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Being English I Like my Tea

2020 Camino Guides

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
Just a quick question regarding the Albergue along the CF.
Being English I do like my cup of tea first thing in the morning, I'm happy to bring tea bags and cup, but can you please tell me if there will be kettle facilities in the Albergue.

Thanks
 

LesBrass

Likes Walking
Camino(s) past & future
yes...
Oh Waka I am so with you on this one! Most places I stayed, there was a kettle and sometimes there was tea (but not as we know it :D ) - often there was also milk and sugar and only on one occassion did we opt for a black tea.

Even on route some places offer Lipton's Yellow or English Breakfast Tea but for me this was a bit weak... you can always pop in your own bag to strenghten it. I have also asked for hot water in bars and once they did this without even charging... so I order something else to compensate.

All in all there are ample opportunities to get your fix :)
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
You should be able to get tea at rest places on the Frances, I drink coffee, but my girlfriend who is Spanish likes tea and she managed to get it when there was a cafe or a bar on the San Salvador route last summer.
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
Just a quick question regarding the Albergue along the CF.
Being English I do like my cup of tea first thing in the morning, I'm happy to bring tea bags and cup, but can you please tell me if there will be kettle facilities in the Albergue.

Thanks
Waka,

There is NO NORM in the albergues! Some have kitchens; others do not. Some kitchens have kettles; others do not. However some of us wise old veterans do get around the 'cuppa' problem by carrying an electric coil. Frankly it is the only luxury that I do carry. What bliss it is to sip an early morning tea while waiting for dawn to start walking.

Happy teatime and Buen camino!

MM
 

Rajy62

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2013, Norte/primitivo 2014, vdlp (2015)
I am not English, but like tea also, perhaps has to do with being colonized by the English....I didn't have trouble ordering tea on the Camino. You may have limited selection though. Make sure you ask for "tea negro", otherwise they give you herbal tea. Most alberques i stayed in had a kitchen.
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
My Spanish friends think I cannot be English because I don't drink tea, don't carry an umbrella, drink cider not beer or lager, have never been to Benidorm and actually know another language!
So the truth is out...you're not Al the optimist, you're Al the (English) imposter! :D
 

cher99840

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
I second @mspath in recommending the coil. I like getting my first fix (tea or coffee, I carry both) before setting out in the morning.
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
Waka,

There is NO NORM in the albergues! Some have kitchens; others do not. Some kitchens have kettles; others do not. However some of us wise old veterans do get around the 'cuppa' problem by carrying an electric coil. Frankly it is the only luxury that I do carry. What bliss it is to sip an early morning tea while waiting for dawn to start walking.

Happy teatime and Buen camino!

MM

Never thought of the electric coil as a back up, might have to look into that.
I'm ok for coffee during the rest of the day, but it's that early morning tea that wakes me up.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Along the way the tea possibilities are patchy.
But the tea at the Tertulia in Santago is FANTASTIC. Go early to the forum meet-up and enjoy some real tea! ;)
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
Along the way the tea possibilities are patchy.
But the tea at the Tertulia in Santago is FANTASTIC. Go early to the forum meet-up and enjoy some real tea! ;)
Thanks, duly noted. Hopefully I'll make it that far!!!
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
My Spanish friends think I cannot be English because I don't drink tea, don't carry an umbrella, drink cider not beer or lager, have never been to Benidorm and actually know another language!
Ha ha....every time I read a post on here about umbrellas I have a mental picture of a dude walking the Camino wearing a dark suit, bowler hat and sporting an umbrella.
 

