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Best Way to Handle Bedbugs On the Camino...

mmmdumplings

New Member
So, my preventative measures failed and Im pretty sure Im carrying some unwelcome guests in my sleeping bag. I was bitten badly one night even after I stopped sleeping in by bag, and was bitten only slightly for the few following nights when I slept in my bag. Ive since stopped using my sleeping bag and I havent gotten any new bites. But heres the question; whats the best way to get bedbugs out of your stuff when your on the camino? Bad news is is that my sleeping bag is down, too. Ive looked everywhere for suggestions on what to do, but I havent found anything.

Thanks,
Katie
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
Hi katie,
Sprays which you can get farmacia they will know which ones to show you. Follow the instructions carefully as most of them have to be given time to dry off before you use the treated items.I put stuff in a plastic bag when I sprayed it to maximise the impact in a very specific 'kill area' and to reduce any chemical spread in the spraying area, and obviously we tried to do this outside at as great a distance from high usage areas as possible.
When you get home put your stuff in a plastic bag and put it in the deep freeze for at least 3 wks that will kill off any bedbug adults, nymphs and eggs. If you know anyone with access to a walk in freezer unit (food processing or restaurant) better still as you can spread out your gear or hang it up so there are no refuges for the little blighters :twisted: .
Bonne route
Nell
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
until you can get to a farmacia for poison, keep your sleeping bag packed inside a plastic trash bag, to prevent them spreading. If they haven´t already.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
The little buggers hide in every seam, in every crack, in every pocket. So you must turn everything inside out... spray, then sun, then HOT water wash. Then prevention measures to keep from being reinfected.

What I have done and so far what seems to have worked is this.

I carry mosquito spray from the farmacia.
When I arrive at the alburgue, I inspect the bed by lifting the mattress up and checking all the seams and the little holes in the those wooden beds where the hardware screws are. If I find bugs, I move on. If I do not find bugs, I spray the bottom and the top of the mattress and WAIT at least 10 minutes. If the bugs are there, they will come out to avoid the spray. If no bugs, I lay down my sleeping bag and HANG MY BACKPACK UP OFF THE FLOOR.

If I do find bugs, I either look for another bed, or even another alburgue.
You can get your money back if you have already paid in all the places I have found bugs.

This is not just a Camino problem. Joe and I found bedbugs in several mattresses here in Rome before we found a clean mattress-place to sleep. Each time, they were either hiding in holes or in the seams around the mattress.

Also, things to look for are black spots on the walls near holes or on the bedding.
If those are present, I do a REALLY good search.

It helps to have a flashlight to look in the dark corners and holes of the bed.

lastly, the metal framed beds seem to harbor fewer bugs.

And double lastly, good luck. They seem to be especially bad this year.
 

Tia Valeria

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pt Norte/Pmtvo 2010
C. Inglés 2011
C. Primitivo '12
Norte-C. de la Reina '13
C. do Mar-C. Inglés '15
One way ensure that your belongings are 'bug-free' would be to iron them well.Check all the labels and iron each thing on its highest possible setting, taking care to iron the seams thoroughly. Not something readily available on the camino, but you might be able to borrow an iron (plancha) from the hospitaleros if they can see you are trying to stay bug-free.
You can iron- wash-iron if you think you are infested, and certainly worthwhile on reaching home before you introduce the little critters to your own abode.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
This is a rotten problem to have ... really horrid.

I know that they cannot be water laundered but was wondering if dry cleaning would kill the bugs in a down bag?

I'm outside Calis, just on my way back from the Camino (hello to everyone who stopped at my van for 1st aid or a cup of tea and cake over the last few weeks) and met a few people who had bad allergic reactions, one I took to the doctor for a horse-syringe sized anti-histamine shot.

The allergic reaction can take two or three days to appear, which means people can spread the nasties along the Camino ... the three bad ones I saw were all female pilgrims.

The allergic reaction is a series of small red blisters that will eventually have yellow pus at the centres .. down one side of the face and neck is common, and on back ... very itchy and truly horrid.

