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Astorga to Santiago in 10 days

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Hello fellow pilgrims.

I am planning to walk to Santiago from Astorga in 10 days, which averages to about 26 kms a day. I am in my mid 30's, and consider myself fairly fit. I haven't walked the Camino before, and I am not sure how difficult the different stages are.
My questions are: Do you think 10 days are enough to do it comfortably, and how would you recommend I split up the different stages? Are there other starting points you would recommend instead? I was also thinking about starting from Ponferrada, but that only gives me about 20 kms a day, which sounds a bit too short. At the same time, I would also like to take my time, I don't want to rush to get there and I would like to have the flexibility of staying a bit longer at one place to experience it if I feel like it.

I am flying into Santiago on the 25th of September, and leaving on the 7th of October. I am planning to start walking on the 26th from Astorga, and arrive in Santiago on the 5th of October to have one extra day there when I arrive.

Thanks for any advice :)

- Tore, Norway
 
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Hello fellow pilgrims.

I am planning to walk to Santiago from Astorga in 10 days, which averages to about 26 kms a day. I am in my mid 30's, and consider myself fairly fit. I haven't walked the Camino before, and I am not sure how difficult the different stages are.
My questions are: Do you think 10 days are enough to do it comfortably, and how would you recommend I split up the different stages? Are there other starting points you would recommend instead? I was also thinking about starting from Ponferrada, but that only gives me about 20 kms a day, which sounds a bit too short. At the same time, I would also like to take my time, I don't want to rush to get there and I would like to have the flexibility of staying a bit longer at one place to experience it if I feel like it.

I am flying into Santiago on the 25th of September, and leaving on the 7th of October. I am planning to start walking on the 26th from Astorga, and arrive in Santiago on the 5th of October to have one extra day there when I arrive.

Thanks for any advice :)

- Tore, Norway

Hej Tore

I used 13 days on that particular section – but then I am considerably older than you… 🙂

It is hard to say if you could do it “comfortably” in 10 days, I guess it’s very personal what you would consider comfortable.

If you haven’t already done so, perhaps take a look at Gronze, it shows profiles of the individual stages and may give you an impression of the difficulty of the stages.

Buen Camino
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
A "Tourigrino" trip once Covid has passed, so 2023
You could do it in 10 days, as to whether that would be wise or enjoyable would be up to you

Day 1 Astorga to Foncebadon 26k
Day 2 Foncebadon to Ponferrada 27k
Day 3 Ponferrada to Villafranca 24k
Day 4 Villafranca to La Faba 24k
Day 5 La Faba to Triacastela 26k
Day 6 Triacastela to Barbadelo 23k
Day 7 Barbadelo to Hospital 30k
Day 8 Hospital to Melide 28k
Day 9 Melide to Arca 33k
Day 10 Arca to SdC 20k

Don't forget all distances are not created equal - Day 2 includes the walk into Molinaseca; Day 5 the walk up to O Cebreiro; Day 6 Alto de Poio and Day 8 includes the slog into Palas de Rey.

Don't get seduced into taking the Samos variant after Triacastela.
 

irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
Hello fellow pilgrims.

I am planning to walk to Santiago from Astorga in 10 days, which averages to about 26 kms a day. I am in my mid 30's, and consider myself fairly fit. I haven't walked the Camino before, and I am not sure how difficult the different stages are.
My questions are: Do you think 10 days are enough to do it comfortably, and how would you recommend I split up the different stages? Are there other starting points you would recommend instead? I was also thinking about starting from Ponferrada, but that only gives me about 20 kms a day, which sounds a bit too short. At the same time, I would also like to take my time, I don't want to rush to get there and I would like to have the flexibility of staying a bit longer at one place to experience it if I feel like it.

I am flying into Santiago on the 25th of September, and leaving on the 7th of October. I am planning to start walking on the 26th from Astorga, and arrive in Santiago on the 5th of October to have one extra day there when I arrive.

Thanks for any advice :)

- Tore, Norway
Easy...seriously simple. I was 47 and hiked the following stages:
Astorga to el Acebo (37km's)
el Acebo to Villafrance de Bierzo (40kms)
Villafranca to o Cebreiro (28kms)
O Cebreiro to Samos (28kms)
Samos to Mercadairo (32kms) I wish I would have continued on to Portomarin (5 more kms)
Mercadairo to Palas del Rei (31kms)
Palas del Rei to Salceda (40kms)
Salceda to Santiago (28kms)

that gives you two "flex" days if you wanted to end a day earlier...10 days is simple.

You didn't ask, but favorite spot on this section was a village called Foncebadon...I was under a time crunch so would often do 2 stages or 1 1/2 stages in one day. If I had a TON of time, I'd stay in Foncebadon, then hike 11kms and stay the day in el Acebo as they had an amazing albuergue (with a pool) and enjoy the day.
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
On my first Camino when I was 58 I did these stages. By this point I had already been walking three weeks.

Screenshot_20220911-072047.png

I would have walked farther than Rabanal del Camino, but bedbugs had been found in my albergue room in Astorga, so I wanted to stop early enough to "de bed bug" my gear, and it was kind of a miserable rainy day.

If I were planning to do it in ten days I would probably chart out stages to be able to finish in nine days so that I had some leeway.
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
You could do it in 10 days, as to whether that would be wise or enjoyable would be up to you

Day 1 Astorga to Foncebadon 26k
Day 2 Foncebadon to Ponferrada 27k
Day 3 Ponferrada to Villafranca 24k
Day 4 Villafranca to La Faba 24k
Day 5 La Faba to Triacastela 26k
Day 6 Triacastela to Barbadelo 23k
Day 7 Barbadelo to Hospital 30k
Day 8 Hospital to Melide 28k
Day 9 Melide to Arca 33k
Day 10 Arca to SdC 20k

Don't forget all distances are not created equal - Day 2 includes the walk into Molinaseca; Day 5 the walk up to O Cebreiro; Day 6 Alto de Poio and Day 8 includes the slog into Palas de Rey.

Don't get seduced into taking the Samos variant after Triacastela.
Going via Samos is one of the highlights of the last 2 Caminos. Makes the next day into Sarria nicer as well.

