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Average Kilometres per Day

Elme Oosthuizen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hopefully be walking July 2019
Hello fellow camino fanatics

I'm planning on walking the camino June/July and it's time for the final planning.

What is the doable/healthy/average/slightly challenging kilometers per day? I'm 22 years old and would see myself as average fit, and healthy.
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.

Thank you in advance ! :)

Elmé
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Hello fellow camino fanatics

I'm planning on walking the camino June/July and it's time for the final planning.

What is the doable/healthy/average/slightly challenging kilometers per day? I'm 22 years old and would see myself as average fit, and healthy.
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.

Thank you in advance ! :)

Elmé
You have plenty of time. 25 km per day is sort of an average day for many.
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Hi, @Elme Oosthuizen, welcome to the forum.

This may sound unhelpful but the opposite is intended. Do not try and plan your camino based on what other people do. There are members of this forum who will walk 30 - 40 Kms per day, every day, for ever: there are members who walk 10 - 15 because that is all they are physically capable of; or, more likely, inclined to do.
The better question is how far can you walk day after day with a loaded rucksack? And the probable answer is - you don't know.

There are easy resolutions to this conundrum. Practice walking with your camino loaded pack. Take a look at a few of the excellent websites such as www.Gronze.com where you can discover the distances between the available accommodations on the Camino Frances and see how that fits to your capacities.

For comfort: 3 weeks Leon to Santiago for a 22 year old average fit and healthy will be very comfortable provided you don't set off like a hare. Start slowly, Santiago isn't going anywhere. 4 weeks gives you ample time to walk to Fisterra and Muxia and time in Santiago.

If it helps your perspective I'm in my late 60's with a heart condition and some muscular- skeletal issues. Some days I walk 15km somedays I'll walk 35+. It kind of depends on the slope ;)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I completely second @Tincatinker . On my Caminos and especially on Frances I've seen many more youngsters dropping out than oldies. No disrespect meant ;) (I'm somewhere in the middle with 49)
I think the reason is that they feel so strong and powerful nothing is impossible for them. But first few stages with 40+ km covered will result most possibly in blisters if not something more devastating. Take it slow the first few days and then you'll see how your body reacts.
For example, my body is very angry with me first few days and I can almost hear it saying "WTF you are doing to me? You were sitting at the computer 10 months and now you want me to do all this!!!" And after completion it's ranting all over again: "WTF you are doing now? First you forced me to walk two months with this backpack and now suddenly you decided that's it. I'm having cramps during the night!!!"
Yep. True conversation :D
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I think the typical moderately fit person of any age can do 20-30 km/day. However (and this is a big HOWEVER), inexperienced walkers might be surprised by a single bad blister in a very painful spot, or shin splints after multiple days, jet lag or catching a cold after a long journey, or a terribly rainy day when you have friends stopping early in a cosy albergue. "Fitness" is not really a factor!

I prefer not to walk over 25 km, but I make my plans on an average (over the whole trip) of 20 km.
 
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John H.

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - 2017
CP Central - 2017
CP Coastal - 2018
CF - [hopefully again someday]
… I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.
Hi Elme: Your plan seems very doable in 3-4 weeks. Leon-Santiago is about 300 kms + 90 kms to Finisterre =19 kms/day over 3 weeks or 14 kms/day over 4 weeks. Many people seem to walk 22-28 kms per day, while I met some that only walked 10-15 and others regularly did 30-40. Set your own pace. I like doing about 25-33 kms/day on avg. (with a few big days around 35-45 kms when I feel inspired).

Being 22 years old, average fit and healthy are all good, but not everything. I met several healthy 20 somethings with foot problems due to minimal preparation, inadequate foot care, wrong size and type of footwear and heavy packs. Be prepared and have fun.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
I let my body clock control the distance I walk each day. I get up when the bag rustling starts which is around 5, 6 or 7. I have usually packed my pack the night before and sleep in the pants/shorts and t-shirt I plan to walk in the next morning. If there is a cafe open that is a plus because I need my cafe con leche; otherwise I walk for an hour or so and hopefully will find myself lucky enough that one has just opened around 9. I air out my feet and then walk a few more hours until around noon to one I call it a day. I put my bag in the queue for the albergue, grab a beer and wait for it to open, followed by a shower, then washing my stuff and then go out for the menu del dia. So depending on the terrain and the weather conditions, because I hate walking in rain, that may have been 12km or that may have been 25km.
Mind you I have been doing this for 10 years and I don't walk much faster than 3 to 4 k/h; I will be 73 on this Camino.
 