Rich1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2015)
Camino Frances (2016-2018)
A complicated Camino from Madrid (Aug/Sep 18)
Top question and one that has been vexing me also :)
May have to be some teabags with me - can I afford the extra weight ;)
 

Rich1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2015)
Camino Frances (2016-2018)
A complicated Camino from Madrid (Aug/Sep 18)
Too heavy, Al ;)
 

cher99840

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013, 2017 Camino Frances SJPP-Santiago
2015 St. Olav's Way Oslo-Trondheim
2017 VdlP Seville-Merida
Top question and one that has been vexing me also :)
May have to be some teabags with me - can I afford the extra weight ;)
It was my one luxury. Nine oz of coil, tea, and Starbucks Via coffee. It was all neatly contained in a gallon ziplock and could have been jettisoned at any time--but it wasn't.

Oh, there was a Sea to Summit cup that folded flat in there too.
 

bystander

Veteran Member
Waka,
Any resemblance between Lipton's and tea is less than coincidental.
Ghastly stuff.
I've tried, in both USA and Chile, doubling up on quantities of Lipton's, stewing it and it's still complete gn@t's p!ss.
Take some Yorkshire tea with you and have fun trying to find "real" milk.

You'd be much better off being a typical "Rosbif" of yore and having ale to break your fast!

Al,
Another language?
After a bottle of wine I'm multilingual in one language.
What's your excuse?
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
Waka,
Any resemblance between Lipton's and tea is less than coincidental.
Ghastly stuff.
I've tried, in both USA and Chile, doubling up on quantities of Lipton's, stewing it and it's still complete gn@t's p!ss.
Take some Yorkshire tea with you and have fun trying to find "real" milk.

You'd be much better off being a typical "Rosbif" of yore and having ale to break your fast!
I'll certainly take some good strong tea with me, regarding the milk, if it's not available then I'll settle for black.

What part of Wessex are you from?
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
And there are always microwaves to heat your tea water, or, even worse, just the hot water coming out of the tap. Brrr, anything for that caffeine/teaine shot in the morning that helps to find the next yellow arrow! Buen Camino, SY
 

Dennis Tam

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino France 2012, 2014. Camino Portugues 2014, Via Francigena, 2013. Camino Norte 2016
I also bring my own tea bags to all my Camino trips. Most of supermarkets over at Spain would have decent selection of tea bags for purchase. I have tried some very interesting tea there. There is nothing more soothing than having a hot cup of tea before heading out to the cool moring. Buen camino.
 

Annie G

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2016)
I'm on the other end of the time clock. Need my bedtime chamomile tea while I read prior to Sleepville. Plan on bringing a coil and at least 35 bags of Stash Chamomile Nights. I don't care how much room it takes up.
 

Pattii

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2016)
Just a quick question regarding the Albergue along the CF.
Being English I do like my cup of tea first thing in the morning, I'm happy to bring tea bags and cup, but can you please tell me if there will be kettle facilities in the Albergue.

Thanks
One of our veterans brings an electric coil that fits in your cup and heats the water...that might be an idea just incase?

http://www.kitchenkapers.com/immersion-heater.html
 

vlogan

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Various
Most coffee shops and bars have tea. Last year I had a choice of either green or English breakfast tea almost everyday.
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
There was me thinking that starting a thread about tea wouldn't get much of a response. It's really nice to know that there are so many non English tea lovers out there.
I'll be taking my own, just weighed out 50 tea bags and it comes to 110g, well worth the extra weight.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
You can buy really good tea bags, and in different varieties, in bigger towns like Pamplona, Logrono, Leon ect. SY
 
Waka,
Al,
Another language?
After a bottle of wine I'm multilingual in one language.
What's your excuse?
Born in South Staffordshire bordering on the Black Country multi-lingual - English as she should be spake, YamYam and Brummie. Can even understand some of what my Geordie pal says! As for the rest I blame my education for my poor attempts at all except my Spanish, for which I thank many Tapas Bars and girlfriends.
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
Al can't be from Devon because he doesn't carry an umbrella, where it's 'occasionally' known to rain...and rain and rain and rain and rain! ;)
My 2nd year in Devon(2000) the Western Morning News had a little count up on the front page every day of how many days it had rained in a row, it started in the 80's and it had gone 100+ before a day off came just before Xmas.
 

