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BBC Program "Celebs" on the Camino

Camino(s) past & future
CF (2018)
I watched it avidly, sorry I will miss the other two episodes as I leave for my first Camino tomorrow.

As a Christian minister, I have to say I found Kate’s overenthusiasm to find a biblical quote for every occasion a bit grating.... maybe that’s how she is, or maybe it was in the editing. Trying too hard to convince everyone that priests are normal people. Which we are, of course, but I think it works better when people discover that for themselves rather than being told every five minutes.

A couple of the participants talked about the Church controlling and dominating people’s lives, and I think it’s a shame no corrective to that was offered, or at least screened. To control and dominate is a human failing and sadly people and institutions of faith are not immune to that temptation. But it is not intrinsic to the Church to dominate, in fact it is antithetical to its identity, IMO
 

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FLEUR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Barbara do you have a UK T.V license? If so put BBC iPlayer T.V.app on your phone or tablet then you can watch the next two episodes while you're away. If it's like iPlayer for radio you won't be able to download them and save for later viewing but I am pretty sure you'll be able to locate the episodes and watch them albeit via a tiny screen and earphones!

Buen Camino
 

kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
I watched it avidly, sorry I will miss the other two episodes as I leave for my first Camino tomorrow.

As a Christian minister, I have to say I found Kate’s overenthusiasm to find a biblical quote for every occasion a bit grating.... maybe that’s how she is, or maybe it was in the editing. Trying too hard to convince everyone that priests are normal people. Which we are, of course, but I think it works better when people discover that for themselves rather than being told every five minutes.

A couple of the participants talked about the Church controlling and dominating people’s lives, and I think it’s a shame no corrective to that was offered, or at least screened. To control and dominate is a human failing and sadly people and institutions of faith are not immune to that temptation. But it is not intrinsic to the Church to dominate, in fact it is antithetical to its identity, IMO
Barbara, do you have any friends who can record it for you? I can manage tech stuff that interests me, and even though tv doesn’t, I did hit the red button at the right moment and i will be able to see it again if I want to. You said husband is at home, i think.. twist his arm... and if it doesn’t work: you are going to be your very own celeb on your own pilgrimage. I hope you have a wonderful one.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via Francigena (2017), plus more than 2000 Km/year of trekking, hiking and minor caminos since 2000.
I wish I could watch that series from my country. :(
I do hope that sooner or later there will be a DVD or an international streaming available...
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF (2018)
Oh, I’ve set it to record, so it will be waiting for me when I get home, I just meant it would have been nice to see them before I go.

I *could* watch vía iPlayer while I’m there..... but I’ll actually be there, which is surely better. Besides, I might get jealous watching all that lovely sunshine they got. My first day of walking SJPdP to Valcarlos is forecast to be cold but dry. My second, however - rain, rain, rain all the way.
 

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FLEUR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
Oh, I’ve set it to record, so it will be waiting for me when I get home, I just meant it would have been nice to see them before I go.

I *could* watch vía iPlayer while I’m there..... but I’ll actually be there, which is surely better. Besides, I might get jealous watching all that lovely sunshine they got. My first day of walking SJPdP to Valcarlos is forecast to be cold but dry. My second, however - rain, rain, rain all the way.
Barbara just think of that second day of rain as character building! For us the walk to Orisson was in perfect weather, clear and sunny (June) next day we continued to Roncesvalles in a howling gail, freezing cold and could hardly stay upright. I think we almost experienced all four seasons in one week .

're the Celebs viewing, you might find that you have an afternoon when you're weary and need to relax with film. If you find yourself in accommodation with good WiFi then why not rest and relax a little.
 