Incidentally, does anyone know what Buddhists and other ethical 'do no harm' folk do to get rid of them? Would be interested to know if there is a non-fatal approach (non fatal to the bugs that is).
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
This must top the list for Buddhists as the most often asked questions - it makes even the most patient Buddhist groan!

But, let a really good, expert Buddhist answer your question on Pest Control David.

First you must understand that the five precepts are not commandments. We undertake to observe the five precepts TO THE BEST OF OUR ABILITIES. They are moral principles for us to live by, to the best of our abilities. I don't think an average person can live through without ever breaking the precepts.
The Buddha prescribed these precepts for us to live our lives peacefully. However, at times certain conditions may not allow us to rigidly adhere to them. It is at such times that we must use our common sense and human intelligence to make decisions. That is the time when we need to use our wisdom and freedom of choice. Sometimes we might even have to compromise for the greater good.
Under normal circumstances if we really make mistakes then it is up to us to realize and to do better the next time. This is the Buddhist way. The Buddhist bottom line is compassion. We are not perfect beings.
Furthermore, this world is full of imperfections and it is not possible for anyone to live a perfect life. So we must be careful not to become good-hearted fools.
Justin Choo
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
sillydoll said:
This must top the list for Buddhists as the most often asked questions - it makes even the most patient Buddhist groan!

But, let a really good, expert Buddhist answer your question on Pest Control David.

First you must understand that the five precepts are not commandments. We undertake to observe the five precepts TO THE BEST OF OUR ABILITIES. They are moral principles for us to live by, to the best of our abilities. I don't think an average person can live through without ever breaking the precepts.
The Buddha prescribed these precepts for us to live our lives peacefully. However, at times certain conditions may not allow us to rigidly adhere to them. It is at such times that we must use our common sense and human intelligence to make decisions. That is the time when we need to use our wisdom and freedom of choice. Sometimes we might even have to compromise for the greater good.
Under normal circumstances if we really make mistakes then it is up to us to realize and to do better the next time. This is the Buddhist way. The Buddhist bottom line is compassion. We are not perfect beings.
Furthermore, this world is full of imperfections and it is not possible for anyone to live a perfect life. So we must be careful not to become good-hearted fools.
Justin Choo



Thank you Sil but I think you will find that 'patient' buddhists do not groan at such questions .. and the top questions tend to be "if there is no self what is it that arises again and again?" and "why is it that Buddhists like ringing small bells and cymbals?"
and you offer an answer from an 'expert' buddhist - an expert buddhist? :lol: :roll:

as for the 'must' understand - firstly no one actually knows my level of attainment, secondly no other sentient has the right to tell me that I 'must' understand anything ... (and no 'expert' buddhist would say that anyway)

An interesting but incorrect on many levels general answer (for one, Gautama prescribed them so that one could attain enlightenment and not return ... I could go on ... ) but it doesn't actually answer my question does it.

'Do no harm' means exactly that so my question stands unanswered. My question was a practical one - "what do they do to get rid of them" - a practical answer from an actual Buddhist would be good - Theravada or Mahayana (or both if possible).

:wink:
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
C'est la vie! :?
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
I am a Pure Land Buddhist, but far from an expert.

Buddhists are opposed on principal to killing other living things, so insects are a challenge. The approach I have seen most often is making the environment uninviting to pests by keeping it clean and well aired and keeping the people and animals who inhabit the environment clean and well-aired. When a major infestation happens, sometimes the critters and their colony are located and moved en-masse to a new location far from the human habitation -- termites and woodworms are taken out along with affected beams in houses, for example, and remaining and replacement beams are treated with coatings that are bug-resistant.

Bedbugs may be gathered up into jars or other containers and taken out to the woods to seek other homes, I suppose, and their host garments or bags thoroughly cleaned to make them less attractive in the future. Still, one of the chief tenets of Buddhism is "Life is Suffering." Bedbug bites are a part of life, so perhaps it is best to just suck it up and thank goodness it was a bedbug that bit you this time instead of a cobra.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
I kill the little suckerdogs!
Smashed two in Rome... luckily, they were full of somebody´s blood (not mine!).

