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Being a Christian on the Camino

Daxzentzu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
FRANCES (2018) in planning
#1
There's a massive volume of information in this place. I seek more insights about what it's like to be a Christian on the camino
Are there Christians here who might point me in the right direction.


Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
 

tyrrek

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
#3
Difficult question. Just like 'What's it like to be a non-Christian on the Camino' the answer will probably be different for each individual, but I imagine similar themes would emerge among both groups. I'm thinking of humanity, spiritual refreshment, reflection, challenge etc. Christianity gives a perspective through which these experiences are understood and taken forward. ('Other perspectives are available', as they would say on the BBC).

Where the Camino really comes into its own is in understanding the history of the faith, and how it changes over time. There is that great link with tradition, the churches, the legends, the monasteries etc. Also the more challenging aspects such as depictions of St James slaying Moors, which perhaps don't effectively relay the Gospel message.

Personally for me it brought me back/closer to my faith, but I think that maybe the Camino was just a catalyst among many other factors such as my personal circumstances, time of life etc.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sept 2014)
#6
Others will probably be wiser, as I'm not able to speak from experience yet. In preparing for my up-coming camino I fiound this practical & candid first-person account by a Catholic priest to be encouraging, thought-provoking and pragmatic. I like that the author treats himself as a 'work in progress'.

To the Field of Stars: A Pilgrim's Journey to Santiago de Compostela, by Kevin A. Codd

It is written as one pilgrim's diary. Sometimes indirectly, it touches on the ups & downs of communal life on the Way, sacramental experiences, lessons in foot care & pain (!), self-awareness, prayer, contrasts between religiosity & faith, aspects of 'ministering' (or not) to the various needs of self or others, etc . It is not 'pious' in its tone and the author is very human and conscious of it. Here's a link to some reviews.

http://books.google.ca/books?id=cYXkq1uueQcC&source=gbs_navlinks_s
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#7
For me being a Christian is... being a Christian. Maybe one has more opportunities to practice this on the Camino as you interact with so many people who need something even if its only encouragement and support and the Camino seems to bring the best out in most people, its in the very soul of it.
 
S

simply B

Guest
#8
For me being a Christian is... being a Christian. Maybe one has more opportunities to practice this on the Camino as you interact with so many people who need something even if its only encouragement and support and the Camino seems to bring the best out in most people, its in the very soul of it.
Yep!

But if you need a bit more definition I would recommend two things:

1. Strive to be aware of the Two Great Commandments at all times.

2. Put that astounding account of the Sermon on the Mount on a small card and laminate it. On the Camino, meditate upon each of the points.

If you are lucky (or blessed) you may finish the Camino with these carried firmly into in your daily life....or maybe not. But you asked for insights.

(Personally, I find being a practicing Christian involves a lot more "practice" than "being Christian".;))

B
 

Daxzentzu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
FRANCES (2018) in planning
#11
It feels like I am burning with a deep hunger for Christian insights and I need to feed it.
Thank you for the suggestion about acquiring "To the Field of Stars: A Pilgrim's Journey to Santiago de Compostela" by Kevin A. Codd.
I have it now, and I am looking forward to reading it.




Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
 

pilgrim b

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances 2013
Ingles 2014
Frances 2015
St Cuthbert's Way 2017
Via Francegena 2018
#12
It feels like I am burning with a deep hunger for Christian insights and I need to feed it.
Thank you for the suggestion about acquiring "To the Field of Stars: A Pilgrim's Journey to Santiago de Compostela" by Kevin A. Codd.
I have it now, and I am looking forward to reading it.
Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
Read the introduction and the beginning of the first chapter (as part of an order offer) I have now ordered a copy. Thanks for the pointer Dax it looks a very good read. We are all a work in pr:)gress!
 

oursonpolaire

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, Toulouse/Aragon 2005, Cami S Jaume/Aragon 2007/9, Mont Saint Michel/Norte/Vadiniense 2011, Norte/Primitivo 2013, Norte/Primitivo 2014. Norte 2015, Cami S Jaume/Castellano-Aragonese 2016
#18
It seems that most "periginos" plot their way by where they sleep and eat.
Is it possible to plot my way based upon the churches on the way.
Are there any resources to enable this.
Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
Every village and pueblo along the Camino Francese has at least one church and, in many places, several. Most of them have services in the evening, usually about 6.30 or 7.00-- ask locally and you will be directed. Hours spent googling will get you lots of information and pictures of these churches, if that helps.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#19
It seems that most "periginos" plot their way by where they sleep and eat.
Is it possible to plot my way based upon the churches on the way.
Are there any resources to enable this.


Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
The millions of pilgrims who made this track did so by travelling in faith from church to church, from one Christian refuge to the next, until they reached Santiago. When they reached a church they stopped, worshipped and rested, and the sleeping and resting places were built to serve their needs. I have read that Santiago is the only city in the world that came into being because it was a sacred site - the town grew up to serve the pilgrims, rather than a city or town that already existed and later became the site of some holy event.

So there is no real distinction between plotting your way from church to church or from town to town - except perhaps an attitude of mind. For me the path itself is a sacred site; it is faith made manifest.

I highly recommend you get hold of a copy of "The Pilgrimage Road to Santiago - the Complete Cultural Handbook" by Linda Davidson and David Gitlitz (can be downloaded in ebook form from Amazon) if you are serious about understanding and following the religiously significant places on the Camino.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
#20
Most Churches in Spain are closed and locked during the day and are only open when Mass is scheduled.
In France Churches are usually always open.

Not all towns have a Mass in the evening. There is a priest shortage, like many countries, and services are often held in neighboring villages.

The schedules found on line are subject to change and are often incorrect.

You simply have to accept that as a fact and not let your expectations set you up for disappointment.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#21
....
So there is no real distinction between plotting your way from church to church or from town to town - except perhaps an attitude of mind. For me the path itself is a sacred site; it is faith made manifest. ...
Poignant words Kanga; long may the camino continue to be so.

Dax,

The Pilgrim Office of the Cathedral of Santiago has a multi language website
and on the Preparation page is a useful English discussion regarding Mass on the Camino. Once on the page click again to see a Map of Spanish churches on the Camino which have daily masses.

Created 2010/updated 2012 in Google maps this map will appear in a separate widow entitled Parroquias de los Caminos de Santiago. Included are parishes in Galicia located on the Camino Portugues. The map lists opening times for the churches and gives the current mass times as of 2012. You can copy the map as a KML file to then add to your own set of Google maps for further reference while walking. Or you can click print to make a continuous flat copy with a wealth of reference data.

Buen Camino,

Margaret Meredith
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#22
It seems that most "periginos" plot their way by where they sleep and eat.
Is it possible to plot my way based upon the churches on the way.
Are there any resources to enable this.
Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
Dax,

You might also be interested in staying in monasteries along your way. Check out what other pilgrims and I have suggested as possible monastic stops in this earlier Forum thread.

Happy planning,

MM
 
#23
I had a good experience in Villar de Mazarife. Stayed in the albergue just opposite the church (closed on arrival). But then suddenly the hospitalera (owner?) went around and said that the church was now open. No evening mass though.

Although though I am a Lutheran, I went to the evening masses when they were there. I especially recall Roncesvalles where pilgrims were asked to step forward to get the special pilgrim blessing. The same in los Arcos. In Carrion de los Condes, it was very special. Stay there and you will see.

Although I wished to take communion on a couple of occasion, I didn't do it out of respect for the catholic dogmas.

annelise

- and I especially appreciate the part when you are asked to stand up and shake hands with all around - front, back and beside, wishing 'pace'.

I was totally caught unawares in Antigua (Mexico) some years ago when I chose to stand behind the last row of chairs (didn't dare to sit down as I was totally unaware about when to kneel, sit, or stand up) - and sudden those in the back row turned around to shake my hand. I was very moved ...
 
#25
Poignant words Kanga; long may the camino continue to be so.

Created 2010/updated 2012 in Google maps this map will appear in a separate widow entitled Parroquias de los Caminos de Santiago. Included are parishes in Galicia located on the Camino Portugues. The map lists opening times for the churches and gives the current mass times as of 2012. You can copy the map as a KML file to then add to your own set of Google maps for further reference while walking. Or you can click print to make a continuous flat copy with a wealth of reference data.
Thanks Margaret, I had missed this.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#27
We downloaded the Meditation 'Forty Days' specially written for the pilgrimage to Santiago. We printed out the full version with the pictures, but for the camino we just printed the text to save weight. The link is still live http://gryjhnsn.tripod.com/santiago/fortydays.pdf
Our method was to read the next days section each evening so we could think about it while walking next day. Also along the Norte and Primitivo there are not only churches but little capillas de anima approximately where pilgrims would have reached each day and could say the Angelus. There might be some too on the Francés where it is genuinely on the ancient route.
Apart from the greater opportunity for reflection, prayer, opportunity to serve /help others etc it is like being a Christian at home. If someone asks about your reasons for walking or your faith then you can share with them, for others it is how you are that will speak to them more....................etc, and some people will not appreciate you sharing anything and silence is best. :)
Buen Camino
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012 Dieppe, FR Bici CF.
2014 Ruta Vasco/CF/Primativo
#30
It seems that most "periginos" plot their way by where they sleep and eat.
Is it possible to plot my way based upon the churches on the way.
Are there any resources to enable this.


Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
Just walk... They will find YOU. Plot any course you want. Better yet plot NO course and stop where you are called to stop. There are no rules about anything here. My work as a Christian on this earth is to wake up, say "Thank you" and be kind.... That's it...
 
Camino(s) past & future
September 2014 Leon-Santiago de Compostella
#31
Without trying not to be to theological, here are some observations.

The great difference between the spirituality of liturgical churches (i.e. Catholic, Easter Orthodox, High Anglican) and the spirituality of non-liturgical churches (i.e. your average, run of the mill, Protestant) is the way grace is received by the believer. Non-liturgical spirituality tends to be more "God and me", meaning grace is received at any time, in a personal way. (I stare at a sun set and I'm assaulted by a sense of awe, in which I encounter God.)

Liturgical spirituality is more "God and us", meaning by purposely doing certain movements with their bodies (sit, kneel, walk long distances in pilgrimage, share a meal, pray in community, etc) practitioners receive grace, and encounter God in the neighbor.

This been said it depends what your spirituality is. If you are more used to the "God and me" then you should look for opportunities to commune privately with God, and be attentive to the interior movements of grace. If you are more of the "God and us" then you are in luck since the Camino, been an ancient Catholic practice, is well suited to this type of experience.

The one caution I would give is in the practice of "works of mercy". Yes, we are supposed to help those who need help but the Camino an interior spiritual exercise, there will be time later for feeding the poor, visiting the imprisoned, correcting the mistaken, and burying the dead.

"Viva Cristo Rey!!"
Camino bound, Sept 2014!
Deacon Harbey Santiago
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2013) Frances (2014) St. Oswald's Way (2015) Le Puy (2016) Portugues (2018)
#32
Hello, Dax, I'm reading a wonderful book you and others might enjoy: Pilgrimages: The Great Adventure of the Middle Ages by John Ure (available in Kindle version) that looks at the greater and lesser pilgrimage routes and talks about them as manifestations of religious devotion and outlets for adventure. Fascinating and, at times, very funny look at the essential functions of pilgrimage -- which are to dispel religious and secular boredom. Pilgrimage survives, I suppose, because it has an amazing ability to quench many thirsts.
 

nigeloz

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept/Oct 2014
#33
Without trying not to be to theological, here are some observations.

The great difference between the spirituality of liturgical churches (i.e. Catholic, Easter Orthodox, High Anglican) and the spirituality of non-liturgical churches (i.e. your average, run of the mill, Protestant) is the way grace is received by the believer. Non-liturgical spirituality tends to be more "God and me", meaning grace is received at any time, in a personal way. (I stare at a sun set and I'm assaulted by a sense of awe, in which I encounter God.)

Liturgical spirituality is more "God and us", meaning by purposely doing certain movements with their bodies (sit, kneel, walk long distances in pilgrimage, share a meal, pray in community, etc) practitioners receive grace, and encounter God in the neighbor.

This been said it depends what your spirituality is. If you are more used to the "God and me" then you should look for opportunities to commune privately with God, and be attentive to the interior movements of grace. If you are more of the "God and us" then you are in luck since the Camino, been an ancient Catholic practice, is well suited to this type of experience.

The one caution I would give is in the practice of "works of mercy". Yes, we are supposed to help those who need help but the Camino an interior spiritual exercise, there will be time later for feeding the poor, visiting the imprisoned, correcting the mistaken, and burying the dead.

"Viva Cristo Rey!!"
Camino bound, Sept 2014!
Deacon Harbey Santiago
We too leave Sept 2014. Starting approx 5 or 6 Sept from SJPDP. For us we know that God is leading us at this time. And also as age marches on we also know that it is better to go sooner rather than later. I am encouraged by the comments of others and I believe there will be many seeking answers on the journey. Hope to meet up on the Way.
Richest Blessings in Him
Nigel & Marilyn
 

Bogong

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
First, March 2014
#34
It feels like I am burning with a deep hunger for Christian insights and I need to feed it.
Thank you for the suggestion about acquiring "To the Field of Stars: A Pilgrim's Journey to Santiago de Compostela" by Kevin A. Codd.
I have it now, and I am looking forward to reading it.




Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)

I'm a work in progress too.

I've struggled with this for decades, but now realise that that it's quite simple, really.

Christianity is about love. Beginning and end of story. Erudite theological concepts are perhaps fun to cogitate, but fundamentally if it's not simple enough for a child to understand it's either irrelevant or wrong. That's what I've come to anyway.

That's the theory. The practice is more difficult, as it's a love which gives rather than receives. (have a look at John Ch 13 vv 34-35 and 1 John ch 4 v 10 to get the picture). I did experience this love, as a recipient, from other pilgrims I met and I hope in some way I was able to return it. It remains a bit of a struggle for me. I don't know whether they were all Christians or not (some were) but it didn't matter.

Some say that their walk was a life-changing experience. Not for me - basically it was just walking about three times my normal daily walk carrying a pack - but on a personal level something did hit me crossing the Meseta alone early morning. It was a feeling of being enveloped in an overall sense of comfort and protection which made the whole universe seem puny. Uncanny.

Camino de Santiago is the way of St James. Traditionally it doesn't end in the city itself but in the Cathedral, the traditional site of his tomb, and culminates in a Mass. It's the most celebrated pilgrimage in the world. By the way I'm not a Catholic but have no issues with taking communion.

Many people do the walk for different reasons and this is traditional too. It was a significant trade route in the middle ages, and there were bandits and robbers on the way, as well.

But the pilgrimage was for me. And I hope I haven't breached the site rules in posting this.

De colores

Bogong (aka John)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
#35
I think the camino is a probably different 'thing' for each one of us.
As a Christian, I find my daily life so full of [probably unnecessary] ties and jobs to be done.... I need my computer to check what my tasks are for today. Ah! Shopping this morning ... fetching my wife from the grand-children at 5 p.m., then a meeting this evening ... and I must do some preparation for a church service on Sunday ... and ....
When I'm on camino I think of just two things - Where shall I eat? and Where shall I sleep? And that's it.
Of course the 'camino family' is also a vital part of it each day - but that's mainly in the evenings when we share our stories together in peace and love.
That gives me time to talk to God, to go to church if there's a service on as I pass, to really enjoy the beauty of nature - which is all God made.
I walk the quiet paths: I've never been on the Camino Frances ;)
I decided that the camino I've just finished - both arms of the Ingles - would be my last. Then, on my last day in Santiago I saw yellow arrows on the pavement outside my B&B pointing AWAY from the city ... I had discovered the camino to Finisterre!
So that is my plan for 2015 ... but you know what they say about 'plans' - if you want to make God laugh, tell Him your plans!!
Whichever path you take - Buen camino.
 
#36
Here's another one, albeit Catholic: "Hiking the Camino: 500 Miles with Jesus" by Father Dave Pivonka. Both instructive and humorous.
To the Field of Dreams (mentioned above) is also from a Catholic perspective. Kevin Codd is a priest. It was a good read on the Camino. I haven 't read the Hiking the Camino: 500 Miles with Jesus book. I'll have to add it to my wish list.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances ('05)
#37
The Camino gives you a lot of quiet solitude for prayer. Sometimes you're out there struggling (physically, emotionally, mentally) and there's nobody to talk to about it but Christ.

I met a peregrine who walked Vezelay, France--> Santiago. She told me she'd never believed in God until she spent all that time alone on the Vezelay path--she realized she was, in fact, not alone.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Leon to Santiago May 21 to June 3, 2014
Ponferrada to Santiago September 2015
#38
There's a massive volume of information in this place. I seek more insights about what it's like to be a Christian on the camino
Are there Christians here who might point me in the right direction.


Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
I know not everyone thinks electronic devices are congruent with the Camino, but downloading The Bible is a wonderful resource to have. Another excellent resource is Sacred Space, a website by Irish Jesuits. It gives you a weekly reflection and a guide to daily prayer based on the gospel of the day. But with or without "tools", use the solitude for prayer and reflection.
Buen Camino
 

smj6

Siempre hay que ver el positivo
Camino(s) past & future
Oct/Nov 2016 (Via Podensis/ Frances)
Oct 2018 (Via Francigena stage)
#39
..................I fiound this practical & candid first-person account by a Catholic priest to be encouraging, thought-provoking and pragmatic. I like that the author treats himself as a 'work in progress'.
To the Field of Stars: A Pilgrim's Journey to Santiago de Compostela, by Kevin A. Codd
It is written as one pilgrim's diary. Sometimes indirectly, it touches on the ups & downs of communal life on the Way, sacramental experiences, lessons in foot care & pain (!), self-awareness, prayer, contrasts between religiosity & faith, aspects of 'ministering' (or not) to the various needs of self or others, etc . It is not 'pious' in its tone and the author is very human and conscious of it. Here's a link to some reviews.
http://books.google.ca/books?id=cYXkq1uueQcC&source=gbs_navlinks_s
I find it fascinating trolling through this forum (circumventing the occasional tirades) and finding gems of information. Have looked up this book, and just downloaded it onto my Kindle. Looking forward to reading it.
Thank you to so many people who take the time to talk about their experiences on the Camino.
Suzanne :)
 

Minta

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#40
Others will probably be wiser, as I'm not able to speak from experience yet. In preparing for my up-coming camino I fiound this practical & candid first-person account by a Catholic priest to be encouraging, thought-provoking and pragmatic. I like that the author treats himself as a 'work in progress'.

To the Field of Stars: A Pilgrim's Journey to Santiago de Compostela, by Kevin A. Codd

It is written as one pilgrim's diary. Sometimes indirectly, it touches on the ups & downs of communal life on the Way, sacramental experiences, lessons in foot care & pain (!), self-awareness, prayer, contrasts between religiosity & faith, aspects of 'ministering' (or not) to the various needs of self or others, etc . It is not 'pious' in its tone and the author is very human and conscious of it. Here's a link to some reviews.

http://books.google.ca/books?id=cYXkq1uueQcC&source=gbs_navlinks_s
I also really enjoyed this book!
 

Minta

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
#41
I am coming to this conversation quite late, the last post being from September of 2014. I have appreciated the resources found here, but am wondering...if there is a rule on this forum about not discussing religion, does anyone out there know a site where pilgrims are indeed allowed to speak openly of such? I find much here to aid me in my planning, physically, mentally, and spiritually, but would also enjoy the opportunity to discuss the pilgrimage from a religious perspective. Thanks for any aid you might be able to offer.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#43
I am coming to this conversation quite late, the last post being from September of 2014. I have appreciated the resources found here, but am wondering...if there is a rule on this forum about not discussing religion, does anyone out there know a site where pilgrims are indeed allowed to speak openly of such? I find much here to aid me in my planning, physically, mentally, and spiritually, but would also enjoy the opportunity to discuss the pilgrimage from a religious perspective. Thanks for any aid you might be able to offer.
Welcome Minta, there is a section where you can post on such matters and where like minded people can discuss issues of interest. See link below.
https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/social-categories/special-camino-topics.147/
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
#44
I am coming to this conversation quite late, the last post being from September of 2014. I have appreciated the resources found here, but am wondering...if there is a rule on this forum about not discussing religion, does anyone out there know a site where pilgrims are indeed allowed to speak openly of such? I find much here to aid me in my planning, physically, mentally, and spiritually, but would also enjoy the opportunity to discuss the pilgrimage from a religious perspective. Thanks for any aid you might be able to offer.
This thread actually is post the 'religious discussion' rule, so as you can see some posting is acceptable. Sadly as @falcon269 says 'rarely ended well', indeed very often such threads became actually abusive, hence the rule. If you decide to use the discussion area @wayfarer gives the link for then I suggest that you maybe need to post a link (maybe here) so that like minded folk know where to find it.

If there is a better way then could @wayfarer, or another moderator, please clarify how like minded folk can find such a discussion please.
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#45
This thread actually is post the 'religious discussion' rule, so as you can see some posting is acceptable. Sadly as @falcon269 says 'rarely ended well', indeed very often such threads became actually abusive, hence the rule. If you decide to use the discussion area @wayfarer gives the link for then I suggest that you maybe need to post a link (maybe here) so that like minded folk know where to find it.

If there is a better way then could @wayfarer, or another moderator, please clarify how like minded folk can find such a discussion please.
From what I remember most people go to the linked section and either join one of the discussions there or start a new Thread there. A message to that effect with a link here would be a good idea.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2011, 2018
#46
Camino(s) past & future
Stages on both French and Northern routes. Plan to walk Tui to Santiago in June 2017
#47
It feels like I am burning with a deep hunger for Christian insights and I need to feed it.
Thank you for the suggestion about acquiring "To the Field of Stars: A Pilgrim's Journey to Santiago de Compostela" by Kevin A. Codd.
I have it now, and I am looking forward to reading it.