VNwalking

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I have nothing but positive things to report about the experience, and really pleased with how beautifully they presented the church.
Glad to hear that, CJ. And I'm glad to meet the 'new you!' Thank you for your service and for everything you do to keep this special place open for all of us.
I’ll actually be there, which is surely better.
Yes...Yes, indeed.
Buen camino, Barbara!
 

kirkie

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Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Thanks for posting this. I watched it last week, but have also watched this episode again, in a few stages. I really value the opportunity to be opened to the story someone else has to tell. This episode has shown me glimpses of the pain in the lives of the celebs. Celebs? What is a celeb? I am not used to watching tv, and I probably couldn’t tell you the name of many actresses or actors, but I can tell you when I recognise a moment of human being. I look forward to watching more, and the second episode is on tv tonight. Thanks, thanks, thanks, as an old friend used to say every day, for the smallest thing.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
'
There was a write up in the Times yesterday regarding this programme, when I got to the bit about two of the so called celebrities say, on meeting a monk at Rabenal, that the monks life choice is a result of being brainwashed, I stopped reading.
I think it is going to be as I feared, a shambles, but with an open mind I will give it a watch on the 16th.
Woah. I've watched this scene three times now. It's part of episode 2 that was broadcast today. I saw and heard something completely different. Do I get it wrong, did the freelance Times religion correspondent get it wrong or what happened here .... :cool:
 
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kirkie

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Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Woah. I've watched this scene three times now. It's part of episode 2 that was broadcast today. I saw and heard something completely different. Do I get it wrong, did the freelance Times religion correspondent get it wrong or what happened here .... :cool:
I am sorry now I didn’t think to press record. However, I can miss bits of dialogue so will need to wait for the next YouTube posting. What did you get from that part, Kathar1na?
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breda (Holland) to Santiago (2016)
Camino Ingles (2017)
I thought that scene was just a polite conversation between three people who were somewhat curious about each other and their view on religion. They were trying different approaches, riffing on definition, origin, shape and form for a bit, but nothing disrespectful in my book. I was only disappointed because they weren't really getting anywhere. I do like that Raphael Rowe however: he seems to be genuinely interested in views not his own and isn't afraid to question himself and his convictions.
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
What did you get from that part, Kathar1na?
Based on the description posted before the broadcast, I expected to see a scene of hostility and attack on the monk/religion/Christian faith. What I saw, was a polite conversation between the monk, who had been invited to the talk, and two persons, one of whom describes himself as a humanist and the other one who says that "none of my family are religious, none of my extended family are religious so there was no - and I say this in the kindest way - brainwashing". He then goes on to say how much we are a product of our environment, the family we grew up in, the schools where we were educated etc. The monk largely agrees about these external influences shaping us but points out that he views it as God's mysterious work in his own life.

I've been always intrigued by the monks and the monastery at Rabanal. The monastery was founded in 2001. They belong to the Benedictine Congregation of Saint Ottilien, with seat in Germany, and they are missionary monks. Rabanal is their only monastery in Spain and they have no others in Europe, apart from those in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. They are mainly active in Africa and Asia and also Latin America. Quite intriguing because one tends to imagine that everything of this kind is centuries old along the Camino de Santiago. :)
 
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kirkie

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Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Based on the description posted before the broadcast, I expected to see a scene of hostility and attack on the monk/religion/Christian faith. What I saw, was a polite conversation between the monk, who had been invited to the talk, and two persons, one of whom describes himself as a humanist and the other one who says that "none of my family are religious, none of my extended family are religious so there was no - and I say this in the kindest way - brainwashing". He then goes on to say how much we are a product of our environment, the family we grew up in, the schools where we were educated etc. The monk largely agrees about these external influences shaping us but points out that he views it as God's mysterious work in his own life.

