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Asking a Camino question – A Suggestion

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S

simply B

Guest
Hello, all! (but most especially for newbies, and even the “old hands” here all held that wonderful status once!)

Though unable to spend much time here, I just now had occasion to quickly browse some of the new threads over the last few weeks. I see a remarkable uptick in folks putting out very general questions as to preparation and, if you will, “How to do the Camino”. I would like to simplify, as economically as possible, how to do this though this post will be still too long… and perhaps not to everyone's taste.

But, please, all you experienced folks - - please read through because this thread may need, over time, the comment of those who have special recommendations for threads they find immensely useful and true. I have set up this post so you can just pick a topic and list your “best/favorite” threads as candidates for exploration. (Not that there’s any obligation!) Okay, thank you! Now moving on…

There is NO “one-size-fits-all” answer to either prep or walking the Way. YOUR Camino starts when YOU begin planning it and YOUR Camino just continues as YOU walk it. How you handle each will comprise YOUR Camino. Still, there is a bewildering set of questions that you will/may have that weigh upon you…and you are looking for the RIGHT answer.

First… get over the concept of “RIGHT”, there will be something “WRONG” at some time and you will have to adapt. On the other hand, there will be times when things are better than “RIGHT”, you could not have planned for better…which is actually one of the beauties of the Camino. Now I’ll stop being philosophical and drill down to the novice’s categories for thought and research.

The “Search” function is the place to start. Pick a category from below. Put in your key words and explore the most recent thread entries first – because in some cases timing matters greatly: albergue openings/closings, the season you wish to walk in influences some of the categories, new services and products will impact others. (And I am limiting my comments to the Camino Francés because that is where I see the inquiries.)

1. Environment
Pick your season for walking the Camino and then check the historical weather for key locations along the route. You will pack for the climate and dress for the weather. Lots of good stuff here on the forum on “layering”.

2. Gear
Do NOT go crazy on gear. You want a well-fitted pack and comfortable shoes or boots with good socks. The amount of weight you put in the pack will influence the type of footwear you need but first it will impact your distance traveled per day. There is neither perfect pack nor perfect footwear for you here. Models change, reliability changes and you need to read several voices to hone YOUR selection process. All else than this is your source for excess weight.

One added thought about footwear. Whether you can believe it or not, your feet are NOT static in dimension. On a walk of more than a week or so they most likely WILL deform – the arch will flatten thus both length and width will expand. Plan on going a size larger when you test them out with a full pack on your back. They should feel comfortable – not overly loose but certainly not snug.

3. Training
Here’s a tip though its origin is lost to me: “Don’t walk the Camino before you walk the Camino.”

“Generally fit” is fine. So is “somewhat unfit”. If one is in prime condition there is a risk of blowing out early. I’d guess most experienced folks here have seen the carnage at Santo Domingo de Calzada or before where the super-fit crashed and burned by over-walking. (It’s not a contest or a race, BTW.)

Walk enough to get your body conditioned to the pack/footgear and socks combination then see what needs to be changed out.

4. Food/Water
This is no walk-in-the-park but let us remember that Spain is a first-world country. Any guidebook you might choose will have fountains, bar/meson/café clearly indicated and those are generally good indications for April through October. For winter Caminos, search the threads dealing with that topic. There are multiple threads on this. Stoves, vegan, gluten-free – all findable here.

5. Shelter
Those same guidebooks will reliably notify you of most albergues/hostels/casa rurales/etc. Actual availability of beds will depend upon seasonal crowding on the Way. If you wish to go during “peak” season, plan on getting away from the Brierley stages except for perhaps the larger cities that can handle the surge. Camping/Tents, yes, the topic is here and easily searched.

6. Communications
Albergue computers with fast internet connection were available a few years back. Now “wi-fi” (wee-fee) is more common to the detriment of the former. Anything you want to know about cell phone plans in Spain, how folks deal with blogging from any device is easily discoverable (just in the last few months’ threads) by use of the “Search” function.

