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Luggage Transfer Correos

Bed bug eliminators

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Jermann75

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2018
So I did the entire CF and never heard of these things until I got to South East Asia where a friend’s mom gave them to her to get rid of bed bugs out of their backpack. Do people know about these things? I was shocked that this was the first time I’d heard about it. I got hit 3 times by bed bugs so wish I had this for my backpack! Especially since my backpack was accidentally thrown out while I was treating it in a black garbage bag.
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Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
It is permethrin. It probably will kill bedbugs if they are exposed to the permethrin for long enough, and if they are not a resistant strain.

I spray my pack inside and out with permethrin before I leave home and on camino bag it each night.
 

Mera

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Camino Porto, Camino Primitivo
Permithrin kills them!;)
I wish I had them. Here are the photos of my bedbug friends who all made a meal out of me, albeit it was their last meal! I didn't personally harm them. I gave them to the hotell manager in the morning, very early in the morning. The hotel later refunded the money.
 

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New York Peregrina

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
4 caminos total completed - 3 Camino Frances, 1 Camino Portugues from Porto
Hello - permethrin is very effective and considered a necessity by World Health Org, many armies treat all fabrics with it etc. You spray it on your sleeping bag and backpack (inside and out, I suggest) before leaving home. Generally very safe to humans but read warnings if you have a cat. Keep the remainder near your bathtub for when you get home and liberally respray all your gear when you return, to kill off any clinger eggs. Hope this helps and have a great trip
 

cbacino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte - Primitivo (2018)
Via Francigena (2017)
Appalachian Trail (2016)
if you get bed bugs in your gear while traveling, put it ALL (pack, sleeping bag, clothes, bags, etc) in a laundromat dryer at the highest heat setting for at least 30 minutes. this will cook them, guaranteed. high temp setting never hurt any of my gear. PS treat your stuff with permethrin before you leave.
 

cmk033

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Jan 21~Feb 27, 2019
Permithrin kills them!;)
Three questions about Permithrin: does it kill bedbugs on contact? How harmful to human on contact and what harmful effect does it cauase to human, if anyone knows. I've heard that the Permithrin is a very harmful chemical and had to be deluded in very weak form to be used. Where can you buy the spray in US?
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Three questions about Permithrin: does it kill bedbugs on contact?
No, it doesn't kill them on contact, but can kill them with prolonged exposure. I spray my backpack, sleep sack and all stuff sacks in the theory that if I get some bedbug hitchhikers in my backpack that they will die from permethrin exposure before I return home.
 

C & W

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP to Santiago (2015)
Lourdes to Jaca (2016)
Pamplona to Santiago (2018)
In the US, permethrin is widely available for outdoor use a a mosquito repellent. It can be found, for example, at Home Depot as a spray. Multiple commercial companies will come to your home about monthly during the warm months to spray your yard if you pay them enough. I have not seen it advertised for use on clothing, but some clothing brands come pre-treated with permethrin. I believe Orvis sells some such clothing.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
No, it doesn't kill them on contact
Direct spraying on a bedbug won't kill it promptly? Where have you found this information? Or do you mean contact with a permethrin-treated item?
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Three questions about Permithrin: does it kill bedbugs on contact? How harmful to human on contact and what harmful effect does it cauase to human, if anyone knows. I've heard that the Permithrin is a very harmful chemical and had to be deluded in very weak form to be used. Where can you buy the spray in US?
1. It does not kill on contact.
2. Permethrin has been safely used for many years as a head lice treatment, including on young children.
3. Toxicity studies have demonstrated that with the concentrations used for consumer use, the levels of exposure are far below that in which side effects are documented to occur. The sprays, like Sawyers, which are available for treating clothing are within that safe level for consumer use.
4. You can buy Sawyers spray thru Amazon or a variety of outdoor stores.
5. Permethrin will not keep bedbugs away or prevent you from being bitten. It is the wrong product for that type of application.
 
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C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I meant contact with a permethrin treated item. One certainly shouldn't be spraying permethrin in albergues!
I agree. I am just trying to get the facts about the product clear.
It does not kill on contact.
I most always agree with you and I do agree with your general message, but I am going to quibble a bit with the words. :confused: Maybe it is semantic, but maybe I'm not aware of the facts, and I would like to know ...
Permethrin is an insecticide, is it not? That means it kills insects. Maybe it takes a few minutes, but I would guess that the insect would be pretty much immobilized very soon after being doused with the product. That's what I would mean by "on contact." I agree that contact with a cloth that was treated and then dried, would be much less effective, to the point of not being effective at all.