I would tend to reduce some of the mountain days in the beginning and have some longer ones at the end. Unless you are a mountain goat Foncebaden to Ponferada is tricky, dont let the downhill fool you.

Villafranca to La Faba is pretty flat, you can extend that day without strain. I walked from the village before La Faba (whose name temporarily escapes me) to Fonfria fairly easily. (But then I had already been walking for weeks)
 
Last edited:

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
On my first Camino when I was 58 I did these stages. By this point I had already been walking three weeks.

View attachment 132697

I would have walked farther than Rabanal del Camino, but bedbugs had been found in my albergue room in Astorga, so I wanted to stop early enough to "de bed bug" my gear, and it was kind of a miserable rainy day.

If I were planning to do it in ten days I would probably chart out stages to be able to finish in nine days so that I had some leeway.

This is great advice. I will try and aim for 9 stages then, to have some flexibility. Did you walk through Samos, or San Xil? Thank you very much :)
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
You could do it in 10 days, as to whether that would be wise or enjoyable would be up to you

Day 1 Astorga to Foncebadon 26k
Day 2 Foncebadon to Ponferrada 27k
Day 3 Ponferrada to Villafranca 24k
Day 4 Villafranca to La Faba 24k
Day 5 La Faba to Triacastela 26k
Day 6 Triacastela to Barbadelo 23k
Day 7 Barbadelo to Hospital 30k
Day 8 Hospital to Melide 28k
Day 9 Melide to Arca 33k
Day 10 Arca to SdC 20k

Don't forget all distances are not created equal - Day 2 includes the walk into Molinaseca; Day 5 the walk up to O Cebreiro; Day 6 Alto de Poio and Day 8 includes the slog into Palas de Rey.

Don't get seduced into taking the Samos variant after Triacastela.

Thanks for the advice. These stages look attainable. I understand some of the stages are more difficult, especially the one up to O Cebreiro and over Foncebadon. Will keep that in mind when I plan the stages. Just out of curiosity, why would you recommend against going through Samos?
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Easy...seriously simple. I was 47 and hiked the following stages:
Astorga to el Acebo (37km's)
el Acebo to Villafrance de Bierzo (40kms)
Villafranca to o Cebreiro (28kms)
O Cebreiro to Samos (28kms)
Samos to Mercadairo (32kms) I wish I would have continued on to Portomarin (5 more kms)
Mercadairo to Palas del Rei (31kms)
Palas del Rei to Salceda (40kms)
Salceda to Santiago (28kms)

that gives you two "flex" days if you wanted to end a day earlier...10 days is simple.

You didn't ask, but favorite spot on this section was a village called Foncebadon...I was under a time crunch so would often do 2 stages or 1 1/2 stages in one day. If I had a TON of time, I'd stay in Foncebadon, then hike 11kms and stay the day in el Acebo as they had an amazing albuergue (with a pool) and enjoy the day.

Great, it's inspirational to hear someone did this in under 10 days without problems. I will definitely try to stay in el Acebo and Foncebadon, if I have time. How did you find the stages through Samos? Thanks for the advice :)
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Going via Samos is one of the highlights of the last 2 Caminos. Makes the next day into Sarria nicer as well.

I would tend to reduce some of the mountain days in the beginning and have some longer ones at the end. Unless you are a mountain goat Foncebaden to Ponferada is tricky, dont let the downhill fool you.

Villafranca to La Faba is pretty flat, you can extend that day without strain. I walked from the village before La Faba (whose name temporarily escapes me) to Fonfria fairly easily. (But then I had already been walking for weeks)

I will keep this in mind. Thanks for the advice :)
To start light, I might walk into Rabanal del Camino on the first day, then stopping in Molinaseca on second day, to Villafranca on day 3 and then increase the length of the stages towards the end.
Would you recommend walking poles for the downhill terrain?

Are you perhaps talking about Las Herrerias? Would you rather recommend to stay in La Faba before doing the O Cebreiro pass?
 
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taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Hej Tore

I used 13 days on that particular section – but then I am considerably older than you… 🙂

It is hard to say if you could do it “comfortably” in 10 days, I guess it’s very personal what you would consider comfortable.

If you haven’t already done so, perhaps take a look at Gronze, it shows profiles of the individual stages and may give you an impression of the difficulty of the stages.

Buen Camino
Oh, that's good to know. Tusen takk :)
 

psheehan

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
CF, CPo, CdN, CPr, F, CS, CV, CI, VdlP, CS, CA
Thanks for the advice. These stages look attainable. I understand some of the stages are more difficult, especially the one up to O Cebreiro and over Foncebadon. Will keep that in mind when I plan the stages. Just out of curiosity, why would you recommend against going through Samos?
Not sure why you are being advised against walking via Samos??? I walked from Triacastela to Sarria last year via Samos and found it to be a beautiful peaceful woodland walk. Samos itself is a lovely stop with great bars/cafes and the wonderful monastery.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
A "Tourigrino" trip once Covid has passed, so 2023
Thanks for the advice. These stages look attainable. I understand some of the stages are more difficult, especially the one up to O Cebreiro and over Foncebadon. Will keep that in mind when I plan the stages. Just out of curiosity, why would you recommend against going through Samos?
The Samos "variant" adds 7kms to your day's hike. It's an attractive route - I've walked both - but unless you especially want to see the monastery (in which case you will need to add time to an already long day) or intend to stay overnight in Samos (which you won't have time to if you want to make your 10 day schedule) you're just adding an extra couple of hours to the day's walking.
Also it can be a lonely route - when we did it in September 2016 we didn't see another pilgrim over the whole 7km so had to be extra vigilant looking for waymarkers.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Going via Samos is one of the highlights of the last 2 Caminos. Makes the next day into Sarria nicer as well.

I will keep this in mind. Thanks for the advice :)
To start light, I might walk into Rabanal del Camino on the first day, then stopping in Molinaseca on second day, to Villafranca on day 3 and then increase the length of the stages towards the end.
Would you recommend walking poles for the downhill terrain?