7. Transportation
A very commonly updated topic here. Search by from whence you are departing AFTER deciding where you wish to arrive. Then check possible routes and fares via Travelocity, orbitz or similar. Several posters have done more than yeoman’s service in making this as simple as possible for in-country travel. Want to move a pack without carrying it, try “Jacotrans” as a search term.

8. Finance
Yes, there are ATM’s in Spain. The guidebooks show them and they are there. Recent threads abound from which to learn. My general rules are: a) Have a travel debit card completely divorced from my bank account. b) Have 300 euro in my pocket upon landing in Europe. c) Only use ATM’s during business hours. (If the card is “eaten” by the ATM, I can go in and retrieve it.) d) When I get down to 50-100 euro in my pocket is my time to start planning to get back to the 300 balance. e) A credit card is useful for "emergency" duty only in larger cities. It is useless in smaller towns.

How much cash you need is a function of how much you spend. How much you spend is particular to the way you wish to live on the road. For a "basement" level, I would think 30-40 euro per day would work - - without you losing too much weight! Multiple threads are here dealing with the topic. I’m cheap. I have done “basement” and I have gone “luxe”. The difference is 35 euro/day increase, at most. (But then, I am still cheap even at "luxe' levels!)

9. Medical
Again, Spain is a first-world country. Farmacias abound and they are staffed by people who generally handle almost any language and can provide almost any general need without a prescription. “Medical Insurance” is an oft-posted topic here with many threads. There are multiple specialized threads on diet (pick one) and specific conditions/medications.

10. Language
Get some Spanish, at least! It is always appreciated, even if just the pleasantries. But this, like the Camino entire, follows the general rule “The more you put into it, the more you get out of it.” Like everything else - - check “Spanish”, “language”, "lessons" or combination - - something will turn out for you in the “Search” function.


I hope that this helps! (But, if it does not, it will be weeks before I can come back to see if I have been flamed!;))


B
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
First… get over the concept of “RIGHT”, there will be something “WRONG” at some time and you will have to adapt. On the other hand, there will be times when things are better than “RIGHT”, you could not have planned for better…which is actually one of the beauties of the Camino. Now I’ll stop being philosophical and drill down to the novice’s categories for thought and research.
Great post @simply B. If I could add, along with getting over what is right, get over being tempted to ask what was 'BEST'. None of us know!

To know would imply we had tried all the alternatives and been able to compare them, and I suggest even those who have walked many times would not wish to claim that they could do that. Certainly we can tell you what we found to be GOOD, and perhaps warn you about things we felt were BAD, but even then these judgements are based on our expectations, which might not exactly match yours.
 

jeffnd

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March/April 2014
I just want to add my 2 cents to a few of your points.

2. Gear

There are certain items on which you can cut corners and save money. The $2 generic water bottle will serve you just as well as some $25 bottle would. Backpacks and footwear are a different story. When it comes to those items, buy the best you can reasonably afford. Now, that doesn't mean you need to spend all your money on a backpack, but look for something that is made well and is well reviewed. Same goes with your footwear. What is on your feet could make or break your Camino.

3. Training
Any little bit of training you can do before you walk the Camino will be a benefit to you. I see a lot of people asking how they are supposed to train when they live in flat, urban areas. The best advice is just to get out there and walk. Get used to walking and build up strength.

6. Communications
In 2014, I met someone who was on his second Camino. The previous was in 2012. He said the biggest change was that wifi in albergues had become the rule and not the exception. You shouldn't have too much of a problem connecting to the internet along the way.

Wireless communication is always changing. There are new technologies coming out all the time. What was true last year might not be this year. If someone comes in and asks about SIM cards or GPS, it really doesn't do them much good to point them to a thread that is 3 years old.

And I will add this to the cellphone vs. no cellphone debate. There should be no debate. Carry a cellphone!

7. Transportation
A very commonly updated topic here. As it should be! Wasn't there a disruption in rail service from Bayonne to St. Jean in the middle of last year? The people who keep on top of stuff like that really deserve a big thank you! And again, bus and train schedules can change. Please don't just point them to a thread that is a few years old and assume that everything is the same.

