office map for the GR101, you might as well get a A-4 of paper and draw your own squiggly line across it, write Lahitte- Toupiere at the top( this is where you turn off the Arles and Lourdes at the bottom.
View attachment 18126


The Gr101 is about 60-65 km long, I was going to do it in 2 days but ended up staying in Ibos.

First night I stayed in the Abbaye Notre Dame de l' Esperance very near Tarasteix ( tel 05. 62 31 11 93), demi pension €25, book it,the route is devoid of shops, cafes, there was just one water tap in a cemetery on the 1st day. About 25-27km, very beautiful forest/woods trail walking, very solitary

View attachment 18127

2nd day I was going to kick it and get to Lourdes, but stopped at a cafe bar in Ibos had a 1/4 carafe of rose with my meal and that was it. Asked about hotels in the cafe and they said go to the Marie they have somewhere for pilgrims, they do. It is a local reception house they have, kitchen, toilets and sinks, gardens and bed but no shower or bath, donativo. This would be hard to book at the weekend if the Marie was shut. A traditional Sardinian voice group sang at the church that night next to the reception, it was a beautiful night, the locals were walking the streets singing in a Occitane Pyrennees tradition and the group were incredible.

View attachment 18128

The next day was the walk to Lourdes less natural walking and more Asphalt, still very beautiful.

From Lourdes you follow the Piedmont route, there is a section on this Forum on that route with good info. View attachment 18129
Did you start in Toulouse and the deviate to Lourdes and spend the first night to the Abbaye? was that the 25-27km
Day 2 to Ibos how many km was that?
Day 3 to Lourdes how many km left...
What are your view on walking it still in 2 days after doing it in 3? I prefer to walk an average of 25km and try not to do over 30km two days in a row.

Thank you in advance...
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
#28
The jump is either catch a train or tram to Pibrac( I think) which misses out about 10 or 11 km and then stay at the friendly local association run Gite in Leguevin.

Had a nieces wedding I had to be at on the 1st of August so that was how I set my target of 65 days, I didn't have a plan to walk all the way or if I did I was flexible about it.

The suggested stages in the Haute Languedoc by various guides are quite heavy going, why risk injury, cut them, use the Miam Miam Guide to look at accommodation options in between suggested stages. You can walk further, longer after Castres(I think).

I had the above book and the French Randonee ( FFRP) books, a lot of pilgrims were using the Rando books- they seemed quite useful.

The turn off for Lourdes is about 5km after Mauborguet, I went 2km on and stayed at a British run Gite, then cut back the next day. This turn off is about 6-7 etapas after Toulouse.

Not sure about distances on the GR101, I am guessing 25-27 to the Abbaye from the Gite I was in, 14 km to Ibos next day, and then around 21-23 to Lourdes next day. It is possible to walk in two, I suggest stay at the Abbaye for the 1st night, then go for it on the 2nd, There is the option of stopping about 6-7km before Lourdes in Bartres, this would give you a long day to look around.

Good luck.
 
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falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#29
The markings leaving Toulouse were hard to find, and the path very convoluted. I was lost several times! Without a guidebook I would never have made it.:) Pibrac is down to one hotel from its former two.
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
#30
The book published by FFRP, Toulouse to Jacca will more or less keep you on the right path, I tried to buy it Toulouse but it was sold out, I did see it at the St Jacques Association office in the St Sernin church but thought I would pick it up in the bookshop in the evening - a mistake. I basically ended up seeing the markings for another GR and ended up on the east side of the airport, which I knew was wrong at the time but without a map couldn't see where or how to get out of it, after two hours decided to retrace my steps and walked back about 3-4 km. The French generally know English better than people give them credit for, just not on that day.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#32
The book published by FFRP, Toulouse to Jacca will more or less keep you on the right path, I tried to buy it Toulouse but it was sold out, I did see it at the St Jacques Association office in the St Sernin church but thought I would pick it up in the bookshop in the evening - a mistake. I basically ended up seeing the markings for another GR and ended up on the east side of the airport, which I knew was wrong at the time but without a map couldn't see where or how to get out of it, after two hours decided to retrace my steps and walked back about 3-4 km. The French generally know English better than people give them credit for, just not on that day.
They know it better than we think Mike , talk Rugby in a non english speaking bar and sit back and smile.
They are doing like wise sitting and smiling with side way looks .
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#33
The jump is either catch a train or tram to Pibrac( I think) which misses out about 10 or 11 km and then stay at the friendly local association run Gite in Leguevin.

Had a nieces wedding I had to be at on the 1st of August so that was how I set my target of 65 days, I didn't have a plan to walk all the way or if I did I was flexible about it.

The suggested stages in the Haute Languedoc by various guides are quite heavy going, why risk injury, cut them, use the Miam Miam Guide to look at accommodation options in between suggested stages. You can walk further, longer after Castres(I think).

I had the above book and the French Randonee ( FFRP) books, a lot of pilgrims were using the Rando books- they seemed quite useful.

The turn off for Lourdes is about 5km after Mauborguet, I went 2km on and stayed at a British run Gite, then cut back the next day. This turn off is about 6-7 etapas after Toulouse.

