• PLEASE NOTE: Please think twice before you travel to Spain now. More here.

Search over 55.000 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.

COVID Be the storm

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, we're all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
 
Last edited:
Camino Cups
Browse our selection of Camino Cups on the forum store
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets
Year of past OR future Camino
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.
Camino Masks
12 different designs, shipped world wide from Santiago.

mspath

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
In this time of worldwide chaos and confusion thank you for sharing your heartfelt thoughts.
With endurence and perseverence may we all strive to eventually find welcome relief.

Deus nobis haec otia fecit/God has granted us this respite.
Virgil (Eclogues I, l.6)
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
@mspath thank you for the Virgil.
My mind immediately jumps by free association to Dante's opening of the Inferno:
“In the middle of the journey of our life I found myself within a dark woods where the straight way was lost.”
And so he follows Virgil into hell, deeper and deeper — until they emerge into light. I wonder where we are now: what circle of hell is this, and how much further will we have to walk? It's not for us to know, so we have to just keep going as best as we can.
 
Last edited:
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.
Silver Oxide Camino de Santiago pendent
Camino de Santiago pendant that has a shell on the front, and "Camino de Santiago" engraved on the back. Comes with a black cord. Pendent is slightly larger than a 50 euro cent coin, about 25mm.

mspath

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Indeed. In Hell Canto 1 cited from Charles Eliot Norton's 1892 translation of The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri.

"Dante in a wood reaches the foot of a hill which he begins to ascend ; he is hindered by three beasts; he turns back and is met by Virgil, who proposés to guide him into the eternal world."
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
Thank you so much for putting very eloquently what, I’m sure, many of us feel. Thank you for your encouragement because I have found it difficult in the past few weeks to look forward confidently.

Ian
Be strong my friend, we’re all in this together. For me, in these difficult times, I remind myself that I have to put one foot in front of the last, just like on the Camino.
 

Elle Bieling

Elle Bieling, PilgrimageTraveler
Year of past OR future Camino
A total of eight in the past 6 years!
Indeed, the darkness of winter is going to challenge us even more. To be the Warrior, to be the storm, to sit with the darkness is our spiritual task right now. It ain't easy! But embrace it we must for the health of us all! We can all share here, thank God and thanks to Ivar and the mods. Thank you @Juspassinthrough for giving us they opportunity, again, to realize the goal, support one another and know that there IS light at the end of this tunnel. Ultreia!
 
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.

Chris Day

Hesed Walker
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances-14/15/16 Part-17/18/19/20
VdlP/Sanab/Finist 16
Port/Ingles 17
Norte 18 Le Puy&Prim 19
A very thoughtful and reflective post, Justpassingthrough....a delight to read. Thank you. And yes, as you say "..one foot in front of the last, just like on the Camino". We take heart as we do that - a step at a time, a day at a time.

I too have reflected much during these difficult times and am drawn back again and again to the memories and recollections of past Caminos - from my first, very much as a "Newby", when I turned up at SJPDP in 2014 as a "Walker" and gradually, to my great surprise, to discovering that over time I had actually become a "Pilgrim". Like peeling away the layers of an onion, through these times I have discovered a deeper personal spirituality with each Camino - my last three years in particular. A time will come when we can all return to enjoy and discover more, as we walk along those Paths.

You mention the history - and it's possibly a function of long-passed as well as the recent past - of all the folk who have walked these Ways. I have concluded that there really is something in that. I shared my thoughts with a pilgrim I met in 2018 in the following and the words are a re-jig of some beautiful prose from "A River Runs Through It", by Norman Maclean

image.jpeg
 
Year of past OR future Camino
CF 2019
CF 2020
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
Lovely, thank you
 
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
 

El Cascayal

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Primitivo May 2019
Invierno November 2019
Ingles April (2020) postponed
“For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.”
You have looked into your heart and ours too.
Thank you? May I share it on my FB page?
Aymarah
 
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.
2021 Camino Guides
Most all Camino authors have decided to use 2020 guides for 2021, with free PDF files with updates coming in the spring. Get yours today.

Quinranda

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances (2016)
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
This is beautiful. Thank you.
 

