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Best way to deal with plantar fascitis and best shoes to wear

Julio Rivera

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés, Camino Inglés, Camino Portugués, Camino Primitivo, Camino del Norte, Camino Aragonés
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
 
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sharon w

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2007
Camino Portugues 2009
Via Podiensis, Camino Frances, Camino Finisterre 2012
Cammino di Assisi 2014
Via Podiensis, Camino del Norte, Camino Frances(Astorga to Santiago) 2015
Aussie Camino 2016
I suffered with plantar fasciitis on the second half of the VdlP. So, after much research, found that boots or shoes that are too flexible in the sole are not good for this condition. You need a boot or shoe with less flexibility and a stiff shank.
Rolling a small ball, such as a tennis ball, around under your foot can help massage the fascia. You might have tight calf muscles that can also be massaged.
I wear Scarpa boots and Salomon shoes. I’ve never suffered plantar fasciitis in thousands of km since.
 

Wendy Werneth

Pilgrim
Past OR future Camino
2020
I developed plantar fasciitis on my first Camino and have suffered from it to some extent on every Camino since.

Since you asked for exercises on YouTube, this one helps me:

There's also an exercise I do to release the fascii in my calves, using either a rolling pin when I'm at home or a wooden walking stick when I'm on Camino. I learned it from the same woman who's in the video above, as part of a paid online course she offered. I don't think she's made a video about it on YouTube.

Another thing that really helps me is cold foot baths. I carry a collapsible basin for this purpose and fill it up when I pass public fountains.
 
Past OR future Camino
Many and many more.
OK, so here’s some medical advice from an economist … perhaps it might be better from a medical professional, but I am a former PF sufferer.

Warm and gently stretch your calf muscle. That connects through the Achilles and is sometimes associated with PF.

If you’re considerably overweight, that’s not helpful.

Otherwise follow standard advice - preferably from or via your doctor.

The forum advice, which I followed once in extremis was to self-medicate internally with orujo. It’s not the worst advice I’ve had on here, ni de aquí a Lima.
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
The general recommendation for sufferers is not to hike. Rest, ice and toe lifts can help relieve pain.
A podiatrist may make recommendations for orthotics and shoe styles.
Chronic (PF) is not a common condition. Please seek medical advice rather than that of this bunch of enthusiasts

Very wise. This needs professional diagnosis and treatment.
My wife who suffers from PF sought advice from doctors, sports podiatrists and others.
But of course all cases are different.

She ended up with custom orthotics, cortisone injections, and a regime of pain killers.

And it was still painful at times.......particularly when the cortisone shots wore off.
 

jenny@zen

Camino Walker
Past OR future Camino
2022 Via De la Plata
Sorry if this seems unhelpful but … best shoes? That is such a personal thing depending on your feet, arch, the way you walk, how much your feet swell and the list goes on. Shoes that are perfect for someone else may be the wrong choice for you.

For me, getting a few shoe brand/style recommendations from a podiatrist many years ago before I started long walking narrowed it down to a few and what I chose has worked for me.

The only ‘general’ advice I’d give regarding shoes is - 1) wear them in and if they are not working for you reconsider; 2) opt for 1/2 to a 1 size bigger than usual; 3) socks are almost as important as shoes and 4) when you’re on the Camino, take care of your feet daily - e.g. socks and shoes off at various intervals, massage feet, run under or immerse in cold water.

🙏
 
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Ronald Boivin

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
I had to cancel this Fall’s Camino because I developed Plantar Fasciitis during my summer training. Could not walk even a km fir two months. Intense use of anti-inflammatoires, daily exercises, acupuncture, energy therapies and deep listening to my foot now allows me to walk 2-3 km on a treadmill. My physiotherapist and podiatrist said if you don’t heal it within three months it can become chronic! … then your Caminos are over. I postponed my Camino for yet another year.
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés: (2015, ‘17, ‘18 and ‘19)
Hi, I developed plantar fasciitis on my first CF, wearing shoes with stiff soles. I walked 2 more CF despite my doctor’s recommendation (certainly due to my stiff attitude) to wear shoes with a more flexible sole.
Well, on my 4th Camino I decided to listen to my GP: no plantar fasciitis whatsoever!
My lesson from the Camino: listen to your doctor and go easy on yourself with a little “flexibilty”.
Ultreïa
 
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all
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
People are giving lots of helpful suggestions for treatments and managing pain. I believe that there is at least one earlier thread on this topic. As for shoes, I wear Hoka One One now, but I see one message that suggests that soft cushiony shoes are the wrong way to go, and Hokas are certainly soft and cushiony.

