A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Baby on the Camino - my takeaways

Camino T-shirt

cassieryle

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fisterre (2017), Norte(2018), Ingles (2019)
Hello Pilgrims,
We just returned from completing the Ingles with our six-month old baby boy. We actually started in Ireland, then flew to Spain to connect with the Ingles. This is called the 'Celtic Camino,' and we did about 170km total. He was no stranger to the Camino - last year while walking the Norte, I became pregnant, essentially walking the entire thing with child without knowing it. We named the resulting child Tiago, of course ;) So, we were anxious to get back out on the Way this year, with him along. We learned a lot in the process, and I thought I'd share it here so others can benefit from our experience if you're thinking of doing the same thing.

The Ingles is the perfect camino to do with a buggy/stroller. There are really no rough spots at all, and we didn't have to lift the buggy once. We were traveling with an Out n' About Sport, which is very affordable, and it held up very well. No complaints. We also used a baby sling about half the time, which he loved, because he felt like he was walking. Most people do the Ingles in 6 stages... we did it in 7, but easily could have done it in 6. We were going our normal speed without baby, which is about 4km an hour.

We didn't have much fun on this Camino. Partly, I think it's because there are way less pilgrims and most of them didn't speak English so we couldn't communicate. The other issue is that we were not staying in albergues. There aren't many choices on the Ingles, and we were forced to stay in small hostals and pensions along the way rather than in private rooms in albergues, which would have been perfect. On our last night, in Sigueiro, there was finally an albergue with private rooms, and we met so many people and felt the Camino spirit again. On the Frances, or even the Norte, this wouldn't have been an issue most of the time, as there are many albergues with private rooms.

Walking the camino with a baby is HARD. The walking is not the hard part. That was easy, and our boy LOVED it. The hard part was getting to your destination in the afternoon, tired from the journey. In the past, this is when we would take a nap, have a shower and a beer, and just relax. With a baby, once you arrive and get him out of the buggy, he is ready to PLAY. So, I found this camino to be doubly exhausting, and it was very hard to find the time to just relax and recover from the day's walk.

The negatives aside, we found this camino to be SO REWARDING. The benefits for the baby were undeniable. He was so stimulated, happy and full of the spirit. Everywhere we went people treated him like a superstar, and you could just see his brain sponging up all the new sights, smells, sounds and people. Any naysayers who say taking a baby on the Camino is cruel or abusive can shove it as far as I'm concerned. It's just plain wrong, at least in the case of our child. It was the best thing we could have done for him. Six months is the perfect age, too, because he was totally into his surroundings and loved looking around and interacting, but not yet mobile so he's happy enough sitting in the buggy or walking with us in the sling. It also brought us way closer together as a family. My husband and I learned even more about team work, and we really got the routines down seamlessly. AND, when we walked into the square in Santiago finally, we were overcome with emotion, unlike ever before. It felt like we had really achieved something. It was all worth it in the end.

About half the rooms we stayed in offered baby cots. In the ones that didn't, we constructed little beds out of extra blankets. He doesn't crawl yet so this worked. We carried all the nappies and formula we needed. He ate from little organic food pouches we brought. In the evenings I'd lay down a clean towel on the shower floor, folded up a few times, and put him on it laying down, then spray him with the shower head for a bath. Worked wonderfully in the absence of a tub.

Unfortunately my husband and I got terrible bed bugs on this camino. The saving grace is that baby Tiago only got one bite, while we were completely covered. I would have been beside myself if he was covered, and probably would have quit immediately. His one bite didn't even bother him though, so we kept going after watching him closely.

The compostela office would not give Tiago his own document, but added his name officially to mine, so we have a combined compostela.

All in all, we are glad we did it. It was the hardest thing we ever did though, nothing like walking it without a baby. We won't be doing it again until he can walk on his own and take care of himself after arriving at the albergues. But the experience was one of the great memories of life, and a true adventure.

I am happy to respond to any questions if anyone needs advice. Ingles is perfect for doing it with a baby, at least as far as surface 69887748_10156634805288100_906283239562280960_o.jpg
 
Last edited:

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
Glad you enjoyed your trip and sensibly took one of the shorter routes so it was manageable for you. Sorry to hear about the bed bugs.

My parents dragged us tramping from a young age and we have many photos of us hanging off track signs with washing in the background, noticeable because of the prominent white nappies from my younger sister. I don't know how they coped with taking 4 daughters, the baby was was carried in a sling and I remember resenting that she got a free ride while I had to carry the bread box. When we talk about our annual slog around the mountains most people think of it as a horror story. "Rember the time Paula broke her ankle?" Or "How about the time/s Hel got lost in the dark!" And who could forget the time Mum discovered TVP and we thought she had poisoned us. Character building. We all survived and went on to inflict walking sickness on our children. Scott and my kids have now several caminos under their belts (done as adults) and my niece is heading off next year.

