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August 2020 looking for some advice

lozelizabeth

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French (2020)
Portuguese way (2020)
Portuguese coastal way (2020)
Hi all,

I am currently in the process of planning my Camino last minute. I am a solo traveller (F 33) looking to meet new people along the way. I had considered doing the French way ( even part of it if not the full) for the social element but the Portuguese route looks appealing. I have found some companies offering self-guided/guided tours but part of me wants to do it on my own and meet up with fellow pilgrims as I go.
I am unsure if I do it alone how to meet up with others and whether to start from Lisbon or do the coastal route from Porto. I have 4- 5 weeks free and would like to take some time to explore Porto and other towns and not rush the journey. I also wondered where people stay - if they book ahead of just find a place to stay as they go.
Has anyone done both the French and Portuguese coastal route and have pros and cons of each?
Is anyone else planning on doing this in August?
Any advice at all would be super helpful. Thank you guys!
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I have done both the CF and CP several times which includes different routes on the CP and I loved them all. Considering the current state of affairs, I would suspect the CP is a better choice with possibly more accommodations opened. There will be a lot fewer pilgrims than in normal times but I'm sure you will meet people and probably find little difficulty with bookings. Porto is a wonderful destination and worth exploring for a number of days. I would forget the tour companies, if you are a capable solo traveler.
 

lozelizabeth

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
French (2020)
Portuguese way (2020)
Portuguese coastal way (2020)
It's very easy to meet fellow pilgrims along the Camino, you just start walking with them. You definitely don't need to spend money on a tour package to do so.
Thanks. I just wasn't sure about the amount of traffic along this route compared with the CF. Total newbie over here.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Thanks. I just wasn't sure about the amount of traffic along this route compared with the CF. Total newbie over here.
Definitely fewer pilgrims on the Portuguese than the Francés - at least in a normal year. But this is not a normal year, so it's hard to say.
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
Thanks. I just wasn't sure about the amount of traffic along this route compared with the CF.
Keep in mind that there will be much less traffic from Lisbon to Porto than from Porto onwards. That's in a normal year but as @trecile says, this is not a normal year. IIRC, Porto and Tui on the CP are normally the third and fourth most popular starting points on any camino after SJPdP and Sarria on the CF.

I am looking at starting the CP from Lisbon (where I live) but probably not until September.

Bom caminho!
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
It is hard to say what it will be like in 2020. In no way is it a typical year. Generally, the traffic on the Portugues is sufficient that meeting other pilgrims isn't a problem at all - especially on the central route north of Porto but increasingly on the Coastal route as well.

The most common ways to meet people are:
- at albergues, where people are thrown in close proximity to each other, especially those albergues with communal meals
- at bars along the way where people commonly stop for coffee, refreshments, and a bite to eat. Pilgrims are easily recognizable by their backpacks and it is easy to join them at a table with a "Fellow pilgrim? May I join you?".
- Catching up to them (or having them catch up to you) along the way and starting a conversation with a simple "Buen camino"
 
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
@lozelizabeth , welcome to this forum and congratulations on asking some questions that we'd all love to answer.

Only you know how far you can walk with a loaded pack in a day; only you know what standard of accommodation you can live with; and none of us know what the Covid virus will do to accessibility to the camino routes and accommodation for the next few months at least. Meanwhile, get yourself a decent guidebook or App or two, search this forum a bit and log-in often to follow the enfolding narrative.

If you had asked your questions last year you would probably have been advised "you don't need a tour company", "book ahead by a day or two", "the French and the Coastal? Chalk and cheese". This year? Who knows what advice to offer - the world and the camino have changed.

Buen camino
 

Lexicos

Jim
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
2017
Camino Portuguese 2019
If it's your first Elizabeth I'd recommend the Frances. I've done both. Planning for the Frances again, soon as it's safe and OK. Agree with the earlier reply, a good guide book is all you need. You'll meet lots of pilgrims and within days you'll be in good company. Plenty to see along the way ..... Lisbon and Porto, you can't go wrong. The pilgrim routes take you along a few more roads etc. but very worthwhile just the same. The very best of luck ........
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
That's in a normal year. This is not a normal year.
I also think that if you don't speak Spanish you will have a harder time communicating with other pilgrims this year.
 

