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jgiesbrecht

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Sept-Oct 2020
So I was at Outdoors Oriented this morning just having a browse. The guy showed me this backpack, the Farpoint, which is about a pound heavier than the others, but the raincover is also great for packing up the bag for checking it on a flight. Debating whether that extra pound should be avoided, or if the benefits outweigh that.


Also browsed some of these other ones.




Anyone have any feedback on any of these, or if they think the benefits are worth the extra pound, or any other recommendations.
 
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Moorwalker

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
The most important thing of all is whether it fits you comfortably. Did they load the pack and let you walk around the store for half an hour or so? if not, go back and try doing that becuase you'll sometimes find that a pack which feels good unloaded really doesn't suit you when it's full.

Most people find that they really don't need a big pack on the Camino. You only need to carry a change of clothes, spare shoes, toiletries and a waterproof.
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (Sep/Oct 2018)
Camino Portugues (May 2021)
As mentioned above, the number one consideration should be fit. A 55 liter pack is probably more than you need on the Camino. I have an Osprey Kestrel 48, which was more than enough for my Camino, but it has cinch straps to reduce the volume of the pack so your gear won't slide around if it's not full. Try to avoid falling in love with a brand or model of pack before trying it out. The best pack will be the one that works best for you

Buen Camino
 
Past OR future Camino
2012
So I was at Outdoors Oriented this morning just having a browse. The guy showed me this backpack, the Farpoint, which is about a pound heavier than the others, but the raincover is also great for packing up the bag for checking it on a flight. Debating whether that extra pound should be avoided, or if the benefits outweigh that.
That is a whole pound, 454 gms, of weight that doesn't do anything but sit on your back while you carry it for 709km up an accumulated elevation of Everest. I use a 20gm refuse Sack or a 50 gm disposable nylon carry-all if, if, I'm going to check a pack. The other risk with a 55L pack is that you'll find you have space to put things in. Things you don't really need but might take just-in-case and you'll carry those for 709km up Everest as well.

Incidentally the height of Everest as a unit of measurement is about as meaningful as the size of Wales but I'm sure you get my drift.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
The Farpoint is designed to be a travel backpack, not a hiking backpack, so I don't know if it's built to be carried for 8 hours a day.
Personally, I wouldn't want to carry a 3+ lb backpack, let alone a 4+ lb one. All of the backpacks linked to are much bigger than necessary for the Camino. Most people do well with about a 36 liter pack, though I know people who manage with as little as 22 liters.
Also, I don't check my backpack, I carry it on the plane.
 
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VAtoNC

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
305 miles of the Frances, 2019. Planning another Frances 4/20 and will go the distance this time!
I don't think you can go wrong with an Osprey backpack. They're well-designed and lightweight. It just depends on how large it is. A 55L is probably too big, try a 36L. You won't be lugging that much stuff and not nearly the load you carry for backpacking -- stove, utensils, etc. Make sure you get it fitted properly, as Osprey's come in XS/S, S/M, and M/L.
 

Lifeisgood

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Walked the Camino Frances in September/October 2018 (St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra)
As mentioned above, the Farpoint is a travel backpack. I have a similar model from Deuter that I use only when I am traveling somewhere for a longer period of time and hence bring more clothing and stuff - and then yes, it is very handy at the check-in. However, I would not use it on the Camino. Hence, the only benefit of the Farpoint may be that it is easier if you have to check it at the airport - but there are other solutions for this case, such as an additional bag/simple foil to wrap around prior to check-in. The negatives (very heavy pack itself, there are better and lighter packs specifically designed for hiking) outweigh the only "benefit" of this pack in my opinion.

I can only second everything that has been said above: Go with a smaller version. Get it fitted with the right back length. Pack it to feel how it is with weight. The lighter your backpack, the better. You will feel every gram on a long day of hiking. I used an Osprey Kestrel 38 which was suitable for hand luggage. One Camino friend used the Osprey Talon - which is even lighter! Also check out other brands - choose the one that fits you the best :)

Buen Camino :)
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Your first consideration should be comfort, as in comfort fully loaded, after wearing the pack for 6 - 7 hours straight... the normal, full walking day on Camino.

IMHO, the second consideration is empty weight. Lighter is ALWAYS better. Less carried is more enjoyable.

