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Being Hospitaleros: a Proposal

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
I´ve been a volunteer hospitalera for several years, and am increasingly aware of an interest among pilgrims in training and becoming hospitaleros. There is no dedicated online Hospitalero site in English, so I wonder if some of the volunteers who lurk hereabouts might be interested in providing info and exchanging insights right here at Ivar´s Virtual Albergue? (Ivar says it´s OK).

Just as a start, I´ll offer my own experience and answers (and guesses!) to anyone with a question or comment. Advice is solicited as well as dispensed!

I was trained as a hospitalera in London via the UK Confraternity, and in Toronto via the Spanish Federation and the USA-based American Pilgrims association. (I am a USA native.) I´ve volunteered for varying lengths of time at CSJ albergues at Rabanal del Camino and Miraz, as well as Spanish Federation albergues in Fuenterroble de Salvatierra, Salamanca, Ourense, Eunate, Ponferrada, and Sahagun (Las Benedictinas); I currently take in pilgrims at my home in Moratinos.

I sometimes attend hospitalero and Camino development events sponsored by the UK Confraternity of St. James and the Federation of Spanish Friends of the Camino Associations (which make me insane); I can post reviews of these events here if there is interest.

So let us know if these are matters considered useful to you all, and what kinds of topics you´d propose.


Rebekah
 

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
I think this is a great idea!
William Marques said:
Perhaps Ivar could start a new Topic File in "Pilgrim Topics Related to all Routes" titled "Hospitaleros".
It has been done... :)

Worst case, if in a years time we realize that there is not really that much interest in this topic, we can just merge all posts here into the Misc. section.

But if there is interest in this topic, we certainly have some "hospitalero experts" here :D

Greeting from another day with sun in Santiago,
Ivar
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Hi Reb,
It isn't possible to train in South Africa, so perhaps you could give a few pointers on what is required of a volunteer. I downloaded a pdf file on a CSJ Hospitalero Workshop which gives an idea. I tried to attach it here but it was too large.
I would like to volunteer to do a stint at the end of my walk next year so any advice would be most welcome.
Sil

PS: I am good at scrubbing floors, loos and windows!!
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
It's the same in NZ - no training here. The only thing I can think of is that one Irish-family-run gite I stayed in on the Le Puy route, where they speak English!- might be glad if I offered them my help for a week or two next time I hit Europe!!- but that might not be for some time yet.....
Margaret
 
You know, sil, with all these far-flung pilgrims, perhaps some sort of online course could be developed? The US training only occurs once a year & always at a bad time for me. You're in South Africa, Margaret's in NZ, & I'm sure others in places that don't offer hospitalero training would like to do this.

Kelly
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
I took the training course with the Canadian Pilgrims (thanks Tom!) in Toronto in April, 2008 and am h9oping to volunteer next year. I did help a little in Rabanal - mostly with language. And I think I helped Reb and Paddy a little - mostly with conversation! haha
It would seem to me that since a prerequisite for the training is that one has actually walked the Camino, that an online course might be feasible. I do know that Tom Freisen told us that some of the training offered by the Spanish Association is a weekend prior to beginning one's stint as hospitalero - perhaps spending some "overlap" time with the outgoing hospitalero prior to taking over.
I'd be willing to help with putting something together.. I have a little english and a little spanish...
Buen Camino,
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
To add to your places that don't have training - as far as I am aware, there is no training conducted for hospitaleros here in Australia. And for those of you who think it would be easy to combine with NZ - we are 2 seperate countries, two and half hours away by plane!. Mind you those living in Sydney are also the same distance from Perth, and so even in Australia having one course may not be helpful! More food for thought! Janet
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
very interesting. I will need to ask the Spanish Federation people how they´d feel about accepting the training credential of people who do online courses, but as desperate as some of these hostals are for help... Maybe Javier could help with this? Javier, will you be at the big hospitalero roundup in Zaragoza in December? Maybe we could do some campaigning there?