9. Medical
I will take some issue with saying that pharmacies "abound" the Camino. A decent sized town will have one, but I think people who are reading this forum for the first time might get the impression that town=pharmacy. This simply isn't true.

Also, I've ranted on this before, but I'll rant on it again. Carry a first-aid kit! It drives me insane to see self-proclaimed "experts" telling people you don't need a first-aid kit.
 

marbuck

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Condom to Pamplona April 2016.
Le Puy to Condom France - April-May 2015.
Roncesvalles to Santiago April - May 2014
Finisterre to Muxia May 2014
I just want to add my 2 cents to a few of your points.

2. Gear

There are certain items on which you can cut corners and save money. The $2 generic water bottle will serve you just as well as some $25 bottle would. Backpacks and footwear are a different story. When it comes to those items, buy the best you can reasonably afford. Now, that doesn't mean you need to spend all your money on a backpack, but look for something that is made well and is well reviewed. Same goes with your footwear. What is on your feet could make or break your Camino.

3. Training
Any little bit of training you can do before you walk the Camino will be a benefit to you. I see a lot of people asking how they are supposed to train when they live in flat, urban areas. The best advice is just to get out there and walk. Get used to walking and build up strength.

6. Communications
In 2014, I met someone who was on his second Camino. The previous was in 2012. He said the biggest change was that wifi in albergues had become the rule and not the exception. You shouldn't have too much of a problem connecting to the internet along the way.

Wireless communication is always changing. There are new technologies coming out all the time. What was true last year might not be this year. If someone comes in and asks about SIM cards or GPS, it really doesn't do them much good to point them to a thread that is 3 years old.

And I will add this to the cellphone vs. no cellphone debate. There should be no debate. Carry a cellphone!

7. Transportation
A very commonly updated topic here. As it should be! Wasn't there a disruption in rail service from Bayonne to St. Jean in the middle of last year? The people who keep on top of stuff like that really deserve a big thank you! And again, bus and train schedules can change. Please don't just point them to a thread that is a few years old and assume that everything is the same.

9. Medical
I will take some issue with saying that pharmacies "abound" the Camino. A decent sized town will have one, but I think people who are reading this forum for the first time might get the impression that town=pharmacy. This simply isn't true.

Also, I've ranted on this before, but I'll rant on it again. Carry a first-aid kit! It drives me insane to see self-proclaimed "experts" telling people you don't need a first-aid kit.

I left it too late to answer, jeffnd said it all. Well done.
 

Jan_89

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés: July/August 2014

Camino Francés: May/June 2017
Super post! Very useful! Thank you for the summary!

BUEN CAMINO! ;)
 

Ahhhs

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago, May 2015
Porto to Santiago, April 2016
Muxia-Finisterre-Santiago, April 2016
Camino Del Norte, April 2017
Good suggestions all.
I would like to second the idea that sometimes starting a new thread is better than adding on to a years old thread of outdated information.
Perhaps adding a date when appropriate could be helpful like
"Camino Communications Technology 2015".

Cheers.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013), Primitivo (2015), Muxia/Fisterra (2015), Haervejen (2017)
simply B -- This is great and the elaborations offered by others are good to. I wonder if this post can pop up when folks first join the forum! I think it would really help them frame their questions. I know I signed on to this forum before we walked in April 2013. I made one post about luggage and got a great answer, but I was absolutely overwhelmed! I really didn't know what to ask so I didn't ask anything. I can see now, having become more active, that others react on the other extreme -- they don't know what to ask, so they ask something so general they don't get helpful info and they maybe even feel the tetchy frustration of some of the more experienced forum members! Liz
 

jayree

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to SdC 2012
Irun to Fisterra 2013
Shikoku 2015
CP 2016
Many thanks, simply B. This is a wonderfully thoughtful post that exemplifies why the CdS Forum (thank you Ivar) is great.
I combined training and learning Spanish. The month before my first Camino I frequently walked 10 miles to test boot and sock combinations while listening to Spanish with Michel Thomas (details at http://www.michelthomas.com/learn-spanish.php).
Not only did I break in my boots but learned enough Spanish to be able to interact and even dine with Spaniards who spoke little or no English.
 

