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Armchair tasting tour of Spanish wine

2020 Camino Guides

Helen1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
London to Santiago (2014)
Narbonne to Oloron (2015)
Camino Portugues (2016)
Sentier Cathar (2017)

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
Mencia is my contribution to this list, prior to my Xmas Camino just gone I have seemed to have missed this deep aromatic red wine grown in the El Bierzo and parts of Galicia. After a night sat on a bar stool in Ponferrada, drinking this after it was recommend by a local, and eating the substantial Pinchos that came with every glass it is now on my watch list https://winefolly.com/deep-dive/mencia-wine/ I have a feeling many on here already know it, but for some reason it has eluded me, for the rest of my Xmas Camino Mencia kept presenting it self to me.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Future
I was instructed by a barman in Orense, as I love wine but knew little about galician wines, still limited knowledge on them though. 😊
Seemingly there are five designation of origin in Galicia, four of them from Orense (vines you go past when walking invierno and portuguese interior) and the fifth is the spread and well known rias baixas. 🍷
Delicious both, red mencia and whites godello or albarino, as I was told they are the kind of grape they come from.
Hope not to sound kind of know-it-all, but couldn’t hold it back. ☺
 

Roland49

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 July
I highly recommend the Red Wine from the Bierzo. I didn't know that wine-growing-region before my Camino. I had a tasting in a Bodega a few km before Villafranca del Bierzo and was astonished about the quality and the taste of those redwines from that specific region.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Mencia is my contribution to this list, prior to my Xmas Camino just gone I have seemed to have missed this deep aromatic red wine grown in the El Bierzo and parts of Galicia. After a night sat on a bar stool in Ponferrada, drinking this after it was recommend by a local, and eating the substantial Pinchos that came with every glass it is now on my watch list https://winefolly.com/deep-dive/mencia-wine/ I have a feeling many on here already know it, but for some reason it has eluded me, for the rest of my Xmas Camino Mencia kept presenting it self to me.
Very good information about Mencia wines thank you.
The Bierzo wines have improved a lot.
Many years ago I always bought a "garrafa" at the Villafranca cooperativa when driving to Galicia. It was cheap but not so good as now.
 

Roland49

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 July
Yesterday evening I finished a bottle of Mencia Roble from 2016 of the Bierzo while playing cards with my beloved one. It was rated as best Mencia of it's pricing. It was cheap, the bottle for 7,90€.

Sometimes even the self-quarantine has it's good times ;).

The Wine we drank had great kindness, few tannins and very strong sour cherry, minimal peppery and red currant flavors with some notes of the mineral it grows on. A very nice wine for the occasion.
Liked it better than most of the Riojas of that pricerange.
 

witsendwv

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015)
Most Galician white wine is expensive here if it can be found. We had to travel out of state back in the beginning of Feb., and brought home a case of Albarino. Spring is here so we may enjoy a bottle out on our porch this evening. With some olives and jamon of course!
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Most Galician white wine is expensive here if it can be found. We had to travel out of state back in the beginning of Feb., and brought home a case of Albarino. Spring is here so we may enjoy a bottle out on our porch this evening. With some olives and jamon of course!
Better a lobster for the Albariño! There are also lobsters in Galicia.
 

witsendwv

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015)
Better a lobster for the Albariño! There are also lobsters in Galicia.
No lobster here in West Virginia. Making do with jars of Castelvetrano olives (similar to Campo Reales found in Madrid), and the last of a leg of jamon that was a birthday present for my husband. I am hopeing the Albarino outlasts the Corona.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future
It's been a few years, even so I still recall it occurred in my early twenties, in Reliegos Elvis Bar while tasting a glass of wine. ☺

We asked for a local beverage, Xinin the owner warned us it was kind of a thick stuff made of Prieto Picudo grapes.
Even so, we ordered it. 💪

I may rarely compare it to past superb riojas or upcoming great mencias, so sayin, I also enjoyed it.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
It's been a few years, even so I still recall it occurred in my early twenties, in Reliegos Elvis Bar while tasting a glass of wine. ☺