Permethrin will not keep bedbugs away or prevent you from being bitten.
There is little or no demonstrated evidence that permethrin will keep bedbugs away or prevent one from being bitten.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I agree. I am just trying to get the facts about the product clear.

I most always agree with you and I do agree with your general message, but I am going to quibble a bit with the words. :confused: Maybe it is semantic, but maybe I'm not aware of the facts, and I would like to know ...
Permethrin is an insecticide, is it not? That means it kills insects. Maybe it takes a few minutes, but I would guess that the insect would be pretty much immobilized very soon after being doused with the product. That's what I would mean by "on contact." I agree that contact with a cloth that was treated and then dried, would be much less effective, to the point of not being effective at all.


There is little or no demonstrated evidence that permethrin will keep bedbugs away or prevent one from being bitten.
I understand the quibble. :) Here is why I have described the effect on bedbugs the way that I have:

1. Within the discussions in this thread, there is a parameter of use for Permethrin: using the spray as a pre-treatment on sleeping gear or clothing. Unless I missed a posted query, we haven't been discussing dousing or directly spraying the insect, so my comments have been focused on application of the product as discussed in the thread.

I used the word "contact" in this discussion because it means physically touching or being exposed to Permethrin.

2. Per the discussions of this and other threads regarding pre treatment of fabrics, there is a lag time, from contact with Permethrin to death, that can be from 2 hours to 36 hours long. For the majority of that time the insect remains mobile and active. If the bedbug is resistant, it will survive contact altogether.

I don't know if that helps clarify things at all. :)
 

alhartman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2005 2007 Frances
2016 Leon to Santiago
My heartfelt thanks to all my fellow pilgrims who DO treat their gear with permethrin. It keeps the annoying little chinchas from hitching a ride to the next albergue.

Here is a boring 10 minute YouTube video watching the slowing and slow death of 5 of 5 bedbugs.

It is pretty much the same scene that I watched in early morning fascination as bedbugs crawled along my treated Tyvek sheet in a French chemin hotel. You can see that permethrin is not a repellent, but a very slow insecticide (video shows they are mobile for over 2.5 hours)

Also thanks to those who do not put their pack on the mattresses.

And while I am at the thanks--also to those who do not store their pack on the one chair in a 4-8 bed dorm!!
 

Mera

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France, Camino del Norte, Camino de Madrid
Camino Porto, Camino Primitivo
I didn't get any bedbug problems when I stayed at Albergues. The ones I caught were from a hotel that charged me 70 Euros. I had two more bags like that. It was a war between little me and those robust and hungry bedbugs. They were very brave. In spite of my relatively intimating size, they looked straight into my eyes. When I put them in a bag, they were furious at me as if they were saying "how dare you, a food fighting back?". I left the hotel at 4:30 am, checked into the next hotel I found, stripped down naked and gave everything, including the backpack, to the laundry service. I spent next 5 hours wrapped up in a towel. I wasted one whole day eliminating the unwanted friends.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
I don't know if that helps clarify things at all.
I would explain it this way:

a. permethrin is a contact insecticide - a bed bug has to come into contact with it on treated clothing, equipment etc for it to work. It doesn't have a vapour or the like the insect inhales which can be effective at any distance from the treated article.
b. the effect is not instantaneous, as the video in @alhartman's post shows.
c. some populations of bedbugs are developing resistance to permethrin, but I admit to not being well informed about the nature and extent of this. However, this is a normal response for large populations and is a often an indication that we have relied on a single treatment measure for too long, and are bearing the fruits of that approach.

ps the video in @alhartman's post shows that the begbugs are still pretty active after 10 minutes, but obviously affected around 15 minutes. That would certainly appear to give them enough time for a last supper, but certainly not proof of the much repeated assertion that they will do so.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
So it sounds like the main benefit of permethrin-treated gear and clothes is that they may interfere with transportation of the bugs to the next stopping place. I would think that DEET on the skin would be more preventive of bites, but I don't know. I don't like coating myself with it before bed. An absence of occurance doesn't prove anything, but I would like to know if anyone here has used either of these two methods and been bitten anyway.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
So it sounds like the main benefit of permethrin-treated gear and clothes is that they may interfere with transportation of the bugs to the next stopping place. I would think that DEET on the skin would be more preventive of bites, but I don't know. I don't like coating myself with it before bed. An absence of occurance doesn't prove anything, but I would like to know if anyone here has used either of these two methods and been bitten anyway.
I think this is a sound analysis. Permethrin treated packs will kill any hitchhikers along the way, and treatment of a sleeping bag or liner will ensure there is some protection for you and more importantly for the places you are staying.