MikeJS

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis (2011), Norte (2012), VdlP (Apr 2016). Sureste/Invierno (Apr/May 2017).
It depends - personally, I tend to try not to walk more than 25 to 30 Kms per day for the first week to let my body and kit settle in to the camino. Thereafter, I tend to walk around 35-40 kms per day. For me this works as I usually start around 0730 and walk at around 5kms/hours. So 40 kms is 8 hours walking which means I finish around 1630 including any stops. For me that is plenty early enough to finish and get any chores done.
 

Elme Oosthuizen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hopefully be walking July 2019
Hi, @Elme Oosthuizen, welcome to the forum.

This may sound unhelpful but the opposite is intended. Do not try and plan your camino based on what other people do. There are members of this forum who will walk 30 - 40 Kms per day, every day, for ever: there are members who walk 10 - 15 because that is all they are physically capable of; or, more likely, inclined to do.
The better question is how far can you walk day after day with a loaded rucksack? And the probable answer is - you don't know.

There are easy resolutions to this conundrum. Practice walking with your camino loaded pack. Take a look at a few of the excellent websites such as www.Gronze.com where you can discover the distances between the available accommodations on the Camino Frances and see how that fits to your capacities.

For comfort: 3 weeks Leon to Santiago for a 22 year old average fit and healthy will be very comfortable provided you don't set off like a hare. Start slowly, Santiago isn't going anywhere. 4 weeks gives you ample time to walk to Fisterra and Muxia and time in Santiago.

If it helps your perspective I'm in my late 60's with a heart condition and some muscular- skeletal issues. Some days I walk 15km somedays I'll walk 35+. It kind of depends on the slope ;)
thank you so much for the helpful reply and the tips, will definitely use them :)
 

Elme Oosthuizen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hopefully be walking July 2019
I let my body clock control the distance I walk each day. I get up when the bag rustling starts which is around 5, 6 or 7. I have usually packed my pack the night before and sleep in the pants/shorts and t-shirt I plan to walk in the next morning. If there is a cafe open that is a plus because I need my cafe con leche; otherwise I walk for an hour or so and hopefully will find myself lucky enough that one has just opened around 9. I air out my feet and then walk a few more hours until around noon to one I call it a day. I put my bag in the queue for the albergue, grab a beer and wait for it to open, followed by a shower, then washing my stuff and then go out for the menu del dia. So depending on the terrain and the weather conditions, because I hate walking in rain, that may have been 12km or that may have been 25km.
Mind you I have been doing this for 10 years and I don't walk much faster than 3 to 4 k/h; I will be 73 on this Camino.
thank you very much for the detailed reply - taking it to heart. good luck on your next camino!
 

Elme Oosthuizen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hopefully be walking July 2019
Hi Elme: Your plan seems very doable in 3-4 weeks. Leon-Santiago is about 300 kms + 90 kms to Finisterre =19 kms/day over 3 weeks or 14 kms/day over 4 weeks. Many people seem to walk 22-28 kms per day, while I met some that only walked 10-15 and others regularly did 30-40. Set your own pace. I like doing about 25-33 kms/day on avg. (with a few big days around 35-45 kms when I feel inspired).

Being 22 years old, average fit and healthy are all good, but not everything. I met several healthy 20 somethings with foot problems due to minimal preparation, inadequate foot care, wrong size and type of footwear and heavy packs. Be prepared and have fun.
thank you very much, i appreciate the detailed reply and the useful tips! hopefully i'll be well prepared!
 