Thirstywork

Member
Camino(s) past & future
First camno May 2015
I just want to add my 2 cents to a few of your points.

2. Gear

There are certain items on which you can cut corners and save money. The $2 generic water bottle will serve you just as well as some $25 bottle would. Backpacks and footwear are a different story. When it comes to those items, buy the best you can reasonably afford. Now, that doesn't mean you need to spend all your money on a backpack, but look for something that is made well and is well reviewed. Same goes with your footwear. What is on your feet could make or break your Camino.

3. Training
Any little bit of training you can do before you walk the Camino will be a benefit to you. I see a lot of people asking how they are supposed to train when they live in flat, urban areas. The best advice is just to get out there and walk. Get used to walking and build up strength.

6. Communications
In 2014, I met someone who was on his second Camino. The previous was in 2012. He said the biggest change was that wifi in albergues had become the rule and not the exception. You shouldn't have too much of a problem connecting to the internet along the way.

Wireless communication is always changing. There are new technologies coming out all the time. What was true last year might not be this year. If someone comes in and asks about SIM cards or GPS, it really doesn't do them much good to point them to a thread that is 3 years old.

And I will add this to the cellphone vs. no cellphone debate. There should be no debate. Carry a cellphone!

7. Transportation
A very commonly updated topic here. As it should be! Wasn't there a disruption in rail service from Bayonne to St. Jean in the middle of last year? The people who keep on top of stuff like that really deserve a big thank you! And again, bus and train schedules can change. Please don't just point them to a thread that is a few years old and assume that everything is the same.

9. Medical
I will take some issue with saying that pharmacies "abound" the Camino. A decent sized town will have one, but I think people who are reading this forum for the first time might get the impression that town=pharmacy. This simply isn't true.

Also, I've ranted on this before, but I'll rant on it again. Carry a first-aid kit! It drives me insane to see self-proclaimed "experts" telling people you don't need a first-aid kit.
I like your point 7
 

Michael Islander

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September, 2015
Hello, all! (but most especially for newbies, and even the “old hands” here all held that wonderful status once!)

Though unable to spend much time here, I just now had occasion to quickly browse some of the new threads over the last few weeks. I see a remarkable uptick in folks putting out very general questions as to preparation and, if you will, “How to do the Camino”. I would like to simplify, as economically as possible, how to do this though this post will be still too long… and perhaps not to everyone's taste.

But, please, all you experienced folks - - please read through because this thread may need, over time, the comment of those who have special recommendations for threads they find immensely useful and true. I have set up this post so you can just pick a topic and list your “best/favorite” threads as candidates for exploration. (Not that there’s any obligation!) Okay, thank you! Now moving on…

There is NO “one-size-fits-all” answer to either prep or walking the Way. YOUR Camino starts when YOU begin planning it and YOUR Camino just continues as YOU walk it. How you handle each will comprise YOUR Camino. Still, there is a bewildering set of questions that you will/may have that weigh upon you…and you are looking for the RIGHT answer.

First… get over the concept of “RIGHT”, there will be something “WRONG” at some time and you will have to adapt. On the other hand, there will be times when things are better than “RIGHT”, you could not have planned for better…which is actually one of the beauties of the Camino. Now I’ll stop being philosophical and drill down to the novice’s categories for thought and research.

The “Search” function is the place to start. Pick a category from below. Put in your key words and explore the most recent thread entries first – because in some cases timing matters greatly: albergue openings/closings, the season you wish to walk in influences some of the categories, new services and products will impact others. (And I am limiting my comments to the Camino Francés because that is where I see the inquiries.)

1. Environment
Pick your season for walking the Camino and then check the historical weather for key locations along the route. You will pack for the climate and dress for the weather. Lots of good stuff here on the forum on “layering”.