Another way to approach this topic is what to do when you eventually recover, in order to ward off reoccurrence. When we walked the Portuguese way my partner worked with a GPS (and other walkers' GPS records) to create a route for us that would have me walking on as little pavement as possible. He created a combination of the coastal and inland routes. It would be great if there were a data base for all camino routes where people could deposit their GPS data, along with information about walking surfaces, etc. I would happily divert from paved portions of main routes in order to be able to keep walking.
 

Aguapura

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Sarria to Santiago 2010
Roncesvalles to Logrono 2015
Hospitalera 2016
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
I developed pf after doing a section of the Le Puy route. It got bad because I did not know what it was, but finally got it diagnosed by a podiatrist. The treatments were exercises that stretch the calf muscles, shoe inserts that support the arch (the stiffer, the better, but you don't necessarily need custom made), shoes that support the sides of your foot, like boots or sturdy shoes, a night brace that kept me from pointing my toes, never going barefoot, ultrasound, and rest. I did get one cortisone shot, which made it go away for a month or so, but then it came back. FINALLY, after about a year, a second podiatrist recommended iontophoresis, which is a cortisone liquid applied to a bandage that vibrates it into your foot. You wear it for about 4 hours, I had the treatment twice a week for about 6 weeks, and it finally went away, although sometimes I get very minor cases. I think there are more and less serious cases. Now when I feel it coming on I use the calf stretches, shoe inserts, and the night brace for a month or so and it goes away. I'd definitely see a podiatrist, and ask about iontophoresis if other things aren't working. Cortisone shots shouldn't be used multiple times
 
Past OR future Camino
2018
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
Would love to hear about this. This is my first bout of this or tendinitis on my ankles. Ruined my trip. Stayed 3 weeks in one place. Now hopping around taking buses. But going home … too much hard asphalt for me. Dreadful am used to mountain paths and climb not road. Will not recommend this way Camino del Norte to others I have seen so many injuries that I never saw in the other 5 Camino I completed.
 

krosemc

Camino Primitivo 2020, Camino Frances 2019
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hello! Yes! I too have plantar fascitis and a heel spur. The first half of my first Camino on the French way was very difficult all because of this and my footwear! Stretching my calves regularly while walking, not just when waking in the morning really helped. Soaking my feet at night in hot water also really gave me some relief while allowing me to sleep better. I just bought a light, inexpensive large plastic salad bowl and went with it.

The shoe brand that practically cleared up the pain while hiking for me is Merrell Moab gortex in wide. I will not hike in any other shoe. I've found them to be really supportive hiking boots, and again offer a wide width. I also got insoles from power step, recommended by my podiatrist. Power step has one specifically for hiking. Those two things, along with going up an entire size from my regular everyday shoes, made walking fantastic. I didn't have problems on my second camino. Something else my podiatrist suggested were anti inflammatories like Advil. If you have asthma, your doctor can give you another that doesn't interfere. Hope this helps!

Buen Camino!

Kathleen
 

Pilgrim Patricia

Want to do the VdlP again!
Past OR future Camino
Via de la Plata; Hospitalera Miraz 2011
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
Totally agree with @Tincatinker: Get thee to a podiatrist (aka chiropodist in some places)! They can provide guidance on foot-strengthening exercises, shoe types and may well suggest orthotics. That's what worked for me, and I only have twinges of recurrence if I wear flat shoes or slippers. Good luck!
 
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Viggo

California
Past OR future Camino
2021
The general recommendation for sufferers is not to hike. Rest, ice and toe lifts can help relieve pain.
A podiatrist may make recommendations for orthotics and shoe styles.
Chronic (PF) is not a common condition. Please seek medical advice rather than that of this bunch of enthusiasts
Regarding PF its worth doing your own research, because even Podiatrists will give you conflicting results. Please don't be so quick to discourage people from doing their own research, no matter the source.
 