We asked for a local beverage, Xinin the owner warned us it was kind of a thick stuff made of Prieto Picudo grapes.
Even so, we ordered it. 💪

I may rarely compare it to past superb riojas or upcoming great mencias, so sayin, I also enjoyed it.
Yes there are other grapes appart from tempranillo, garnacha, mencia...with small productions.
For example Albarin (different to Albariño) that is the base for Cangas de Narcea wines in Asturias.
A cousin of mine has planted them near Lugo (that is not a wine area) and now is waiting for his first harvest. I don't know the wine but I'm sure that the orujo will be great.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future
Yes there are other grapes appart from tempranillo, garnacha, mencia...with small productions.
For example Albarin (different to Albariño) that is the base for Cangas de Narcea wines in Asturias.
A cousin of mine has planted them near Lugo (that is not a wine area) and now is waiting for his first harvest. I don't know the wine but I'm sure that the orujo will be great.
Albarin grape is news to me, also those Lugo bred vines sound great.
Please, and to the extent you feel like, let us know on them.
Northern vines. ❤
 
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Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Albarin grape is news to me, also those Lugo bred vines sound great.
Please, and to the extent you feel like, let us know on them.
Northern vines. ❤
It is not a new Denominacion de Origen Lugo.
It is just an experiment of my cousin with this grape.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Why does that simple concept make me oh so very happy 🤔
In Galicia North is famous the Betanzos orujo. They say that is the best of all.
The grape is also Albarin. My cousin's place is 300 mts higher and therefore is colder (near Baamonde).
So I think that the orujo there must be even more fruity and aromatic than in Betanzos (and the wine worse).
 

Isca-camigo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various ones.
Betanzos orujo. They say that is the best of all.
Its probably the one I had in a pulperia in Lugo. The taste was smooth, and it let a collective oohhh from the group I was with when we downed them, rather than the usual collective shudder.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Its probably the one I had in a pulperia in Lugo. The taste was smooth, and it let a collective oohhh from the group I was with when we downed them, rather than the usual collective shudder.
In the Denominación de Origen Orujos de Galicia there are subregions.
I am not an expert in Orujos but I bet that the Nothern ones: Betanzos and Portomarin must be the best. But I am afraid that there is not possible to find in the market Orujo bottles with these origins defined because the global quality market for Orujo is small.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
No lobster here in West Virginia. Making do with jars of Castelvetrano olives (similar to Campo Reales found in Madrid), and the last of a leg of jamon that was a birthday present for my husband. I am hopeing the Albarino outlasts the Corona.
Are there no crayfish in the streams of West Virginia? Albarino would be excellent after a day of netting them.

I am in quarantine in Canada for the next 9 days after bringing my mother back from Florida, and I have some shrimp in my freezer which will accompany a bottle of godello for next Sunday's dinner.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
There are a couple of very small regions in Palencia. They are superior but hard to find for sale in Spain, much less the US. The blends of tempranillo and cabernet sauvignon are incredible and when they add some local grape varieties, out of this world. I am not sure what the DOC is.
 

witsendwv

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2015)
Are there no crayfish in the streams of West Virginia? Albarino would be excellent after a day of netting them.

I am in quarantine in Canada for the next 9 days after bringing my mother back from Florida, and I have some shrimp in my freezer which will accompany a bottle of godello for next Sunday's dinner.
I hate to admit this, but I go to Spain and eat absolutely no pescado or mariscos. I ask for my ensalada mixta with the tuna on the side on a separate dish for my husband to eat. I do not eat seafood of any kind. I can locate a fish market a mile away no matter how fresh. I can tolerate sitting across the table from my husband while he eats pulpo, but only if I am upwind. 🤪
 

Roland49

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2019 July
DOC means Denominazione (di) origine controllata. Wine from controlled (specified) geographical origin.
Originating from Italy it's widely used for wines all over the world with a controlled growing area. Cooperatives and Associations of winegrowers or government agencies are controlling the origin of the grapes used for winemaking. So Rioja is from the Region Rioja in Spain, while wine from Franconia in Germany come from Franconia and not elsewhere.