I will contact the American Pilgs hospitalero coordinator, (who is a mensch) and the Candadians, who I think use the same format, and see if we can adapt some of their curriculum for this. Somehow they manage to stretch a training over two or three days. It includes lectures and medical and spiritual components and some lovely sessions in the kitchen, learning to cook for a crowd using minimal ingredients and equipment. (I always show up in time for dinner!)

(I am always amazed at the number of newly trained hospitaleros who have great people skills and accounting methods, but have no idea how to clean a toilet or mop a floor or start a laundry load!)

People who have pdf´s of training materials, etc., please email them to me, and I´ll try compiling them into useable sizes and files for posting as wikis or otherwise. Original material will be duly credited.

I don´t see why this can´t work, especially as the antipodians are so accustomed to adjusting and flexing. Please let me know what elements would be indispensible to you in a hospitalero training setting. I am a writer, I´ve done some lecturing, but this is a new field for me and I can use all the input I can get!

Rebekah (rebrites (at)yahoo.com)
 

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
If this online course needs a home, I can set up a e-learning classroom here on this site.

I would suggest that the materials would be pdf documents, graphics and maybe some mp3 recordings made by the "veterans" on the various topics.

Let me know if this would be of interest.

Saludos,
Ivar
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:

vjpulver

Crazy Chicken Lady with the Camino on my Mind!
Camino(s) past & future
Apr-Jun 2009 - I solo walked from Roncesvalles to Santiago. I hope to return as a hospitalera in 2016.
I understand that the Pilgrims here in the USA will offer hositaleros training in conjunction with the annual gathering of pilgrims. This year, the events are scheduled in March 2009 in Albuquerque, NM.

I can well imagine many trainees will have eye-opening experiences learning to deal with those amazing butane hot water heaters! It is too soon for me to be an effective hospitalero since I have yet to walk (May 2009!) but having lived in Spain for a decade of my younger life, I do have some inside experience and knowledge of some of what may be expected. What a joy it would be to be the host and mentor making the pilgrim's journey even better as they pass through...

Rebekah - thanks for initiating this thread and compiling data! :cool:

Life is good...very, very good...

"Ginn"
Sipping Tinto in Sunny Santa Fe - Salud!
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Thank you to everyone who´s posted here and emailed me personally. I am now trying to sort it all into some logical order, whilst doing my Castilian Idiom Total Immersion driver´s education training in the tiny backstreets of Leon!
(the actual on-the-street driving exam is Oct. 20. Pray for me!)

This weekend there´s a meeting of Spanish Federation honchos in Sahagun, and I hope to run this Online Hospitalero Training idea up the flagpole Friday night at dinner. Can those in the NZ, Australia, South AFrican communities give me some idea of HOW MANY potential trainees there may be out there, before I get too far with this? I need the info soon as possible, as I am trying to put things into writing.

Thanks
Reb.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Reb, thanks for your efforts. I have sent out an email to our local mailing list - Cape Town CSJ will send out to the rest of the country. I've had three positive replies already so I think the response will be good. Will come back to you in the morning.
 

jl

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances('05, '07), Aragonese ('05), del Norte / Primitivo ('09), Via Tolosana (Toulouse '05), Via Podiensis (Le Puy '07), Via Lemovicensis (Troyes '09), VF ('12), Winter Camino ('13/'14) Cammino d'Assisi ('14) Jakobseweg (Leipzig - Paris '15) San Salvador/Norte ('15) Ignaciano ('16) Invierno ('16)
Hello Rebekah,

As yet, here in Adelaide (and surrounds), as far as I am aware, we don't have a formal organisation (mailing list, once a quarter / half yearly meeting etc) and so it would be very difficult to say. It is my intention to call a gathering of interested pilgrims - past and future - but haven't quite got there yet. I suspect that in the Eastern States there could well be some interest from individuals and perhaps they could answer on an individual basis - as could the Sth Aussies. I am not sure what structure there is over there. Sorry I can't be of any more help than that.