Rich1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May 2015)
Camino Frances (2016-2018)
A complicated Camino from Madrid (Aug/Sep 18)
...just weighed out 50 tea bags and it comes to 110g, well worth the extra weight.
That's brilliant news - count me in on tea-carrying ;)
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
Waka, make sure you stay in Rabanal. There you get a real cup of tea in the afternoon. Really civilised!
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
The camino does strange things to your preferences!

Before I walked, I thought that I was incapable of doing anything without my first brew of the morning. I also thought that coffee made with 50% heated milk was vile and never took sugar.

So first morning off, I had a bottle of cold water and a banana to eat. Walked happily for nearly 2 hours before I stopped at a cafe for a cafe con leche and something to eat. Later around lunchtime when tea is again usually essential, I found that a cool beer made a very acceptable alternative. And again at 4. I think I only had 2 cuppas the entire month I was on the camino, and never had withdrawal symptoms. Strange how the camino provides!

But then this was during Sept when the weather was delightful.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
The camino does strange things to your preferences!

Before I walked, I thought that I was incapable of doing anything without my first brew of the morning. I also thought that coffee made with 50% heated milk was vile and never took sugar.

So first morning off, I had a bottle of cold water and a banana to eat. Walked happily for nearly 2 hours before I stopped at a cafe for a cafe con leche and something to eat. Later around lunchtime when tea is again usually essential, I found that a cool beer made a very acceptable alternative. And again at 4. I think I only had 2 cuppas the entire month I was on the camino, and never had withdrawal symptoms. Strange how the camino provides!

But then this was during Sept when the weather was delightful.
Indeed, the Camino gives you what you truly need, but not always what you think you need. SY
 

Lachance

Me llamo Deb
Camino(s) past & future
Part Francese 2016
There was me thinking that starting a thread about tea wouldn't get much of a response. It's really nice to know that there are so many non English tea lovers out there.
I'll be taking my own, just weighed out 50 tea bags and it comes to 110g, well worth the extra weight.
Here's another. Teabags and heating element on the packing list now, thanks. And to think, I might have missed it. They're always provided here in Oz, from budget motel to 5* hotel. Now remember having to take mini jug, mug and teabags on any trips to Europe in days gone by. You couldn't even get a proper cuppa in most cafes back then - they'd bring a jug of hot water, cup and saucer and a teabag.

Take some Yorkshire tea with you and have fun trying to find "real" milk
Hope you mean "real" as in fresh and not mucked about with? With all those cows...
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Never thought of the electric coil as a back up, might have to look into that.
I'm ok for coffee during the rest of the day, but it's that early morning tea that wakes me up.
Oh, it's been so long since we had an electric coil discussion -- it makes me miss Susanna from Sweden even more!

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/the-electric-coil-changed-my-life-on-the-camino.19167/

I know there are many people who say that it's silly to bring a coil on the Camino Francés. I rarely am on the Francés and I would have had many mornings with no coffee without my beloved coil. It's a personal decision about whether its weight is worth it or not, but for me it definitely is! Buen camino, Laurie
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
As far as I'm concerned, a cup of tea without milk in it is not worth drinking. So to those of you who took teabags etc, what did you do about milk? Did you buy a whole carton and leave it behind each day, take dried milk or milk sticks, or drink it black? Or where you lucky enough to find milk in an albergue kitchen, as I once did?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
As far as I'm concerned, a cup of tea without milk in it is not worth drinking. So to those of you who took teabags etc, what did you do about milk? Did you buy a whole carton and leave it behind each day, take dried milk or milk sticks, or drink it black? Or where you lucky enough to find milk in an albergue kitchen, as I once did?
Hi, Felice,
Well, though I'm a coffee drinker, I have a similar opinion about a cup of tea without milk. But what I have found to be most available is not exactly my ideal -- I buy condensed milk in a tube, which means that my coffee is also sweetened. I have learned that I prefer sweet and with milk over no milk. Last year I tried to find some powdered milk to bring with me, but could only find it in huge quantities, so I went back to my "leche condensada en un tubo." Very widely available.
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
Peregrina - oh please no no NO NO! NOT condensed milk......... Give me cafe con leche any day rather than THAT!!!!