There is evidence that, provided the concentration is sufficiently high, DEET treated material forms an effective barrier against bedbugs. See this abstract for a summary, which also identifies some other compounds that don't have DEET's odour or effect on plastics. So rather than slather yourself with DEET, it appears you should be able to treat a sheet or sleeping bag liner with DEET. Knowing my luck, I would roll around in bed and scrunch the sheet up underneath me, potentially leaving bits exposed on the far side of the barrier!
 

islandwalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrana
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chinacat

Veteran Member
ps the video in @alhartman's post shows that the begbugs are still pretty active after 10 minutes, but obviously affected around 15 minutes. That would certainly appear to give them enough time for a last supper, but certainly not proof of the much repeated assertion that they will do so.

If you were about to expire, would you be looking for a meal? 😉
 
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Jodean

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
22 Sept. to 21 Oct. 2015, Pamplona to Santiago
6-23.04 Porto to Santiago 2018
17.09-30.09 CF 2018
Would be interesting to see similar videos showing what kind of resistance lavender oil or silk provides since those seem to be quite popular "myths" on the Camino. Have looked for studies but not found anything except ads for the various essential oils.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
Would be interesting to see similar videos showing what kind of resistance lavender oil or silk provides since those seem to be quite popular "myths" on the Camino. Have looked for studies but not found anything except ads for the various essential oils.
Lavender oil soothed my bites and stopped them itching.
I spot-treated each individual bite almost immediately; all I had left in the morning were some slightly red marks.
(this was in a Pension, I never saw a bed bug in an albuerge.)

There is only one way of avoiding sleeping in a bed-bug infested bed, and that is to remove all bedding, turn the mattress over and examine every seam and every millimetre of said bed. Do the same for the area around the bed ... look for the tell tale signs .. there have been plenty of pics of these on the forum since way back when.

Your pack should remain outside the room until you are sure the room is free of the little devils.

A slightly soggy piece of soap will catch any you find, so that you can show them to the proprietor (who’ll probably tell you that you brought it in yourself, as happened to me in a popular overnight spot in SdC.)
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
If you were about to expire, would you be looking for a meal? 😉
I don't have anything but difficulty generating any insights into the mental processes of some of my fellow humans. I wouldn't pretend to think I would have any more success with other species!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
You never heard of the "Last Supper"? Or the special meals requested by inmates on their way to execution?
 

Marcus-UK

Old Git
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (2016) Camino Portuguese (2017) Considering Invierno 2019
There is an article today in the Guardian concerning bed bug infestations in German Alpine huts.

Quoting one extreme:

"One refuge has resorted to more extreme methods. The Münchner Haus, at a height of 2,964 metres on the Zugspitze mountain on the German-Austrian border, requires hikers to microwave their sleeping bags on the way in to kill the bugs. "

Some huts also require packs to be enclosed in a bag to reduce the chance of contamination.

The article also estimates 10 to 15% of huts are affected. I am not sure whether this is higher or lower than France/Spain/Portugal. The camino forum articles are not quoting statistics just stating that there are problems.

A good quote from the article states:

“It doesn’t matter if its in Germany, or Austria, or Switzerland, or France, or anywhere else,” said Bucher. “The bugs don’t recognise borders.”

The full article can be seen here:


I am not quite sure how safe microwaving a sleeping bag is? In most sleeping bags, the metalwork of the zip would make a good inductor and the induced current would at best cause a heating effect and at worst sparking and fire.
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I am not quite sure how safe microwaving a sleeping bag is? In most sleeping bags, the metalwork of the zip would make a good inductor and the induced current would at best cause a heating effect and at worst sparking and fire.
It got lost in the translation: they mean the Hüttenschlafsäcke which are made of cotton or of silk and don't have a metal zip. Their use has always been obligatory in all the Alpine huts managed by the German Alpine Club.

People are requested to microwave their sleeping bags when they enter the hut for their stay and when they leave the hut the next day. Apparently for 30 seconds at 600 Watt.

