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Backwards on the Camino de Madrid?

rivrod

New Member
How feasible/easy is it to walk backwards on along the Camino de Madrid from Sahugun to Madrid? Is there any difficulty staying in municipal albergues if you're walking backwards?

Thanks!
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
rivrod,

I have never walked the Camino de Madrid but there would be no problem staying at pilgrim albergues as long as you have a Pilgrim Passport or Credential. Walking backward during the 'prime time season' should be easy since you would see other pilgrims coming towards you and thus marking the path. However walking out of season and especially through woods or prairie it might be more difficult to find the way. In December 2011 I walked from Santiago to the Portuguese border at Tui in reverse along the Camino Portuguese. To go backward was more complicated than you might imagine and searching for the famous yellow arrows pointing in the opposite direction wasn't easy. Viewed backwards the arrows resembled anchors. Thus it all was a bit of a treasure hunt!

Forward or backward I wish you Buen Camino,

Margaret Meredith
 

rivrod

New Member
That's what I figured re: staying in albergues but had read on another post that a pilgrim had a tough time once or twice. The plan now is to walk the Frances starting in May. Afterwards I'm staying with family in Madrid. With no definite end date and a plane ticket back in August, I was wondering, or maybe daydreaming!, about maybe licking my wounds in Santiago for a little while then walking the camino Frances backwards to Sahagun and then down to Madrid.

Ultimately I think it should be a decision made in Santiago and see how I feel. It may just be too much to do with so little time in between but just an idea I'm kicking around at the moment.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, rivrod,

When I walked the Camino de Madrid, I had two companions for about 5 nights, and the rest of the time I was completely alone in some beautiful albergues, so I can't imagine anyone is going to care which way you are going.

Walking backwards is a different story, IMO. On the Frances to Sahagun, there won't be a problem, because of the huge numbers walking towards you. But on the Madrid, I think it could be tricky. I'd bring some good maps and a compass. The good thing about this camino, like most of the caminos, is that you are never far from civilization (except maybe for the day between Cercedilla and SEgovia), so even if you get lost, you will wind up in a town nearby and can reset your bearings.

Buen camino, Laurie
 

rivrod

New Member
Laurie,

I found your blog while searching the forum on the camino de Madrid. Its been very helpful. Do you remember how many days the camino Madrid took you and how many rest days you took?

Thanks
Anthony
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Anthony,
I had a lot of time and decided to set my stages to coincide with good albergues. Some of the albergues on this camino are very basic and others are palatial, so I opted for the latter. :D

Here is a summary of my stages: camino-de-madrid/topic11148.html

I sort of took a rest day in Valladolid, which is about 8 kms off the Camino. One morning I walked 8 kms into Valladolid, then the next day, I left in the afternoon and walked another short 12 kms or something like that. I had never been to Valladolid and really enjoyed it, especially the sculpture museum.

And in case you haven't seen it mentioned in other threads, there is a new version of the Confraternity's guide, which is online. http://www.csj.org.uk/guides-online.htm

Hope this all helps, buen camino, Laurie
This was actually the only guide I had and it was great.
 

rivrod

New Member
Thanks Laurie!

That's incredibly helpful. I've printed out that guid eon the site, it says 2010, is that the new updated one?

One last question, do you know if the entire camino is on the pastoral paths? I'm wondering if I can get a map that shoes these pastoral paths so I can have one detailed enough to help me walk it backwards.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member

rivrod

New Member
There we go, that link took me to the newest one. Can't thank you enough for answering these questions!
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Hola

Sorry I'm just catching up with this. I think walking from Sahagun to Madrid is feasible and Laurie has given really good advice. The train journey from Santiago to Sahagun is about 7 hours I think.

Anyway for excellent maps you can use on a mobile device have a look here: http://pilgrim.peterrobins.co.uk/routes ... adrid.html

You should have absolutely no problem using the albergues as there will be few other pilgrims around.

The route is beautiful and will be just as nice going backwards!

Buen camino

John
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
rivrod said:
How feasible/easy is it to walk backwards on along the Camino de Madrid from Sahugun to Madrid? Is there any difficulty staying in municipal albergues if you're walking backwards?

Thanks!
I think your main requirement would be a rear view mirror, otherwise you will be continually bumping into things if you walk backwards. :mrgreen:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata 2010, Camino de Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo 2013, Olvidado, Invierno 2014
Sojourner47 said:
rivrod said:
How feasible/easy is it to walk backwards on along the Camino de Madrid from Sahugun to Madrid? Is there any difficulty staying in municipal albergues if you're walking backwards?

Thanks!
I think your main requirement would be a rear view mirror, otherwise you will be continually bumping into things if you walk backwards. :mrgreen:
:mrgreen: :lol:
 

mmaxx

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2009-10, 2012), Camino de Madrid (2012)
I met a guy walking the Camino de Madrid backwards when I did it. I agree that it is probably the hardest one to walk backwards due to the fact that it is likely that many days you will not encounter a single person walking it, even in peak season. Certainly feasible though!
 

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