But then I believe in reincarnation, so I´m hoping they come back as a tigerlily or a giant sequoia... :lol:
 

Caminando

Veteran Member
I used cat/dog flea powder, which is cheap and widely available (in Europe) on a trip to India.

When I've walked this or that Camino, I carry some of this powder, tho' I've never had to use it.
Just sprinkle it all over, and it works - well, the one time I had a "guest", it worked. In India. I also use my own sheet sleeping bag, everywhere.

On the Buddhist approach to these beasts - they say the tiger is as noble as the bedbug. Hmmm, in theory, yes. Yet in 'Buddhist' Thailand I believe they execute people by the firing squad shooting not at the condemned person, but at a paper screen - which obscures the victim. So that's all right then :roll: There's often a way round problems, however dodgy.

Darwin might also help us find a practical answer to the problem.
:arrow:
 

Janeh

Active Member
I asked my buddhist nun this question, her answer....
it isn't right to kill anything, although at times this will be tested. (eg if your child is being attacked by a snake you kill the snake?) but it will be your motivation for why you killed the snake that will also be considered. We need to consider our own karma if we kill something......and that's a long subject with many answers. I see where Reb is coming from - it is our suffering if we get bitten, and perhaps if we are mindful of that, we may only get bitten a little and not suffer too much.
(looking at a positive - it makes for an added arm to our pilgrim story when we return, although that is ego coming in :)
I think laying everything out in the sun, giving it a good shake and leave it there as long as possible might be a good way to encourage any bedbugs in our gear to walk away.
But most importantly I think - try preventative measures instead of waiting to get bitten. I took tea tree oil with me and impregnated my pack and belongings with it. I remember reeking of it one night in Carcabelos when I shared a room with a Norweign woman - one of her stories when she went home must be how strange australians smell! :)
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
As to dusting albergues with stuff: in Los Arcos, the storage compartment next to my bunk was covered with a fine white powder. I did not know if it was bedbug control by management, talc from a pilgrim with moist feet, or anthrax left by a terrorist, so I covered it with my plastic sitting mat before using the storage.

My suggestion in treating anything but your own equipment is to consider other pilgrims. How do you feel when contacting mystery ingredients left by others?
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
An Aussie woman today told me that her daughter eradicated the beasties by having all of her items drycleaned. She said no more problems after that!
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
Came across this manufacturer of sleeping bags that have a treatment for bed bugs and mozzies.The company is Lifeventure

"Sleeplight 750 Sleeping Bag Our lightest synthetic sleeping bag, this is perfect for indoor or outdoor use when travelling in warm climates. It contains a small security pocket for your wallet, passport etc ... or alarm clock if you need an early start! If you’re staying in hostels we all know how clean bedding may not be what it is at home so we have treated our Sleeplight range with Ex3 which protects your sleeping bag against bed bugs, mosquitoes and the build up of bacteria. Comes with a waterproof compression stuff sack".
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2006,08,09,11,12(2),13(2),14,16(2),18(2) Aragones 11,12,VDLP 11,13,Lourdes 12,Malaga 16,Port 06
Different for everyone.. bedbugs

Iäve come to the conclusion that these beasties bite SOME people, and ignore others.. not sure why or what the difference is, but several times now I have told people I found LOTS of bugs in places such as Azofra (where they were literally crawling up the walls, only to be told they did not see a single critter.

Well.. the bugs ARE nocturnal.

I also met an aussie woman covered in bites who INSISTED that the hospitalera told her these were NOT bedbug bites covering her arms...I almost laughed out loud... Of COURSE the bad hospitalera told her that! I have met GOOD hospitaleras who admit they have a problem and take action, and I have met horrid ones who insist they do not have a problem and continue to rent beds, such as the folks at St. Javier in Astorga.

This lady insisted that "bedbug bites are huge and they bite in a straight line along the vein"
... (sigh)...

This is not true. All one needs to do is do a GOOGLE search on bedbug bites and click on IMAGES and see that these beasts affect different people different ways. And since the bugs themselves are of varying sizes from nearly microscopic (at hatching) to the size of a squished rice grain... their bites are also of varying size.. and they do NOT carry a ruler to be sure they bite in a straight line!