Holly West

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
Love this. Thanks for posting.
 
Create your own ad
Have a camino related project that you are interested in promoting on the forum? Create your own ad right now.
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.

Bob from L.A. !

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Francis 2012, 2014, 2016. Camino Norte 2018. Many more to come in my future God willing !
Very well stated. I needed the positive spin right about now. Thank you!
 

Dani7

Stop wishing, start doing.
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances
When the time is right
In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

How so beautifully written. Thank you for sharing ❤️
 

MarthaD

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Portugues May 2019
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
So beautiful- so grateful
 
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.

CourtneyZ

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
September 2016
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
This is really beautiful. Thank you!
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Year of past OR future Camino
CF - sections and whole (2012-2019) and part VF (2017)
Thank you so much Keith for your beautiful opening post. Posts such as yours and the responses to it - the depth of community, goodwill and understanding shared - make the Forum the uniquely special and wonderful place that it is.
With best wishes from Oz -
Jenny
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
Thank you so much Keith for your beautiful opening post. Posts such as yours and the responses to it - the depth of community, goodwill and understanding shared - make the Forum the uniquely special and wonderful place that it is.
With best wishes from Oz -
Jenny
JennyH94, thank you, thank everyone for the kind words. I’m humbled by the response.
 
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Holy Year Credential
Get the HOLY YEAR Camino Credential (Passport) here.

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
What a wonderful evaluation of the Camino from so many different perspectives. I have forwarded ‘be the storm’ to my friends who are experiencing difficult times. It has become my mantra. Thank you
It’s a fine mantra, I hope it serves you well.
 

susanawee

susanawee
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
Thankyou for such a great post.
 

Reggitano52

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
Beautifully said. Bravo!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2014 2016 2018
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, were all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
I’ve come back again to your discourse because it gives me hope for another Camino. I’ve done three one from Le Puy but now time catches up with me. I’ll be 73 next Camino with a lot of pain from arthritis of the spine. Can I do it. Should I do it?
 
Silver Oxide Camino de Santiago pendent
Camino de Santiago pendant that has a shell on the front, and "Camino de Santiago" engraved on the back. Comes with a black cord. Pendent is slightly larger than a 50 euro cent coin, about 25mm.
John Brierley Camino Frances Guide
This guide is one of the ones that has been around for over 15 years. Updated yearly. Please read the reviews.

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
I’ve come back again to your discourse because it gives me hope for another Camino. I’ve done three one from Le Puy but now time catches up with me. I’ll be 73 next Camino with a lot of pain from arthritis of the spine. Can I do it. Should I do it?
So much of that is up to you, you know yourself better than anyone. I’m not far behind age wise but I plan on doing the Aragones and CF in 2023. The difference is that I’ll be retired and plan to take time to smell the roses, maybe 2 months. I hope my warrior friend that you can return to the Camino. If not, you should revel in the good fortune of having done 3. Happy Holidays, be safe and Buen Camino.
 
Last edited:

Susan B Johnson

PuraVida
Year of past OR future Camino
June (2016)
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, we're all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.

As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, we're all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
Thank you for writing this! Due to my husband's underlying condition, we have had been in extreme isolation. This has been especially hard for my 21-year-old daughter. We walked Camino Ingles and then on to Finisterra in 2017. I will remind her of the warrior within her, and hopefully she can draw on that strength.
 

Anthony18

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
As we approach the end of an incredibly challenging year, I’ve begun reflecting on 2020, the year of COVID-19. And while there are many things to be negative about, far too many, I can’t help but think about how others have dealt with adversity.

The Casa Ivar site is a place where Pilgrims, past, current, future and those who can only dream can gather to pass on knowledge from our experience. Future Pilgrims can ask questions to benefit from the experience of those who came before them.

It’s a place where those interested in the religious history and offerings of the Camino can bond and find community. For the non-religious or those looking for a beautiful outdoor experience, it’s a place to learn and share.

For me and those like me, I’ve discovered that I’m not the only person who found and understood spirituality in a way I did not before. This was possible because someone took the time to listen and share. You may not believe in fate but that’s what led me to the Camino in 2017.