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Past OR future Camino
Frances 2021
I had plantar fasciitis and was able to cure it completely with some exercises. Here's a link to a video of the treatment.


In particular, the splaying massage exercise, but going all the way back to the end of my heel, was the most effective. I was very surprised how quickly this exercise worked for me. I hope you have success treating your fasciitis.
Buen Camino!
 

Peter J Martin

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Full Camino, St Jean Pied de Port - Santiago de Compostela and on to Finisterre, planning now from Friday 25 August 2017 to Monday 2 October 2017
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
Yes to all the advice on here, I have suffered with plantar fasciitis. I quickly found out that the use of Rock Tape along the insole and round the instep helped with my daily walks. Put his on both my feet every day before starting. Google Rock Tape and you will be pleasantly surprised. Google and go to Rock Tape - Kinesiology Tape Instruction for plantar Fasciitis. You will be taken to YouTube and it will show you how to use it. It has worked for me on 5 Caminos. Best wishes. Buen Camino.
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances Roncesvalles to Sahagun Oct 2016
Sahagun to SDC April 2017 Burgos to SDC April 2018
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
For chronic foot pain, please consult a professional. However, I have found it helpful to freeze a bottle of water that you can buy in any store. Then place my bare foot on it and roll. You get the benefit of icing and the same action as you would get rolling a ball under your foot.
 
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Keith H

Member
Past OR future Camino
😱
Chase Mountain has some good exercises from feet that may be useful in addition to seeing your doctor. This one is about zero shoes but had general advice
Chase is so good! His exercises and prep work for long arduous treks is outstanding. Health professional with 25 years experience here so it’s not a random recommendation 😉.
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances TBD
I wanted to share something that worked for two people I know with plantar fasciitis. My friend who is a serious athlete told me she had suffered from plantar forever. She has super flat feet and had always used inserts/orthotics. After years of this, she went to a trainer who told her she should use zero-drop shoes, which sounded crazy to her (and to me too when she told me). The trainer told her that the zero-drop shoes would allow her to develop certain muscles that would resolve the issue, and she had had success with many clients who went this route. She also taught her some exercises to do. My friend gave it a try with Altra Lone Peak shoes and has never looked back and never had plantar issues again.
I then told my husband who has flat feet and plantar fasciitis (and orthotics). He too thought this was very counter-intuitive and a bad idea initially but out of desperation was willing to give it a try. He bought some Altra Lone Peak shoes and unlike my friend never did exercises, but his plantar issues went away, and he's been able to walk and hike with no pain ever since.
There was an initial adjustment for them both with theses shoes. My friend said the trainer told her her feet would be sore as unused muscles were getting into shape initially. I also switched to these shoes. Have flat feet but not plantar fasciitis--did have knee and hip issues that resolved with these shoes.
 
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GuyA

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
I wanted to share something that worked for two people I know with plantar fasciitis. My friend who is a serious athlete told me she had suffered from plantar forever. She has super flat feet and had always used inserts/orthotics. After years of this, she went to a trainer who told her she should use zero-drop shoes, which sounded crazy to her (and to me too when she told me). The trainer told her that the zero-drop shoes would allow her to develop certain muscles that would resolve the issue, and she had had success with many clients who went this route. She also taught her some exercises to do. My friend gave it a try with Altra Lone Peak shoes and has never looked back and never had plantar issues again.
I then told my husband who has flat feet and plantar fasciitis (and orthotics). He too thought this was very counter-intuitive and a bad idea initially but out of desperation was willing to give it a try. He bought some Altra Lone Peak issues and unlike my friend never did exercises, but his plantar issues went away, and he's been able to walk and hike with no pain ever since.
There was an initial adjustment for them both with theses shoes. My friend said the trainer told her her feet would be sore as unused muscles were getting into shape initially. I also switched to these shoes. Have flat feet but not plantar fasciitis--did have knee and hip issues that resolved with these shoes.
My brother walked the Camino Frances with me in 2014 and has suffered from serious planter fasciitis ever since. Many of the suggestions mentioned in this thread have been tried after seeking medical help. I have sent him this…you never know…at present his Caminos are over so not much to lose…
 

philmickm

New Member
Past OR future Camino
first one Aug/Sept '18
Hi, must routinely stretch your calf muscles and rolling your soles over the small nobbled ball works wonders, (Pilates studios sell them) concentrate the ball under your heel.
I stand on the ball.