Are you perhaps talking about Las Herrerias? Would you rather recommend to stay in La Faba before doing the O Cebreiro pass?
Just looked it up, Vega de Valcarce , flat walk to breakfast in Las Herrerias, and then again in OCebreiro after the hill. After O Cebreiro its pretty easy until the last bit up to Alto to Poio.
Coffee and icecream shared with the dog (icecream not the coffee) at the top of at Alto Do Poio. After that the walk down to Fonfria is easy. I have stayed in Alto do Poio, but I prefer Fonfria.
The next day is downhill and pretty easy as well, I always use poles. I found the waymarking to Samos had improved between the first time I walked it , and the last in 2019. There is now a cafe midway as well. It is still beautifully rustic though, we met a handful of pilgrims in 2019.
I found walking longer days at the end worked because it is very busy after Sarria, but the pilgrims thin out during the day, and after the first few hours the walking became less crowded and more enjoyable.
Plus by that stage fitness is increased. I avoid the common end stages if possible.
The first few days are the challenging ones.
The walk from Astorga is pretty easy though, you dont even feel the climb until the approach to Rabanal.
Molineseca is a lovely place. The walk from there to Ponferada isnt hard, neither is the walk to Villafranca.
 
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irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
Thanks for the advice. These stages look attainable. I understand some of the stages are more difficult, especially the one up to O Cebreiro and over Foncebadon. Will keep that in mind when I plan the stages. Just out of curiosity, why would you recommend against going through Samos?

Great, it's inspirational to hear someone did this in under 10 days without problems. I will definitely try to stay in el Acebo and Foncebadon, if I have time. How did you find the stages through Samos? Thanks for the advice :)
You'll leave O Cebreiro and have about 20kms to a town called Tricastela...at the end of the town you'll see that you have a choice of two routes. I went left to Samos (I think it was 10-11 more km's...but a GREAT 10-11km's...you'll feel the Galicia environment). That is a bit longer than if you went right that skips past Samos and takes you to Sarria. (this is what I'll do next time as I understand it is a shorter route but really great increase in elevation and has great views)

You're a young guy...20kms/day for you will be nothing. I'd actually say 30kms was fine and the last 10kms to get to 40kms is what wore out my feet (I started in SJPP) but the legs were strong by this point. I just didn't like stopping for the day at noon or 1:00...the added benefit of afternoon hikes is that I often had the Camino to myself.

(just a note...Foncebadon to el Acebo is only 11km's...the next time I hike, I'll stay the night in Foncebadon and then do the same in el Acebo and consider that a kind of rest day...and sit at the pool all day long and enjoy some beers)
 

irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
I will keep this in mind. Thanks for the advice :)
To start light, I might walk into Rabanal del Camino on the first day, then stopping in Molinaseca on second day, to Villafranca on day 3 and then increase the length of the stages towards the end.
Would you recommend walking poles for the downhill terrain?

Are you perhaps talking about Las Herrerias? Would you rather recommend to stay in La Faba before doing the O Cebreiro pass?
go straight to O Cebreiro...it's such a cool and enchanting place (top 2-3 places on the entire Camino). You'll be so sad and disappointed if you don't continue there.

(candidly, I'm thinking a lot of this advice is not factoring in the part about you being strong and young...there is NO spot on the Camino that will debilitate you...far from it. You'll be inspired. Please note that there are numerous people who hike 50-60kms per day. You should "hike your own hike" of course, but do not stop on La Faba...go to O Cebreiro and don't think twice about it)
 

irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
I will keep this in mind. Thanks for the advice :)
To start light, I might walk into Rabanal del Camino on the first day, then stopping in Molinaseca on second day, to Villafranca on day 3 and then increase the length of the stages towards the end.
Would you recommend walking poles for the downhill terrain?

Are you perhaps talking about Las Herrerias? Would you rather recommend to stay in La Faba before doing the O Cebreiro pass?
Foncebadon is just 6kms past Rabanal...and Foncebadon is so cool (my favorite Spanish/Camino village on the entire Camino) that it's worth continuing on (everybody has an opinion and you are smart to seek them ALL out)
 

Tincatinker

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2012
There are all sorts of ways in which Astorga to Santiago can be achieved in 10 days, route variants and “best” stages notwithstanding. Nonetheless, if you’re not trail fit and able to hit that 25k + day after day for 10 contiguous days you’re more likely heading for a breakdown than Santiago.
I’ll suggest you start in Ponferrada and enjoy Santiago when you get there.
 
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taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Not sure why you are being advised against walking via Samos??? I walked from Triacastela to Sarria last year via Samos and found it to be a beautiful peaceful woodland walk. Samos itself is a lovely stop with great bars/cafes and the wonderful monastery.

That sounds lovely. I will definitely try to make it, even if it's a bit longer. Cheers :)
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
The Samos "variant" adds 7kms to your day's hike. It's an attractive route - I've walked both - but unless you especially want to see the monastery (in which case you will need to add time to an already long day) or intend to stay overnight in Samos (which you won't have time to if you want to make your 10 day schedule) you're just adding an extra couple of hours to the day's walking.
Also it can be a lonely route - when we did it in September 2016 we didn't see another pilgrim over the whole 7km so had to be extra vigilant looking for waymarkers.
Ok I see. I will definitely factor that in when deciding my route of choice. Thanks!
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Just looked it up, Vega de Valcarce , flat walk to breakfast in Las Herrerias, and then again in OCebreiro after the hill. After O Cebreiro its pretty easy until the last bit up to Alto to Poio.
Coffee and icecream shared with the dog (icecream not the coffee) at the top of at Alto Do Poio. After that the walk down to Fonfria is easy. I have stayed in Alto do Poio, but I prefer Fonfria.
The next day is downhill and pretty easy as well, I always use poles. I found the waymarking to Samos had improved between the first time I walked it , and the last in 2019. There is now a cafe midway as well. It is still beautifully rustic though, we met a handful of pilgrims in 2019.
I found walking longer days at the end worked because it is very busy after Sarria, but the pilgrims thin out during the day, and after the first few hours the walking became less crowded and more enjoyable.
Plus by that stage fitness is increased. I avoid the common end stages if possible.
The first few days are the challenging ones.
The walk from Astorga is pretty easy though, you dont even feel the climb until the approach to Rabanal.
Molineseca is a lovely place. The walk from there to Ponferada isnt hard, neither is the walk to Villafranca.
This is great to know. I will pack the hiking poles with me then. Longer days towards the end also sounds more appealing, if that means it's less crowded on the Camino in the afternoons.
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
You'll leave O Cebreiro and have about 20kms to a town called Tricastela...at the end of the town you'll see that you have a choice of two routes. I went left to Samos (I think it was 10-11 more km's...but a GREAT 10-11km's...you'll feel the Galicia environment). That is a bit longer than if you went right that skips past Samos and takes you to Sarria. (this is what I'll do next time as I understand it is a shorter route but really great increase in elevation and has great views)

You're a young guy...20kms/day for you will be nothing. I'd actually say 30kms was fine and the last 10kms to get to 40kms is what wore out my feet (I started in SJPP) but the legs were strong by this point. I just didn't like stopping for the day at noon or 1:00...the added benefit of afternoon hikes is that I often had the Camino to myself.