"Bed bugs don't fall from the sky, it's people who bring them here".
 
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JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
That's going to complicated extremes. I have found that simply dusting my hiking clothes with anthrax and carrying along a small, lightweight chunk of radioactive plutonium to drop into my sleeping bag each night are very effective solutions to the bedbug problem.

(as for developing resistance, those bedbugs that survive the irradiation glow in the dark, so they are easy to see at night)
 
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Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
On a more serious note, one concern that they have about the use of chemicals is apparently the fear that widespread use will lead to an increase of the resistance to insecticides.

I find it remarkable that bed bugs are appearing only now on the scene in Alpine huts and that the majority of the huts have been spared so far. The DAV makes a massive effort to keep their huts free of bed bugs and to educate the users of their huts about bed bugs and preventive measures.
 
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Marcus-UK

Old Git
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (2016) Camino Portuguese (2017) Considering Invierno 2019
On a more serious note, one concern that they have about the use of chemicals is apparently the fear that widespread use will lead to an increase of the resistance to insecticides.

I find it remarkable that bed bugs are appearing only now on the scene in Alpine huts and that the majority of the huts have been spared so far. The DAV makes a massive effort to keep their huts free of bed bugs and to educate the users of their huts about bed bugs and preventive measures.
I wonder with Alpine huts whether the installation of efficient heating has actually caused the problem. Previously in the winter months the extremely low temperatures would have killed off any infestations.
In previous "bedbug threads" the effective non-chemical treatment for bedbugs when returning from Camino was to place your entire kit inside a bin bag and the place int a chest freezer for a number of days
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
I wonder with Alpine huts whether the installation of efficient heating has actually caused the problem. Previously in the winter months the extremely low temperatures would have killed off any infestations.
Well, one article says that bed bugs freeze to death only after a longer stay at temperatures below 18 ºC and therefore turned out to be more robust than their hosts ;). Some of the huts are in very popular areas and are also open in winter. And a major problem is the fact that people bring in bed bugs again during the next season. I have no idea where from ...
 

moxy

May your search through nature lead to yourself.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015), Camino Ingles (2016), Camino Primitivo (2018), Camino Português (2019)
Permithrin kills them!;)
That’s exactly what I use on everything prior to a hike, from clothes, backpack, tent, and down quilt. It works great.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese.
I have my hopes pinned on the feet piercing properties of bean leaves, and the possibility of a material being developed that will mimic that. In the meantime I treat my pack with permethrin, put everything in dry bags and am assiduous in keeping them closed, and at night put myself in a silk sleeping envelope that I cinch closed, over my head, like a shroud!
 

Nitasele

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019)
I am home after my walk and I have not taken my stuff out of black bags for days. My first night in Santiago I woke up to bed bugs in my bed in a nice hotel. After searching the very clean room and mattress I found them in large numbers in the very clean looking box spring in a tiny opening only showing 2-3 back marks around the entrance. I had treated my shoes, backpack and luggage with permethrin and used silk liner before the walk. Still got some really ugly red around the bites on my feet, hands and stomach. The worst part was seeing the critters under my body and when I pressed on them all the blood they released. Even though I was so careful washing everything I owned on that trip that same day I found them and checked my backpack and luggage, now I am paranoid thinking the bugs are in my stuff so the bags sit on my porch.

How long do you leave them in the black bags in the sun?
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Would be interesting to see similar videos showing what kind of resistance lavender oil or silk provides since those seem to be quite popular "myths" on the Camino. Have looked for studies but not found anything except ads for the various essential oils.
The myths are based on anecdotal observations. Folks observed that their personal use of a silk liner (which is a popular fabric for warm climates) coincided with no bedbug bites. Of course, some others who did not use silk liners also experienced no bedbug bites. However, as conversations and comparing notes and discussing experiences are wont to do, those using silk liners, etc, and who did not have any bedbug bites mad the association of silk = no bedbug bites.

Most of this is bias based on storytelling and word-of-mouth.

Of course there a lots of folks who used silk, and still do, who DO get bit by bedbugs. However, what is common with anecdotal 'facts' as evidence, is that the experiential observations are self-selecting to further affirm the bias. In this case, the only information heard, shared, and focused on is that of people who also used silk and suffered no bedbug bites.