IMHO the third consideration are the features the pack has. Everyone has a personal view of what features they prefer. Pack brands and styles vary. So, you need to shop judiciously.

IMHO, the last consideration should be price. I say this because most of us will forget the price long before we forget the value. This pack will be your best friend and shadow for months and many hundreds of kilometers. The pack will become part of you. At the end of the day, you will come to feel naked without it on. Hence, you need to make the best, well-considered decision.

This all stated, Osprey make some of the best rucksacks out there. Their customer service is beyond compare. Deuter and Gregory also make very capable rucksacks. A very large tranche of the rucksacks one sees on Camino are Ospreys. Folks all over the world seek these packs out for their value.

I am on my third Osprey Kestrel rucksack. The others were donated when I either outgrew them (I shrank out of the first frame), or bought the wrong frame size and did not realize it until I was on Camino. So, the Pilgrim House was the beneficiary, and I eventually obtained what I think will be my last Camino rucksack.

FYI - I am now using a 38-liter Osprey Kestrel in the M/L frame size. It more than holds everything I need for a month-long Camino without "dangly bits" (stuff attached to the outside.)

While not the lightest among all Osprey rucksacks, the Kestrel series is the best featured IMHO. I recommend that for most Camino purposes, a rucksack between 35 and 40 liters is likely the best range to start with. Going much larger USUALLY means you are carrying too much.

I have a theory that larger rucksacks, bought for general use, tend to "suck up" stuff. Nature abhors a vacuum... You end up with an overly heavy load to carry. Conversely, if you restrict the volume you can carry by buying a bag in the recommended range 35 - 40 liters) you will necessarily bring less stuff. This recommendation can vary if you are a very petite person with smaller than average clothing. Then 35 liters becomes you upper limit, at least IMHO.

I hope this helps.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Your first consideration should be comfort, as in comfort fully loaded, after wearing the pack for 6 - 7 hours straight... the normal, full walking day on Camino.

IMHO, the second consideration is empty weight. Lighter is ALWAYS better. Less carried is more enjoyable.

IMHO the third consideration are the features the pack has. Everyone has a personal view of what features they prefer. Pack brands and styles vary. So, you need to shop judiciously.

IMHO, the last consideration should be price. I say this because most of us will forget the price long before we forget the value. This pack will be your best friend and shadow for months and many hundreds of kilometers. The pack will become part of you. At the end of the day, you will come to feel naked without it on. Hence, you need to make the best, well-considered decision.
Totally agree with these priorities.
 
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jgiesbrecht

Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Sept-Oct 2020
I understand that hiking bags may be a bit better than the travel one, but I'm also thinking of the potential for future use even if it's not full this time. I haven't had a bag for over a decade so everything's so different now.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I understand that hiking bags may be a bit better than the travel one, but I'm also thinking of the potential for future use even if it's not full this time. I haven't had a bag for over a decade so everything's so different now.
You really need to think more about how that pack is going to feel on your back for 6-8 hours a day, not potential future uses.
Read the post from @t2andreo again
 

Lifeisgood

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Walked the Camino Frances in September/October 2018 (St Jean Pied de Port - Finisterra)
I understand that hiking bags may be a bit better than the travel one, but I'm also thinking of the potential for future use even if it's not full this time.

What are your prospects for "future use"? I second trecile! Think about the purpose of your backpack which is primarily hiking. There are other solutions for hiking backpacks if you want to check them in at the airport ;) Make the comfort your priority to enjoy your Camino the most!

I myself got the Kestrel 38 to also use for other hiking journeys/camping/backpacking in general. That is why I chose a backpack with a stable internal frame (I am not a believer in airflow back systems) to also carry heavier loads when going camping etc.
 
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bmcbride

CVRambler
Past OR future Camino
Frances (2014), Camino Inca (2015), Primitivo (2017), Portugues (2018), Finisterre (2018)
I currently have two Osprey Sirrus packs, the 24 L. and the 36 L., and love both of them. I've used the 36 L. on two Caminos so far, and am seriously trying to pack light enough to use the 24 L. for my next Caminos. As has been said by others, the first consideration for purchasing a pack should be how it fits you. For me, personally, another big consideration is the weight. I would not want to carry around the extra pound. For other travel purposes, I have a wheeled suitcase and usually use my 24 L. pack as my carry-on bag.
 
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