MarkyD

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 31/08/2018 - 20/10/2018
Hi all,

I am currently in the process of planning my Camino last minute. I am a solo traveller (F 33) looking to meet new people along the way. I had considered doing the French way ( even part of it if not the full) for the social element but the Portuguese route looks appealing. I have found some companies offering self-guided/guided tours but part of me wants to do it on my own and meet up with fellow pilgrims as I go.
I am unsure if I do it alone how to meet up with others and whether to start from Lisbon or do the coastal route from Porto. I have 4- 5 weeks free and would like to take some time to explore Porto and other towns and not rush the journey. I also wondered where people stay - if they book ahead of just find a place to stay as they go.
Has anyone done both the French and Portuguese coastal route and have pros and cons of each?
Is anyone else planning on doing this in August?
Any advice at all would be super helpful. Thank you guys!
I have walked both, although I started at Tui for my short Portugués Camino. You mention having 4 to 5 weeks,
Hi all,

I am currently in the process of planning my Camino last minute. I am a solo traveller (F 33) looking to meet new people along the way. I had considered doing the French way ( even part of it if not the full) for the social element but the Portuguese route looks appealing. I have found some companies offering self-guided/guided tours but part of me wants to do it on my own and meet up with fellow pilgrims as I go.
I am unsure if I do it alone how to meet up with others and whether to start from Lisbon or do the coastal route from Porto. I have 4- 5 weeks free and would like to take some time to explore Porto and other towns and not rush the journey. I also wondered where people stay - if they book ahead of just find a place to stay as they go.
Has anyone done both the French and Portuguese coastal route and have pros and cons of each?
Is anyone else planning on doing this in August?
Any advice at all would be super helpful. Thank you guys!
I have walked the French route from SJPP to Fisterra and a short version of the Portuguese route, starting from Tui, via the spiritual variant after Pontevedra to Santiago.
I would say that the route from Porto will have the following particular advantages:

1. Your time allowed for the trip will be more than enough, which will allow you to walk at a more leisurely place, stay longer in your favourite places and, if you have time over once you reach Santiago then you could do the Fisterra - Muxia - Santiago loop as a bonus! Alternatively, you could also do the Camino Inglés instead of the Fisterra loop.

2. The Portuguese route starting from Porto is significantly shorter than the French route, so this will give you options to explore towns and other places of interest. In contrast, the French route will require at least 4 weeks to complete, depending on your walking pace and any other unexpected delays along the way. This would limit how much "spare time" you'll have available.

That said, I would also say that the French route somehow has more potential to provide a more "intense and transformative experience".

It's impossible to say, with any degree of certainty, which of the routes will have more pilgrims this year, let alone just the month of August. It will certainly be significantly less than normal. Possibly, the Portuguese route might see more pilgrims in August, it certainly seems a more appealing route to many. I'm sure there will be plenty of opportunity to walk with others, meet up with others at cafés, hostels etc. You certainly won't need any official guide, in my opinion. Just do a bit of research here and on YouTube and you'll see how amazingly easy it can be. A basic guide book will also be useful.

Personally, I am considering walking a section of the French route with my wife in the last 2 weeks of August, from Pamplona to Burgos maybe. I live in Madrid, so it would be a relatively easy trip for me to do. However, we are also considering doing the route from Porto to Vigo, via the coastal path.