I snapped my Achilles in half and the result is that it’s now shorter, so that foot is prone to pf if I don’t regularly stretch. I tend to roll if I feel the pf coming on, and I know I’ve become a bit slack with my stretching.

I walked the CF in 2018 with no problems whatsoever, and loved it.

If it becomes sore, ice up, rest up a bit and stretch.

Buen Camino
 

Wheelchairpilgrim

Wheelchair pilgrim, in annual stages to Santiago.
Past OR future Camino
By wheelchair: 2016 Haarlem-Den Bosch 2017 Den Bosch-Maastricht 2018 Maastricht-Reims 2019 Reims-...
The things that helped me are bare foot shoes. I struggled with it for years and after I stopped to wear normal shoes and only walked on bare feet shoes and bare feet it disappeared in 2 months.
 
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CA_Pilgrim

Member
Past OR future Camino
El Camino Real de California
Camino Frances (2017)
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
I can only relay my experience as a long-time, now cured, suffer of sever plantar fasciitis. You better get a cup of coffee now to get through this post. I didn't intend for it to be this long, but the problem and the cure was about 12 years in the making. It's difficult to relay it in one post.

My PF began to bother me sometime around 2007/2008 when I started running and working toward completing a marathon. At first the PF was mild and it only slightly bothered me. However, as I began to run more, the problem became progressively worse. I went through literally thousands ( yes plural) of dollars in shoes and inserts trying to find some combination that would work. Some worked better than others, but never enough to resolve the problem.

In order to reach my goal of completing a marathon, I resorted to cortisone shots. They worked, but there were side-effects. There was noticeable soft tissue loss at the site of the injection. My podiatrist at the time warned me about this potential problem and also warned me about more shots, as it could lead to tendon rupture. I finally completed a full marathon and then gave up running all together. That was sometime in 2009. Instead, I took up hiking and and set my sites on completing the Camino de Santiago for my 55th birthday. However work and life got in the way and that goal was reset to my 60th birthday and now my 65th birthday. I will finally do it next May/June 2022.

After I realized I could not take 6 weeks off from work and life to fly to Spain to complete the Camino without being retired, I set an interim goal of completing the 850 mile El Camino Real (California Mission Trail). I was able to do this in sections varying from 50-200 miles at a time which was compatible with my work obligations. By this time I had developed several strategies for coping with PF but never completely getting rid of it. I can talk about the coping strategies in another reply post if you like. They were enough to get me the mission trail, but I definitely still had PF pain.

It wasn't until after I completed the Mission Trail that I changed podiatrists. The prior podiatrist had made me some very pricy custom orthotics that did not work. I decided to give the custom orthotics a second chance with this new podiatrist. What I discovered is that experience matters in the casting procedure. The new doc was a casting artist! I could feel relief from the chronic PF pain within the first week of using the new orthotics and it continued to get better and better day by day. By about 3 months, the PF pain was completely gone has and never returned. That was about 6 years ago. I can hike endless miles and still not feel any feel an PF pain. I'm currently progressively increasing my daily walking and weekend hiking in preparation for the Camino de Santiago. My current average is around 6 miles per day with hikes varying between 2 miles and 15 miles and NEVER any PF pain.

So, a very long story short, the cure for me was finding the right podiatrist to make the right pair of orthotic inserts form me.
 

Eric G

Member
Past OR future Camino
1st timer
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
I always go to the podiatrist for custom made inserts and cortisone injections prior to each Camino..
 