But she DID have bedbug bites, which can be ANY size, from pinpoint bites to horrible boils... and so she cheerfully continued to walk, spreading the joy! ACK!

I have met many people who are infested, spreading the bedbugs along the camino, who I have told and have shrugged and said, "Well.. what can one do? It is a fact of life on the Camino" and I feel like strangling them! One told me he that it was just "too much work" to buy bugspray, spray, and wash all of his gear, and that the bites were not so bad...

To me, this is 100% irresponsible, and ruins the Camino for many other people, including the hostpitaleros, by spreading this scourge!

I do not know the answer, but when I meet people like this, I pray they take the beasts home to their mother, and let HER deal with them! :roll:
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
A committed Christian, as with all humanity, is blessed with a mind to think and to act. It is the very height of spiritual ignorance to ignore that which the Lord has given us. On the other hand, prayer is the choice we make when first awake, before we lie down to sleep, and throughout the day.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
HHmm .. just had a rather unnerving thought .... :shock:

so they suck a lot of blood out and then the next night (?) find another victim and repeat .. well .... is there enough of the previous hosts blood left in the creatures for there to be a transmission of, say, AIDS or Hepatitus A/B/ or C ?? :shock:
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
Transmission of Aids or Hepatitis - that is certainly a thought that I don't like. Anne
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
Re: Different for everyone.. bedbugs

Anniesantiago said:
Iäve come to the conclusion that these beasties bite SOME people, and ignore others.. not sure why or what the difference is,

A bedbugs 'menu for life' is set by the blood type of their first victim-and for the rest of their lives they will only feed on hosts with that blood type.
So whether its feast or famine for a bedbug-depends on a pilgrim(s) with the right blood type coming within crawling range.
One almost has to admire the little critters. :?
Nell
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
What an utterly brilliant piece of information! So were I to be a rare blood group I would stand a high chance of never being bitten ...

don't you just love good information!

So how do they find out? .... if that was known perhaps we could dupe them into thinking we were other than a human blood group ... hmmm ..

smearing ourselves in pig blood might work .... ?
 

Caminando

Veteran Member
MichaelB10398 said:
A committed Christian, as with all humanity, is blessed with a mind to think and to act. It is the very height of spiritual ignorance to ignore that which the Lord has given us. On the other hand, prayer is the choice we make when first awake, before we lie down to sleep, and throughout the day.

So prayer is useless against bedbugs? Is prayer so feeble?

In Germany at the moment, a small town is praying that a glacier will stop melting; 300 years ago the same village prayed that it would melt. Is this laughable or reasonable?
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
Bed bugs feed on any warm blooded animal, so I doubt that your blood type will give any immunity! Adult bed bugs can live for as long as a year without eating, so an absence of hosts in the winter will not extinguish them.
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
Is prayer so feeble? Is you mind so feeble that Christians should refuse to think? Did God give us two hands for anything? Should we use them? If all we had to do was to pray and wait for God to provide without ever lifting a finger on our own, then this would be a totally different world. The world we live is best summed up by the old saying, "Pray as if everything depended upon God and work as if everything depended up you".

The construct you are proposing, "Just pray and let God do everything" is not how God designed this life. He gave us a brain and hands to use. I am not sure this is the proper context for this discussion, but since you asked I will go further. Think of the command that God gave to Adam and Eve upon casting them out of the Garden of Eden...by the sweat of your brow will you eat and provide for all your wants. Assuming that bad things will not happen to good Christians is a naive position.

Are miracles helpful through prayer? Yes. Can we be lazy and ignore common sense after we pray, no. If we are going to converse further, maybe take it to the spiritual forum. We are too far off base.
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
falcon269 said:
Bed bugs feed on any warm blooded animal, so I doubt that your blood type will give any immunity! Adult bed bugs can live for as long as a year without eating, so an absence of hosts in the winter will not extinguish them.
What they won't do is change their diet. After a period of dormancy, winter for example, they are activated by the detection of increased carbon dioxide levels in their habitat (signifying living breathing beings) and then, if adult, they do a 'recce to find the correct host/match for them. Those emerging from the nymph phase will be indiscriminate in the choice of their first feed- but the blood type of that victim will dictate their menu option for life. There is no genetic propensity for one or other blood groups between siblings.
So if you were the 'Prima Cena' for a bedbug you have had a profound impact on its life and habits-the thought might almost makes one..............proud? :?