I've been always intrigued by the monks and the monastery at Rabanal. The monastery was founded in 2001. They belong to the Benedictine Congregation of Saint Ottilien, with seat in Germany, and they are missionary monks. Rabanal is their only monastery in Spain and they have no others in Europe, apart from those in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. They are mainly active in Africa and Asia and also Latin America. Quite intriguing because one tends to imagine that everything of this kind is centuries old along the Camino de Santiago. :)
Thanks, Kathar1na, I now see where the brainwashing word came into it. Context explains, I suppose that is part of the success of narrative painting...
 

kirkie

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Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
I thought that scene was just a polite conversation between three people who were somewhat curious about each other and their view on religion. They were trying different approaches, riffing on definition, origin, shape and form for a bit, but nothing disrespectful in my book. I was only disappointed because they weren't really getting anywhere. I do like that Raphael Rowe however: he seems to be genuinely interested in views not his own and isn't afraid to question himself and his convictions.
I am nodding my head in agreement as I read, Purky. We might not get to see if they do really get anywhere. No matter the motive for the programme, the reality is clearly having a powerful effect on the characters, as one of them has been quoted twice saying, we are becoming pilgrims. I am reminded of what I learned to be a North American Indian saying: don’t judge me till you have walked two weeks in my mocassins.
 

Dorpie

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Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
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A Good Wander posted a link to YouTube above. I trust it is legal...
Afraid not, but there are greater crimes. If it makes you feel better, just pretend you've come round to my house to watch it. I consume precious little TV on the BBC these days so I should have a little license fee to share around.
 

kirkie

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Afraid not, but there are greater crimes. If it makes you feel better, just pretend you've come round to my house to watch it. I consume precious little TV on the BBC these days so I should have a little license fee to share around.
Is that true, Dorpie? Youtube videos are not legal? Or ‘ripped’ from tv shows are not legal? If so, I might have to forego watching the YouTube shows.. In an earlier post someone referred to why people watch tv at the end of the day. I once participated in a community education project where those in the group explored the Soaps on uk tv. Among the reasons given for watching: “When I get home from work, I sit down in front of the box and say: it’s YOUR turn now!” Thanks for the invitation!
 

Purky

The Dutch guy
Camino(s) past & future
Breda (Holland) to Santiago (2016)
Camino Ingles (2017)
I am nodding my head in agreement as I read, Purky. We might not get to see if they do really get anywhere. No matter the motive for the programme, the reality is clearly having a powerful effect on the characters, as one of them has been quoted twice saying, we are becoming pilgrims. I am reminded of what I learned to be a North American Indian saying: don’t judge me till you have walked two weeks in my mocassins.
I recognise that the participants are all very serious about walking this thing called camino, but as far as I'm concerned the key ingredients to a pilgrimage are time and distance. For a full immersion in the world of the pilgrim you need to take the time to get rid of a lot of stuff you put in your pack earlier, and I mean that both practical and metaphorical. And you have to put some distance in. It can't really be a short-term undertaking, because it'll be a lot of little bits of touch and go, and that is exactly what I see happening on screen as I watch the BBC2 show.

I see a lot of self-affirming stuff going on, and still preciously little of what I think is the true might of the camino shine through: that it isn't about you. There was a glimpse of it at the end of part two, when Byrne remarked (with some surprise in his voice) that he felt so happy about Small enjoying herself.

I'm now grinning about myself while typing. I take this stuff way too serious, and I'm forgetting that it isn't about me. But at the same time I am very serious: I so wish that everyone on this planet could experience the things there are to learn and be a part of on a really long walk. Inluding the cast of this show. I'm rooting for them.
 
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Dorpie

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Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
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Is that true, Dorpie? Youtube videos are not legal? Or ‘ripped’ from tv shows are not legal? If so, I might have to forego watching the YouTube shows.. In an earlier post someone referred to why people watch tv at the end of the day. I once participated in a community education project where those in the group explored the Soaps on uk tv. Among the reasons given for watching: “When I get home from work, I sit down in front of the box and say: it’s YOUR turn now!” Thanks for the invitation!
Hey Kirkie,

It's the ripped from TV part that's the issue. The video above was posted by someone called GSD MOM, not the BBC. Incidentally the BBC does have their own official Youtube channel but having just taken a look at the offerings they have there the word dross springs very readily to mind.

A big part of BBC revenues (nearly a quarter) these days come from their commercial arm called BBC Worldwide which sells programs and concepts to overseas broacasters. It also wouldn't be acceptable to be giving programs to a worldwide audience effectively for free when households in the UK are paying £147 a year each to produce the content.
 