BookGirl305

Member
Past OR future Camino
Ingles (after Covid)
It's also very easy to call everything involving tight tendons PF and assume you need major medical intervention. Sometimes, it's just tight tendons. A couple of things that have worked for me over the years are wide width shoes so that my feet can fully spread out and the muscles aren't contracting from lack of space, KT tape worked wonders in just that little extra support (someone else mentioned the video at Rock Tape- KT Tape has the videos as well. If the taping methods look similar despite the brand difference, it's probably a good place to start) and my favorite after-stretch combo is stairs and the lacrosse ball. On the stairs, shoes off socks on and very slowly, hang just the tip of your heel off, then inch up a bit and have the lip of the stair hit you right at the start of the heel, then the arch, then the ball, then the toes. That multi layer action ends up putting the pressure on the whole tendon and just feels amazing.
 

ElsaEliz

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Future path, The Campostele
People are giving lots of helpful suggestions for treatments and managing pain. I believe that there is at least one earlier thread on this topic. As for shoes, I wear Hoka One One now, but I see one message that suggests that soft cushiony shoes are the wrong way to go, and Hokas are certainly soft and cushiony.

Another way to approach this topic is what to do when you eventually recover, in order to ward off reoccurrence. When we walked the Portuguese way my partner worked with a GPS (and other walkers' GPS records) to create a route for us that would have me walking on as little pavement as possible. He created a combination of the coastal and inland routes. It would be great if there were a data base for all camino routes where people could deposit their GPS data, along with information about walking surfaces, etc. I would happily divert from paved portions of main routes in order to be able to keep walking.
I love the idea of a GPS library.
 

Dalieb

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Spring 2019
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
Don't know about that problem but can mention that I wore Altra Lone Peak trail shoes and Darn Tough merino wool socks, walked from Bayonne to Sarria and didn't get one blister!! Just purchased Altra Timpe 3 and really like them.
 
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Past OR future Camino
Voie de Vézelay, Podiensis, Arles Route, Voie de Paris/Tours, Frances, Primitivo, La Plata
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
Although I had never had PF prior to my first Camino, I got a very rude introduction a few weeks south of Reims. I went to a doctor in Limoges, who made the standard rest and ice recommendations, but also advised me to get some NIFLUGEL (2.5% Niflumic Acid gel) at the pharmacy. No Rx needed. You'll know in 5 minutes if it's going to help. It totally transformed my walk, removed all pain and calmed it completely over the next few weeks.

Since then I've had a number of friends and family try it and most have found it miraculous. You'll know almost immediately one way or the other. I've tried it elsewhere for pain, and it didn't have any real effect, but for PF, Achilles tendonitis, I find it's superb.

If you're in the states, you can buy online from New London pharmacy in NYC, if you want to try it, else most pharmacies in France and Spain stock it. Also, it also comes as a cream, but I didn't find that nearly as effective.

Have a good walk...
 

SenorJacques

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Spring 2022 (finally!)
Altra Lone Peak trail shoes and Darn Tough merino wool socks
This is exactly the combination I've been using for my training hikes over the last few years, so it's great to hear about actual Camino experiences where it's been successful.
 

CA_Pilgrim

Member
Past OR future Camino
El Camino Real de California
Camino Frances (2017)
I went to a doctor in Limoges, who made the standard rest and ice recommendations, but also advised me to get some NIFLUGEL (2.5% Niflumic Acid gel) at the pharmacy.
This is a new one for me. I'll need to research the drug some more.

When I hiked the California Mission Trail (El Camino Real), I had not yet had custom orthotic that worked and was still struggling with PF. I had a 2-part coping mechanism, both of which worked well. I would dose up my feet in the AM, PM and before bed with either Ibuprofen Gel (IBULIEVE) or Diclofenac Gel (VOLTAREN Gel). They are both topical analgesics that help with the pain and swelling. Both are OTC in the EU but only Diclofenac Gel is available in the USA. You can import Ibuprofen Gel into the USA for personal use but it can be a bit pricy with the shipping. In Spain, it should be available OTC at any pharmacy. In my experience, Ibuprofen Gel works better than Diclofenac gel, but it can cause some flaking of the skin with prolonged use. Diclofenac Gel does not have this limitation. Usually, I alternated the two.