On holiday, we take UHT milk sticks with us, which make a fairly poor cuppa, which is OK first thing in the morning but I'm not so desperate that I am prepared to take a couple of dozen sticks with me when walking.

Am I a tea snob for only liking fresh milk in my tea???
 

Waka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Some but not all, and other routes too.
[QUOTE="

Am I a tea snob for only liking fresh milk in my tea???[/QUOTE]

Not at all, fresh milk is the only way to go. Having said that if there's none available I'll take it black, not ideal but I'm afraid I can't substitute for fresh milk.
 

hecate105

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2009 Portuguese Estellas 2014 Aurelia 2016 St Davids 2017 Via Augusta/V dl P. 2018 Michael Mary Way
Take yer teabags - life's too short to do without and life's too dear to drink Liptons... Also if you take a small plastic bag of powdered milk - it will do when there's no fresh milk.
Anyone cycling - do not carry fresh milk or even soya milk - you end up with something that looks like yoghurt but in no way tastes like it!
Those carrying a Devon flag - beware - folk will think you are from Sweden - even if you are round and dark... But take heart - altho' ending a pilgrimage is hellish - returning home to Devon reminds you that you are G/god's chosen one!
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Peregrina - oh please no no NO NO! NOT condensed milk......... Give me cafe con leche any day rather than THAT!!!!

On holiday, we take UHT milk sticks with us, which make a fairly poor cuppa, which is OK first thing in the morning but I'm not so desperate that I am prepared to take a couple of dozen sticks with me when walking.

Am I a tea snob for only liking fresh milk in my tea???
Well, Felice, I agree with you, but it's all a question of compromises. On many days I buy a liter of milk in a box and just leave the rest behind. It's not that expensive, and I'm sure others use it up. So, all you have to do is remember to buy a liter of milk the night before.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
As far as I'm concerned, a cup of tea without milk in it is not worth drinking. So to those of you who took teabags etc, what did you do about milk? Did you buy a whole carton and leave it behind each day, take dried milk or milk sticks, or drink it black? Or where you lucky enough to find milk in an albergue kitchen, as I once did?
Easy: If you are at a bar the previous evening ask/pinch/leave a donativo for some of their 'portioned' milk, you know, the ones in tiny plastic containers. Buen Camino! SY
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
See signature
Oh it's lovely to read a light-hearted conversation about such serious subjects as tea and coffee :D
I always bring English tea bags with me to France and Spain (Yorkshire tea!) as nothing else will do but... Never on the Camino ! I switch to 'cafe solo' with no trouble....
Oh and I have no probs with the Rioja wine either :D (yet I never drink red wine at home...)
 