One thing that we all have in common is the 1000-year history of souls walking from their homes and trekking, for whatever reason and maybe reasons unknown, across Spain to Santiago de Compostela.

They did it, in most cases with literally nothing more than what they had on their backs. They walked barefoot or in crude sandals. They were preyed upon by thieves and bandits. They survived malnutrition, disease, and pestilence.

Fortunately, most of us cannot claim the same difficulties but, we, in our modern ways endured our own hardships. Those of us who have walked the Camino Francés or any of the other Caminos certainly saw or met Pilgrims suffering physically, mentally, spiritually or emotionally.

Many of us felt the pains brought on by 30 plus days of walking towards Santiago. Blisters, sprains, illness, and fatigue. For me, sore knees were my primary complaint.

But most of us journeyed on and persevered and we rejoiced, each in our own way, as we walked down the steps, through the bagpipe music, and into the Praza do Obradoiro.

A few may have been unimpressed; I don’t understand how but I accept their reality. Most of us were full of awe. The completion of a true pilgrimage for some. For others, an accomplishment that they may have thought was beyond their ability. For me, a journey that I did not know at the time that was unfinished and never ending.

Now, how did this diverse group accomplish this feat. How did people from Spain, Germany, the United States, Korea, Russia, Brazil and dozens of other countries survive, prosper, laugh, share and support one another? What led them to the Camino?

Many believe there is divine guidance along this Way. Maybe the Camino attracts the type of personalities who are naturally more social, amenable, caring or forgiving. There are though dozens of other possibilities and all reasonable explanations.

For me, while all of the above are viable, the common thread is that we all shared the same goal. Our reasons were as diverse as the nationalities and personalities of those on the Camino. But we were all walking in the same direction and towards the same place.

So, how does any of this relate to 2020, the year of COVID-19? Sadly, even some of us who are veterans of the Camino have forgotten that spirit and instead have seen only the dark side of 2020.

We want to go out. We don’t want to shelter in place. We don’t want to wear a mask. I think we can all say that we do and don’t want to do these things but, we must.

Like it or not, we're all on this journey together. And whether we realize it or not, we’re all headed in the same direction. I can say with some confidence that we will all rejoice, in our own way when we finally reach the end and enter that far off plaza which is the end of this pandemic.

In my darkest moments, I think of that goal. I look forward to going back out, with friends and without a mask. Until then, and metaphorically, I keep walking west with the sun at my back and my shadow leading the way.

I help those that I can. I accept help when I need it. I take care of myself and I think beyond myself. I can do this because I know there is light at the end of the tunnel.

There’s a quote by Jake Remington that goes like this: Fate whispers to the warrior. “You cannot withstand the storm.” The warrior whispers back. “I am the storm.”

As we walked across Spain, the warrior in us got us over the mountains. The warrior pushed us to take that next step, descend that steep hill. The warrior accepted additional burdens when required.

So now, as we enter a difficult winter, I choose to be the warrior. I will and we will persevere because, we are the storm, if we choose to be.

Be strong, be safe and we’ll soon hear the faint sound of bagpipes in the distance.
Thank you for the beautiful message to start off the new year with. God bless you and buen camino!
 

Juspassinthrough

in our minds, we're vagabonds, you and I
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Inglés 2019
Leon-Sarria, June (2019)
Camino Aragonés (2023?)
Thank you for writing this! Due to my husband's underlying condition, we have had been in extreme isolation. This has been especially hard for my 21-year-old daughter. We walked Camino Ingles and then on to Finisterra in 2017. I will remind her of the warrior within her, and hopefully she can draw on that strength.
@Susan B Johnson, I hope your daughter is as inspired by that thought as I have been. As others before us persevered, so shall we. For her, this is probably the first real challenge in her life. Buen Camino to you all. And, looked at your Bio, while I’m a native Texan, I grew up on Lake Minnetonka and attended the U. Ski-U-Mah!
 

Similar threads

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.7%
  • March

    Votes: 60 4.3%
  • April

    Votes: 207 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 336 24.3%
  • June

    Votes: 100 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 27 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 29 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 398 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 171 12.4%
  • November

    Votes: 19 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 10 0.7%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top