Not sure about distances on the GR101, I am guessing 25-27 to the Abbaye from the Gite I was in, 14 km to Ibos next day, and then around 21-23 to Lourdes next day. It is possible to walk in two, I suggest stay at the Abbaye for the 1st night, then go for it on the 2nd, There is the option of stopping about 6-7km before Lourdes in Bartres, this would give you a long day to look around.

Good luck.
Thank you Mike I am noting all the information you are sharing with me while I wait patiently for my Sentier Guide books to arrive (its been 2 months in the coming!!) and the postal system is more on strike than working...

Is there a pilgrims hostel in Lourdes , I would like to spend 2 nights there.

Cheers
Susie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#34
I wait patiently for my Sentier Guide books to arrive (its been 2 months in the coming!!) and the postal system is more on strike than working...
Hi Susie, I hope your guide books arrive soon. I ordered a copy of “The Way” in February, and it still hasn’t arrived :mad: Jill in Sabie, Mpumalanga
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#35
I hope we both get lucky....
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#36
I hope we both get lucky....
I hope we both get lucky....
I see you also walked Chemin du Puy in which month? I started end of August and finished 3rd October in Roncevalles via the Clee valley. I am expecting the Chemin de Arles to be more difficult...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, Le Puy, Rota Vicentina, De Soulac, Norte, Madrid-Salv-Primitivo
#37
Hi Susie, I walked from Le Puy in May/June. The Arles route is on my bucket list! Jill
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
#38
There is an Accueil Jacquaire called La Ruche in Lourdes, very plush, prime location 15 Euros for dorm room including breakfast, evening meal donativo. Two nights possible maybe 3 but don't quote me on it.
 

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SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#39
Thank you Mike. Have noted it.
Being a bit blond but am I correct in thinking there is do detour to Lourdes marked in the Miam Miam. except.on Plan 63 it shows a path GR101 vers Lourdes.... and then ...nothing!
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
#41
When I was at the priests house on the Piemont route in Arudy, he had a copy of the above book, it showed the GR101 route and from Lourdes back to Somport, the book will very helpful for you especially on the way to Lourdes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012
Le Puy- Roncesvalles & Figeac-Rocamadour 2014
Le Puy-Conques & CeleValley 2016
#42
I've enjoyed reading all your comments about this route; I'm planning to walk the section from Pau to Puenta la Reina in 2016. Does anyone know how far that section is or roughly how long it takes? It seems to be about 260kms.
 

futurefjp

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
started in 2013 ... the plot thickens. Next walk part of the Jakobsweg from Nuremberg towards ...
#43
Yep! I'm off on 18th. Anyone else heading out 18th from Arles?
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#44
Yep! I'm off on 18th. Anyone else heading out 18th from Arles?
Hi was wondering how your camino is going so far would really love to have your feed back after your trip on the stages you did and your experiences good and bad regarding the gites , places to eat and places not to miss....
Cheers
Susie
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#45
Can anyone help or explain......I am busy trying to work out the stages starting in Arles.....
I understand that it is recommended to catch the #21 bus from Vendargues to Montpellier then #1 tram to Euromedicine the #24 le Pradas bus to Grabels stadium.
If I do that it seems that I will be missing Montpellier completely .... or stop here and the next day.....#1 tram to Euromedicine the #24 le Pradas bus to Grabels stadium
 

futurefjp

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
started in 2013 ... the plot thickens. Next walk part of the Jakobsweg from Nuremberg towards ...
#46
Hi was wondering how your camino is going so far would really love to have your feed back after your trip on the stages you did and your experiences good and bad regarding the gites , places to eat and places not to miss....
Cheers
Susie
18th June hasn't arrived yet.

Any advice on how to get to Arles from Montpellier Airport direct would be helpful - hitching and bla bla car checks already done
 

futurefjp

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
started in 2013 ... the plot thickens. Next walk part of the Jakobsweg from Nuremberg towards ...
#47
Hi was wondering how your camino is going so far would really love to have your feed back after your trip on the stages you did and your experiences good and bad regarding the gites , places to eat and places not to miss....
Cheers
Susie

Sorry I didn't say which month!
 

futurefjp

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
started in 2013 ... the plot thickens. Next walk part of the Jakobsweg from Nuremberg towards ...
#49
Parc Expo to Montpellier by tram,
Montpellier Roche to Arles by train.
Really I need to hitchhike. Recommendations for hitchhiking from Months Airport to Arles?
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#50
Sorry I didn't say which month!
No problem .... I wish a wonderful camino....and would love to hear all your recommendations gites and stages ect.
God willing I am planning to start in Arles +/- 25 August...any one else starting that time?
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#51
I am trying to plan my stages and would like some advice on breaking down the stages from Lunas - St Gervais sur Mare - Murat sur Vebre from the 2 stages into 3 stages as I have a hip injury and need to take shorter stages on the demanding Haut- Languedoc...any suggestions....
 

SUSIE

Camino addict....
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2010)
Camino Portuguese Lisbon to Santiago via Fatima(2013)
Via Podiensis Le Puy - Roncevalles (2014)
Via Tolosana via Lourdes (2015)
Planning Via Francigena [2017]
#53
How does this look...

Lunas to Servies 16.7km + 3km downhill to gite and up 3km the next day.....
Servies to Castanet le Haut/ Le Fau off route 19km
Castanet le Haut to Murat sur Verbe 15.3km....

Are the km per day correct?
 

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