The second part of my coping strategy was to wear nighttime foot braces. These keep the plantar fascia stretched as you sleep. Normally, you curl your toes when you sleep and this will cause the fascia to heal in a contracted position. This is why the first step in the morning is the worst. There are many foot braces out there, but I found FUTURO brand to be among the best with the added bonus that they are light enough to carry in your backpack. Sounds simple, but these night braces do help a lot!

A third strategy is to ice the feet when you can, but for me finding what I needed for icing was less dependable on the Mission Trail than it is on the Camino de Santiago. The Camino has much better infrastructure and is set up to assist pilgrims with feet problems.
 

RosemaryMcG

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2016 León a Santiago de Compostela
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
I used to suffer from PF years ago really bad. I went to a foot medical doctor and he had insoles made in medical clinic, they were terrible. I saw a podiatrist and he made me insoles that I have worn now for many years and never had the problem again. But something else worked as well. It's a two prong approach. Second this is really importnat. Never ever put any weight on a foot hurting without solid support. Everytime you do you re-damage the injury. For six months when I got out of bed, no weight on my feet until I had proper shoes with good support and/or insoles. Never put weight on your feet, including finding sandals with foot support for the shower. This was the most important for me. Next phase, if you can find a person that specializes in foot exercises it's worth it and it's more than you think. I attended at 3 month course on how to strengthen my feet taught by a Brazilian osteopath specialist. It was quite beneficial. There may be youtube videos now available. And of course finally get proper footware for your camino and prepare them for walking. Hope any of these ideas help as I know how painful it can be. Edit I just saw people recommending zero drop shoes and that was something the specialist did recommend BUT you have to go at it gradually when your feet aren't hurting anymore. I have the Altra Lone Peak hiking and running shoes (very expensive). I wear the running shoes for indoor running on a rebounder up to an hour. But I would not rely on the hiking shoes without insoles for a whole day of walking. I tried and still am working at it. I know, what's the point of a drop zero shoe if you end up using insoles. Your foot knee and hip will realign which is part of the solution but it can't be done in a short period. IF your foot starts to ache at all be prepared to insert insole or switch to other shoes. These do strengthen the foot slowly. Another benefit I find is the Altra have a very wide toe box which allows me to move and spread toes. You'll learn how important that is from a osteopath specialist. As well I tend to get toe blisters but these shoes allow spreading the toes physically or with toe separators which eliminate that problem. Good luck.
 
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Fine art photography from the Camino Ways.

walkinglover

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, '16 and '18; Portuguese '17; Ingles - 19
I am chronic suferer of plantar fascitis but I do not want that to prevent me from hiking. Does anyone has a particular shoe brand to recommend, to hike with plantar fascitis? Any youtube video about exercises to deal with it will be greatly appreciated it. Thank you.
J.
I am a runner and have suffered from pf multiple times. Two things that always help to either prevent or cure: Prevent: build up the arches of all shoes by making a portable, multi-layer of thin cardboard that fits against the arch of your foot. I use an old shoebox, and continue to tape semi-circles (size that fits my foot), until when placed in my shoe, fits comfortable against my arch. It is portable and I use it in all shoes until the pf clears up.
Cure: wear only a shoe with a lifted heel ( wedge). This will lessen the strain on the pf and within days you will see a good improvement.
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Inglés 2009+2017, Francés 2012+2018, Astorga-Santiago repeatedly
As above: Seek professional help and advice. Which is what I did when I came back from my first long camino with PF and could hardly walk for the first month I was home. My GP was an ardent walker herself and gave me two pieces of advice I still follow: Stretch your heel over an edge like a step or kerb (or a rock) en route to keep it supple, and *never* walk barefoot on hard surfaces to stop it from flaring up. From that day I have stretched during every walk and wear Birkenstock EVA (plastic type material) sandals at home, on holiday and in albergues. No exceptions. I bought Salomon trail shoes too, and this worked well though the PF could flare up around the 15 km mark, especially on tarmac. Five years ago I changed to Hoka Speedgoats and haven't looked back. Worn out several pairs so far and keep buying them in the sales. No more PF for me.
 

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