VNwalking

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Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2014, 2015)
St Olav/Francés (2016)
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I see a lot of self-affirming stuff going on, and still preciously little of what I think is the true might of the camino shines through: that it isn't about you. There was a glimpse of it at the end of part two, when Byrne remarked (with some surprise in his voice) that he felt so happy about Small enjoying herself.

I'm now grinning about myself while typing. I take this stuff way too serious, and I'm forgetting that it isn't about me. But at the same time I am very serious: I so wish that everyone on this planet could experience the things there are to learn and be a part of on a really long walk. Including the cast of this show. I'm rooting for them.
Me too. I can't watch the series, but still think this is a great post, @Purky .
Especially the part of your quote I highlighted in bold. It's a lesson of the Camino that not everybody gets, but plenty do...and I SO wish a few million (billion?) more of us could understand this.

[Sorry. Rant over. I take things too seriously too, a lot of the time. (Except on the NOT serious thread...which is a wonderful playpen for learning how not to do that, and just being generally silly...)]
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015-2016 VdlPlata - Sanabres
2016.Primitivo
2017 Salvador
2018 Norte?
I did not manage to see more than 5 minutes of both broadcasts. Yesterday I decided to give it another try but the concept of the broadcast irritated me. In general I don't like the idea of using"celebrities" in this way. ( Being Dutch I don't know anyone of them) As I did not walk the CF and don't intend to it also was not a joy of recognition
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
I'm now grinning about myself while typing. I take this stuff way too serious, and I'm forgetting that it isn't about me. But at the same time I am very serious: I so wish that everyone on this planet could experience the things there are to learn and be a part of on a really long walk. Including the cast of this show. I'm rooting for them.
A lot of the criticism aimed at this BBC series (of which I've only seen the first two episodes of three in total) will center on this point. One has to bear in mind, however, that right from the outset, i.e. when we heard about the project in August last year, the intention of the program makers was a different one: to also explore aspects of (Christian) faith and (Christian) "non-faith" in a rather general way. And they make absolute no secret about the fact that the group has only 15 days, that they walk only sections, that they travel by minibus at times. And that some others walk all the way, at least from SJPP to Santiago.

For me, that discussion/conversation angle is actually a major reason for watching the series. I don't want to sound critical but I, personally, have now reached a high level of saturation as far as the more standard Camino narrative goes, i.e. I won't buy another book or watch another movie concentrating on those common contemporary aspects, although I still enjoy reading about people's experience on the forum.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
'
I actually have a question if someone knowledgeable reads this. And if I may ask, please no discussion about what people leave and should leave, I just want to know the origin of this custom as I googled and searched the forum without results: the crosses made of small sticks or twigs and attached to metal fences along the way. Where does this come from? I tend to think it has perhaps to do with Catholic youth organisations but I really don't know. Anyone?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances June/July 2015 with Jam
Starting Camino Frances 11 April 2018 :)
I've seen 2 of the programs so far and I'm loving it - I'm not that bothered about what they skip or how much they carry.... Its given me loads of opportunities to chat with family, friends and gym buddies about how brilliant walking the camino for yourself is and I call that a big fat WIN and I know the 7 people will be impacted by the bit of the way they walked and the people they walked with which makes me very happy for them :)
 
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CJ Williams

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Via Turonense (1995)
Camino Francés (1996; 1999; 2001; 2005; 2008; 2011)
Camino Aragonés (2000)
Glad to hear that, CJ. And I'm glad to meet the 'new you!' Thank you for your service and for everything you do to keep this special place open for all of us.