Elme Oosthuizen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hopefully be walking July 2019
I completely second @Tincatinker . On my Caminos and especially on Frances I've seen many more youngsters dropping out than oldies. No disrespect meant ;) (I'm somewhere in the middle with 49)
I think the reason is that they feel so strong and powerful nothing is impossible for them. But first few stages with 40+ km covered will result most possibly in blisters if not something more devastating. Take it slow the first few days and then you'll see how your body reacts.
For example, my body is very angry with me first few days and I can almost hear it saying "WTF you are doing to me? You were sitting at the computer 10 months and now you want me to do all this!!!" And after completion it's ranting all over again: "WTF you are doing now? First you forced me to walk two months with this backpack and now suddenly you decided that's it. I'm having cramps during the night!!!"
Yep. True conversation :D
thank you very much :)
 

MichaelB10398

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
Hello fellow camino fanatics

I'm planning on walking the camino June/July and it's time for the final planning.

What is the doable/healthy/average/slightly challenging kilometers per day? I'm 22 years old and would see myself as average fit, and healthy.
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.

Thank you in advance ! :)

Elmé
Regardless of how much you can walk, I recommend that you begin slowly UNLESS you are an avid hiker/walker. It will allow your body to adjust to hours of walking each day. Then as you feel like you are better adjusted, begin to walk more each day.
You have plenty of time to accomplish the entire walk you have planned. You will succeed by taking care of your body that first several days.
Cheers and buen Camino
 

Elme Oosthuizen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hopefully be walking July 2019
Hi, @Elme Oosthuizen, welcome to the forum.

This may sound unhelpful but the opposite is intended. Do not try and plan your camino based on what other people do. There are members of this forum who will walk 30 - 40 Kms per day, every day, for ever: there are members who walk 10 - 15 because that is all they are physically capable of; or, more likely, inclined to do.
The better question is how far can you walk day after day with a loaded rucksack? And the probable answer is - you don't know.

There are easy resolutions to this conundrum. Practice walking with your camino loaded pack. Take a look at a few of the excellent websites such as www.Gronze.com where you can discover the distances between the available accommodations on the Camino Frances and see how that fits to your capacities.

For comfort: 3 weeks Leon to Santiago for a 22 year old average fit and healthy will be very comfortable provided you don't set off like a hare. Start slowly, Santiago isn't going anywhere. 4 weeks gives you ample time to walk to Fisterra and Muxia and time in Santiago.

If it helps your perspective I'm in my late 60's with a heart condition and some muscular- skeletal issues. Some days I walk 15km somedays I'll walk 35+. It kind of depends on the slope ;)
thank you for the detailed reply! i appreciate, will take to heart! :)
 

Elme Oosthuizen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hopefully be walking July 2019
Regardless of how much you can walk, I recommend that you begin slowly UNLESS you are an avid hiker/walker. It will allow your body to adjust to hours of walking each day. Then as you feel like you are better adjusted, begin to walk more each day.
You have plenty of time to accomplish the entire walk you have planned. You will succeed by taking care of your body that first several days.
Cheers and buen Camino
fantastic, thanks! will definitely start off slowly...buen camino!!
 

twh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May/June, 2018
Porto-Muxia-Finisterre Oct (2019)
The Reason you won't finish your Camino is all about your Feet, not your Fitness.

I apologize for the drama, but it's really important to take seriously what the others have said about foot care.

Training (walking) with weight has an obvious benefit of getting your large muscles and cardio in shape which at 22, you can probably get away without doing. The less obvious benefit is getting your feet in shape and youth is of no benefit here. The feet get toughened up internally with training as well as the skin on your feet. Blisters and then infection at worst can end your Camino and at best delay your arrival and insure some very uncomfortable days or weeks of walking. There are no "good" quick fixes once you have a couple of blisters. Keep walking without proper management and they get worse and then infected and then you're in the hospital figuring out the bus schedule to Santiago.

On this forum there are hundreds of pages on foot care and proper fitting of shoes, get this figured out first. The only way to know if your "shoe/sock/foot" system is going to work is to test it beforehand. Training with your backpack loaded will give you that answer and you will have time to make adjustments if necessary.