All the best for you future walks.
 

NualaOC

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few and hopefully lots more. See signature.
Well done @cassieryle and thanks for sharing your experience A very honest and informative post.

Reading your account reminded me of when we used to take our kids on scout camps as babies/toddlers. Great fun and stimulation for them, but hard work and no rest for us!
 
Last edited:

Colin4sam

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2012
le puy 2013
Hello Pilgrims,
We just returned from completing the Ingles with our six-month old baby boy. We actually started in Ireland, then flew to Spain to connect with the Ingles. This is called the 'Celtic Camino,' and we did about 170km total. He was no stranger to the Camino - last year while walking the Norte, I became pregnant, essentially walking the entire thing with child without knowing it. We named the resulting child Tiago, of course ;) So, we were anxious to get back out on the Way this year, with him along. We learned a lot in the process, and I thought I'd share it here so others can benefit from our experience if you're thinking of doing the same thing.

The Ingles is the perfect camino to do with a buggy/stroller. There are really no rough spots at all, and we didn't have to lift the buggy once. We were traveling with an Out n' About Sport, which is very affordable, and it held up very well. No complaints. We also used a baby sling about half the time, which he loved, because he felt like he was walking. Most people do the Ingles in 6 stages... we did it in 7, but easily could have done it in 6. We were going our normal speed without baby, which is about 4km an hour.

We didn't have much fun on this Camino. Partly, I think it's because there are way less pilgrims and most of them didn't speak English so we couldn't communicate. The other issue is that we were not staying in albergues. There aren't many choices on the Ingles, and we were forced to stay in small hostals and pensions along the way rather than in private rooms in albergues, which would have been perfect. On our last night, in Sigueiro, there was finally an albergue with private rooms, and we met so many people and felt the Camino spirit again. On the Frances, or even the Norte, this wouldn't have been an issue most of the time, as there are many albergues with private rooms.

Walking the camino with a baby is HARD. The walking is not the hard part. That was easy, and our boy LOVED it. The hard part was getting to your destination in the afternoon, tired from the journey. In the past, this is when we would take a nap, have a shower and a beer, and just relax. With a baby, once you arrive and get him out of the buggy, he is ready to PLAY. So, I found this camino to be doubly exhausting, and it was very hard to find the time to just relax and recover from the day's walk.

The negatives aside, we found this camino to be SO REWARDING. The benefits for the baby were undeniable. He was so stimulated, happy and full of the spirit. Everywhere we went people treated him like a superstar, and you could just see his brain sponging up all the new sights, smells, sounds and people. Any naysayers who say taking a baby on the Camino is cruel or abusive can shove it as far as I'm concerned. It's just plain wrong, at least in the case of our child. It was the best thing we could have done for him. Six months is the perfect age, too, because he was totally into his surroundings and loved looking around and interacting, but not yet mobile so he's happy enough sitting in the buggy or walking with us in the sling. It also brought us way closer together as a family. My husband and I learned even more about team work, and we really got the routines down seamlessly. AND, when we walked into the square in Santiago finally, we were overcome with emotion, unlike ever before. It felt like we had really achieved something. It was all worth it in the end.

About half the rooms we stayed in offered baby cots. In the ones that didn't, we constructed little beds out of extra blankets. He doesn't crawl yet so this worked. We carried all the nappies and formula we needed. He ate from little organic food pouches we brought. In the evenings I'd lay down a clean towel on the shower floor, folded up a few times, and put him on it laying down, then spray him with the shower head for a bath. Worked wonderfully in the absence of a tub.

Unfortunately my husband and I got terrible bed bugs on this camino. The saving grace is that baby Tiago only got one bite, while we were completely covered. I would have been beside myself if he was covered, and probably would have quit immediately. His one bite didn't even bother him though, so we kept going after watching him closely.

The compostela office would not give Tiago his own document, but added his name officially to mine, so we have a combined compostela.

All in all, we are glad we did it. It was the hardest thing we ever did though, nothing like walking it without a baby. We won't be doing it again until he can walk on his own and take care of himself after arriving at the albergues. But the experience was one of the great memories of life, and a true adventure.

I am happy to respond to any questions if anyone needs advice. Ingles is perfect for doing it with a baby, at least as far as surface View attachment 64813
Hello Pilgrims,
We just returned from completing the Ingles with our six-month old baby boy. We actually started in Ireland, then flew to Spain to connect with the Ingles. This is called the 'Celtic Camino,' and we did about 170km total. He was no stranger to the Camino - last year while walking the Norte, I became pregnant, essentially walking the entire thing with child without knowing it. We named the resulting child Tiago, of course ;) So, we were anxious to get back out on the Way this year, with him along. We learned a lot in the process, and I thought I'd share it here so others can benefit from our experience if you're thinking of doing the same thing.