La Barre

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances, Roncesvalles to SdC 2010
C. Frances, SJPDP to Sdc 2012
C.Frances,SJPDP to Finisterre 2014
C.Portuguese, Lisbon to SdC(hopscotch) Sept. 2015
C. Frances SJPDP to Muxia 2017
You can make your own " milk sticks". Take a large diameter straw and seal one end with heated pliers or even a hot hair straightener, fill the straw with powdered milk, creamer, what ever you want and seal the other end. Buen caffeinated Camino.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
.......oh please no no NO NO! NOT condensed milk.........
That's funny! Having been born and raised in the tropics, where fresh milk is difficult to come by, condensed milk is very close to my heart, and coffee sweetened with condensed milk is way up there among my favourite things. In fact, I try constantly not to buy condensed milk, whether in a tube or can, as I like it so much I can't resist consuming it straight.:)
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
That's funny! Having been born and raised in the tropics, where fresh milk is difficult to come by, condensed milk is very close to my heart, and coffee sweetened with condensed milk is way up there among my favourite things. In fact, I try constantly not to buy condensed milk, whether in a tube or can, as I like it so much I can't resist consuming it straight.:)
Hmm, maybe that's why I am so averse to tea with condensed milk. I spent many years working in the Middle East, when I already had a serious tea addiction, and I hated the tea I was served there - very strong, made with evaporated milk (Bonny Maid or Rainbow) and undrinkable without sugar. Brings back too many memories of working in vile back offices, trying to make sense of things.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Hmm, maybe that's why I am so averse to tea with condensed milk. I spent many years working in the Middle East, when I already had a serious tea addiction, and I hated the tea I was served there - very strong, made with evaporated milk (Bonny Maid or Rainbow) and undrinkable without sugar. Brings back too many memories of working in vile back offices, trying to make sense of things.
I can quite understand @Felice that your taste for canned milk is coloured by your memories of those vile offices in which you had to work. My memories, on the other hand, of drinking coffee with condensed milk is of sitting of a morning enjoying the north east trades and listening to birdsong. ......... Sorry! ..... yes, I'm Canadian now, so I will say ....sorry!:oops::)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Sept (2014)
So grateful that I like my cafe con leche and cortado
Hello Al, every time I asked for tea "con leche" I was given hot milk with froth, which is not great in a cup of tea. I carried 6 little containers of UHT milk with me and teabags. While we were in Europe we bought an electric kettle as hotels don't do the tea making thing and I seriously wondered about trying to fit it in my pack to take to Spain, but sense prevailed and we sent it to friends in France before we began the Camino. I did bring it back to Australia with me though!!
 

Aliotmail.co

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
2012=2 weeks; 2013= 10 days; 2014= 10 days; will do the whole thing at some point in one go.
I have to have teabags from home which don't weigh much extra for the pleasure they bring; I keep my pack to 6 1/2 Kg as I would rather have them than too many clothes and buy milk each day which doesn't go off if you do most of your walking early. If you buy tea in the cafes then you need to impress cold milk ( which they usually understand if you know the word, I don't remember but ask a Spanish speaker ). Another nice thing was that I still carried 1/2 Kg of salted almonds from home which I shared with new neighbours in the albergues and which I think they appreciated that you had carried with you and just one or two given created a nice atmosphere.
 

Bernard duffy

Active Member
On my Camino last june/july on the decent into El Cebo i was startled by a strange rattling sound behind me,suddenly a young lady sprinted past shouting 'buen Camino',and attached to her rucksac was an electric kettle,i could only laugh,made my day.I later met the young rather eccentric english girl and she told me it was her first Camino and she wasn't going to do without her cups of tea.

PS,the kettle ended up dumped in a alberque 2 days later :)
 
Last edited:

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
To all you tea lovers out there, please do not forget to stop in at the Tertulia at the end of your journey!
They have real tea, properly served!
(Meeting other forum members in the evening is an added bonus...and since there are more people out there now than 2 months ago, hopefully the gatherings will be a regularly 'happening' thing in the sunmertime....)
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
[QUOTE="

Am I a tea snob for only liking fresh milk in my tea???
Not at all, fresh milk is the only way to go. Having said that if there's none available I'll take it black, not ideal but I'm afraid I can't substitute for fresh milk.[/QUOTE]
I have to ask in memory of my mother as tea is all she would drink. What is a good English tea consisting of? I am more than sure there will be more than one answer. Then I will go get the ingredients from a local importer & try them. My grandmother was English so I know where it came from. But when I was in England I did not make the time for a "proper " tea.
Keith
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
What is a good English tea consisting of? I am more than sure there will be more than one answer.

Too true Keith.
Enlgish tea is everything from 'Builders tea' - strong and dark, served in a mug and with at least 2 sugars in it - through to Earl Grey tea, served in a china cup, accompanied by cucumber sandwiches, and lots of variations in between!