Cheers, Janet
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Good news and bad news on the Antipodean Online Hospitalero front:

I met on Saturday with Ana B., the woman in charge of the Federation Hospitalero program, and asked her about the idea of training Southern Hemisphere volunteers without access to "live" sessions via an adapted online forum. She thinks it´s a great idea, and said go ahead and get crackin´ with adapting materials current in USA and Canada. (at least that´s what I THINK she said...!)

Unfortunately the lively and charismatic people who do "live training" in Spain told me today they think online hospitalero training is an impossible idea, that hospitaleros must be trained in person, and in Spanish, by them. (the fact that my training, done in London and Toronto, was all done in English somehow didn´t register.)

My spoken Spanish isn´t up to the task of arguing this with them, but I will contact the original Ana B. tomorrow and make sure we are on the same page... We can´t let politics and turf-battles derail a fine idea, eh? I´ve decided not to worry about this, let St. James deal, etc.

But do say a prayer, OK? This bad Spanish problem is getting to be a real obstacle.

Meantime I met the Famous Jose Ignacio and heard some wonderful albergue stories and legends!
 

ivar

Administrator
Staff member
Unfortunately the lively and charismatic people who do "live training" in Spain told me today they think online hospitalero training is an impossible idea, that hospitaleros must be trained in person, and in Spanish, by them.
Is this training volunteer work or are they getting paid to do it? If they get paid, they may see this new idea as a threat to their jobs.

I have developed 7 online courses at university level and have found that the ideal mix is to have some training in person and some training (once back home) online. If for geographical reasons we can not meet, an online course is much much better than nothing. Alternatively it could also be used as a meeting place after a "in-person" class on each continent.

...just ideas..

Saludos,
Ivar
 

KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
Lol if the training is offered in Spanish, I wouldn't understand much more than the greeting at the beginning! In my case, as I speak a reasonable amount of French, it perhaps makes more sense for me to write to one of the gites I stayed in in France to offer help if they need it. But it might be a while before I next spread my wings in any case!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Thousands - perhaps millions - of people study through distance programs. I met an author a couple of months ago who has 7 degrees and has never been inside a University!
 

Deirdre

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés (2007), Camino Francés (2008), Camino Portugués (2010), Camino Aragonés - from Lourdes (2012)
Hi Reb,

I've heard your Spanish - and it is way better than you think! Trust what you know! You're doin' great!

¡Tonteria! I was recently looking at a website - HigherEd jobs.com - and there were postings for university professors for distance learning online classes.

Of course it is great to get together with a group and hear the stories and share in the learning... I had a wonderful time in Canada in April. But the reality is that much of the information I brought home on paper to keep and to review... that part could easily be done by computer.

It seems to me (and please correct me if I'm wrong!) that the mechanical part of the job (cleaning, tidying,shopping, etc) is different at every albergue and really must be learned "on the job". A broom and a mop in New Zealand and Australia are pretty much the same as they are in North America and Europe, no? It's the hospitalero's "bag of tricks" that really needs to be prepared before hand... and to me if someone want to "give back" to the Camino in volunteer service...I think versatility is key.

Don't give up - I think Ana is pretty savvy and reasonable to deal with. She deals in "distance" with the American and Canadian pilgrims... she can speak directly to you! And you're right.. let Santiago take care of it.

Buen Camino,
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Here´s a bit of encouragement for those who believe they must have official training in order to become hospitaleros:

The original hospitaleros were homeowners who offered passing travelers a place to stay. Abraham offered hospitality to passing strangers, and found out he was entertaining angels. Moses was offered a place to stay on his early travels, and ended up marrying into the family! A starving widow offered a scraggly stranger a place to stay in the starving town of Zeraphath, and the Prophet of God miraculously provided her and her son with enough oil and flour to feed themselves through the end of the famine...And Jesus told his followers that anyone who offers even a cup of water to a stranger who asks for it is, in essence, giving Jesus himself a cup of water.