(just a note...Foncebadon to el Acebo is only 11km's...the next time I hike, I'll stay the night in Foncebadon and then do the same in el Acebo and consider that a kind of rest day...and sit at the pool all day long and enjoy some beers)

Ok great, I will definitely consider going through Samos. I also think 20 kms/day will be a bit short, so I like the idea of longer walks in the afternoons. If you had to choose, would you rather stay in Foncebadon or el Acebo for the night? I might not have time to do both this time.
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
go straight to O Cebreiro...it's such a cool and enchanting place (top 2-3 places on the entire Camino). You'll be so sad and disappointed if you don't continue there.

(candidly, I'm thinking a lot of this advice is not factoring in the part about you being strong and young...there is NO spot on the Camino that will debilitate you...far from it. You'll be inspired. Please note that there are numerous people who hike 50-60kms per day. You should "hike your own hike" of course, but do not stop on La Faba...go to O Cebreiro and don't think twice about it)
Duly noted, thanks! :)
 
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taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
There are all sorts of ways in which Astorga to Santiago can be achieved in 10 days, route variants and “best” stages notwithstanding. Nonetheless, if you’re not trail fit and able to hit that 25k + day after day for 10 contiguous days you’re more likely heading for a breakdown than Santiago.
I’ll suggest you start in Ponferrada and enjoy Santiago when you get there.
Yes, my original plan was to go from Ponferrada. However, I am now thinking that walking 20 kms/day will be a bit short. I'd prefer to spend longer days on the road, as opposed to reaching my destination earlier in the day. I'm not sure how "trail fit" I am, as I am most used to hiking in the mountains of Norway. But I will definitely take it slow in the beginning as many people has advised me to.
 
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Hi Tore
a slightly different view from me... very few younger people on the camino bother to use walking poles, although you often see them on their backpacks. Otherwise it's nearly all 'oldies', like most of the people who talk regularly on this forum. I think the mountains of Norway shoooould at a pinch, just about prepare you for this 😭
I'm interested to know about how you are planning the accommodation - are you intending to stay in public albergues where you turn up and sign in, or are you booking places in advance?
Cheers, tom
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
Yes, my original plan was to go from Ponferrada. However, I am now thinking that walking 20 kms/day will be a bit short. I'd prefer to spend longer days on the road, as opposed to reaching my destination earlier in the day. I'm not sure how "trail fit" I am, as I am most used to hiking in the mountains of Norway. But I will definitely take it slow in the beginning as many people has advised me to.
You could start in Ponferrada, then continue on to Finisterre or Muxía if you find that you have extra time. Or just relax and enjoy Santiago for a few days.
 

Dessie2016

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Leon to Santiago (2016)
St Jean to Santiago (2021)
I will keep this in mind. Thanks for the advice :)
To start light, I might walk into Rabanal del Camino on the first day, then stopping in Molinaseca on second day, to Villafranca on day 3 and then increase the length of the stages towards the end.
Would you recommend walking poles for the downhill terrain?

Are you perhaps talking about Las Herrerias? Would you rather recommend to stay in La Faba before doing the O Cebreiro pass?
Definitely walking poles for sure (I was 50 yrs old when I did Leon to Santiago). They help a lot, especially on the downhill segments (like into Molinaseca). Make sure you get rested for the hike up to O'Cebreiro (which I could not find accomodation in and had to walk beyond). And if memory serves me correctly (I did my Camino in 2016), there is also a climb up a significant flight of steps into Ponferrada.

I didn't plan XXkm each day. We just sort of marked out a town we thought would be nice to stop at and headed for it. More hits than misses but I agree with irishrock and Tincatinker to plan for completing in 9 days so that you give yourself a 'one day' buffer either in Santiago or even Sarria.... Santiago to Finisterre and Muxia is another 100km so perhaps save that for another time (which is my next walk).

Buen Camino! And enjoy the experience and time with God.
 

irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
Ok great, I will definitely consider going through Samos. I also think 20 kms/day will be a bit short, so I like the idea of longer walks in the afternoons. If you had to choose, would you rather stay in Foncebadon or el Acebo for the night? I might not have time to do both this time.
I'd stop in Foncebadon for two hours and enjoy a few beers...then continue to cruz de Ferro (in the mid-afternoon, you'll have the place all to yourself) and then on to el Acebo. El Acebo has an amazing albuergue but it's at the far end of the town (you've got to keep on going through the village). Great and comfortable room, an EXCELLENT pilgram meal, and a refreshing pool. Depending on the time of year, it'll stay light until 10:30pm. The views to the west are amazing...it was my 2nd favorite day of the entire Camino with the first day out of SJPP to Roncevalles being my #1. Buen Camino
 
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trecile

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If you had to choose, would you rather stay in Foncebadon or el Acebo for the night? I might not have time to do both this time.
Foncebaden and El Acebo are only a little over 11 km apart, so most people wouldn't stay in both places. I've never stayed in El Acebo, but it sounds very nice.

Astorga to Foncebaden is 25.19 km.
Astorga to El Acebo is 36.47 km.

Godesalco has a good stage planner, but doesn't take into account some route variants like the high route out of Villafranca del Bierzo. You'd have to consult other sources like Gronze to work out those distances.

 

irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
Foncebaden and El Acebo are only a little over 11 km apart, so most people wouldn't stay in both places. I've never stayed in El Acebo, but it sounds very nice.

Astorga to Foncebaden is 25.19 km.
Astorga to El Acebo is 36.47 km.