Real English tea is made using tea leaves in a warmed tea pot, using boiling water. It's a dying breed as most people now use teabag, and make a cuppa straight in a mug.

Don't attempt to have tea at a coffee shop - you will be served a mug of tepid water with a tea bag on the side. Disgusting.

An average cafe or restaurant will use teabags and provide an average cup of tea.

One of the best cups of tea I have had away from home, was actually in Muscat Oman, where a cafe was using teapigs. These expensive teabags have a generous sized bag and quality tea and if properly made, produce a good cup of tea.

Myself, at home everyday, I use a glass teapot and a tea bag cos I'm lazy. Type of tea depends on the time of day. TG Tipps for breakfast (nice and strong), Kenyan for lunch and Earl grey after supper.

And fresh milk of course.....
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
What is a good English tea consisting of? I am more than sure there will be more than one answer.

Too true Keith.
Enlgish tea is everything from 'Builders tea' - strong and dark, served in a mug and with at least 2 sugars in it - through to Earl Grey tea, served in a china cup, accompanied by cucumber sandwiches, and lots of variations in between!

Real English tea is made using tea leaves in a warmed tea pot, using boiling water. It's a dying breed as most people now use teabag, and make a cuppa straight in a mug.

Don't attempt to have tea at a coffee shop - you will be served a mug of tepid water with a tea bag on the side. Disgusting.

An average cafe or restaurant will use teabags and provide an average cup of tea.

One of the best cups of tea I have had away from home, was actually in Muscat Oman, where a cafe was using teapigs. These expensive teabags have a generous sized bag and quality tea and if properly made, produce a good cup of tea.

Myself, at home everyday, I use a glass teapot and a tea bag cos I'm lazy. Type of tea depends on the time of day. TG Tipps for breakfast (nice and strong), Kenyan for lunch and Earl grey after supper.

And fresh milk of course.....
Thank you, I happen to have a glass tea pot never used it but now I have an excuse. I will go round up the teas you recommended. I also have access to fresh milk strait from the cow. Or are you referring to pasteurized store bought stuff? In any case I will experiment with just cream, whole & half/half. Milk is a very interesting taste depending on the type of grass fed to the cows. Any suggestion on what you get will help. I am excited!
Keith
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999, now living in Santiago de C
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Santiago - Muxia 2019

Now: http://egeria.house/
I guess I should ask how easy is it to get proper milk on the camino?
If you mean fresh milk (unpasteurized) - not likely, which is understandable thinking of the climate there. You could always ask a farmer when walking past the stable ;-) SY
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
Thank you, I happen to have a glass tea pot never used it but now I have an excuse. I will go round up the teas you recommended. I also have access to fresh milk strait from the cow. Or are you referring to pasteurized store bought stuff? In any case I will experiment with just cream, whole & half/half. Milk is a very interesting taste depending on the type of grass fed to the cows. Any suggestion on what you get will help. I am excited!
Keith
By fresh milk, I am referring to the pasteurized store bought stuff - unpasteurized fresh milk is very very difficult to get hold of here in the UK. Basically, I am excluding all types of milk that do not need to be kept in the fridge at all times, such as UHT, dried, condensed and evaporated milk. However, UHT is half passable when there is nothing else and that is all that seems to be commonly available in Spain.

Next point is full cream, semi skimmed or no fat. All a matter of personal preference.

Then there is how much milk to put in your tea! In a 250ml mug, I put about 20ml, my son puts about 5ml whilst my mother goes for a huge 70ml. And traditionally, Earl Grey should be served without milk.

Next, sugar. No self respecting builder used to accept anything other than 2 spoons in a mug, but lately I have noticed that many are becoming health conscious and only take 1 spoonful.

Lastly your choice of tea. Not sure what you can get in Montana, but chose an English breakfast tea or Assam if you fancy a strong cup, or Ceylon or Darjeeling for a more delicate brew, and Earl Grey for a scented cup. These are the ordinary teas. Then there is a whole world of specialist teas on which you can waste lots of time and money experimenting with!