And at least one-fourth of the "official" hospitaleros I know started on that path by being asked -- or volunteering -- to stay an extra few days at a pilgrim facility and help out. Ponferrada is a good place for that, and Ventosa, El Acebo and Manjarin and Arroyo San Bol as well. It really is very much a "common sense" practice.

Training is a very good idea, for all the reasons stated in the posts above... not everyone knows how to offer an evening prayer, coordinate a meal for 20, balance books, greet strangers, or clean out drains. And training ensures that insurance regulations are met, hospitaleros form a sort of "family network," and the worst of the possible Bad Hospitaleros are screened out.

But if you really want to be one, the job will find you. You don´t HAVE to go looking for it!

(that said, the work goes forward for an online training thingy!
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
So, a support network.....
But really being a hospitalero isn't rocket science. Just do what you enjoyed people doing for you when you were a pilgrim, and remember what you hated. A large dose of common sense, more tolerance than you would think possible, and a realistic amount of cleaning. A bit like being a mum, isn't it?
Let's not turn looking after tired people into something that needs a university degree, eh?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I would LOVE to volunteer to be a hospitalera... Can anyone give me information on the training offered in New Mexico in 2009? I went to the website and didn't see anything? Help?
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Annie:
There ought to be a link on the website to the hospitalero training coordinator, so you can email him for details. If you can´t find anything that specific, just email them on their general "Contact Us" link and wait a while... and if that doesn´t work, contact me offline and I´ll put you in touch. The US program is based on a model used by the Federation for several years, and interested volunteers spend a day or two in seminars and discussions that are surprisingly informative and useful... they cover things you might not have thought of.

It´s true, it ain´t rocket science, and I don´t think there´s much mystic knowledge involved (no matter what some people tell ya!) But in order to meet insurance and safety regulations, trained people are a presupposition.

If it looks easy to you, just try doing it for two whole weeks!

Rebekah
 

brendan nolan

Active Member
Hi All :)
I've worked twice as hospitalero at the CSJ refugio at Rabanal and, as others have said, it isn't rocket science but be aware you do have to do things such as cleaning toilets ..... it might sound obvious but the imagination of some folks doesn't get that far.
Obviously the CSJ refugio can't take all those wishing to volunteer but it is recognized that pilgrims from around the world like to volunteer but can't get to a training day. The CSJ will put a new volunteer with somebody who is experienced and ask them to arrive at the refugio 24 hours before takeover so they can see how the place is run. It is required that the hospitalero has gone through a first aid course but the cost is re-imbursed.
Hope this is helpful to some. If there are questions on practical things I'll try my best.

Brendan
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
Also.. you never know what kind of road the Camino will send you down!

Over the last couple of months, through this ongoing adventure of getting these Southerners "educated," I´ve now become an Official Hospitalero Trainer under aegis of the Canadian Company of Pilgrims. (ta-daa! Thank you, Mary and Tom!) So... now that I am legitimate, (if not Canadian) we can get on with this.

I still must sell the idea of an online course to the Federation bosses, before we undertake the long tough slog it may require to get it written and get it posted and passworded. I hope to get this done at the big Hospitalero Round-Up in Terrazona Dec. 6-8.

Meantime, those who want to be trained, in English, using the Canadian program can come here to Moratinos for the experience, before/during/or after their camino, if I´m given enough notice and the candidates meet the requirements. Thanks for being patient!
 

John Hussey

Active Member
Anniesantiago said:
I would LOVE to volunteer to be a hospitalera... Can anyone give me information on the training offered in New Mexico in 2009? I went to the website and didn't see anything? Help?

I cannot tell whether your question was answered offline so I decided to look it up and here is the link to the 2009 New Mexico training in the USA:

http://www.americanpilgrims.com/events/ ... ional.html

I am quite interested in getting the online training too as the distance to Albuquerque is somewhat far away from me at 2000 miles (3200 km).