The Ingles is the perfect camino to do with a buggy/stroller. There are really no rough spots at all, and we didn't have to lift the buggy once. We were traveling with an Out n' About Sport, which is very affordable, and it held up very well. No complaints. We also used a baby sling about half the time, which he loved, because he felt like he was walking. Most people do the Ingles in 6 stages... we did it in 7, but easily could have done it in 6. We were going our normal speed without baby, which is about 4km an hour.

We didn't have much fun on this Camino. Partly, I think it's because there are way less pilgrims and most of them didn't speak English so we couldn't communicate. The other issue is that we were not staying in albergues. There aren't many choices on the Ingles, and we were forced to stay in small hostals and pensions along the way rather than in private rooms in albergues, which would have been perfect. On our last night, in Sigueiro, there was finally an albergue with private rooms, and we met so many people and felt the Camino spirit again. On the Frances, or even the Norte, this wouldn't have been an issue most of the time, as there are many albergues with private rooms.

Walking the camino with a baby is HARD. The walking is not the hard part. That was easy, and our boy LOVED it. The hard part was getting to your destination in the afternoon, tired from the journey. In the past, this is when we would take a nap, have a shower and a beer, and just relax. With a baby, once you arrive and get him out of the buggy, he is ready to PLAY. So, I found this camino to be doubly exhausting, and it was very hard to find the time to just relax and recover from the day's walk.

The negatives aside, we found this camino to be SO REWARDING. The benefits for the baby were undeniable. He was so stimulated, happy and full of the spirit. Everywhere we went people treated him like a superstar, and you could just see his brain sponging up all the new sights, smells, sounds and people. Any naysayers who say taking a baby on the Camino is cruel or abusive can shove it as far as I'm concerned. It's just plain wrong, at least in the case of our child. It was the best thing we could have done for him. Six months is the perfect age, too, because he was totally into his surroundings and loved looking around and interacting, but not yet mobile so he's happy enough sitting in the buggy or walking with us in the sling. It also brought us way closer together as a family. My husband and I learned even more about team work, and we really got the routines down seamlessly. AND, when we walked into the square in Santiago finally, we were overcome with emotion, unlike ever before. It felt like we had really achieved something. It was all worth it in the end.

About half the rooms we stayed in offered baby cots. In the ones that didn't, we constructed little beds out of extra blankets. He doesn't crawl yet so this worked. We carried all the nappies and formula we needed. He ate from little organic food pouches we brought. In the evenings I'd lay down a clean towel on the shower floor, folded up a few times, and put him on it laying down, then spray him with the shower head for a bath. Worked wonderfully in the absence of a tub.

Unfortunately my husband and I got terrible bed bugs on this camino. The saving grace is that baby Tiago only got one bite, while we were completely covered. I would have been beside myself if he was covered, and probably would have quit immediately. His one bite didn't even bother him though, so we kept going after watching him closely.

The compostela office would not give Tiago his own document, but added his name officially to mine, so we have a combined compostela.

All in all, we are glad we did it. It was the hardest thing we ever did though, nothing like walking it without a baby. We won't be doing it again until he can walk on his own and take care of himself after arriving at the albergues. But the experience was one of the great memories of life, and a true adventure.

I am happy to respond to any questions if anyone needs advice. Ingles is perfect for doing it with a baby, at least as far as surface View attachment 64813
We just fid the camino frances from st jean to santiago with our 2 year old it was very hard especially with the heat but she loved it we too found that after you get to the albergue she wanted to play and was full of energy whilst we were exhausted it was a great experience for my daughter and her parents
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
April 2019: Frances, Salvador, Primitivo
What a great story! I'm so glad it worked out for all of you. Especially for your baby.
May the spirit of the Camino always be with him.
 

K Turner

One step at a time
Camino(s) past & future
14 August 2019 (SJPdP 16 August)
Hello Pilgrims,
We just returned from completing the Ingles with our six-month old baby boy. We actually started in Ireland, then flew to Spain to connect with the Ingles. This is called the 'Celtic Camino,' and we did about 170km total. He was no stranger to the Camino - last year while walking the Norte, I became pregnant, essentially walking the entire thing with child without knowing it. We named the resulting child Tiago, of course ;) So, we were anxious to get back out on the Way this year, with him along. We learned a lot in the process, and I thought I'd share it here so others can benefit from our experience if you're thinking of doing the same thing.