On this map you can see all the different winegrowing regions in germany that are listed in the german wine-legislation.

Hope that this help a bit. :)
And now for something stronger: 🥃 Tullibardine Single Malt
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future
I also recall when walking Coruña’s leg of the ingles, in an old fashioned looking (still lovely) ❤ bar pulling draft vermouth into tiny individual spanish pitchers called porrones.
Just curious I asked the barman, who told me they came from Cataluña where seemingly it is quite traditional.
No doubt it was one of the highlights from that camino.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
DOC means Denominazione (di) origine controllata. Wine from controlled (specified) geographical origin.
Originating from Italy it's widely used for wines all over the world with a controlled growing area. Cooperatives and Associations of winegrowers or government agencies are controlling the origin of the grapes used for winemaking. So Rioja is from the Region Rioja in Spain, while wine from Franconia in Germany come from Franconia and not elsewhere.

On this map you can see all the different winegrowing regions in germany that are listed in the german wine-legislation.

Hope that this help a bit. :)
And now for something stronger: 🥃 Tullibardine Single Malt
A wine included in a DOC in Spain must also have the authorized grape. For example, DOC Rioja doesn't admit Mencia or Pinod Noir grapes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
I also recall when walking Coruña’s leg of the ingles, in an old fashioned looking (still lovely) ❤ bar pulling draft vermouth into tiny individual spanish pitchers called porrones.
Just curious I asked the barman, who told me they came from Cataluña where seemingly it is quite traditional.
No doubt it was one of the highlights from that camino.
The artisanal vermouths of Spain are a delight and I would often find that bars would make their own (well, not all of them were delightful). They were an excellent way to while away a half-hour before the evening mass.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future
The artisanal vermouths of Spain are a delight and I would often find that bars would make their own (well, not all of them were delightful). They were an excellent way to while away a half-hour before the evening mass.
I found it quite an experience.
At that time I was far from being familiar with craft vermouth, and absolutely loved it.
As memorable as those small pitchers it was poured into.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Some of the most interesting wine I had on pilgrimage came in unlabelled bottles - and I include Orujo.
I was always amused seeing the same label as we moved from place to place, Vino de casa. Always good.

We just left a Zoom meeting with a dozen friends with an invitation of Cocktails before dinner. There were four of us with Spanish wines including one who gave me some cava for Christmas in appreciation for being a "tour guide" in October before I did my camino. That's the wine Peg and I had.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
Some of the most interesting wine I had on pilgrimage came in unlabelled bottles - and I include Orujo.
I recall being in Yesa after a really long day out of Berdun along the north shore of the lake, and the waitress brought me an unlabelled bottle, to the horror of the patron, who apologized and went to fetch me something more elegant (with a label). After a moment of discussion, he allowed that it was from his uncle's finca in the centre of Aragon----given that the labelled bottle was a Gran Feudo, a very decent wine with which I was familiar, I told him that I would like to see what his uncle's wine was like. He admitted that his uncle produced a very nice wine which they would drink on Sundays, and proceeded to get me a bottle. It was a deep dark velvet and, while it might have been the fatigue of the day which made it memorable, I believe it to be one of the best reds I have had.

As the restaurant was empty aside from two German motorcyclists who were happy with their beer, I ended up with the patron and the waitress (a cousin) sitting with me, hearing tales of the Carlists and the Civil War in the valley. I should note that one's linguistic capabilities are greatly improved by good tinto.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Future
My brother invited me yesterday for lunch and showed me a Monjardin red wine he had been recommended by the owner of a winery he visits quite often.
Fruity, tasty and, oddly enough, unexpectedly familiar. :)
I forgot to take a picture, but have found it on its site.
Monjardin.png
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
JillGat Food and drink on the Camino de Santiago 34
OLDER threads on this topic
wine tasting on the Camino Frances

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