So...I certainly hope the online course on this site becomes a reality. It is quite an innovative idea!
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Congratulations Reb! An American/English/Canadian hospitalero trainer!

Can you list for us here what the requirements are that need to be met?
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
If you want to be trained as a hospitalero you (and your spouse/partner, assuming you are serving with one) have to have been a Santiago pilgrim... having walked, biked, or ridden a horse at least the requisite distance. You should be healthy enough to withstand very long days and short nights. You should be flexible and outgoing enough to deal with every kind of person from everywhere in the world, in every sort of condition, but tough enough to say No when it´s appropriate. You should have funds enough to pay your own way travel and food-wise, if need be.

A first-aid course and familiarity with Spanish is VERY handy, although not required. And most of all, you must be able to commit to two full weeks of work -- either the first half or second half of a month -- as assigned by the Federation HQ in Logroño. Don´t be trained unless you really intend to serve.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
another way to be trained

The good people at the Canadian Company of Pilgrims have extended their reach over the Atlantic, and now offer hospitalero training at The Peaceable Kingdom in Palencia. (aka my house on the Camino Frances.) It takes a couple of days (or one long day); you can stay here while it goes on.

At the end of it you will be an accredited Federation hospitalero, qualified to serve at the many albergues staffed by the Spanish Federation of Amigos.

The online option is still under development, and may well take some time. Please be patient. Or just come on over and get it over with! For an application or other questions, contact me at: rebrites (at)yahoo.com.

Rebekah
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
Barbara said:
A large dose of common sense, more tolerance than you would think possible, and a realistic amount of cleaning. A bit like being a mum, isn't it?

Ok...problem solved..just recruit the moms who do the camino..let's face it, most of us got on the job training that we never would have believed ourselves capable of. Don't let the by the books folks make you crazy! Anything is possible, and most especially with a healthy dose of faith and prayer!

Buen Camino All, and hoping perhaps someday to return the favors given during my short camino!

To the lovely folks of the Camino Portuguese...Vielen Dank!

Karin
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Aside from being a gourmet chef, having run a company of 123 with a 5 MIL $ budget AND I can get folks to turn off the lights at 10 pm and go to sleep...what more training do I need? O.K. my Spanish is awful..but I never went hungry, always had a drink and found my way into and out of the amblatoria...on two different occasions. GIVE ME THE SHEEPSKIN AND PUT ME TO WORK.

Buen please take off your boots outside Camino
Arn
 

MermaidLilli

Active Member
Two caminos and both times I hurt my ankle (not the same one) and had to stop for 3 weeks. Because I have family and friends, I left the camino and stayed with them. I felt a little bad asking to be put up and honestly it was a bit boring. It was so good to get back and keep walking.
Camino number 3 coming up.... hopefully there will be no ankle issues this time (any tips appreciated), but if there were I would love to stay in an albergue and help out. I know I need to stay off the ankle, but I don't have to all the time, so I can be useful. The question is, are there albergues on any of the Caminos that would let someone hang and help? If all is well and I have extra time left in Spain, I can also help out at any albergue. Without making prior commitments, would there be any place that would allow a drop-in?
The online training is one option and I can also go to Reb's for her training....ooooooo, I am getting excited.
Thanks
Lillian
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
I´m sorry I seem like I´m lecturing here, I really am NOT the boss. Really.
Ivar´s now at work on the techy end of the online program, so I´ll get into formatting and getting it ready for testing hopefully before the end of Feb. Anyone want to be a beta tester/guinea pig?

As for your questions about staying around places to help out:
The drop-in option is always there, but it is very, well... drop-in. Lots of people stay around in exchange for some work or company. It all depends on your condition, and how amenable the hosts are. I´ve seen a lot of it go on in places all over, but never more than a week or two. Just ask. (in Ponferrada they´ll snap you right up!)