The Ingles is the perfect camino to do with a buggy/stroller. There are really no rough spots at all, and we didn't have to lift the buggy once. We were traveling with an Out n' About Sport, which is very affordable, and it held up very well. No complaints. We also used a baby sling about half the time, which he loved, because he felt like he was walking. Most people do the Ingles in 6 stages... we did it in 7, but easily could have done it in 6. We were going our normal speed without baby, which is about 4km an hour.

We didn't have much fun on this Camino. Partly, I think it's because there are way less pilgrims and most of them didn't speak English so we couldn't communicate. The other issue is that we were not staying in albergues. There aren't many choices on the Ingles, and we were forced to stay in small hostals and pensions along the way rather than in private rooms in albergues, which would have been perfect. On our last night, in Sigueiro, there was finally an albergue with private rooms, and we met so many people and felt the Camino spirit again. On the Frances, or even the Norte, this wouldn't have been an issue most of the time, as there are many albergues with private rooms.

Walking the camino with a baby is HARD. The walking is not the hard part. That was easy, and our boy LOVED it. The hard part was getting to your destination in the afternoon, tired from the journey. In the past, this is when we would take a nap, have a shower and a beer, and just relax. With a baby, once you arrive and get him out of the buggy, he is ready to PLAY. So, I found this camino to be doubly exhausting, and it was very hard to find the time to just relax and recover from the day's walk.

The negatives aside, we found this camino to be SO REWARDING. The benefits for the baby were undeniable. He was so stimulated, happy and full of the spirit. Everywhere we went people treated him like a superstar, and you could just see his brain sponging up all the new sights, smells, sounds and people. Any naysayers who say taking a baby on the Camino is cruel or abusive can shove it as far as I'm concerned. It's just plain wrong, at least in the case of our child. It was the best thing we could have done for him. Six months is the perfect age, too, because he was totally into his surroundings and loved looking around and interacting, but not yet mobile so he's happy enough sitting in the buggy or walking with us in the sling. It also brought us way closer together as a family. My husband and I learned even more about team work, and we really got the routines down seamlessly. AND, when we walked into the square in Santiago finally, we were overcome with emotion, unlike ever before. It felt like we had really achieved something. It was all worth it in the end.

About half the rooms we stayed in offered baby cots. In the ones that didn't, we constructed little beds out of extra blankets. He doesn't crawl yet so this worked. We carried all the nappies and formula we needed. He ate from little organic food pouches we brought. In the evenings I'd lay down a clean towel on the shower floor, folded up a few times, and put him on it laying down, then spray him with the shower head for a bath. Worked wonderfully in the absence of a tub.

Unfortunately my husband and I got terrible bed bugs on this camino. The saving grace is that baby Tiago only got one bite, while we were completely covered. I would have been beside myself if he was covered, and probably would have quit immediately. His one bite didn't even bother him though, so we kept going after watching him closely.

The compostela office would not give Tiago his own document, but added his name officially to mine, so we have a combined compostela.

All in all, we are glad we did it. It was the hardest thing we ever did though, nothing like walking it without a baby. We won't be doing it again until he can walk on his own and take care of himself after arriving at the albergues. But the experience was one of the great memories of life, and a true adventure.

I am happy to respond to any questions if anyone needs advice. Ingles is perfect for doing it with a baby, at least as far as surface View attachment 64813
Wow! That's a wonderful accomplishment! I finished the Frances last week and can't imagine having kids with me.

By the way, I flew to Ireland Friday after relaxing in Santiago a few days. It's my first time here and I love it!
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
Nice story, nice baby, nice name.

"... once you arrive and get him out of the buggy, he is ready to PLAY." This made me laugh.

"Any naysayers who say taking a baby on the Camino is cruel or abusive can shove it as far as I'm concerned." Unintended irony?
 

Bob from L.A. !

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
Sounds like you truly earned that Compostela
 

armymustang

New Member
Lovely experience! Currently walking the Francés with my 11yo and she's a total champ. We built our Camino family in SJPP and Orisson and people look for her on the trail now. Her confidence is growing by leaps and bounds. It is so much easier when they can carry their own packs though. We walked a section 3 years ago and did shorter distances. Now she's keeping up with the adults, about 22-24km a day.
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
Lovely experience! Currently walking the Francés with my 11yo and she's a total champ. We built our Camino family in SJPP and Orisson and people look for her on the trail now. Her confidence is growing by leaps and bounds. It is so much easier when they can carry their own packs though. We walked a section 3 years ago and did shorter distances. Now she's keeping up with the adults, about 22-24km a day.
Well done, that young lady.
 

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.3%
  • February

    Votes: 7 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 46 4.1%
  • April

    Votes: 168 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 270 24.2%
  • June

    Votes: 84 7.5%
  • July

    Votes: 22 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 25 2.2%
  • September

    Votes: 321 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 138 12.4%
  • November

    Votes: 14 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.5%
Top