Godesalco has a good stage planner, but doesn't take into account some route variants like the high route out of Villafranca del Bierzo. You'd have to consult other sources like Gronze to work out those distances.

this advice is spot on.

I'd guess it depends on how your legs are feeling. As it is your first day, you might call it a day in Foncebadon. (good news is that you can't really go wrong either way)
 

Walkerooni

Active Member
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C. Frances SJPdP to Santiago (June-ish 2018)
Keep in mind that many, if not all, of the people who are stating it is easily achievable in 10 days, likely started in St Jean. And thus had 500 km under their belt by the time they hit Astorga. I was 64 and had no problem with those distances, but surely would not have started my Camino that way!
 

Walkerooni

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Looking at all of your comments, with respect, it seems like you are blowing in the wind. You don’t seem to have tested your distances, tested your need for poles. You state desire for max distances. And state your desire to slow down and take it all in. Given all of that, I would strongly recommended starting further along, perhaps Ponferrada. Walk. Enjoy. If you return with more time, that will be a different discussion. Buen Camino, whatever you decide.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
I would also recomend starting in Ponferrada (which has an amazing templar castle to be explored) and test your walking pace from there. You have time to explore cities and, if you arrive early in Santiago, just continue to Muxia :p

I was in my mid-30s in my first camino, and I found out really quickly that 20km was my happy pace, 25km if needed. Above that, days started getting tiring and like there was no time to enjoy the places I was passing through. I am fit, but short, so it affected how much I walked.
 
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taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Hi Tore
a slightly different view from me... very few younger people on the camino bother to use walking poles, although you often see them on their backpacks. Otherwise it's nearly all 'oldies', like most of the people who talk regularly on this forum. I think the mountains of Norway shoooould at a pinch, just about prepare you for this 😭
I'm interested to know about how you are planning the accommodation - are you intending to stay in public albergues where you turn up and sign in, or are you booking places in advance?
Cheers, tom

Okay, that's good to know. I haven't really used the poles before when walking in the mountains, but I have heard many people recommend them for the Camino. I guess I should be fine without them.

I was planning to booking some private places in advance, but mostly just show up to the public albergues to give me some flex in where to stay for each night. With that approach, I guess I also run the risk of not getting a bed for the night. What would you recommend?
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
You could start in Ponferrada, then continue on to Finisterre or Muxía if you find that you have extra time. Or just relax and enjoy Santiago for a few days.
I will consider this option, thanks. I guess it would also be nice to enjoy an extra day or two in Santiago :)
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Definitely walking poles for sure (I was 50 yrs old when I did Leon to Santiago). They help a lot, especially on the downhill segments (like into Molinaseca). Make sure you get rested for the hike up to O'Cebreiro (which I could not find accomodation in and had to walk beyond). And if memory serves me correctly (I did my Camino in 2016), there is also a climb up a significant flight of steps into Ponferrada.

I didn't plan XXkm each day. We just sort of marked out a town we thought would be nice to stop at and headed for it. More hits than misses but I agree with irishrock and Tincatinker to plan for completing in 9 days so that you give yourself a 'one day' buffer either in Santiago or even Sarria.... Santiago to Finisterre and Muxia is another 100km so perhaps save that for another time (which is my next walk).

Buen Camino! And enjoy the experience and time with God.
Thank you very much! Great advice :)
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
I'd stop in Foncebadon for two hours and enjoy a few beers...then continue to cruz de Ferro (in the mid-afternoon, you'll have the place all to yourself) and then on to el Acebo. El Acebo has an amazing albuergue but it's at the far end of the town (you've got to keep on going through the village). Great and comfortable room, an EXCELLENT pilgram meal, and a refreshing pool. Depending on the time of year, it'll stay light until 10:30pm. The views to the west are amazing...it was my 2nd favorite day of the entire Camino with the first day out of SJPP to Roncevalles being my #1. Buen Camino
Thanks, that sounds amazing. If my legs agree with me, I will try to make it to El Acebo. Cheers ;)
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Foncebaden and El Acebo are only a little over 11 km apart, so most people wouldn't stay in both places. I've never stayed in El Acebo, but it sounds very nice.

Astorga to Foncebaden is 25.19 km.
Astorga to El Acebo is 36.47 km.

Godesalco has a good stage planner, but doesn't take into account some route variants like the high route out of Villafranca del Bierzo. You'd have to consult other sources like Gronze to work out those distances.

Yeah, I guess I'd have to choose between the two. Great, I'll check out Gronze to work out the different distances, thanks!
 
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taustad

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25/09/2022
Looking at all of your comments, with respect, it seems like you are blowing in the wind. You don’t seem to have tested your distances, tested your need for poles. You state desire for max distances. And state your desire to slow down and take it all in. Given all of that, I would strongly recommended starting further along, perhaps Ponferrada. Walk. Enjoy. If you return with more time, that will be a different discussion. Buen Camino, whatever you decide.

Thank you for the advice. As this is my first Camino, I would have to experience what is a comfortable pace and distance for me. In that regard, I may have to do a few longer hikes of 25+ kms before to see what distance is preferable for me. But I definitely want to enjoy the walk, and take my time.
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
I would also recomend starting in Ponferrada (which has an amazing templar castle to be explored) and test your walking pace from there. You have time to explore cities and, if you arrive early in Santiago, just continue to Muxia :p

I was in my mid-30s in my first camino, and I found out really quickly that 20km was my happy pace, 25km if needed. Above that, days started getting tiring and like there was no time to enjoy the places I was passing through. I am fit, but short, so it affected how much I walked.
Great advice, I will take it to heart. It definitely sounds nice to have some time to explore the cities as well. I guess I will find out what is my ideal pace after the first few days.
 