2. Gear
Do NOT go crazy on gear. You want a well-fitted pack and comfortable shoes or boots with good socks. The amount of weight you put in the pack will influence the type of footwear you need but first it will impact your distance traveled per day. There is neither perfect pack nor perfect footwear for you here. Models change, reliability changes and you need to read several voices to hone YOUR selection process. All else than this is your source for excess weight.

One added thought about footwear. Whether you can believe it or not, your feet are NOT static in dimension. On a walk of more than a week or so they most likely WILL deform – the arch will flatten thus both length and width will expand. Plan on going a size larger when you test them out with a full pack on your back. They should feel comfortable – not overly loose but certainly not snug.

3. Training
Here’s a tip though its origin is lost to me: “Don’t walk the Camino before you walk the Camino.”

“Generally fit” is fine. So is “somewhat unfit”. If one is in prime condition there is a risk of blowing out early. I’d guess most experienced folks here have seen the carnage at Santo Domingo de Calzada or before where the super-fit crashed and burned by over-walking. (It’s not a contest or a race, BTW.)

Walk enough to get your body conditioned to the pack/footgear and socks combination then see what needs to be changed out.

4. Food/Water
This is no walk-in-the-park but let us remember that Spain is a first-world country. Any guidebook you might choose will have fountains, bar/meson/café clearly indicated and those are generally good indications for April through October. For winter Caminos, search the threads dealing with that topic. There are multiple threads on this. Stoves, vegan, gluten-free – all findable here.

5. Shelter
Those same guidebooks will reliably notify you of most albergues/hostels/casa rurales/etc. Actual availability of beds will depend upon seasonal crowding on the Way. If you wish to go during “peak” season, plan on getting away from the Brierley stages except for perhaps the larger cities that can handle the surge. Camping/Tents, yes, the topic is here and easily searched.

6. Communications
Albergue computers with fast internet connection were available a few years back. Now “wi-fi” (wee-fee) is more common to the detriment of the former. Anything you want to know about cell phone plans in Spain, how folks deal with blogging from any device is easily discoverable (just in the last few months’ threads) by use of the “Search” function.

7. Transportation
A very commonly updated topic here. Search by from whence you are departing AFTER deciding where you wish to arrive. Then check possible routes and fares via Travelocity, orbitz or similar. Several posters have done more than yeoman’s service in making this as simple as possible for in-country travel. Want to move a pack without carrying it, try “Jacotrans” as a search term.

8. Finance
Yes, there are ATM’s in Spain. The guidebooks show them and they are there. Recent threads abound from which to learn. My general rules are: a) Have a travel debit card completely divorced from my bank account. b) Have 300 euro in my pocket upon landing in Europe. c) Only use ATM’s during business hours. (If the card is “eaten” by the ATM, I can go in and retrieve it.) d) When I get down to 50-100 euro in my pocket is my time to start planning to get back to the 300 balance. e) A credit card is useful for "emergency" duty only in larger cities. It is useless in smaller towns.

How much cash you need is a function of how much you spend. How much you spend is particular to the way you wish to live on the road. For a "basement" level, I would think 30-40 euro per day would work - - without you losing too much weight! Multiple threads are here dealing with the topic. I’m cheap. I have done “basement” and I have gone “luxe”. The difference is 35 euro/day increase, at most. (But then, I am still cheap even at "luxe' levels!)

9. Medical
Again, Spain is a first-world country. Farmacias abound and they are staffed by people who generally handle almost any language and can provide almost any general need without a prescription. “Medical Insurance” is an oft-posted topic here with many threads. There are multiple specialized threads on diet (pick one) and specific conditions/medications.

10. Language
Get some Spanish, at least! It is always appreciated, even if just the pleasantries. But this, like the Camino entire, follows the general rule “The more you put into it, the more you get out of it.” Like everything else - - check “Spanish”, “language”, "lessons" or combination - - something will turn out for you in the “Search” function.