Perhaps inverting Davids suggestion and sending a special troupe of 'decoy pilgrims' (now there's a job) with a less common blood type around early in the year might help us commoners but only a tad I'm afraid as the little buggers breed like....... well bedbugs. So breathtaking numbers of eggs are laid and nymphs are hatched throughout the season (ie whenever we arrive-like the Wise Virgins they always have their lamps trimmed and ready)

I'm not sure about the feeding habits of their cousins bird, bat bugs etc and perhaps the may well be less discriminatory than their domesticated cousins.
Nell
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Fascinating ... the rascals -- so the question isn't 'why are they here now?' but 'why were they absent before?' -

what is the best way to handle them on the Camino? I cannot see how they could be eradicated. Even if every refuge, guest house and hotel in the whole of Spain closed for the same week to fumigate there would bound to be some of the creatures who survived ... or more would be brought in by the next pilgrim .... or even from someone just opening up a sleeping bag that had been in a cupboard for half a year ....

hhmm .... I suppose that the next plague to add into this will be fleas - then the experience will be really horrid :shock:
And what will 2010 be like!!! :shock:

There is a lightweight sleeping bag made by snugpak that has a zipped mesh covering over the head so you can zip yourself in and nothing can get through .... no kicking legs out in hot weather though. ..

So the answer is chemicals on our bodies then?

hhmm ... the 'sleeping out under the stars' option that has been so often vilified on this forum may become an accepted alternative within a few years, don't you think? :wink:
 

wisepilgrim

Guidebook Author
Camino(s) past & future
Many
Work in the hotel taught me the true value of sleep, just as being
hungry had taught me the true value of food. Sleep had ceased to be a mere
physical necessity; it was something voluptuous, a debauch more than a
relief. I had no more trouble with the bugs. Mario had told me of a sure
remedy for them, namely pepper, strewed thick over the bedclothes. It made
me sneeze, but the bugs all hated it, and emigrated to other rooms.

I've never been a tramp, nor down and out in Paris or London, but I have always believed everything else George Orwell ever wrote.
 
D

Deleted member 3000

Guest
A Do-It-Yourself Bed-Bug Detector
Posted: December 29, 2009

By Susan Milius, Science News
INDIANAPOLIS — After trying some 50 arrangements of household objects, researchers have come up with a new low-cost, homemade bed-bug detector.

To lure the bugs out of hiding, Wan-Tien Tsai of Rutgers University in New Brunswick put dry ice into an insulated, one-third-gallon jug, the kind available at sports or camping stores. Adding 2.5 pounds of dry ice pellets and not quite closing the pour hole allowed carbon dioxide to leak out at a bug-teasing rate for some 11 hours at room temperature, she said.

She stood the jug in a plastic cat food dish with a piece of paper taped on the outside of the dish as a ramp up to the rim. The bowl’s steep, slippery inside, with an added dusting of talcum powder, kept bugs from crawling out again.

In tests in real apartments, the homemade setup detected bed bugs as well, or better, than did two brands of professional exterminating equipment, Tsai said December 16 at the annual meeting of the Entomological Society of America.

The parts, including the dry ice, cost $15 and don’t require any special skills for assembly. “Everyone can do it,” she said.

These days a growing number of people might want to. The tiny, night-crawling bugs that draw blood and can leave itching welts had dwindled to rarity in North America during most of the last century. But since the 1990s, outbreaks have surged. The bugs flatten themselves into crevices in furniture, fabric and even electrical devices, and can prove difficult to eradicate. Many of today’s bed bugs are resistant to pyrethroid insecticides, which account for much of indoor pest treatments.