Good luck with making your decision. Although, as many people here will testify, the Camino will probably make the decision for you. Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese Coastal (2018)
Portuguese Coastal, with Spiritual Variant (2019)
Hi lozelizabeth,
I have not done the Frances so I cannot compare the two, but I have walked the coastal Portuguese twice (second time including Spiritual Variant). To get a sense of what the coastal is like, you can look at my wife's blog at https://twoclinestraveling.wordpress.com. Click on the tab for 2018 Camino de Santiago or the one for 2019. 2018 probably more applicable to what you're thinking of doing.
In any case, just based on the fact that you're a newbie (we all start that way!), have 4-5 weeks and want to explore towns along the way, I would recommend that you start in Porto, rather than Lisbon. That will provide a more leisurely, less stressful walk and give you plenty of time to look around Porto and other interesting towns on the way to Santiago (like Viana do Castello, Pontevedra and Padrón).
As for lodging, my wife and I tended to book ahead, since that was safer. But as other have pointed out, traffic will be much reduced on all Camino routes for some time to come so you might be able to be more flexible about that. Good luck!
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
You have received some excellent advice. Especially that we all newbies right now due to the Pandemic. I have no idea which Camino will have more pilgrims but I would recommend not using a company and just walking and allowing whatever will happen to happen. Book as late as possible as this virus changes things locally, nationally and internationally almost daily. I have walked both Caminos. But with this new normal none of us know what albergues/pensions will be open, how many people will be on the Camino and who you will meet. Historically of course the CF has the most pilgrims. The CP does not have many pilgrims until you get close to or into Porto. The downside to the CP early on is the road walking. It will get progressively nicer the further north you go. More people speak English in Portugal and I think the nicest people I have ever met are in Portugal. Before the pandemic the CF had far more towns and places to sleep than the Portuguese. But now who knows. The weather in August/September can be pretty hot. But you never know about this either. If you want to take your time and you have 5 weeks maybe the CP may be a better option for you. You can start in Lisbon and make your way north and do the Camino at a little more leisurely pace. If it is a hot summer the CP may also be better as it probably would be cooler walking along the coast from Porto.
In the past it would be really easy to delineate the pros/cons of each camino. Now it is alot of speculation.
My only concrete advice would be to download both the Buen Camino and Wisely apps on your phone. I believe they are both free. Refer to Gronze.com (open in Chrome so you get a pretty good translation) that has distances, lists and reviews of albergues/pensions. Also there are running lists of albergue openings and closings here on the forum. In normal times three apps may be overkill. But to know what is available and to call ahead to reconfirm because who knows how many beds places will have is pretty important now.
Finally if you want to take your time go on your own and let your heart and the Camino dictate what happens as it seems like you want to go at your pace. If you choose the CF download the Alert Cops app it will put you in immediate contact with police if you have problems. Guess that is it from a dad with 2 daughters close to your age!!!!! Be safe and Buen Camino!
 

KariC

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminho portugûes (2016)
I hiked the Caminho Portugues as a solo traveler, albeit older than you, and had absolutely no trouble meeting people. Granted, things could be different this year, but it was really important to me to have the flexibility of deciding how far and which route I wanted to go (coastal, central, variante espiritual), and where I wanted to stay, without having it all preplanned.
 

AnnaLW

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo - Oviedo to Santiago (2018)
Portuguese - Lisbon to Santiago (2019)
Frances - ?
We (my partner and I) did the Camino Portuguese from Lisbon last year, and the section between Lisbon and Coimbra particularly was quiet. We walked most of the way with one other person we met on the second day, and most nights there were 5-10 other pilgrims in the albergues (though occasionally just one). That said, we met one pilgrim after Porto who had also walked from Lisbon, starting one day later than us, and hadn't met anyone until Porto. This isn't really a problem if you're okay with being on your own as the infrastructure is good enough, but he was an experienced walker so it might be different if it's your first time. After Porto it was very busy last year - booking a day or two in advance would probably still be a good idea, especially if you'd like to take the days slowly.

There are lots of beautiful places on the way, especially from Porto - we'd especially recommend Casa do Sardao in Carreco as a place to stop and even take a day to rest (https://www.facebook.com/casadosardao). Coimbra and Baiona were great places to stop, and the Monastery at Herbon is an amazing place to spend the night. We did the coastal and espiritual variants and the espiritual was incredible (plus you get a cool boat ride!).