Reb.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
Arn said
.what more training do I need?

Most hospitalero training workshops are held over two days. I'm sure there is a lot more to learn than being a housewife or sergeant major!

Looking at the requirements, you need to be a good listener, pilgrims don't want to hear about your journey.
You need to be empathetic.
You need to know how Spanish emergency services work and have a bit of knowledge of First Aid.
Ditto, plumbing, electricity, telephone system, where to shop for food, how to cook for a crowd on a budget, perhaps on a gas stove.
You need to keep the books, registers, donations etc.
You need to clean toilets, pull hair out of shower drains, wash floors, make beds and sweep inside and outside.

In the blurb for volunteering at St Jean pilgrim's office they say:
You need to listen to them, provide answers to questions they ask you possibly, inter alia the first stage and satisfy, as far as possible, their requests. Your role is not to tell your path, whether the pontificating mode or friendly but to be an adviser to the pilgrim, the hiker or tourist. Neither inquisition, or proselytizing, the host must be warm and tolerant.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
as anyone who´s walked the camino knows, there are all types of hospitaleros: Moms, sergeant-majors, hippies, evangelists, doctors, walking-woundeds, nutters, chefs, know-it-alls, crabby old people, crabby young people, neatniks, nuns, control-freaks, cops, robbers, nice folks ... well. Just the usual lineup of Human Beings.

The only real reason you have to have training is because They Say So.

Reb.
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Sil wrote: Most hospitalero training workshops are held over two days. I'm sure there is a lot more to learn than being a housewife or sergeant major!

Well!

When my wife passed away I became Mister Mom. Both my beautiful daughter and son call/email most every day...well, Romi calls the most and I love it. SO I can do the housefrau side. And, the demotion to SgtMaj really cuts deep Sil. Actually, most SgtMaj's are heads and shoulders above officers when it comes to understanding how to motivate rankers and junior officers.

Reb wrote: as anyone who´s walked the camino knows, there are all types of hospitaleros: Moms, sergeant-majors, hippies, evangelists, doctors, walking-woundeds, nutters, chefs, know-it-alls, crabby old people, crabby young people, neatniks, nuns, control-freaks, cops, robbers, nice folks ... well. Just the usual lineup of Human Beings.

Well #2

Never been a Mom (biologically that is) and while I've gone long periods having none, I've never been a Nun, but the rest sounds like me on any given day. I'm like the weather...wait a sec and I'll morph.

The keepers of the keys that I encountered on the Camino were often driven by the time of day and number of peregrinos waiting to check in. I've observed the most agreeable hospitalero turn on a dime if someone arrived with an attitude...for no reason...then revert back...in a heart beat.

I can tell you this...there were times following my fall where, once I arrived at the albergue, the hospitalero not only helped me up the stairs (carrying my pack)and when needed...helped me undress because I couldn't do for my self.

BIG hat tip to all the hospitaleros!

Arn
 

Hermanita

Active Member
sillydoll said:
I've been waiting for Brett to post on this topic but he hasn't yet.
Don't forget to read his blog:

http://innkeepersguide.blogspot.com/

I just read and thoroughly enjoyed Brett's post about volunteering as a hospitalero. It is a very insightful and sometimes hilariously funny account of his stints as a vonlunteer hospitalero along with some advice for future volunteers...also good for past and future pilgrims. Even if you don't want to volunteer it gives you some idea of how at least one volunteer looks at hospitaleroing. Keep me laughing.
 

PilgrimChris

Active Member
Dear Rebekah
A facincting thread.
I think however i may have gotten lost somewhere because the last post as far as i can see was in the middle of 2009?
Did you manage to get on online course up and working? Sorry for my ignorance if indeed i have "lost my way" slightly :?
I am very interested in receiving some 'training' as a hospitalero so if the email you gave in an earlier post is still active could you let me know please? I will contact you directly for advice then.
God bless all your endeavours.
Chris
 

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