Tsai worked with Changlu Wang, also at Rutgers, for six months on designing homemade devices that lure bed bugs out into a trap so residents can tell whether a home is infested. Like many insects that search for blood, bed bugs are attracted to plumes of concentrated carbon dioxide, good clues that an animal filled with liquid dinner is breathing somewhere nearby. In lab tests, carbon dioxide beat heat and several chemical attractants in drawing the bugs out of hiding, Wang reported at the meeting.

He has published on low-tech ways to attract bed bugs with carbon dioxide. For example, setting out dry ice in insulated travel mugs can work. Apartment dwellers don’t need research supply companies for dry ice. Beverage companies, for example, may sell it by the pound.

To design a new low-tech detection system, Tsai experimented with various setups but says her breakthrough came when she discovered the one-third-gallon insulated jugs. They performed well in lab tests, so she decided to test them in apartments that had low levels of bed-bug infestation. She searched for bed bugs herself to confirm that apartments were suitable. Then she set either her homemade detector or a commercial one in each apartment near a typical bug haven, such as the sofa.

Designing and testing a low-cost detector is a substantial contribution to the field, comments entomologist Stephen Kells of the University of Minnesota in St. Paul. During decades of low bed-bug infestations, scientists didn’t study them much. "We have literally skipped a generation of knowledge with this pest," he says.

Studies from early in the last century may not describe today’s bed-bugs well, says entomologist Andrea Polanco-Pinzón of Virginia Tech in Blacksburg. Older generations of bed bugs weren’t resistant to pesticides and lived in tougher environments: houses without central heating.

On the bright side though, Polanco-Pinzón reported at the meeting that her survival tests found that a pesticide-resistant strain she collected from Richmond, Va., lived at most two months without feeding. That record, set by the fifth stage of the immature bugs, falls far short of the year and a half reported in the old literature.

http://www.bedbugcentral.com/shop/produ ... y-ice-trap
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
Nothing to do with any previous posts....but it occurs to me that it is odd that we have not seen commercial "delousing/bedbugging stations" pop up along the way. :?
We are seeing many commercial enterprises from pack transport, accommodation booking, "guides", etc. This would seem to fall in the line.

One could set up a station at the front of a village and pilgrims (for a fee) could have all of their belongs debugged and then, if desired, have their person cleansed of the nasty things. :wink: :wink:
 

nellpilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
SDC-Fisterra 08/Camino Frances SJPP to SDC 09/Nuremburg-SDC 11- ongoing
When walking in last April we saw Pest control vans with graphic illustrations of beasties and pests on their sides scooting around a couple of towns- and I was glad to see them as I presumed it meant that either preventative or corrective measures were being taken.
But as you said Greyland a 'Bug Busters service' offered on an individual basis would be great :D
Nell
 

LNata

Member
Uh... topic of horror...

Some people mention about powder or spray against bedbugs. Are there some names of the staff which can be bought in Spain? Where to ask for it - in pharmacy? Have never seen this creatures (and hope never get acquainted) so I don't even know what to look for. Don't even know how this things would be called in Germany, where I live.

Natalia.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
LNata said:
Don't even know how this things would be called in Germany, where I live.

It's a bettwanze :wink: Useful word for hospitaleros! Anne
 

Hedley49

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Santiago Apr-May "2013" Completed.
SJPdP - Santiago - Finisterre Apr-May "2014" Completed.
Via De La Plata Apr-May 2015 planning at present.
So, my preventative measures failed and Im pretty sure Im carrying some unwelcome guests in my sleeping bag. I was bitten badly one night even after I stopped sleeping in by bag, and was bitten only slightly for the few following nights when I slept in my bag. Ive since stopped using my sleeping bag and I havent gotten any new bites. But heres the question; whats the best way to get bedbugs out of your stuff when your on the camino? Bad news is is that my sleeping bag is down, too. Ive looked everywhere for suggestions on what to do, but I havent found anything.

Thanks,
Katie
If you think you have Bed bugs in your gear simply put your back pack with everything in it into a black polythene bin bag. Tie the opening up and leave in in the sun on a bright sunny day. This is mother natures Microwave and should kill the little suckers.
 

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