Yes...Yes, indeed.
Buen camino, Barbara!
Nice to meet you, too! As I have basically been “outed” by the programme, I asked Ivar to go ahead and change my name, and I put up my photo. I’m Curtis, obviously. Nice to meet you all.
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte
Kathar1na asked. "I just want to know the origin of this custom as I googled and searched the forum without results: the crosses made of small sticks or twigs and attached to metal fences along the way." Call me cynical, but I think it's like leaving pebbles on the marker posts. One person does it for their own personal reason, and for (almost) everybody else it's "Me, too." The crosses will stay up for a long time, but the pebbles cannot last forever. When there is no room for another one, someone will swipe all the pebbles off the post in order to leave their own "offering".
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte
I watched the second episode of "Pilgrimage" tonight. There is a scene about 40 minutes in where the group are sitting in a street talking. In the background there is a fountain. I recognised that as being the fountain of San Vicente Ferrer in Praza do Campo, Lugo. What were they doing in Lugo on the CF?
 

Robo

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CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
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CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
I've watched 2 episodes online so far.

It's quite entertaining, but my overall impression is that it's really an observation of the Camino not really a participation.

But given the aims of the programme highlighted above that is probably quite OK.

If you met actual 'Pilgrims' like some of the Celebs, you'd probably give them a wide berth though! ;)

Just stopping to rest a bit.............see you later :p:p

The bit at the wine fountain annoyed me. Filling up their water bottles with wine! :mad:
 

Iriebabel

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Start Walk SJPDP 1 April 2018
First episode is posted on US YouTube! Watch it before it gets taken down. Fairly enjoyable show which has (so far) avoided all the doom-and-gloom drama foisted upon it by all those posters who hadn’t watched it. It’s always good to be reminded not to pre-judge anyone.
Watched it and enjoyed. Was not happy when they took the bus. If you see me on the Comino mumbling constant complaints like the priest... someone please slap (not literal) some sense into me. Camino is a choice with Pain and pleasure we are human
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
Watched it and if you see me on the trail mumbling constant complaints like the priest... someone please slap (not literal) some sense into me Camino is a choice Pain and pleasur we are human
I know it's unkind, but I can't help but feel she is trying to act out the Dawn French character in the Vicar of Dibley :oops::oops:
 
Camino(s) past & future
(2003) Francés, (2014) Francés, (2016) Portugués , (2016) Aragonés, (2018) del Norte
When I used the "wine fountain" at Irache, it dispensed about 5ml every time the tap was rotated. The wine did not flow continuously for me as it did for the celebs.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
When I used the "wine fountain" at Irache, it dispensed about 5ml every time the tap was rotated. The wine did not flow continuously for me as it did for the celebs.
I think that happens when the tank is empty.........
 

Iriebabel

Active Member
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Start Walk SJPDP 1 April 2018
Can I ask a silly question? Why did she put her mouth under the wine tap...hmmm water bottle seems more sanitary no? I saw someone else do a similar thing placing their lips on the tap...really made me rethink. No a germaphobe but don’t want cooties :p
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
When I used the "wine fountain" at Irache, it dispensed about 5ml every time the tap was rotated. The wine did not flow continuously for me as it did for the celebs.
Maybe their team had paid for it ... I would not be surprised one bit if there was more wine flowing for the purpose of filming than just the content of one plastic bottle for 3 people and an additional gulp for the vicar. At the end of the wine fountain scene, Neil Morrissey says "Graçias" to someone outside of the scene and a moment later you see a female person, obviously belonging to the staff of the winery, rushing towards their offices. I guess she will have immediately ordered the tap to be turned off. :)

Am I the only person who did not pose for a photo and did not get a drink from these taps? The smell (of spilled wine) alone put me off plus I was majorly disappointed that it was a commercial company and not the monastery that dispensed the charitable liquid. :cool:
 
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Finisterre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
a lot of people misunderstand celebrity. Celebs exist because we are social animals, but our troupe has expanded beyond our ability to know everyone. And so we create our social cohesion through discussion on social media, in the pub, on the bus, at work, of the people we have in common. Neil Morrissey and people like him are part of our acquaintance because we need them to cement our membership of tribe. Being critical of them is just another way to build community. And I enjoyed the programs.