We're planning to walk the Frances this year - each Camino is a different experience, so just know that whatever way you choose to walk there isn't a wrong choice as long as you're safe and happy! Any questions let us know :)
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
I am also interested in hiking the CP from Porto - as soon as possible - hoping to enter Spain eventually! I hiked the central route of the CP (2018) and the entire CF twice (2018 and 2019). I agree with the previous post that the CF might provide a more intense and transformative experience, but both were very fulfilling experiences for me. This time, I'm thinking of taking the CP coastal route with the Spiritual Variant and the boat ride from Vilanova de Arousa to Padrón if it is open! Anybody know if the boat service is running?
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
We (my partner and I) did the Camino Portuguese from Lisbon last year, and the section between Lisbon and Coimbra particularly was quiet. We walked most of the way with one other person we met on the second day, and most nights there were 5-10 other pilgrims in the albergues (though occasionally just one). That said, we met one pilgrim after Porto who had also walked from Lisbon, starting one day later than us, and hadn't met anyone until Porto. This isn't really a problem if you're okay with being on your own as the infrastructure is good enough, but he was an experienced walker so it might be different if it's your first time. After Porto it was very busy last year - booking a day or two in advance would probably still be a good idea, especially if you'd like to take the days slowly.

There are lots of beautiful places on the way, especially from Porto - we'd especially recommend Casa do Sardao in Carreco as a place to stop and even take a day to rest (https://www.facebook.com/casadosardao). Coimbra and Baiona were great places to stop, and the Monastery at Herbon is an amazing place to spend the night. We did the coastal and espiritual variants and the espiritual was incredible (plus you get a cool boat ride!).

We're planning to walk the Frances this year - each Camino is a different experience, so just know that whatever way you choose to walk there isn't a wrong choice as long as you're safe and happy! Any questions let us know :)
I'm trying hard to find the Monastery on a map - any more help would be appreciated!
 

AnnaLW

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo - Oviedo to Santiago (2018)
Portuguese - Lisbon to Santiago (2019)
Frances - ?
I'm trying hard to find the Monastery on a map - any more help would be appreciated!
Of course - here's a photo of the page in the Wise Pilgrim guide book (a really great option for the Portuguese as it includes all of the different variants!). The Monastery it about 3km or so before Padron, and if you take the Espiritual variant (marked with the red line up the river on this map) you can walk straight to Herbon on the day you catch the boat from Vilanova de Arousa - about 5k. Makes it a nice short day including the boat ride! But it's an amazing place to relax, very peaceful indeed and there is one bar in the village (another km or two from the monastery). Communal dinner on offer was great, and if I remember right they did breakfast too. They also offer a tour of the monastery which was well worth it, and you can attend Pilgrim Mass if you like.

IMG_0475.jpg
And a link to the site with an interactive map: https://www.wisepilgrim.com/camino-portugues/herbon. You can buy the guide book of this site too :) Hope that helps!
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
Also - does anyone know if US citizens can fly into Portugal now? I see mixed comments.
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
Of course - here's a photo of the page in the Wise Pilgrim guide book (a really great option for the Portuguese as it includes all of the different variants!). The Monastery it about 3km or so before Padron, and if you take the Espiritual variant (marked with the red line up the river on this map) you can walk straight to Herbon on the day you catch the boat from Vilanova de Arousa - about 5k. Makes it a nice short day including the boat ride! But it's an amazing place to relax, very peaceful indeed and there is one bar in the village (another km or two from the monastery). Communal dinner on offer was great, and if I remember right they did breakfast too. They also offer a tour of the monastery which was well worth it, and you can attend Pilgrim Mass if you like.

View attachment 77580
And a link to the site with an interactive map: https://www.wisepilgrim.com/camino-portugues/herbon. You can buy the guide book of this site too :) Hope that helps!
Thank you so much, I assume that monastery is the red spot marked "Herbón" - couldn't find anything mentioning that location had a monastery or was once a monastery!
 

jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
Also - does anyone know if US citizens can fly into Portugal now? I see mixed comments.
Yes, per the EU’s reopening site:

Only allowed for: nationals of EU27, Schengen Area countries (Liechsteinsten, Norway, Switzerland and Iceland) and their family members, passengers on flights from UK, Brazil and CPLP, USA, Canada, Venezuela and South-Africa. Suspension of visa processing for the remaining countries.