Don't forget to use boiling water, and pour it onto the tea, then leave it to brew for a couple of minutes.

But be warned. Tea drinking is an acquired habit. Bit like learning to enjoy olives or beer. A taste that gradually grows on you. With so many other drinks around, it is not surprising that lots of British youngsters no longer drink tea nowadays, they prefer fizzy drinks or very milky coffee. Anyway, best of luck and hope you find a tea that you enjoy.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Real English tea is made using tea leaves in a warmed tea pot, using boiling water. It's a dying breed as most people now use teabag, and make a cuppa straight in a mug.
Assam, brewed strong in a pot with a bit of fresh milk. Delicious! And it wakes you up, and more gently than coffee. Get it loose online, if you can't find it where you are.
[/QUOTE=Don't attempt to have tea at a coffee shop - you will be served a mug of tepid water with a tea bag on the side. Disgusting.[/QUOTE]
Indeed. This is a different beverage than the above.
But be warned. Tea drinking is an acquired habit.
Yes, with emphasis on habit! Once hooked.......;)
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Looks like black tea then.
I actually had a great discution with a dairy farmer in Galicia about their farming methods turns out they produce some of the best milk in the country, I really liked there milk in the farm areas it was fresh. But finding small quantities will be the tough part. Those folks are very approachable the tough part is a translator. As some of the dialects are hard even for a lady who lived in Spain. I love the way they put up hay to feed the cows. They explained that was the secret behind the sweet milk. I can see why as most of it is put up by hand then trimmed into long hay stacks creating a silage type feed.
A bit off topic ....
 

Nanumea

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 2016
So do you have to carry your own cup?

I'm planning to take teabags with me, but now I'm concerned about the tea cup situation in the albergues. I drink green tea, so I don't have to worry about milk and stuff. And sorry for replying this old topic, hopefully someone still reads this. :)
 

mspath

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
It is best to carry your own especially in Galicia where Xunta albergues often have new appliances but rarely dishes/glasses/cutlery.
Be prepared!

For more on the joys of brewing your own cup read this earlier Forum post.
 
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alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2005, 2007; Madrid/Frances 2011; 1/2 VdP 2012; Portugese Litoral2019; Finisterre/Muxia2019;
Hi, Felice,
Well, though I'm a coffee drinker, I have a similar opinion about a cup of tea without milk. But what I have found to be most available is not exactly my ideal -- I buy condensed milk in a tube, which means that my coffee is also sweetened. I have learned that I prefer sweet and with milk over no milk. Last year I tried to find some powdered milk to bring with me, but could only find it in huge quantities, so I went back to my "leche condensada en un tubo." Very widely available.
Hi, Felice,
Well, though I'm a coffee drinker, I have a similar opinion about a cup of tea without milk. But what I have found to be most available is not exactly my ideal -- I buy condensed milk in a tube, which means that my coffee is also sweetened. I have learned that I prefer sweet and with milk over no milk. Last year I tried to find some powdered milk to bring with me, but could only find it in huge quantities, so I went back to my "leche condensada en un tubo." Very widely available.
Try looking for "Nido" in the grocery store, it might be in the Hispanic section. It comes in a medium-sized can, about 4 cups worth of product. It's dried milk, sold as for babies/young children. We use it backpacking...
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2005, 2007; Madrid/Frances 2011; 1/2 VdP 2012; Portugese Litoral2019; Finisterre/Muxia2019;
You can make your own " milk sticks". Take a large diameter straw and seal one end with heated pliers or even a hot hair straightener, fill the straw with powdered milk, creamer, what ever you want and seal the other end. Buen caffeinated Camino.
Trader Joe's, not in all States unfortunately, sells these but includes instant coffee/dried milk/sugar. Great in a pinch...
 

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