A big part of BBC revenues (nearly a quarter) these days come from their commercial arm called BBC Worldwide which sells programs and concepts to overseas broacasters. It also wouldn't be acceptable to be giving programs to a worldwide audience effectively for free when households in the UK are paying £147 a year each to produce the content.
The BBC was set up to educate and inform. BBC Worldwide is a newfangled corruption of its purpose. As far as I am concerned my £147 is there to partly pay for anyone that wants to be informed and educated, worldwide.
 

Dorpie

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Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
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The BBC was set up to educate and inform. BBC Worldwide is a newfangled corruption of its purpose. As far as I am concerned my £147 is there to partly pay for anyone that wants to be informed and educated, worldwide.
I apologise. I know I shouldn't get into petty discussions on the internet but I'm afraid this is a subject close to my heart. So may I draw your attention to the very first line of the very first clause concerning "objects of the Corporation" in the original BBC Charter of 1927;

3(a) To carry out a broadcasting service within our kingdom of Great Briatin and Ireland (But not including therin The Irish Free State). You can read the whole thing here.

Please note as I've stated previously in this thread I really don't care what anyone does in this regard, just don't do it with the idea that you have legality or right on your side.
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
Hihi now my curiosity has been sparked. Thanks
I think in essence she says that Dawn French who played the vicar of Dibley is a brilliant actress and the character Dawn French played is a lovely person - and that is a good thing for the public image of the clergy - while she (Kate Bottley) is a real life vicar.

In one of the articles I've read she refers to other representations of (Anglican) clergy on telly, for example 'all sorts of images of clergy from sitcoms for example like Dad’s Army, that probably haven’t done much good in the long term. The cultural memory of people is quite long'. She also mentions the more recent Rev series on BBC, I don't know whether many of you are familiar with it as the majority on this forum is not from the UK or surrounding areas with BBC on cable providers. She obviously believes it's her calling to make use of her capabilities to reach out to people who don't know any vicar at all in their daily lives and I think nowadays that's quite a few. It's obvious that she's not to everyone's liking.

I got censured by a moderator for one of my very first posts on this forum because I was interested in the question of what the Church (Catholic mainly but not only) is getting out of the Camino these days. I had just discovered the concept of New Evangelisation. But we can't discuss it so we restrict ourselves to discussions about the use of minibuses and the locations where scenes of the BBC series have been filmed.
 
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Finisterre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria 2001,
Porto 2006,
Valenca 2008,
Finisterre 2010,
SJdPP 2012,
Tui 2014.

No plans to return, yet.
I apologise. I know I shouldn't get into petty discussions on the internet but I'm afraid this is a subject close to my heart.
If it is close to your heart I think quite important would be fair. Interesting link, thankyou.

The fine print of the charter is typical elitist establishment blather. I'm still happy to pay my £147 to educate and inform. And I see the corruption of mammon in the greed of BBC Worldwide and the prioritising of copyright over the service of God.

The BBC is a part of our soft power. Closing it down would damage us.


And Ivar will be telling me off, again.
Sorry Ivar.
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
Am I the only one who finds this weird: the "starter image" that people chose when they upload a video to Youtube? Each and everyone has chosen a close-up of one of the participants, and an "in your face" one to boot in one case. I follow this thread on a big screen and get startled each time I open this thread. These uploaders are clearly more focused on "celebrity faces" than the BBC themselves who have chosen different images (and more inviting ones, if I may say so) to mark the start of the episodes on their website. :cool:
 
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Kanga

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Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid.
Really good to have your contribution @CJ Williams and in particular your comments about the barefoot "ritual". We are such sheep! I no longer hesitate to knock stones off cement marker posts if I want to perch my behind on one for a rest.
 