The worst cases of blistered feet I saw on the Camino tend to be in the younger than 25 group.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
I let my body clock control the distance I walk each day. I get up when the bag rustling starts which is around 5, 6 or 7. I have usually packed my pack the night before and sleep in the pants/shorts and t-shirt I plan to walk in the next morning. If there is a cafe open that is a plus because I need my cafe con leche; otherwise I walk for an hour or so and hopefully will find myself lucky enough that one has just opened around 9. I air out my feet and then walk a few more hours until around noon to one I call it a day. I put my bag in the queue for the albergue, grab a beer and wait for it to open, followed by a shower, then washing my stuff and then go out for the menu del dia. So depending on the terrain and the weather conditions, because I hate walking in rain, that may have been 12km or that may have been 25km.
Mind you I have been doing this for 10 years and I don't walk much faster than 3 to 4 k/h; I will be 73 on this Camino.
I’m starting on April 26 at SJPP, and I’m following your lead. I’m 74 with the usual panoply of age related issues. I’m ready to go!
 

dfox

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (4/2017)
CP (5/2019)
This may sound unhelpful but the opposite is intended. Do not try and plan your camino based on what other people do. ...
I did mine on CF, one step at a time, one day at a time, in 4/2017. I will do it again on CP this May, one step at a time, one day a time.

I'll listen to my "senses" and enjoy whatever happening at the moment.
 

dfox

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF (4/2017)
CP (5/2019)
I did mine on CF, one step at a time, one day at a time, in 4/2017. I will do it again on CP this May, one step at a time, one day a time.

I'll listen to my "senses" and "re-act" accordingly. I will gratefully enjoy whatever happening along the Way.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Two peregrinos will have at least three opinions on this issue. As a stout, overweight fellow, now in his mid-60s, I find that my walking pace is as follows:\
  • On flat or down slope paths - 5 km per hour.
  • On undulating ups and downs, with not steep climbs - 4 km per hour
  • On an uphill slog, or a really long but continuously up segment - 3 km per hour
For daily planning I figure on the midpoint, 4 km per hour, and assume an approximate 6-hour walking day. Typically, I rise at 0600, depart my overnight lodgings by 0700, and stop for the day around 1300 - 1400. The time in excess of 4 km per hour is basically the time I am stopped having coffee or a snack at a cafe, or raking a shade break.

While I am walking I pace myself using a old school wristwatch, with arabic numbers, by clocking / counting one km per 15 minutes. That tells me how far I've come, and how far or how long I have to go to get where I am aiming...

That is usually when the sun is the hottest, not from 1000 to 1400, as in North America, but from 1200 to 1600. This aptly explains why siesta remains popular. The hot sun can be an issue even in the 'hip' seasons of May and September.

After six Caminos, this pattern has been repeatedly borne out for me. Everyone is different. I have met folks, mostly form northern Europe who can easily walk 50 km daily. That is not for me. I KNOW Santiago is not going anywhere and will be there when I arrive.

So, I plan around a 25-km day, and accept the variances due to accommodation availability. I do not usually stay in albergue my personal choice. I I sometimes have to walk up to 30 km - I dislike doing this, or as little as 18 or 19 km. Not fond of the latter either.

Hope this helps.
 

pjacobi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
Don't wait until Spain to start walking! Start training at home and slowly build up to the daily amount that you plan to travel on the Camino. Then you will know exactly how many KMs that you can walk in a day.


-Paul
 

Elme Oosthuizen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
hopefully be walking July 2019
Two peregrinos will have at least three opinions on this issue. As a stout, overweight fellow, now in his mid-60s, I find that my walking pace is as follows:\
  • On flat or down slope paths - 5 km per hour.
  • On undulating ups and downs, with not steep climbs - 4 km per hour
  • On an uphill slog, or a really long but continuously up segment - 3 km per hour
For daily planning I figure on the midpoint, 4 km per hour, and assume an approximate 6-hour walking day. Typically, I rise at 0600, depart my overnight lodgings by 0700, and stop for the day around 1300 - 1400. The time in excess of 4 km per hour is basically the time I am stopped having coffee or a snack at a cafe, or raking a shade break.

While I am walking I pace myself using a old school wristwatch, with arabic numbers, by clocking / counting one km per 15 minutes. That tells me how far I've come, and how far or how long I have to go to get where I am aiming...

That is usually when the sun is the hottest, not from 1000 to 1400, as in North America, but from 1200 to 1600. This aptly explains why siesta remains popular. The hot sun can be an issue even in the 'hip' seasons of May and September.