Last update: 23-06-2020
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
Yes, per the EU’s reopening site:

Only allowed for: nationals of EU27, Schengen Area countries (Liechsteinsten, Norway, Switzerland and Iceland) and their family members, passengers on flights from UK, Brazil and CPLP, USA, Canada, Venezuela and South-Africa. Suspension of visa processing for the remaining countries.

Last update: 23-06-2020
Thank you!
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Yes, per the EU’s reopening site:

Only allowed for: nationals of EU27, Schengen Area countries (Liechsteinsten, Norway, Switzerland and Iceland) and their family members, passengers on flights from UK, Brazil and CPLP, USA, Canada, Venezuela and South-Africa. Suspension of visa processing for the remaining countries.

Last update: 23-06-2020
I find the wording of that statement unclear. It's my understanding that until the US, Brazil and some other countries have the virus under control that residents of those countries will not be allowed into the EU.

You might want to read this thread

 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
I find the wording of that statement unclear. It's my understanding that until the US, Brazil and some other countries have the virus under control that residents of those countries will not be allowed into the EU
@trecile is right. The EU’s reopening site is a very useful site but don't take what you read there for the law. Always check an official national site, like a website from the Portugal government or similar before you make plans and buy a airplane ticket. During the last two to three months, Portugal did not suspend all flights to countries that have a strong Portuguese community, like the USA or Brazil. That's all that this text means. It doesn't mean that anyone can go on such a flight and enter Portugal. Not yet.

Somewhere the EU Commission says about the EU reopen site and app that they depend on the information that is sent in by the Member States. Information gets translated into English, often by non-native speakers, gets edited, taken out of context ... things like this happen ...
 
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jungleboy

Nick
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017
Primitivo 2018
Madrid 2019
Kumano Kodo 2019
@trecile is right. The EU’s reopening site is a very useful site but don't take what you read there for the law. Always check an official national site, like a website from the Portugal government or similar before you make plans and buy a airplane ticket. Portugal did not suspend all flights to countries that have a strong Portuguese community, like the USA or Brazil. That's all that this text means. It doesn't mean that anyone can go on such a flight and enter Portugal. Not yet.
Points taken. SEF is the Portuguese government's service for foreigners and borders (for lack of a better term, directly translated). Here is the relevant passage from their website:

Only the following persons are authorised to enter the national territory by air:
  • To nationals of a Member State of the European Union, from the Schengen associated countries authorised under Order n.º 5503-C/2020, n.º 1, of 13 May, and their relatives under Directive 2004/38/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council, except where, in transit, they travel to a Member State other than of their nationality in which they cannot avail themselves of their right of free movement;
  • To passengers of the Portuguese-speaking countries, from South Africa, Canada, the United States of America, the United Kingdom under the transitional arrangement and Venezuela, as long as the principle of reciprocity is ensured in those countries to the Portuguese citizens;
  • To third-country nationals holding a residence permit or a long-stay visa issued by the national authorities;
  • To third-country nationals holding a residence permit or a long-stay visa issued by a Member State of the European Union, for transit purposes to the country of residence;
  • To people holding an identity document issued by the Foreign Affairs under article 87 of Law n.º 23/2007, of 4 July, currently worded;
  • Repatriated citizens through the consular assistance mechanism;
  • Applicants for international protection;
  • Citizens travelling for urgent professional reasons duly substantiated;
  • Nationals from the Portuguese-Speaking Countries under health protocols for urgent and pressing medical acts;
  • Citizens whose entry is justified for humanitarian reasons;
  • To citizens of the Special Response to Forest Fire Fighting, and those to be included as well, duly accredited;
  • To nationals of the Member States of the European Union implementing the Schengen Acquis, when, under n.º 10 of the Council of Ministers’ Resolution n.º 34-A/2020, of 13 March, arriving in flights from countries of the Member States of the European Union which do not implement the Schengen Acquis, the provision of subparagraph i) of the previous paragraph applies.
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
For me, this part is the deal-killer!
"Only the following persons are authorised to enter the national territory by air:
.....
"To passengers of the Portuguese-speaking countries, from South Africa, Canada, the United States of America, the United Kingdom under the transitional arrangement and Venezuela, as long as the principle of reciprocity is ensured in those countries to the Portuguese citizens".....