SEB

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Camino(s) past & future
April (2015) SJPdP to SdC; Porto to SdC April (2016)
I actually have a question if someone knowledgeable reads this. And if I may ask, please no discussion about what people leave and should leave, I just want to know the origin of this custom as I googled and searched the forum without results: the crosses made of small sticks or twigs and attached to metal fences along the way. Where does this come from? I tend to think it has perhaps to do with Catholic youth organisations but I really don't know. Anyone?
Back in the early 1980s when I was involved with many women-led anti-nuclear campaigns, there was a massive protest at Greenham Common in England where the US Air Force had stationed its Cruise missiles. Women in their thousands travelled to the base to 'humanise' what they saw as a place of potential death. To do this they brought items to decorate the nine mile perimeter fence of the base that symbolised aspects of the life they saw under threat at that time. This included crosses, such as those on the fence just before Rabanal, as well as children's clothes, teddy bears, flowers, needlework etc., I was there with my young daughter and I will never forget the sight of that fence, mile after mile. I can't explain @Kathar1na where this comes, except to suggest that it is a deeply-ingrained impulse to make contact through symbols and that for human beings involved in a communal activity that crosses international boundaries (in terms of its participants and their varied languages for example, as walking the Camino is ) they feel reassured by symbols left by those who have walked before them and which speak of a basic need both to commemorate and to communicate.
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
Really good to have your contribution @CJ Williams and in particular your comments about the barefoot "ritual". We are such sheep! I no longer hesitate to knock stones off cement marker posts if I want to perch my behind on one for a rest.
So happy to hear that I am not the only one who does that, ha ha.
Sheep, yes many.
I believe it was two years ago, or abouts that several pilgrims set fire to a wooded spot in Muxia whilst doing that silly bit of burning their clothes and footwear. As though the toxic fumes from burning rubber and synthetics was not damage enough.
 

philip a tobin

irish scouse
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013....2014....2015.......2017...2018
Back in the early 1980s when I was involved with many women-led anti-nuclear campaigns, there was a massive protest at Greenham Common in England where the US Air Force had stationed its Cruise missiles. Women in their thousands travelled to the base to 'humanise' what they saw as a place of potential death. To do this they brought items to decorate the nine mile perimeter fence of the base that symbolised aspects of the life they saw under threat at that time. This included crosses, such as those on the fence just before Rabanal, as well as children's clothes, teddy bears, flowers, needlework etc., I was there with my young daughter and I will never forget the sight of that fence, mile after mile. I can't explain @Kathar1na where this comes, except to suggest that it is a deeply-ingrained impulse to make contact through symbols and that for human beings involved in a communal activity that crosses international boundaries (in terms of its participants and their varied languages for example, as walking the Camino is ) they feel reassured by symbols left by those who have walked before them and which speak of a basic need both to commemorate and to communicate.
The first time I walked the Camino I was so moved by all those crosses,thinking of all the people who were being remembered,that by the time I got near the top of the hill I was in tears,I made a cross in memory of my own parents and knelt by it for ages in silent prayer.For me this was one of my "Camino Moments".
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
I can't explain where this comes, except to suggest that it is a deeply-ingrained impulse to make contact through symbols and that for human beings involved in a communal activity that crosses international boundaries (in terms of its participants and their varied languages for example, as walking the Camino is ) they feel reassured by symbols left by those who have walked before them and which speak of a basic need both to commemorate and to communicate.
Thank you for these memories of the time of these protests, it was very interesting to read.

I understand the impulse to imitate a ritual, or presumed ritual, and I also understand that we strive to find meaning in our environment and to give meaning to our actions - and I've grown quite tolerant of the transient contemporary heritage that's being created along the Frances. I tried to do a bit more research, in various languages, but have come up empty handed so far. It does not seem to be a tradition that is typical of Galicia, judging by some newspaper articles. I've found similar images of chain-link fences with rosaries and improvised crosses made of twigs at the Santuario de Chimayo in New Mexico in the United States, apparently a major pilgrimage site. I know next to nothing about it. Perhaps there is a connection, perhaps not.
 