After six Caminos, this pattern has been repeatedly borne out for me. Everyone is different. I have met folks, mostly form northern Europe who can easily walk 50 km daily. That is not for me. I KNOW Santiago is not going anywhere and will be there when I arrive.

So, I plan around a 25-km day, and accept the variances due to accommodation availability. I do not usually stay in albergue my personal choice. I I sometimes have to walk up to 30 km - I dislike doing this, or as little as 18 or 19 km. Not fond of the latter either.

Hope this helps.
thank you very much for the detailed reply en the tips - will take it to heart. this helps a lot! thanks :)
 

jdpiguet

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past? Not enough.
Future? Sure!
I have walked from Vézelay to Santiago in 2017. My shortest day was 13, my longest 37. The average was roughly 23 km, without the rest days.
My first day was 27, way to much (but I wanted to reach a specific point), not again!
The next week was never over 20...
I am 57, overweight and no real training...
I am blessed with my feet: I don't know what blisters are:eek:😇...
Follow the good information from the previous post: start slow, stop early and enjoy!
You will not get more points for suffering...
Buen Camino, Jacques-D.
 
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jostony

Camino del Vino
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPdP 2015
Finisterre/Muxia 2015
Portugues 2017
Finisterre 2017
Ingles 2018
Primitivo 2019
Depends what motivates you. For my first Camino I was woefully unfit, having just retired from stressful job. Motivation for Camino triggered when my beloved father died and Camino took on huge significance on many levels. Walking quickly wasn't one of them. I deliberately left my fancy mobile at home and bought a cheap text and call mobile for emergency use. I just slowed down and walked as far as I thought I could, planning one day to next on how tired I felt. I didn't want noise in my ears, I wanted to listen to the wind, the birds and breathe in the landscape. I bought a good lightweight camera and took so many beautiful pictures. I enjoyed and needed to think, in between huffing and puffing up the hills. I didn't enjoy the blisters, but I loved the country, meeting people, drinking some fine wines along the way, eating local foods, visiting the many beautiful churches, towns and Cities. When we arrived in Santiago, our Camino didn't feel finished and we pressed on after a rest to Muxia and Finisterre. and seeing the sea was also special. Take your time. Enjoy it and Buen Camino.
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
I remember my Camino as something like this:
First day = 15km. Felt like I did OK
Second day = 20km. Tired but feeling positive
Third day = 28km. Told myself never to try more than 25km again
Third week = Capable of >35km but with shorter days and rest days mixed in
Average distance per day after 70 days = 22 or 23km (including some zero days)
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Hello fellow camino fanatics

I'm planning on walking the camino June/July and it's time for the final planning.

What is the doable/healthy/average/slightly challenging kilometers per day? I'm 22 years old and would see myself as average fit, and healthy.
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.

Thank you in advance ! :)

Elmé
For me, the sweet spot is 20-25 km/day, though I can go longer. If I get down under 20, I start feeling lazy (not that I am completely unwilling to do so). When I was walking with my teenage son, his blisters started getting really bad when we hit a sustained series of days 25 km/day or more. When we dropped back under 25, it was much better for his feet. That was us, though.

My advice is always to plan your camino so that you have more time than you think you will possibly need for the distance you have chosen. That way, if you get something that lays you low for a few days you don't end up racing to Santiago. If you end up with days free at the end (which is to be hoped), there is plenty to see in Spain with any leftover time.
 

Telboyo

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I intend to leave the UK the day Before Brexit and walkMarch -April 2019 Camino Frances
I plan on 32 usually ending with 36Km. I have been walking from 06:30 to between 15:30 and 16:30. Stopping for coffee and maybe food on the way. I have been fortunate with Albergues ,since starting on 1 april in St Jean i have only seen 1 full Albergue and that was oceribo. If i stop walking at noon i would be bored
 

RevLee

New Member
My wife and I did Leon to Santiago in 14 days for our 30th wedding anniversary, so you've got plenty of time. After a couple of days in Santiago, we went on to Finisterre in 4 days, which I would highly recommend. After the crowds and urban hiking getting into Santiago, the trek on to the coast was very relaxing. You could easily do it in 3 weeks, and 4 would let you spend time in Leon, Santiago, and Finisterre.
 