Those who also used silk, but who had bedbug bites, do not get heard for a variety of reasons: They are ignored because they do not fit the narrative; they decide not to say anything because they would be viewed negatively for not being part of the group of pro-'silkers', they might think that their experience was very atypical and so decline to say anything; they might think that they did not use the 'correct' silk or they used it wrong; etc.

The same happens with lavender and other concoctions viewed as natural. In these cases, the anecdotal evidence is not only based on the above, but is also based around confirmation bias and cherry-picking in which you ignore anything other than the result you EXPECT to see, or look at only those results which match what you WANT to see.

There is no evidence to support either silk or lavender oil ,etc. During my time with the Chelan Douglas Public Health District, I looked extensively at these issues. Right now, I cannot immediately pull up the information in my files, but lavender oil, tea tree oils, etc were as effective as using none of those substances at all. . . in other words, in practical use, there was no repellent effect.

Silk is as effective as any other material, like cotton, in providing a barrier to a bedbug. However, unless fully cocooned, bedbugs can still find a an opening through which to get a meal. Lavender oil has demonstrated no repellent effect to insects. . . but is quite effective at repelling people with sensitivity issues to such aromatics :)
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I have used a silk sleep sack that I sprayed with permethrin for each of my Caminos. Neither the silk fabric, nor the permethrin will deter a bedbug from crawling in. On my first Camino I did get three bites despite being in my treated silk sack. I was awoken at 5:00 in the morning when the woman in the bunk above me found a bedbug in her bed (dispelling the other myth that top bunks are more bed bug proof). We also saw another one crawling up the wall. I immediately packed up and started walking to my next destination, where I told the hospitalera that there was a possibility that I had bed bugs. She washed and dried everything that could go into a washing machine, and everything else was put into a plastic trash bag and sprayed with insecticide (it was a cold, rainy day, so we couldn't use the hot sun/plastic bag method). I had no other problems on that Camino.

Based on the evidence in the video in post #17 above, I still treat my sleep sack, sleeping bag, and all my cloth stuff sacks with permethrin. Not to prevent bites, but to prevent transporting live bed bugs to the next albergue or home.
 

Marcus-UK

Old Git
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles (2016) Camino Portuguese (2017) Considering Invierno 2019
I am home after my walk and I have not taken my stuff out of black bags for days. My first night in Santiago I woke up to bed bugs in my bed in a nice hotel. After searching the very clean room and mattress I found them in large numbers in the very clean looking box spring in a tiny opening only showing 2-3 back marks around the entrance. I had treated my shoes, backpack and luggage with permethrin and used silk liner before the walk. Still got some really ugly red around the bites on my feet, hands and stomach. The worst part was seeing the critters under my body and when I pressed on them all the blood they released. Even though I was so careful washing everything I owned on that trip that same day I found them and checked my backpack and luggage, now I am paranoid thinking the bugs are in my stuff so the bags sit on my porch.

How long do you leave them in the black bags in the sun?
To ensure that you do not contaminate your home I think you either need to put your bags in a chest freezer for a number of days to kill them off or use a Permethrin spray inside your bags and reseal them and leave for the best part of a week. Just leaving them in the sun is just making them ravenous!
There are numerous threads on killing bedbugs but I think the above are the only two practical considerations
.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Just leaving them in the sun is just making them ravenous!
There are numerous threads on killing bedbugs but I think the above are the only two practical considerations
.
Not true. Heat is the best way to kill bed bugs. So if the day is hot enough to get the temperature inside the bag up to 118F/48C for 90 minutes you can effectively kill bed bugs and eggs.


From the article above
Bed bugs ex- posed to 113°F will die if they receive constant exposure to that temperature for 90 minutes or more. However, they will die within 20 minutes if exposed to 118°F. Interestingly, bed bug eggs must be exposed to 118°F for 90 minutes to reach 100% mortality.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
To ensure that you do not contaminate your home I think you either need to put your bags in a chest freezer for a number of days to kill them off or use a Permethrin spray inside your bags and reseal them and leave for the best part of a week. Just leaving them in the sun is just making them ravenous!
There are numerous threads on killing bedbugs but I think the above are the only two practical considerations
.
Heat above 140F will kill bedbugs after a period of time. Freezing takes a whole lot longer, as they can survive bitter cold for prolonged periods. And not everyone has the freezer space to store belongings for a couple of weeks.