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I was planning to booking some private places in advance, but mostly just show up to the public albergues to give me some flex in where to stay for each night. With that approach, I guess I also run the risk of not getting a bed for the night. What would you recommend?
Sounds good to me. Staying in a range of places gives you a richer range of perspectives and experiences about the camino. Try for at least one of the donativo-style places (although some may have a fixed charge now..) like Gaucelmo in Rabanal or Ave Fenix as you come into Villafranca. Also I recommend aiming for at least one Parroquial and one place that has a communal meal (as Fenix does). No pressure...
PS I see no reason at all to move away from your original plan of starting in Astorga - it's a good plan, so I'd stick to it!
 

irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
Sounds good to me. Staying in a range of places gives you a richer range of perspectives and experiences about the camino. Try for at least one of the donativo-style places (although some may have a fixed charge now..) like Gaucelmo in Rabanal or Ave Fenix as you come into Villafranca. Also I recommend aiming for at least one Parroquial and one place that has a communal meal (as Fenix does). No pressure...
PS I see no reason at all to move away from your original plan of starting in Astorga - it's a good plan, so I'd stick to it!
totally correct on staying on point starting in Astorga...I completely agree.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
Another option is that you can start in Astorga, see how you go. If you think the pace is too strong to reach Santiago in 10 days and still enjoy your surroundings, take a taxi os bus ahead towards Sarria.
If a Compostela is important for you, as long as you walk the entire 100km from Sarria to Santiago, you would still get it.

You have probably already seen this Gronze website, but it's pretty good to give you distances, altitude and a list of accommodation.
 
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taustad

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25/09/2022
Sounds good to me. Staying in a range of places gives you a richer range of perspectives and experiences about the camino. Try for at least one of the donativo-style places (although some may have a fixed charge now..) like Gaucelmo in Rabanal or Ave Fenix as you come into Villafranca. Also I recommend aiming for at least one Parroquial and one place that has a communal meal (as Fenix does). No pressure...
PS I see no reason at all to move away from your original plan of starting in Astorga - it's a good plan, so I'd stick to it!

That sounds like good advice. Definitely want get a wide range of experiences during my Camino. Would you recommend booking these places in advance or is it sufficient to just show up and ask for a bed? I am leaning more towards starting in Astorga as planned. Did a 20k test walk yesterday with all equipment, and felt like I easily could have walked another 5-10 kms. Legs felt fine today as well.
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Another option is that you can start in Astorga, see how you go. If you think the pace is too strong to reach Santiago in 10 days and still enjoy your surroundings, take a taxi os bus ahead towards Sarria.
If a Compostela is important for you, as long as you walk the entire 100km from Sarria to Santiago, you would still get it.

You have probably already seen this Gronze website, but it's pretty good to give you distances, altitude and a list of accommodation.
Yes, I thought of that option too. As long as I walk the last 100 kms, I am really okay with anything. And I do like a bit of a challenge. Will have a closer look at Gronze for planning the different stages. Cheers :)
 

Marbe2

Active member
Time of past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
Hello fellow pilgrims.

I am planning to walk to Santiago from Astorga in 10 days, which averages to about 26 kms a day. I am in my mid 30's, and consider myself fairly fit. I haven't walked the Camino before, and I am not sure how difficult the different stages are.
My questions are: Do you think 10 days are enough to do it comfortably, and how would you recommend I split up the different stages? Are there other starting points you would recommend instead? I was also thinking about starting from Ponferrada, but that only gives me about 20 kms a day, which sounds a bit too short. At the same time, I would also like to take my time, I don't want to rush to get there and I would like to have the flexibility of staying a bit longer at one place to experience it if I feel like it.

I am flying into Santiago on the 25th of September, and leaving on the 7th of October. I am planning to start walking on the 26th from Astorga, and arrive in Santiago on the 5th of October to have one extra day there when I arrive.

Thanks for any advice :)

- Tore, Norway
Do take a look at accommodations in towns you are more than likely thinking that you might stay in. Expect accommodations to be very tight then! If not making reservations before leaving home, do call ahead to get a place to stay before you walk. We will be on that route at a similar time and it appears that many private accommodations and albergues are full on specific days. So your itinerary could be influenced by where you might find places to sleep! Good luck!
 
Time of past OR future Camino
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Would you recommend booking these places in advance or is it sufficient to just show up and ask for a bed?
All my experience is pre-COVID, so others can chip in if anything has changed, but my explanation is as follows:
Municipal - local authorities/towns/villages operate these. Low cost, dormitory accommodation. Typically no booking, first come-first served until full, although usually hospitaleros really helpful in sourcing other nearby accommodation if that happens. These are state-owned in Galicia where they operate under contract. The Galician accommodation is often modern and clean, but can feel lacking the personal touch sometimes - check other threads about this!
Parroquial - operated by local diocese, also low cost, sometimes Donativo, dormitory accommodation also not bookable. More likely to have an evening Pilgrim's Mass linked in - but it's purely optional (but often wonderful/profound)
Other Donativo, typically an older established operation, in what was accepted as the spirit of the camino, which is now largely over-written by more modern/digital ways of living/thinking. Typically dormitory (or mats!) and a communal meal. Generally limited amenities, but an infusion of something special..
Private - run by a huge spectrum of operators, from enthusuasts returning to the camino they love through to full-on commercial operations and many that sit somewhere between the two. Tend to charge more, have better facilities and smaller rooms - some are fantastic and a few are not so good.
Hotels.
Paradors - 5 star state-run hotels with a discount for pilgrims. Some folks treat themselves when they reach Santiago..
Generally, dormitory style places popular with younger people, single people and old-skool camino enthusiasts. Private albergue a better option for couples wanting some privacy, and those liking a more comfortable camino and prepared to pay accordingly. In some times/places you don't have the choice, so this oversimplified classification will not apply! A guidebook or Gronze (commentarios) will give you an indication about what others think about different places, but try not to rely on it too heavily (the vast majority of people don't comment) and make your own choices.
Municipals tend not to be staffed overnight - the hospitalera/o will be there for a few hours to stamp pilgrim passports and then leave. Private places and donativos tend to be where the owner/manager/volunteer lives as well.
I think municpals, parroquials and donativos are great for meeting people and enjoying others' company. However you might find that many folks have already formed into groups over the preceding 400km+. In which case you just have to be bold and introduce yourself and start talking with people regardless (if it's a social camino that you would like to experience).
It can be good to start the camino without too much information and just discover things along the way. I think I have already said too much!
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
CF 2019
CP 2022 (canceled)
CP 2023 (planned)
Hej,
did it in 9 and a half days when I was 48 years old and it did not feel hurried for me. I actually went slower than I could as I had met some nice folk along the way. But then again, we are all different.
 