Lance Chambers

Lance Chambers
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria (2015), SJPdP (2016), Burgos (2017), SJPdP (2018), Burgo (2019), SJPdP (2023?).
For me, it depends on the weather and the terrain. Too hot and I can't walk far or fast. Too steep and I slow down to a snail pace so not far either.

But relatively flat and cool and I'll do a very easy 25 kms a day with a long comfortable lunch of 30 - 40 minutes and about 2 - 3 coffee stops. I also like to get finished early so I have time to explore.

So I start early 6:00 - 6:30 AM, walk to the first coffee stop have a coffee and a small snack and then keep walking until lunch time around 12 - 1 if I can find a place to eat I will stop there but if not I always have something I can eat with me. If it's been an easy walk then I am no more than around 30 minutes to an hour from my destination for the day.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
As many have said don't be swayed by averages. It is dependent on physical condition and temperament. I am 50 and "fat but fit". I perversely enjoy the long march. Last summer I did the Leon to Finisterre section in 8 days/7 nights (from Leon overnights were Astorga , Molinaseca, Las Herrerias, Barbadelo, Azofra, Santiago, Santa Marina). Barbadelo to Azofra was about 70km and I paid for that the two following days but otherwise it felt good. Everyone is different!
 

Lifeisgood

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked the Camino Frances in September/October 2018 (St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra)
My 2 cents about the distance per day topic: Don’t make it about the kilometers, make it about the path and the experience :) I saw many focusing on the kilometers every day and that sometimes broke them (“I HAVE to walk xy today” - “It is still 10 km more to my goal for today”). Over time, many of my fellow pilgrim friends and me realized that it doesn’t matter. There are places to sleep every 2-10 km, just go with the flow. Also I recommend to reserve some days if you want to stay a day extra in Santiago or walk the loop to Muxia - Fisterra.

Other than that, I started slowly with 18 - 25 km per day during the first two weeks and then got faster doing 25 - 35 km per day, couple of times around 40 just to know where my limits are ;) I am 29 and regular fitness.

Buen Camino and much love!
 

DonnaS18

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept (2018)
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.
Elmé
[/QUOTE]

It comes down to the foot and body care.
You need good boots that you’ve worn around home for 8 hrs a day and not got blisters.
I walked Leon- Santiago in 14 days, reasonably unfit. I Only got one blister but my friend joined me the last 6 days for less distance and slower pace and she got 10+ blisters.
I wonder what was the difference?
Shoes- mine breathed more and were cooler. Feet - mine were tough from being barefoot in the Aussie sun and my friend wears covered shoes n socks in Vancouver.
We both had good woollen socks used Nivea Lubricant etc.
go with your flow and stop when you need or want to. You appear to have lots of time unless life throws you a curve ball.
 

danielle aird

La vie est belle
Camino(s) past & future
May (2018); September (2018); May (2019)
Hello fellow camino fanatics

I'm planning on walking the camino June/July and it's time for the final planning.

What is the doable/healthy/average/slightly challenging kilometers per day? I'm 22 years old and would see myself as average fit, and healthy.
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.

Thank you in advance ! :)

Elmé
Let’s put it this way, I am 70 and reasonably fit. I don’t train and I can walk 15 to 20 k a day. Go for it and enjoy
 

MMcA

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP - Los Arcos (2012)
- Burgos (2014)
- León (2015)
- Villafranca (2016)
- SdC - Fisterra (2017)
I completely second @Tincatinker . On my Caminos and especially on Frances I've seen many more youngsters dropping out than oldies. No disrespect meant ;) (I'm somewhere in the middle with 49)
I think the reason is that they feel so strong and powerful nothing is impossible for them. But first few stages with 40+ km covered will result most possibly in blisters if not something more devastating. Take it slow the first few days and then you'll see how your body reacts.
For example, my body is very angry with me first few days and I can almost hear it saying "WTF you are doing to me? You were sitting at the computer 10 months and now you want me to do all this!!!" And after completion it's ranting all over again: "WTF you are doing now? First you forced me to walk two months with this backpack and now suddenly you decided that's it. I'm having cramps during the night!!!"
Yep. True conversation :D
That reminds me of the argument I had with my feet one day. I did my Camino Frances in stages. On the Burgos to León leg: day one I arrive in Hornillos del Camino and the argument went something like this:
My head "I'll stop here for something to eat and go on".
My feet "we're going no further today ".
My head "But that's only 18km, we continue on to San Bol"
My feet "No we're not, what about the three hours walking about Burgos this morning around the museum and to the cathedral etc?"
My head "But that wasn't really on the camino so that didn't count"
My feet "they counted!"
My head "...but..."
My feet "We're stopping here!"
Needless to say we (my feet and I!) stayed in Hornillos. The moral of the story is, in any dispute your feet have the deciding vote. That being said I did put in a few 30+km days later in the week, but remember the feet are the boss!
 