It doesn't look like I'll be able to sneak in before the EU entirely shuts down US citizens from entering. Where is my cry emoji, lol.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
For me, this part is the deal-killer!
"Only the following persons are authorised to enter the national territory by air:
.....
"To passengers of the Portuguese-speaking countries, from South Africa, Canada, the United States of America, the United Kingdom under the transitional arrangement and Venezuela, as long as the principle of reciprocity is ensured in those countries to the Portuguese citizens".....

It doesn't look like I'll be able to sneak in before the EU entirely shuts down US citizens from entering. Where is my cry emoji, lol.
You also have to think about your medical insurance for travel. Does your health insurance cover you in foreign countries? Do they have language about coverage during a pandemic or travel against US government recommendations?
I know that many people travel without insurance, but it's especially irresponsible to do so now when the risk of needing medical treatment is higher.
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
Good point. I always have travel insurance with a strong medical component. I know if doesn't cover cancellations of anything due to COVID-19 but I would think it should cover medical if I got sick. I will ask them. But, very good point!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
Yes, per the EU’s reopening site:

Only allowed for: nationals of EU27, Schengen Area countries (Liechsteinsten, Norway, Switzerland and Iceland) and their family members, passengers on flights from UK, Brazil and CPLP, USA, Canada, Venezuela and South-Africa. Suspension of visa processing for the remaining countries.

Last update: 23-06-2020
I suspect that you are misreading what is written on that site. It is in two parts. The first part says only Schengen nationals and family are currently permitted to enter. The second part refers to flights from certain countries. The second part does not extend the first part, it simply states which countries that Schengen nationals can enter from.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
For me, this part is the deal-killer!
"Only the following persons are authorised to enter the national territory by air:
.....
"To passengers of the Portuguese-speaking countries, from South Africa, Canada, the United States of America, the United Kingdom under the transitional arrangement and Venezuela, as long as the principle of reciprocity is ensured in those countries to the Portuguese citizens".....

It doesn't look like I'll be able to sneak in before the EU entirely shuts down US citizens from entering. Where is my cry emoji, lol.
This EU site may be a less confusing source: https://ec.europa.eu/info/live-work...rus-pandemic/travel-and-eu-during-pandemic_en
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
Thank you. It doesn't look like I'll be going anywhere soon. I made a joke on Facebook that last year I visited Costa Rica, Australia, Paris, Spain, Belgium, Amsterdam, India, Nepal, and Bhutan, and so far this year I've been to the park! Should I laugh or cry, lol?
 

Galloglaigh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lycra tribe.
CF (2017/8), VF (2018/9), Old Way (2020), VFnS (2020), CP (rebooked) (2021), VdT (ToDo)
It's all very odd. Have booked a flight to Portugal from the UK without an issue (have an EU passport). So the (portuguese) rules appear to allow me to go. However someone I know has booked UK - Estonia return for next month (EU passport) but has had the outward flight cancelled but not the inbound.

So you could be allowed to travel within the rules but find that at the last minute, economics apply.
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
It's so risky to book a flight at this time. I think I could hike in the UK if I wanted to self-quarantine for 2 weeks?
 

Stephan the Painter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
As an EU national, you always have the right to enter (providing you use your EU passport). But wait a couple of days because the rules are changing very soon, so that the new rules can be in place for the 1st July.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
Those rules don’t sound like they allow international tourism at all? Am I misunderstanding that? I’m a dual national (IT- US) residing in the US, and it doesn’t look like even I could come to Europe, because I’m not “returning home.”
What @Doughnut NZ says. You must not hang on every word that you read on these informational webpages, not even when it's a European Commission webpage. They merely issued legally non-binding recommendations to the EU member states. What counts, are the legal dispositions of the country where you reside or whose nationality you have. I don't know about Italy. But I know for certain that several EU countries allow everyone of their nationals entry into their country.

Strictly speaking, the idea is of course that you enter the country of your nationality (or nationalities) for other purposes than a touristic visit ... but yeah nobody is checking on you and the number of such nationals would be too low to be worth checking, I guess.
 