Permethrin sprays, as a method of controlling the transport of bedbugs, can still kill most bedbugs with proper application, but there are more instances of bedbugs becoming resistant to Pyrethroids, so care must be taken to assure a total kill.
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
I was online and noticed a lot of links to Mossie nets.
It occurred to me that it might be possible to use a one-person net, as long as it was entirely bug-proof, eg closed with a zip.
A hanging point might be a problem, though ... for upper bunks or beds.

@Rick of Rick and Peg ...any suggestions?
Your use for a coat hanger was just brilliant ... I’m sure you’d be able to come up with a way of fixing a simple mossie net ... 😉
 

alhartman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2005 2007 Frances
2016 Leon to Santiago
"Permethrin sprays, as a method of controlling the transport of bedbugs"
Thank you @davebugg for a totally accurate phrase.
I treat all of my gear and NEVER place my pack on a mattress as a courtesy to fellow pilgrims, not to keep cinches away from me.
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
I hear recommendations to put your backpack in a plastic compactor/trash bag and seal it up at night in the albergue. You know, I have never actually seen a single example of anyone doing this with their backpack in the albergues.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I hear recommendations to put your backpack in a plastic compactor/trash bag and seal it up at night in the albergue. You know, I have never actually seen a single example of anyone doing this with their backpack in the albergues.
I carry a large dry back (actually a "pack liner") specifically for that purpose and I do put my backpack in it when I arrive at the albergue. But I try to do it without drawing attention. The whole issue of bedbugs is sensitive - ranging from deniers, to alarmists and the insectophobes - and I prefer not to get in a discussion at that point. On the unpopulated routes I sometimes don't bother, but I've tried to make my routine as simple as possible.
 

twh

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances May/June, 2018
Porto-Muxia-Finisterre Oct (2019)
Do most bedbugs hang out on the mattress?

If yes, I wonder if draping a large flat sheet so it covers the mattress (& box spring if applicable) would help to deter bed bugs from getting to you at night.

Or using one fitted sheet on top of the mattress or 2 fitted sheets....one put on the bottom of the mattress and the second put on the top, thus encapsulating the mattress?
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Do most bedbugs hang out on the mattress?
It would be easier if they did, but unfortunately it doesn't seem to be the case. They like to hide in backpacks or retreat to crevices in the walls, cupboards, etc., during the daylight when there are no CO2-producing sleeping bodies around. Most albergues have plastic covered mattresses now.
 

Caligal

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 4- May 12, 2018
CP April 2019
I hear recommendations to put your backpack in a plastic compactor/trash bag and seal it up at night in the albergue. You know, I have never actually seen a single example of anyone doing this with their backpack in the albergues.
When i walked last spring El Serbal la luna Albergue in Pieros required everyone to put their backpacks in black trash bags before checking in.
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
if you get bed bugs in your gear while traveling, put it ALL (pack, sleeping bag, clothes, bags, etc) in a laundromat dryer at the highest heat setting for at least 30 minutes. this will cook them, guaranteed. high temp setting never hurt any of my gear. PS treat your stuff with permethrin before you leave.
Some kit is seriously damaged by the heat however, especially some of the modern ultralight stuff. Things like wool socks might not like it much either. There is no way I would put my dyneema backpack into a tumble dryer but many packs have plastic components or use fabrics that could be seriously damaged.

Permethrin is OK on most fabrics.
 

cbacino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte - Primitivo (2018)
Via Francigena (2017)
Appalachian Trail (2016)
Some kit is seriously damaged by the heat however, especially some of the modern ultralight stuff. Things like wool socks might not like it much either. There is no way I would put my dyneema backpack into a tumble dryer but many packs have plastic components or use fabrics that could be seriously damaged.

Permethrin is OK on most fabrics.
Nope. All the gear survived just fine. I’m still using all the heat-treated gear a year later (pack, sleeping bag, clothing). And the bedbugs were roasted. 🦄
 

Moorwalker

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
The Saint's Way, Cornwall
Nope. All the gear survived just fine. I’m still using all the heat-treated gear a year later (pack, sleeping bag, clothing). And the bedbugs were roasted. 🦄
That's good. However the fact remains that some fabrics and materials really are damaged by heat so it's worth checking things over before subjecting them to hot tumble drying. And some tumble dryers run much hotter than others.
 

Martin505

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
I don't have any plan now. May be in future
Lavender oil is great to use for hair growth. researcher has found that it increase the tendency of hair growth
 
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L Bed Bugs 24
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