Shmclelland

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago June 2019
Hello fellow camino fanatics

I'm planning on walking the camino June/July and it's time for the final planning.

What is the doable/healthy/average/slightly challenging kilometers per day? I'm 22 years old and would see myself as average fit, and healthy.
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.

Thank you in advance ! :)

Elmé
Hi I’m also walking Leon to Santiago perhaps fisterre. I arrive late on its June. I am allowing myself 4 weeks averaging 12-15 Kim’s per day with hopefully a few days rest when I come to somewhere that just calls for some time out. Be good to meet you if your around that time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago (2018)
Planning future Camino (2019)
Hello fellow camino fanatics

I'm planning on walking the camino June/July and it's time for the final planning.

What is the doable/healthy/average/slightly challenging kilometers per day? I'm 22 years old and would see myself as average fit, and healthy.
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.

Thank you in advance ! :)

Elmé
Leon to Santiago via the Salvador followed by the Primitivo could be a great option for you given the time you have. That’s what I’m trying actually in June and July as well. Buen Camino!
 

Old Kiwi

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Last walked St Francis "2016"
Walking St Francis again "2019"
I am 75 and fairly fit. I start at 6;00am and just stroll to the next village for breakfast. After that I walk a bit quicker buy not fast. All of my walking, both speed and distance, is dictated by how my feet feel. Without good feet you don't get anywhere. I have walked as little as 12 kilometres when my feet were not the best, to just under 40 kilometres on easy going, but average 25 to 28 kilometres so that I have got time to see things and talk to people. Buen Camino.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
That reminds me of the argument I had with my feet one day. I did my Camino Frances in stages. On the Burgos to León leg: day one I arrive in Hornillos del Camino and the argument went something like this:
My head "I'll stop here for something to eat and go on".
My feet "we're going no further today ".
My head "But that's only 18km, we continue on to San Bol"
My feet "No we're not, what about the three hours walking about Burgos this morning around the museum and to the cathedral etc?"
My head "But that wasn't really on the camino so that didn't count"
My feet "they counted!"
My head "...but..."
My feet "We're stopping here!"
Needless to say we (my feet and I!) stayed in Hornillos. The moral of the story is, in any dispute your feet have the deciding vote. That being said I did put in a few 30+km days later in the week, but remember the feet are the boss!
Love it.

I had a very similar argument with my feet in 2015.
I was suffering from bad Achilles Tendonitis.
For me it was a long day. 32 kms.

I discovered that my feet are really 'The Boss' when it comes to distance and when to stop.
But with some cunning negotiations and promises, rather like convincing a small child to go to bed, I was able to coax a few extra kms out of them.......

Twas 13 kms from El Burgo

Feet. Hey we hurt! We need more meds.........
Me. You know full well that we can only take anti-inflams and painkillers once every 4 hours. with food!

Feet. So it must be 4 hours already?
Me. No it's only a bit more than 3 hours. I know it's a real pain, but the effect wears off at 3 and a bit hours.

Feet. So let's stop and wait till 4 hours are up!
Me. But the next village is only 5 kms. Why don't we stop there? We can get some ice and have a proper break.

Feet. No! We hurt. There's some nice shade under those trees, let's stop there till 4 hours are up. Take off the boots and socks and get us elevated....
Then we can have a drink, some food and some more meds. And when we get to the next village, we stop for the day.....

Me. OK we'll stop for a rest. But what if we get to the next village, and put some ice on you. And if you feel OK, maybe we continue on to our planned stop at El Burgo? It's a really nice place.

Feet: No.....
Me. But if we get to El Burgo today, we can have a shorter day tomorrow, only 18 kms, and you won't be so sore.