I hope that this helps! (But, if it does not, it will be weeks before I can come back to see if I have been flamed!;))


B
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
Exceptionally succinct. Very helpful!
 

JohnMcM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some, and with luck, some more.
Good, sensible and well delivered post simply B. I think many people people will benefit from your patient posting.
Buen Camino
 

yolanda Mejia

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
none past, planing to go on May to do the French walk( 2015) do not have sense of direction
Hello, all! (but most especially for newbies, and even the “old hands” here all held that wonderful status once!)

Though unable to spend much time here, I just now had occasion to quickly browse some of the new threads over the last few weeks. I see a remarkable uptick in folks putting out very general questions as to preparation and, if you will, “How to do the Camino”. I would like to simplify, as economically as possible, how to do this though this post will be still too long… and perhaps not to everyone's taste.

But, please, all you experienced folks - - please read through because this thread may need, over time, the comment of those who have special recommendations for threads they find immensely useful and true. I have set up this post so you can just pick a topic and list your “best/favorite” threads as candidates for exploration. (Not that there’s any obligation!) Okay, thank you! Now moving on…

There is NO “one-size-fits-all” answer to either prep or walking the Way. YOUR Camino starts when YOU begin planning it and YOUR Camino just continues as YOU walk it. How you handle each will comprise YOUR Camino. Still, there is a bewildering set of questions that you will/may have that weigh upon you…and you are looking for the RIGHT answer.

First… get over the concept of “RIGHT”, there will be something “WRONG” at some time and you will have to adapt. On the other hand, there will be times when things are better than “RIGHT”, you could not have planned for better…which is actually one of the beauties of the Camino. Now I’ll stop being philosophical and drill down to the novice’s categories for thought and research.

The “Search” function is the place to start. Pick a category from below. Put in your key words and explore the most recent thread entries first – because in some cases timing matters greatly: albergue openings/closings, the season you wish to walk in influences some of the categories, new services and products will impact others. (And I am limiting my comments to the Camino Francés because that is where I see the inquiries.)

1. Environment
Pick your season for walking the Camino and then check the historical weather for key locations along the route. You will pack for the climate and dress for the weather. Lots of good stuff here on the forum on “layering”.

2. Gear
Do NOT go crazy on gear. You want a well-fitted pack and comfortable shoes or boots with good socks. The amount of weight you put in the pack will influence the type of footwear you need but first it will impact your distance traveled per day. There is neither perfect pack nor perfect footwear for you here. Models change, reliability changes and you need to read several voices to hone YOUR selection process. All else than this is your source for excess weight.

One added thought about footwear. Whether you can believe it or not, your feet are NOT static in dimension. On a walk of more than a week or so they most likely WILL deform – the arch will flatten thus both length and width will expand. Plan on going a size larger when you test them out with a full pack on your back. They should feel comfortable – not overly loose but certainly not snug.

3. Training
Here’s a tip though its origin is lost to me: “Don’t walk the Camino before you walk the Camino.”

“Generally fit” is fine. So is “somewhat unfit”. If one is in prime condition there is a risk of blowing out early. I’d guess most experienced folks here have seen the carnage at Santo Domingo de Calzada or before where the super-fit crashed and burned by over-walking. (It’s not a contest or a race, BTW.)

Walk enough to get your body conditioned to the pack/footgear and socks combination then see what needs to be changed out.

4. Food/Water
This is no walk-in-the-park but let us remember that Spain is a first-world country. Any guidebook you might choose will have fountains, bar/meson/café clearly indicated and those are generally good indications for April through October. For winter Caminos, search the threads dealing with that topic. There are multiple threads on this. Stoves, vegan, gluten-free – all findable here.

5. Shelter
Those same guidebooks will reliably notify you of most albergues/hostels/casa rurales/etc. Actual availability of beds will depend upon seasonal crowding on the Way. If you wish to go during “peak” season, plan on getting away from the Brierley stages except for perhaps the larger cities that can handle the surge. Camping/Tents, yes, the topic is here and easily searched.