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taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Do take a look at accommodations in towns you are more than likely thinking that you might stay in. Expect accommodations to be very tight then! If not making reservations before leaving home, do call ahead to get a place to stay before you walk. We will be on that route at a similar time and it appears that many private accommodations and albergues are full on specific days. So your itinerary could be influenced by where you might find places to sleep! Good luck!
Thanks, I will have a look. Will also try to stay out of some of the main Galician cities after Sarria. Hoping to find more accommodation options there. Buen Camino! :)
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
All my experience is pre-COVID, so others can chip in if anything has changed, but my explanation is as follows:
Municipal - local authorities/towns/villages operate these. Low cost, dormitory accommodation. Typically no booking, first come-first served until full, although usually hospitaleros really helpful in sourcing other nearby accommodation if that happens. These are state-owned in Galicia where they operate under contract. The Galician accommodation is often modern and clean, but can feel lacking the personal touch sometimes - check other threads about this!
Parroquial - operated by local diocese, also low cost, sometimes Donativo, dormitory accommodation also not bookable. More likely to have an evening Pilgrim's Mass linked in - but it's purely optional (but often wonderful/profound)
Other Donativo, typically an older established operation, in what was accepted as the spirit of the camino, which is now largely over-written by more modern/digital ways of living/thinking. Typically dormitory (or mats!) and a communal meal. Generally limited amenities, but an infusion of something special..
Private - run by a huge spectrum of operators, from enthusuasts returning to the camino they love through to full-on commercial operations and many that sit somewhere between the two. Tend to charge more, have better facilities and smaller rooms - some are fantastic and a few are not so good.
Hotels.
Paradors - 5 star state-run hotels with a discount for pilgrims. Some folks treat themselves when they reach Santiago..
Generally, dormitory style places popular with younger people, single people and old-skool camino enthusiasts. Private albergue a better option for couples wanting some privacy, and those liking a more comfortable camino and prepared to pay accordingly. In some times/places you don't have the choice, so this oversimplified classification will not apply! A guidebook or Gronze (commentarios) will give you an indication about what others think about different places, but try not to rely on it too heavily (the vast majority of people don't comment) and make your own choices.
Municipals tend not to be staffed overnight - the hospitalera/o will be there for a few hours to stamp pilgrim passports and then leave. Private places and donativos tend to be where the owner/manager/volunteer lives as well.
I think municpals, parroquials and donativos are great for meeting people and enjoying others' company. However you might find that many folks have already formed into groups over the preceding 400km+. In which case you just have to be bold and introduce yourself and start talking with people regardless (if it's a social camino that you would like to experience).
It can be good to start the camino without too much information and just discover things along the way. I think I have already said too much!
Cheers, this is good to know! I consider myself somewhat social, so I will try and make some new friends on the local municipals and donativos. :)
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
Hej,
did it in 9 and a half days when I was 48 years old and it did not feel hurried for me. I actually went slower than I could as I had met some nice folk along the way. But then again, we are all different.
That's great! Do you remember how you divided the walking stages?
 

Arctic_Alex

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
CF 2019
CP 2022 (canceled)
CP 2023 (planned)
That's great! Do you remember how you divided the walking stages?
My own old brain might be insufficient, but my GPS tracker remembers everything. Will send you my detailed schedule in private later.
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
1663576104638.png

So this is my 10 day itinerary so far. Will make changes along the way if I find it necessary. Also have one flex day, so could extend to 11 walking days. That means one less day in Santiago though. Any feedback on the stages would be appreciated.
 
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irishrock

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Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
View attachment 133271

So this is my 10 day itinerary so far. Will make changes along the way if I find it necessary. Also have one flex day, so could extend to 11 walking days. That means one less day in Santiago though. Any feedback on the stages would be appreciated.
looks good except for the La Faba stop...you're going to get to O Cebreiro the next morning and kick yourself for not extending to O Cebreiro. (trust me)
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
looks good except for the La Faba stop...you're going to get to O Cebreiro the next morning and kick yourself for not extending to O Cebreiro. (trust me)
I agree that Villafranca to O Cebreiro is very doable in one day. @taustad said that he will adjust his itinerary as he goes, so perhaps that's an adjustment that he will make.
 

irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
I agree that Villafranca to O Cebreiro is very doable in one day. @taustad said that he will adjust his itinerary as he goes, so perhaps that's an adjustment that he will make.
right on...I think O Cebreiro is such an exciting and fascinating place that I'd for him to miss out on spending an extended amount of time there.

But everyone should "hike their own hike" and do as they see fit
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
looks good except for the La Faba stop...you're going to get to O Cebreiro the next morning and kick yourself for not extending to O Cebreiro. (trust me)
I'll trust you on that one, and will opt to make it for O Cebreiro. I read somewhere on this forum someone saying that O Cebreiro was a tourist trap, but they might have been woefully wrong.

I agree that Villafranca to O Cebreiro is very doable in one day. @taustad said that he will adjust his itinerary as he goes, so perhaps that's an adjustment that he will make.
I will definitely try to make that adjustment, as I am usually a good friend with the mountains.

On that end, I also might take the mountain path out of Villafranca to avoid the highway route if I'm feeling particularly adventurous.
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
On that end, I also might take the mountain path out of Villafranca to avoid the highway route if I'm feeling particularly adventurous.
I highly recommend the mountain path out of Villafranca del Bierzo. Be sure to stop by Albergue Lamas in Pradela for lunch or some homemade cake and coffee.
 
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irishrock

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Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
I'll trust you on that one, and will opt to make it for O Cebreiro. I read somewhere on this forum someone saying that O Cebreiro was a tourist trap, but they might have been woefully wrong.


I will definitely try to make that adjustment, as I am usually a good friend with the mountains.

On that end, I also might take the mountain path out of Villafranca to avoid the highway route if I'm feeling particularly adventurous.
I promise it's not a tourist trap...you might want to check in on accomodations...because I think it might fill up, but definitely a great place for a visit
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
I highly recommend the mountain path out of Villafranca del Bierzo. Be sure to stop by Albergue Lamas in Pradela for lunch or some homemade cake and coffee.
Thanks, duly noted :)

I promise it's not a tourist trap...you might want to check in on accomodations...because I think it might fill up, but definitely a great place for a visit

Great, I will have a look at accommodations!
 