Feet. Maybe...
Me. Let's give these meds 15 minutes to start working. And I'll put these compression socks on you to reduce the swelling. Then let's stop at the next village for ice, and if you guys feel OK, we'll continue to El Burgo. OK?

Feet. OK, but if we hurt too much........we stop for the day!
Me. OK...... Praying they have ice at the next village...........

I had these types of conversations most days.......always with my feet! :mad:

Funny how the other parts of the body are more co-operative! :rolleyes:
 
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Australian Crawl

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (SJPdP - Finisterre) 2019
Hello fellow camino fanatics

I'm planning on walking the camino June/July and it's time for the final planning.

What is the doable/healthy/average/slightly challenging kilometers per day? I'm 22 years old and would see myself as average fit, and healthy.
I'm planning to walk from León to Santiago (and depending on time and fatigue hopefully to Finisterre) and giving myself between 3 and 4 weeks.

Thank you in advance ! :)

Elmé
Hi Elme
I’ve just got home from walking the Camino frances and Camino Fiisterra. I would suggest that 25km is a reasonable average daily distance for planning your overall trip length, BUT... how far you are able to manage in practice will be an unknown till you start unless you’ve got a good idea from prior experience. Don’t try to measure yourself by what others do - everyone walks their own Camino and whilst some smash out 35-45km a day every day, others take lots of time and do mid-teens.
If you can, allow a day or two in your itinerary as rest days - either fixed or flexible to use as needed. What you do each day will vary - listen to your body and let it tell you when you have gone far enough for the day. It will take at least the first week for your body to get walk fit for going day after day, possibly longer. Don’t try and push too hard the first week - do shorter daily distances and build up slowly after the first week - even then you can overdo it. 4 weeks in I thought I’d be ok to do 28- 30km a day the last 7-10 days to keep up with some new friends, and ended up with tendinitis up the front of one of my ankles, so limped into Santiago.
 

AnaRosario

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pomplano to Santiago (March 29-May 6 2018)
You have plenty of time. 25 km per day is sort of an average day for many.
I don't want to follow a book! I want to follow my heart, my inner spirit. I think you need to follow your inner being, not what others did or what a book says. buen camino
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I don't want to follow a book! I want to follow my heart, my inner spirit. I think you need to follow your inner being, not what others did or what a book says. buen camino
Just clarifying my statement that 25 km per day is average for many, but by all means is not required. Some average 30 - 35 km per day, others 10 - 20. It's all good !
 

vlogan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various
Just clarifying my statement that 25 km per day is average for many, but by all means is not required. Some average 30 - 35 km per day, others 10 - 20. It's all good !
I average 32-38 km per day, some days are short especially when arriving in Pamplona, Burgos and Leon where I like to spend a full day. Some days are over 40 km. It all depends on how I feel. Be interested to know. Who has walked 50 Km?
 

John H.

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - 2017
CP Central - 2017
CP Coastal - 2018
CF - [hopefully again someday]
. . . Who has walked 50 Km?
I did it once. Coming up from the south on the CP, I walked 46 kms to reach Santiago at about 7pm (don't ask me why). I was very tired. I checked in to my hotel, had a shower and went for dinner. About 10pm I started thinking how close I was to 50 kms so I went back to my hotel, grabbed my backpack and walked 4 kms around Santiago just to experience what 50 kms feels like. :) Won't do that again but it felt very satisfying at the time and gave me closure to another great Camino experience.
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
VdlP (2020)
Barbadelo to Arzua approx 70k started 6:30am finished around 11pm (called a casa rural from melide to make sure I would have a bed). I was definitely fatigued for the next day walk to SDC.
If I tried that I would be found face down in a ditch at about the 40 km mark I reckon :eek:
 

mikebet

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Pamplona (2016); Baiona to Santiago (2018); Sarria to Santiago (2018)
The daily distance thing is kind of a conundrum for me at age 73. I really don't enjoy walking very much after 20km or so, but that usually means stopping pretty early in the afternoon. Unless the stopping point has some interesting things to see it can get a little tedious just sitting around, and it feels like time is being wasted. It would be great if every overnight stopping point had some points of touristic interest, but that is not very often the case.
 

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