6. Communications
Albergue computers with fast internet connection were available a few years back. Now “wi-fi” (wee-fee) is more common to the detriment of the former. Anything you want to know about cell phone plans in Spain, how folks deal with blogging from any device is easily discoverable (just in the last few months’ threads) by use of the “Search” function.

7. Transportation
A very commonly updated topic here. Search by from whence you are departing AFTER deciding where you wish to arrive. Then check possible routes and fares via Travelocity, orbitz or similar. Several posters have done more than yeoman’s service in making this as simple as possible for in-country travel. Want to move a pack without carrying it, try “Jacotrans” as a search term.

8. Finance
Yes, there are ATM’s in Spain. The guidebooks show them and they are there. Recent threads abound from which to learn. My general rules are: a) Have a travel debit card completely divorced from my bank account. b) Have 300 euro in my pocket upon landing in Europe. c) Only use ATM’s during business hours. (If the card is “eaten” by the ATM, I can go in and retrieve it.) d) When I get down to 50-100 euro in my pocket is my time to start planning to get back to the 300 balance. e) A credit card is useful for "emergency" duty only in larger cities. It is useless in smaller towns.

How much cash you need is a function of how much you spend. How much you spend is particular to the way you wish to live on the road. For a "basement" level, I would think 30-40 euro per day would work - - without you losing too much weight! Multiple threads are here dealing with the topic. I’m cheap. I have done “basement” and I have gone “luxe”. The difference is 35 euro/day increase, at most. (But then, I am still cheap even at "luxe' levels!)

9. Medical
Again, Spain is a first-world country. Farmacias abound and they are staffed by people who generally handle almost any language and can provide almost any general need without a prescription. “Medical Insurance” is an oft-posted topic here with many threads. There are multiple specialized threads on diet (pick one) and specific conditions/medications.

10. Language
Get some Spanish, at least! It is always appreciated, even if just the pleasantries. But this, like the Camino entire, follows the general rule “The more you put into it, the more you get out of it.” Like everything else - - check “Spanish”, “language”, "lessons" or combination - - something will turn out for you in the “Search” function.


I hope that this helps! (But, if it does not, it will be weeks before I can come back to see if I have been flamed!;))


B
Thank you!
 

Lydia Gillen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007/8/9 2011 (C.F 2015)
B, this is an excellent post. Thank you for taking the time to write it. I am an experienced pilgrim but I had never hear the expression " Walk the Camino before your walk it" I t really encapsulates the need to train in one handy easily remembered little sentence.
 

Rev Anthony

Tony Budell
Camino(s) past & future
April 2020
Good morning everyone, First and foremost, may I offer a great big 'Thank you' to all of you. I have never walked the Camino but recently I have been spiritually shoved, pushed and generally badgered into it. Synchronicity and coincidences have come one after the other. I loved the the beautiful Quote sent to me by 'Pellicano Solitudinis' in which he said:- "Coincidence is a small miracle in which God chooses to remain anonymous." I will be 76 years old when I walk the Camino, hopefully in April 2020 and will probably travel with a group, walking the 'short' Sarria - Santiargo route. I say all this because I knew absolutely nothing about the routes etc until I found Ivar Rekve's site on my PC. You all have your opinions and advice and as I wander through the forums, I feel that I am already on my way. As a 'Newbie' I cannot thank you enough. Bless you. (Now where the hell did I put my passport???)
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
@Rev Anthony , welcome and buen camino!
You may have surmised that this is a dated thread, but the information in it is absolutely not dated.
So you are starting in a good place. I wish I had seen it when I first was wandering around here....
 
Camino(s) past & future
1st camino - (April, 2020)
I'm also walking my first Camino in April 2020, starting in St. Jean. I've wanted to do this for years, and finally reached the, "If not now, when?", moment a few months ago. My friends and family (especially my grandson), are excited for me:) My intention is that this be a time of discernment for whatever the Holy Spirit has in store for me. I am looking forward to meeting my new "family" along The Way. Blessings!
 

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