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I have just found out the on BBC2 (UK) later this year there is going to be a bunch of celebrities spending 15 days on the CF. If its anything like some of the celebrity things they've done in the past it will be very tacky, I really hop that this will not be the case and that they respect the Camino.
I guess time will tell.
McDonaldization of Camino :(

The more noise of the world people bring to Camino the more antCamino it can get, the direction is completly the opossite - bring silence to everyday life from Your Camino, not noise from the world to the special space when you have a chance to listen (maybe for the first time) what t r u l l y is :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
The YouTube links to episode 1 and 2 posted in this thread no longer work. You either get "This video is unavailable" or this beauty:

Dead link.jpeg

There are, of course, others ...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino frances 2013 - Camino Portugues 2014 - Camino frances 2016
I was thoroughly dissapointed after having watched the first two episodes and are not going to watch the last. I can't understand what the goal is - just a couple of people that are nowhere close to being prepared for the long walk, neither physically nor spiritually. Had to rewatch the danish series Bertelsen on the camino just to lighten my mood again. 24 episodes at 20 minutes each. He begins in Leon - and stays in albergues and walks all the way. He just did the japanese camino in 2017. Sorry danish language mostly.
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
No comments on episode 3 which was aired on Good Friday ... I watched it just now and quite liked it. Meanwhile, another group of celebrities walked a part of the camino a week ago or so. Like many Spanish people and other Europeans, they do sections at a time, not the long haul from SJPP to Santiago:


M.jpg
P.jpg

Source: ABC, EFE and others
 

FLEUR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
I finally got to watch episodes 2 & 3 which friends had recorded for me. I enjoyed all three episodes. I think the series was well done.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid.
Or maybe more walking, more soul searching but less talking about the soul searching! As often happens on Camino, the best moments I though were when were enjoying each other's company in an uncomplicated, unselfconscious, way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
'
In episode 3, I loved the way Guy Hayward sang the Dum pater familias (at about 14:00 into the video). It was the first time that I could "hear" pilgrims sing it. All the other versions I had heard sounded very liturgical or "medieval re-enactment". He does emphasise that not only monks but also - actually mainly - pilgrims sang it. I tried to find his version on YouTube or elsewhere but no luck. Can anyone help?

It also caused me to look again into the British Pilgrimage Trust which he founded with Will Parsons. I've been in two minds about it but I start to like some of their ideas. I wish them luck in any case with their endeavour.

BTW, I managed to download episode 1 and 3 into the BBC iPlayer thing but episode 2 always stops at 99% of the download. Is this a common problem?
 
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NualaOC

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: Francés, Inglés, Fisterra/Muxia, Baztanés x2, Primitivo, Norte. 2018:Porto to Santiago.
I enjoyed this series and found to be be easy and gentle viewing. A bit too much talking in the final episode and perhaps (IMO) too much attention given to the loudest voice! But overall, I was glad to have watched it.

I'm giving a presentation next week to a group of first timers, who'll be walking from Sarria to Santiago in October. Most will have watched the programmes, so it will be interesting to hear their observations and questions. They'll be walking longer daily distances, but I expect/hope they'll do less complaining than some of those folk :)
 
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kirkie

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
In episode 3, I loved the way Guy Hayward sang the Dum pater familias (at about 14:00 into the video). It was the first time that I could "hear" pilgrims sing it. All the other versions I had heard sounded very liturgical or "medieval re-enactment". He does emphasise that not only monks but also - actually mainly - pilgrims sang it. I tried to find his version on YouTube or elsewhere but no luck. Can anyone help?

It also caused me to look again into the British Pilgrimage Trust which he founded with Will Parsons. I've been in two minds about it but I start to like some of their ideas. I wish them luck in any case with their endeavour.

BTW, I managed to download episode 1 and 3 into the BBC iPlayer thing but episode 2 always stops at 99% of the download. Is this a common problem?
Kathar1na, perhaps if you contact The British Pilgrimage trust you might find a contact for him, to ask if he has a digital version you could buy. Meantime, I attach a photo of the one i love to use.. I can’t see a way to share my copy, but you can probably find it on YouTube. F59C9E91-7CC9-44E4-AE0C-6C785C5F2A7F.png
 


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