Dax
In Pune, (a work in progress)
I think you would also enjoy the cloud of unknowing by Thomas a Kempis it was written in the 14th century but is still an easy read and is very helpful in developing the virtue of meekness, with which almost over half of the book is concerned, and on refocusing the direction of our hearts on charity, and purity of heart. I think you would derive a lot of joy from it.
When you walk try to free up your mind leave worries, troubles all that stuff that doesn't really matter behind you. Turn off your phone and only put it on if you really need to in the evening time it's a distraction. God knows where to find you.Let the Camino envelope you, don't go with a prescribed idea of what you expect to get from it , just let it happen!
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#49
This link is no longer working. I would love to find an active forum on the subject and any help would be appreciated. Thank you.
Hi Catherine, I have checked and the "social-categories" section did not transfer with the new forum. Sorry for the delay in replying.
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
#51
I'm ready to give up myself to the way of St James

and reading the posts in the thread that I started so long ago, it's obvious that there is no one size fits all
You mean it's time to put boots on the ground? Go for it!! :) Each walk is different as each time and each pilgrim is different. The reasons I'm walking this time are quite different from any of the others. And they have all been instructive and wonderful and memorable. Buen Camino!
 

Stacey Wittig

Stand at the crossroads and look
Camino(s) past & future
Leon-Santiago (2005)
Arles-Toulouse (2006)
St. Jean Pied de Port-Burgos (2008)
Lourdes-Santiago (2015)
Le Puy-Santiago (2016)
Camino Primitivo (2017)
#52
Will this be your first Camino de Santiago? I loved reading most of the thread that reaches back to 2014
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#55
I'm ready to give up myself to the way of St James
and reading the posts in the thread that I started so long ago, it's obvious that there is no one size fits all
You're right. There is no 'cookie cutter' camino.
Buen Camino, @Daxzentzu ! Finally, it is your time to head out the door and onto the way.
May the pilgrimage be everything you hope and need (which will likely be 2 different things...)...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#56
I have read the first four, and the last few posts. You are about to walk your camino, after at least 4 years of contemplating walking it. One step after another, and ready to give and take... buen camino, may you bless and be blessed. If you have not read it, please read about the cyborg turtle’s camino. It will put a spring in your step!
 

Daxzentzu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
FRANCES (2018) in planning
#57
You mean it's time to put boots on the ground? Go for it!! :) Each walk is different as each time and each pilgrim is different. The reasons I'm walking this time are quite different from any of the others. And they have all been instructive and wonderful and memorable. Buen Camino!
yes time to put my boots on the ground
 

Daxzentzu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
FRANCES (2018) in planning
#58
I have read the first four, and the last few posts. You are about to walk your camino, after at least 4 years of contemplating walking it. One step after another, and ready to give and take... buen camino, may you bless and be blessed. If you have not read it, please read about the cyborg turtle’s camino. It will put a spring in your step!
thank you for your wishes

in 4 years many things have changed for me and it has been the contemplation of the walking the way of St James that has been an unchanging aspect of my life
 
Camino(s) past & future
November (2018)
#59
Hopefully I don't run afoul of the rules here. I am truly curious if anyone can elaborate on the reasons listed on the "Credencial" for doing a Camino. Devotion, vote, and mercy are listed. I did a search but nothing useful came up. Does anyone know what these terms mean and how they apply to the Camino? Especially curious what is meant by "vote"?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - central from Porto (2018 - planned)
#60
Just a guess but it might relate to "votive" - offered or consecrated in fulfillment of a vow. So, if you are walking the Camino as a result of a vow to God to do so.
 
Camino(s) past & future
November (2018)
#61
All good points and I thank you all for the insight. It has made the interpretation much more understandable. I find the nuances intriguing.
 

DLJ

Member
Camino(s) past & future
(4/2012) St.Jean to Santiago; (9/2013) Geneva to Le Puy-en-Velay and beyond
#62
Obviously, the Pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela was originally, and for eons after a Catholic endeavour. But, today, walked by, peoples of all faiths, beliefs and none, the Camino recognizes all as Pilgrims, and all are touched in some way by the "Spirit" of the Camino. The Camino will tattoo both questions and answers on the soul of all, who stay open to the experience.
 


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