Time of past OR future Camino
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+1 for the mountain route, if you are feeling the previous days have been well within your capabilities. Otherwise I think it's more of an alternative for when you return for your 2nd camino..
La Faba/O Cebreiro has been debated before, this discussion from 8 years ago..
Something not mentioned so far is that by starting on the 26th you'll probably be in the midst of the big wave of pilgrims that set off SJPdP and Roncesvalles at start of Sept. And O Cebreiro has been a pinchpoint for accommodation in 'high season' in the past.
I'd say - leave your options open, see whether you have picked up some companions by then and if so, discuss the possibilities with them. Maybe look in on La Faba anyway if it is open, and if the vibe feels right, then stay!
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
I promise it's not a tourist trap...you might want to check in on accomodations...because I think it might fill up, but definitely a great place for a visit
I had a look on booking.com, but couldn't find a bed in O Cebreiro for the date I will be there. Closest I found was in Albergue la Escuela in La Laguna. Any other places you can recommend for finding accomodations?
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
+1 for the mountain route, if you are feeling the previous days have been well within your capabilities. Otherwise I think it's more of an alternative for when you return for your 2nd camino..
La Faba/O Cebreiro has been debated before, this discussion from 8 years ago..
Something not mentioned so far is that by starting on the 26th you'll probably be in the midst of the big wave of pilgrims that set off SJPdP and Roncesvalles at start of Sept. And O Cebreiro has been a pinchpoint for accommodation in 'high season' in the past.
I'd say - leave your options open, see whether you have picked up some companions by then and if so, discuss the possibilities with them. Maybe look in on La Faba anyway if it is open, and if the vibe feels right, then stay!
Yes, I might keep it open for now. Looks like O Cebreiro is fully booked for the date I will be there anyway. Any thoughts on staying in La Laguna?
 
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irishrock

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances (1st three stages in 2016 and finished in 2017)
I had a look on booking.com, but couldn't find a bed in O Cebreiro for the date I will be there. Closest I found was in Albergue la Escuela in La Laguna. Any other places you can recommend for finding accomodations?
are you familiar with https://godesalco.com/plan/frances ? I'd try to get past O Cebreiro, but that's me...You want to spend some time there mid-day to afternoon (couple of hours at least) Camino provides
 
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.
Yes, I might keep it open for now. Looks like O Cebreiro is fully booked for the date I will be there anyway. Any thoughts on staying in La Laguna?
O Cebreiro has 104 beds at the Municipal that are not reservable, but allocated on a first-come basis (unless COVID restrictions means they aren't operating to full capacity... someone who's stayed there this month might be able to say?).
La Faba has 50 beds that are not reservable too
La Laguna looks good too (is bookable), as well as a couple of places after O Cebreiro (where you are walking along the high ridge, not immediatley descending the other side..).
Tore, you can get too deep into the detail on the forum when you are not even there! The most important thing is to assess the situation when you are on the camino and talk to all the pilgrims and hospitalero/as around you, then the right things will happen often - that's why we love it so much!
 

trecile

Moderator
Staff member
Time of past OR future Camino
PAST - Francés, Norte, Salvador, Portuguese
I had a look on booking.com, but couldn't find a bed in O Cebreiro for the date I will be there. Closest I found was in Albergue la Escuela in La Laguna. Any other places you can recommend for finding accomodations?
As @peregrino_tom said, the municipal albergue in O Cebreiro is large. You should be able to get a bed there.
 

taustad

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
25/09/2022
are you familiar with https://godesalco.com/plan/frances ? I'd try to get past O Cebreiro, but that's me...You want to spend some time there mid-day to afternoon (couple of hours at least) Camino provides

Cheers, I will definitely spend some time there either way!

O Cebreiro has 104 beds at the Municipal that are not reservable, but allocated on a first-come basis (unless COVID restrictions means they aren't operating to full capacity... someone who's stayed there this month might be able to say?).
La Faba has 50 beds that are not reservable too
La Laguna looks good too (is bookable), as well as a couple of places after O Cebreiro (where you are walking along the high ridge, not immediatley descending the other side..).
Tore, you can get too deep into the detail on the forum when you are not even there! The most important thing is to assess the situation when you are on the camino and talk to all the pilgrims and hospitalero/as around you, then the right things will happen often - that's why we love it so much!

That is good to know. I will keep things open ended for now. Might head out early and try and get a bed at the Municipal in O Cebreiro if I don't feel like stopping at La Faba.

As @peregrino_tom said, the municipal albergue in O Cebreiro is large. You should be able to get a bed there.

Great! Looking forward to it :)
 

pepi

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Last: Sept 2022
next 🤷
A latecomer to this thread, I'd like to chip in my $0.02. I have finished my 7th CF just a few weeks ago and the Astorga to SdC section is one of my favorites; this year I did it in 12 days. But then, I would not want to miss the stay in Rabanal enjoying the Gregorian chants at the 7 O'Clock Vesper; neither would I deprive myself of that excellent Massage at the Casa Peregrino, its pool, watching the magical sunset with a glass of wine and the excellent dinner. The second leisurely breakfast in Molinaseca and the most incredible Bistecca Fiorentina (1 kg – 1-inch thick prime steak @ 16 €!) at that Italian Restaurant next to the clock tower in the old center of Ponferrada. Wasting time on the main plaza in Villafranca, drinking cold beers with co-Peregrinos. Spending an evening in enchanting O'Cebreiro; watching the coming and going of the main street bar/restaurant in Triacastela. In Sarria talking to the new, all excited kids starting there, A G&T on the plaza terrasse in Portomarin....the pulpo in Palas de Rei, the growing excitement of the forthcoming end of the way in Arzua, and finally, in Lavacolla, the arguably best Peregrino dinner of the entire Camino. And the finale, arriving in SdC.

For me, all this is plenty worth the extra 2 days it took me (in comparison to your time budget). OK, at 78, I am also no longer the fastest guy on the trail. If I really really had to do it within 10 days, I would rather ride the most boring road between Molinasecca and Ponferrada in a Taxi or bus and carry on to SdC in Lavacolla, with only 11 km to go. In the very worst case.....but then, why would I want to do that.

Buen Camino
 

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