Stephan the Painter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
As an EU national, you always have the right to enter (providing you use your EU passport). But wait a couple of days because the rules are changing very soon, so that the new rules can be in place for the 1st July.
Well, I doubt I would be turned back at the airport, Because probably no one would ask. They would assume I was an EU resident and was returning home. But the rules seem to currently say that I can’t come back unless I’m returning home. Below is a copy and paste from the link you offered. And perhaps that will change after July 1, as you said.


The following are exempt from the temporary travel restriction to the EU+ area

  • all EU citizens and citizens of the Schengen Associated States, and their family members for the purposes of returning home.
Edit: I didn’t realize those were European Union recommendations. I understand. I’d have to check what the rules were in whatever country I wanted to travel to. No plans to walk the Camino this year, but I dislike the possibilities that I wouldn’t be able to go to Europe.
 
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Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
Well, I doubt I would be turned back at the airport, Because probably no one would ask. They would assume I was an EU resident and was returning home. But the rules seem to currently say that I can’t come back unless I’m returning home. Below is a copy and paste from the link you offered. And perhaps that will change after July 1, as you said.


The following are exempt from the temporary travel restriction to the EU+ area

  • all EU citizens and citizens of the Schengen Associated States, and their family members for the purposes of returning home.
Edit: I didn’t realize those were European Union recommendations. I understand. I’d have to check what the rules were in whatever country I wanted to travel to. No plans to walk the Camino this year, but I dislike the possibilities that I wouldn’t be able to go to Europe.
Things seem to be changing daily so hopefully you'll get to Europe this summer. I'm trying as well and I'm only a meager US citizen. Doesn't this article suggest if someone is a tourist in the UK, they can enter Spain?
 

Stephan the Painter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2020)
Things seem to be changing daily so hopefully you'll get to Europe this summer. I'm trying as well and I'm only a meager US citizen. Doesn't this article suggest if someone is a tourist in the UK, they can enter Spain?
I think you’re suggesting a legal loophole work around, at least if you’re starting in the United States. I’m not sure I would want to base my vacation on a maybe. But perhaps you are a resident of the united kingdom?

If I was the EU, I wouldn’t allow US residents to come, given the current rate of infection here and lack of effective government action in the United States. Not at least without requiring testing and quarantine. I guess they’re deciding that now, at least the last time I looked at the news about it. It’s all horrifying, scary and embarrassing to me. I actually expect bigger surges in the US. A month ago people were taking precautions in my area, but now that’s pretty much out the window.
 

Orlando Wren

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018), Fisterra (2018)
Portuguese from Porto (Oct 2018)
Frances (2019)
I agree the EU shouldn't let US citizens come directly there. But if someone goes to another country first, say the UK, and self-quarantines for 2 weeks, then enjoys that country and moves on to Spain, should that be allowed? I was thinking about doing just that!
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
To Santiago and beyond (from home; Voie de Tours; Camino Francés; Biskaya; Manche; Via Brabantica)
This thread is really moving far away from the OP's question and it is also moving into speculation about what may or may not be government(s) regulation in the future and how it may or may not be controlled.

Please have a look at this recent thread: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/americans-banned-from-eu-travel.67925/#post-857733. That thread is now closed because forum members could not refrain from making comments about political leaders but it covers more or less the facts as they currently present themselves.

Today is the 25th of June 2020. It is only six days until the 1st of July 2020 when we will know more facts about who can travel from the USA and from other third countries to any of the EU+ countries.
 
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Casserole

Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 - Solo, SJPdP to Finisterre
2018 - Daughter (2) and Hubby, Sarria to SdC
I agree with many people on here. I think a guidebook is just fine. The CF will be more populated, ensuring that you are able to meet plenty of pilgrims. I did the CF solo from SJPdP to Finisterre when I was 24 and made legit life long friends. We were actually supposed to meet up in Finisterre this year.

Now, at 35, I was supposed to be heading out to the CP solo, but the pandemic had other plans.

A tour group provides you with a set group of people but its more regulated. I loved the ability to change my mind if I wanted to continue on or stop for the day.
 

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